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F E AT U R E S 

C6A@CE286ĂŠ Your backstage pass to



DA64:2=C6A@CEĂŠ The women leading



C62=A6@A=6ĂŠ Meet the new breed

the spring/summer 2017 collections Australia’s far-right political movement of father who’s never happier than when left holding the baby



46=63C:EJC6A@CEĂŠ Going through an A-list divorce? Call Laura Wasser

 

492==6?86ĂŠ A frazzled workaholic



H@C=5C6A@CEĂŠ The female sleuths

has 30 days to find her zen taking the private-eye industry by storm

 

D6I=:G6DĂŠ What happens when your lesbian fantasies become reality?



A@CE7@=:@ĂŠ Style icon Brigitte Bardot talks about her inimitable fashion legacy

 

7:CDEA6CD@?ĂŠ Four women reflect on the most trying 12 months of their lives



:?E6CG:6HĂŠ Emma Stone opens up

 

D@4:6EJĂŠ We delve into the secret world

about her path to Hollywood stardom of men who dress like rubber dolls

76

frankly speaking with Michael !@CDĂŠ The fashion designer talks

 

H@C=5HC2AĂŠ Pairing rescue dogs

about his “professionally social� life with prisoners; fake weddings in the Chinese LGBT community

 ˆ  A=2JĂŠ Music, movies and more ‌   =:76DE@C:6DĂŠ A decade after her death, the larger-than-life Anna Nicole Smith is still making headlines


FA S H I O N 

72D9:@?7:CDEÊ A fresh look at stripes, checks and florals

90 pool party 100 blue lagoon  :562DÊSports-inspired pieces so good they’re worthy of wearing well after your workout

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13 @W O R K  E9636DE>:DE2<66G6C>256Ã&#x160; Successful women share some of the their biggest blunders â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and masterful recoveries

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  2C@F?5E96H@C=5Ã&#x160; marie claire international editors reveal the products they simply canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live without

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179 whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new   @?E96C@25Ã&#x160;Go the distance with our cool girl car guide

182 horoscopes

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WELLNESS  46=63C:EJ7:E?6DDDA64:2=Ã&#x160; Stay glowing throughout 2017 with these workout and nutrition tips from Jess Hart, Robyn Lawley and Rachael Finch

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ON THE COVER Re-create Emma Stoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s look with make-up by Giorgio Armani Beauty. On face: Luminous Silk Foundation in #5; Cheek Fabric Powder Blush in #306. On eyes: Maestro Eye Shadow Quad in #6; Smooth Silk Eye Pencil in #4; Eye & Brow Maestro in #11; Eyes to Kill Classic Mascara in #1. On lips: Lip Magnet in #400.


R Turn to page 100 for our pick of the hottest holiday essentials. Below left: Sunrise’s Natalie Barr reflects on a challenging year that led to greater personal strength on page 62.

NICK Y LOVES

ight now you’re hopefully reading this sprawled on a beach, perched by a pool or kicking back on your annual holiday after the post-Xmas binge. But if you’re like me, you’re also mentally compiling an arm-long list of resolutions with one aim in mind: how to make 2017 bigger, better, happier and healthier than last year. Well, consider this issue your guide to a total New Year reboot. From fitness, fashion and beauty to life-changing tips and career advice, we’ve covered the spectrum to help set you on the path to success. First, we challenged writer Noelle Faulkner to follow the sage advice dolled out in popular new book Get Your Sh*t Together. Her 30-day metamorphosis from “workaholic wreck” (her words) to calm, organised powerhouse will inspire even the most seasoned cynic. Continuing the transformation theme, this month’s Wellness special is dedicated to health, food and workout advice from three celebrity fitness freaks – Jess Hart, Robyn Lawley and Rachael Finch. What can these genetically perfect models teach me, I hear you mutter? Well, keeping fit and looking great is their job, and they work damn hard at it. Their tips, philosophies and recipes are a revelation; kickstart your new regimen on page 155. In the world of beauty, nothing’s more confusing than deciphering which products glean the greatest results, so we’ve done the work for you. We contacted beauty editors from the international editions of marie claire and asked them to name the products they can’t live without (page 140). Similarly, our fashion team brings you the must-know trends for 2017; turn to page 118 for your guide on what you’ll be wearing, wanting and loving this year. Finally, don’t miss our story “The Year That Nearly Broke Me” on page 62. We interviewed four high-profile women to reflect on a challenging time in their lives, and they reveal how unwanted adversity gave them greater personal strength and much-needed perspective. So, recline in that deck chair and devour our bumper February issue. But don’t feel overwhelmed – big change happens with small steps. Even if we inspire you to clear out your 37,000 unread emails (page 42), our job here is done.

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1 EARRINGS, $370, by Tiffany & Co. 2 SHOES, $800, by Marco de Vincenzo. 3 JUMPER, $561, by White + Warren. 4 DRESS, $550, by Matin. 5 BAG, $1695, by Bally. 6 PANTS, $399, by Trelise Cooper. 7 BAG, POA, by Balenciaga. 8 SHOES, $1065, by Balenciaga. 9 BLAZER, $499, by Cooper. 10 BAG, $1017, by Emilio Pucci at Farfetch.com. 11 SHIRT, $400, by Frame Denim at Stylebop.com.


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1 TOP, $245, by Aje. 2 PANTS, $490, by Jacquemus at Farfetch.com. 3 EARRIN EARRINGS, $384, by Rosantica at Net-a-porter.com Net-a-porter.com. 4 BAG $1602 by Balenciaga. Balenciaga 5 TOP BAG, $1602, TOP, $ $89, by Paddo To Palmy. 6 SHIRT, $528, by Marc Jacobs at Stylebop.com. 7 DRESS, $470, by Marques’Almeida at Farfetch.com. 8 BAG, approx $1675, by Christopher Kane. 9 TOP, $63, by Henry Holland for Debenhams. 10 SKIRT, $887, by Marco de Vincenzo at Stylebop.com. 11 SANDALS, $59.95, by Nine West.

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STYLE TIP Invest in a romantic, vintage-inspired dress. It will stand the test of time and remain a go-to for any special occasion.

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1 TOP, $169, by Equipment. 2 TOP, $686, by Rochas at Stylebop.com. 3 BAG, $2910, by Miu Miu. 4 BROOCH, $129, by Mimco at David Jones. 5 DRESS, $1860, by RED Valentino at Stylebop.com. 6 SCARF, $250, by Dior. 7 SHOES, $1520, by Prada. 8 BAG, $975, by Christopher Kane. 9 TOP, $1675, by Vetements at Parlour X. 10 DRESS, $2002, by Zimmermann at Farfetch.com. 11 SHORTS, $571, by Burberry London at Stylebop.com.

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Reportage

Forget the runway. We found that when it came to the spring/summer 2017 collections, the real fashion show was behind the scenes. By Hannah-Rose Yee

KEVIN TACHMAN

POSTCARDS FROM


CHANEL Karl Lagerfeld’s latest collection – an ode to tech culture, replete with snapback caps, robot bags and bold prints – was practically made for the social media supermodel. Enter Pauline Hoarau (opposite page, centre) and Ala Sekula (left), resplendent in a “butterfly dress”. The pair were two of Chanel’s millennial model “squad” (to use Hoarau’s words) this season, part of a line-up that also included Australian Catherine McNeil.

Backstage


GETTY IMAGES; GO RUNWAY/SNAPPER MEDIA

Reportage

20

marieclaire.com.au


G I A M B A T T I S TA VA L L I (opposite page) Clad in the romantic silhouettes and soft, feminine florals this Rome-based brand is renowned for, models (from far left) Ratner – one name only – from Ukraine, Dutch native Sara Dijkink, American supermodel Gigi Hadid and Estella Boersma from the Netherlands, were classic “Valli girls” backstage at the brand’s Paris show.

MOSCHINO Earlier that same fashion month, Hadid was the picture of perfection at Moschino, the brand helmed by close friend Jeremy Scott, where the models were dressed like glamour dolls. “Love always,” Hadid said to Scott on Instagram. “Thank you for having me open your epic show tonight.”


22

CHARL OT TE OLYMPIA

EMILIO PUCCI

It was all strawberry shortcake and fruit salad at this footwear brand’s electric first fashion show in London.

Odette Pavlova and Céline Bouly palled around at the Emilio Pucci show. “Amazing team, show and energy,” said Pavlova.

DOL CE & GABBANA

GUCCI

After a stellar season walking for Balmain, Chanel and more, Tami Williams was all smiles backstage at Dolce & Gabbana.

“Ciao Gucci,” was Canadian model Carly Moore’s gleeful refrain while she shimmied for the photographers in Milan.

marieclaire.com.au


Reportage CHRISTIAN DIOR

GO RUNWAY/SNAPPER MEDIA; GETTY IMAGES; KEVIN TACHMAN/TRUNKARCHIVE.COM/SNAPPER MEDIA

Russian model Kris Grikaite (on left) and Canadian Emm Arruda hammed it up for the cameras behind the scenes at Maria Grazia Chiuri’s debut presentation for Christian Dior. It was an uplifting collection, with a strong feminist message (Chiuri is the brand’s first-ever female creative director). After exiting the catwalk, Grikaite was effusive: “I was so happy to be a part of the show.”


Reportage

KEVIN TACHMAN

ELIE SAAB Model BFFs Karlie Kloss and Gigi Hadid hardly left each other’s side at the Elie Saab show in Paris. The discothemed collection, complete with a hot pink, glitter-dusted catwalk, sexy ’70s silhouettes and plenty of gold lurex, was “about dancing”, Saab exclaimed backstage.


DOL CE & GABBANA “It’s been a dream of mine to walk for Dolce & Gabbana since I began modelling,” said Sara Sampaio before she led the charge in the show’s finale.

M A R C JA C O B S

JEREMY SCOT T

(top)

(above)

Platform heels, pastel dreadlocks and fairy lights ... Marc Jacobs’s latest show was a rave, and no-one was enjoying themselves more than Estella Boersma (left) and Stella Maxwell (right). “So stoked to have walked this incredible show,” enthused Maxwell.

“Giving that Brazilian Barbie realness,” was Lais Ribeiro’s description of the hot pink, sequinned catsuit she wore at Jeremy Scott’s New York show. Lida Fox (on right) summed up her outfit even more succinctly, calling it an oversized blue “taco”.

GIAMBA Homegrown stars Matilda Dods (centre) and Fernanda Ly (right) were in fits of giggles with Isabella Ridolfi at the Giamba show.

marieclaire.com.au

25


PATRIOT GAMES

Kim Vuga, founder of the Love Australia or Leave party, rejects the labels “right wing” and “anti-Islam” – she prefers to be called a “patriot”.

The WOMEN ruling RIGHT


Special report

WING AUSTRALIA

NEWSPIX

If you believe Donald Trump’s win and rise of the far-right is an American problem, think again. Extremist groups are growing in Australia and it’s women who are leading the charge. By Robert Hardy

“A

ussie pride! Nationwide!” shouts a woman with dark sunglasses and a high ponytail, proudly holding an Australian flag high over her head, as she marches towards the rally against refugees. Her fingernails are painted silver and blue with the initials of the True Blue Crew, a “pro-Australian” group for “traditional morals, values and Aussie pride”. Dozens of police officers in protective armour watch her walk past under the gunmetal grey sky. She’s wearing long pants and a dark hoodie to keep warm in the fickle weather at Eltham, in Melbourne’s north-east, where a large rowdy crowd has gathered to protest against a plan to house refugee families in an unused section of a nearby nursing home. A chill wind whips signs reading “Love Australia marieclaire.com.au

29


Above and right: antiIslam and Trump-style slogans are popular with Australia’s far-right movements. Left: North Fitzroy grandmother Margaret Lennon is calling for a ban on Sharia law in Australia. Above left: police oversee the Eltham rally.

or leave” and “The Battle of Eltham: guardians of the aged vs. the refo invaders”. A sudden gust topples a set of speakers midway through Mental As Anything’s “Live It Up”. “It’s bullshit, I’m over it,” the woman says. By “it” she means Muslims, Islam, refugees, asylum seekers, welfare cheats, politicians, political correctness, burqas and Safe Schools. She won’t give her name because “you can’t trust the media”. She has two young children and says she’s in her 30s. “Our history, our culture, our Aussie pride is being stolen,” she adds. But there’s little evidence of that theft here today. The microphone is shared between members of the Party for Freedom, True Blue Crew, United Patriots Front and an Akubra-wearing member of Aussie Farmers First, who rail against everything from refugees and Muslims to socialists and soy lattes. Police keep the tight pack of protesters (or as they prefer to be called, “patriots”) corralled in a small section of the park. Within the crowd gathered on the grass is 20-year-old Penny Tridgell, dressed in a Donald 30

marieclaire.com.au

Trump T-shirt and a red cap with the slogan “Make Australia Great Again”. She’s flown in from Mount Druitt, in western Sydney, to rally against the “freaking refugees”. “I love Trump because he’s a freaking legend,” she says. “He stands for loving his country and being proud of it, and not being ashamed. We get called racists because we love our country, we want to keep it proudly Australian. Where’s your average Anglo-Saxon these days? It’s ‘spot the Aussie’.” I’m in Eltham to spot one type of Aussie in particular: Australian women, who have played a significant role in the resurgence of the country’s far-right. This influence is often overshadowed by footage of angry men with Southern Cross tattoos. But somewhat surprisingly, many women sit in

From left: Reclaim Australia organiser Monika Evers; Debbie Robinson, president of the Australian Liberty Alliance; Kirralie Smith, founder of Halal Choices.

the senior ranks of some of Australia’s most controversial anti-Islam groups. Today they’re here in force, waving Australian flags, chanting slogans and wearing T-shirts saying: “Rapefugees not welcome – stay away.” Among them is North Fitzroy grandmother Margaret Lennon, 65, who has bright red hair and a shirt calling for a ban on Sharia law. She says her peers are joining the far-right out of a sense of national pride and concerns over Islam’s treatment of women. “It is the beginning of a movement,” she says, looking around. “We are coming out and speaking out, where before we were frightened to. People in this country are entitled to have their say and women are having that now.”


Special report

The Eltham rally drew a crowd of people with the shared vision of keeping refugees out of Australia.

WAYNE TAYLOR; GETTY IMAGES; DAVID ISRAEL

T

he anti-Islam movement is being led by the women of Australia,” says Reclaim Australia organiser Monika Evers. “The men are there protecting the women, but women are leading. They can see what damage is being caused to our culture and our society.” According to Evers, the electoral success of Pauline Hanson has emboldened many women in patriot groups. Pauline Hanson’s One Nation party snared four senate seats in the 2016 federal election, its support strongest in disadvantaged areas with a higher proportion of voters born in Australia. The movement was also buoyed by a national poll published in September showing almost half of all Australians want a ban on Muslim immigration. The most common reasons given were fears over terrorism and a belief Muslim migrants neither integrate into society, nor share Australian values. “I am a peace-loving mung bean; I want the best for everyone, but I think Islam is unsuitable for integration with the West,” says Evers, who joined Reclaim in 2014. “I am not a

bigot – I have done the research, I am Interview enough women from actually very well-educated. It’s not like Australia’s far-right and you discover I hate Muslims, but I stand for truth. they cover all ages, education levels and I am a watcher on the wall.” occupations. Their common cause is Kirralie Smith, founder of the webseeking a ban on Muslim immigration, site Halal Choices, says she started burqas, mosques, or the Koran. They studying Islam after attending a meetgenuinely fear that Australia will be ing about the religion near her home in overrun by Islam – despite the fact Taree, NSW, in 2010. that Muslims account Smith, 45, a mother for barely two per cent of three, believes Halal of the population. certification fees help Dr Susan Carland, fund terrorism, despite a former Australian a 2015 senate inquiry Muslim of the Year, finding no direct link who lives in Melbourne – Anonymous protester between the two. But with her husband, TV facts don’t seem to shake host Waleed Aly, anyone’s resolve. Smith stood for the and their two children, says these opinsenate in 2016 for the anti-Islam party ions are sincere but harmful. Australian Liberty Alliance (ALA) “They probably genuinely believe and claims broad support for her Muslims are trying to change the Ausviews, despite winning just over tralian way of life and if they don’t stand 3000 first preference votes. up for that, everything is going to go “We’re that silent majority who down the S-bend,” she says. have been neglected and ignored for The rise of right wing politicians too long,” she says. “It has got to the such as Hanson and Trump have helped point where too many things are being legitimise such fears, adds Dr Carland, compromised. People are saying, who teaches gender studies, politics ‘That’s enough, no more.’” and sociology at Monash University.

“Our history, our culture, our Aussie pride is being stolen”

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Special report

“I feel despondent about the future because it shows there is a lot of fear and anger”

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Pauline Hanson’s political comeback has emboldened many women in right-wing groups.

Haron Monis took 18 people hostage inside the Martin Place cafe. I meet Brennan, 45, near her home in Sydney’s south. She used to manage a bridal boutique, but is now a stay-athome single mum to her 17-year-old son and five-year-old daughter. She declines to use her real name for fear of people harming her children. “This is my fight back,” she says. “This is a way I can change that having to happen to anyone else.” It’s easy to spot the contradictions in her way of thinking. She praises the right to say and wear what you please, but wants to ban the Koran and burqas. She says she has good friends who are Muslim (“about five all up”), but still wants to stop Muslim immigration. To explain these contradictions, she tells me a story about chocolate. “Suppose there are 100 M&M’s in a bowl and two are laced with arsenic, are you going to eat that bowl of M&M’s? “It’s like with the refugees, 98 will be beautiful but two will not be. Are you willing to risk your kids’ lives on that?” But isn’t that unfair to those 98 delicious M&M’s, I ask. “Yep, that’s right,” she says. “But I am going to protect my family first.”

WAYNE TAYLOR; GETTY IMAGES

“If you feel you have missed out, or the way society works isn’t in your favour, you are going to look for someone to blame,” she explains. FEAR FACTOR “No Muslims in AusAnti-refugee tralia are calling for the protestors claim the Australian implementation of burway of life is qas, but there is a genuine under threat, predominantly paranoia that we are a due to Muslim sleeper cell, waiting for immigrants. the moment when enough of Australia has its back turned to launch a stealth takeover of this nation.” women at right wing rallies, which are often driven by claims that Islam Love Australia or Leave founder subjugates women. She admits sexism Kim Vuga rejects labels like “right wing” exists within the Muslim community, or “bigot”. “You can call me a patriot,” but claiming women need to be she says. “I see us as more of a resistance protected from Islam is patronising movement than a far-right movement.” and condescending. Also, the impact of Townsville-based Vuga, 48, stood this prejudice is typically borne by Musas an independent in the last federal lim women, she adds. election, winning less than 200 votes. “We are the ones more likely to be She claims she is more than simply yelled at in the street or have our head anti-Islam: “We have so many issues in scarf ripped off,” explains Dr Carland. Australia. Farmers are struggling, we “There are times I’m glad my 13-yearhave homeless on the street, our judicial system is a mess.” old daughter hasn’t choThe ALA, which sen to wear the head had Dutch anti-immiscarf, for her own safety. gration politician Geert That makes me sad as a Wilders as the keynote proud, Muslim woman.” speaker at its launch in She says while many 2015, claims to sit on a Australians have become similarly broad base of more accepting of Islam, disaffection. “There are there remains a strong so many people in our sense of unease. “Fifteen – Dr Susan Carland society who are not redyears ago we would necks, not bigots,” says president Debnot have seen the Reclaim Australia bie Robinson. “I believe our media have rallies. I feel kind of despondent about miscalculated what the average person the future because it shows there are really believes and thinks about the areas in our community where there is problems associated with Islam.” a lot of anger and fear.” Perth-based Robinson, who is in For Reclaim Ausher 50s, migrated to Australia as a child tralia founder, Catheand still has a hint of a Scottish accent. rine Brennan (not her In 2010, she joined anti-Islam group real name), the fight the Q Society of Australia, the driving against Islam is perforce behind the ALA. sonal. She planned “I came to the realisation that once to take her children to we allow a little bit of Islamic law into Sydney’s Lindt ChocoFormer this country there will come a time late Café on the mornAustralian when women, no matter how strong ing of December 15, Muslim of they think they are, will not be able to 2014, but she delayed the Year, Dr Susan Carland, stand up to it,” she says. the trip to visit a relative with husband Dr Carland says she’s concerned in hospital. That same Waleed Aly. but not surprised by the ranks of young morning, gunman Man


welcome

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to

W H I T S U N DAYS

S E A F O L LY. C O M . AU


Meet They work full-time but compete with their wives to be the perfect parent. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re obsessive dads and proud of it. Ben Machell dishes on being a Daddy-Mummy, the new breed of father whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never happier than when left holding the baby

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Real people

TOM JACKSON/THE TIMES MAGAZINE/NEWS SYNDICATION

D-ummies

DAD’S THE WORD

Ben Machell (above) is totally smitten with his new daughter, Willow, and son, Thomas. Matt Hill (opposite) wants to spend as much quality time as possible with his baby, Roxana, but says there’s “nothing heroic about looking after your own kid”.


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y day begins around 5am, when my not quite two-year-old son, Thomas, wakes and starts shouting, “Daddy!” I climb out of bed and go to him, to shush and to stroke him and to whisper that it is still sleepy time. This might win us a further 45 minutes of dozing, but after that he really is up and we lock into our weekday morning routine. Milk. Nappy. Stories. Clothes. My girlfriend tends to our two-monthold daughter, Willow, and we pass her back and forth like the ball in an elaborate rugby move so we can get dressed, go to the toilet, send emails. At 7.45am, Thomas and I head off to daycare, where I inform the carers that while he has a rash, I took him to the out-of-hours GP at our local hospital yesterday, who identified it as molloscum contagiosum – very common and nothing to worry about. Then I go to the office, where I begin to exchange text messages with my girlfriend. I tell her how the dropoff went. I post a picture of Thomas eating a banana on Facebook. Around lunchtime, my editor approaches me and asks if I’d like to go to Los Angeles to interview a supermodel. I feel a wave of anxiety. I do not want to go. I want to stay here, with my children, to take photographs of them eating bananas and to remain the constant, loving, looming presence the past two years have seen me become. So I make a weak excuse. Sometimes, as Thomas whimpers himself to sleep, I loiter in the corner of his room, just so he knows I’m there. And it’s during these moments that I wonder if my behaviour is perhaps a bit ... much? I am, in every other aspect of my life, moderate, measured and frankly kind of boring. But as a father I’m verging on obsessive. Am I happy? Impossibly so. But I’ve also developed a kind of tunnel vision. Am I doing enough to help my girlfriend? Can I ever do enough? My family have become this psychological velcro from which I can never quite tear myself away. And I am not alone. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, around 30 per cent of dads now take advantage of flexible work hours to

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MODERN FAMILY

Machell eschews flashy work trips for daily Daddy time: taking twoyear-old Thomas to the doctors and daycare. Richard Turney (opposite, with Nico) admits that D-ummies feel a constant need to prove themselves.

look after children under 12, compared with 16 per cent two decades ago. I see lots of dads like me, blokes in their mid 30s at playgroups, in parks and cafes, carrying bags crammed with nappies and wet wipes. They – we – are not the “latte pappas” of Scandinavia, with their beards and never-ending parental leave. Nor are we stay-athome dads, although many of us would no doubt secretly love to be. But no, that’s not us. Rather, we are simply the first generation of fathers to have the means, motive and opportunity to take on more and more family responsibilities. We have more flexible working hours than our own dads did. Some of us have access to decent parental leave. Also, most important of all, we have wives and girlfriends with careers just as developed as our own, who very much expect our support. We are honestly not asking for medals. We are just stolid, slightly stressed,

relatively competent men committed to sharing in as much of the grunt work of parenting as we can. So what should we be called, “Mummy daddies”? “Daddy mummies”? “D-ummies”? Oh man. It’s D-ummies, isn’t it? We’re all D-ummies, which I suppose is kind of ironic given how earnest and po-faced many of us can be about our new role. One thing we can say for certain, however, is that D-ummies have only become widespread recently. The first-ever State Of Australia’s Fathers report, released in 2015, involved the interviewing of more than 1000 fathers. It identified significant changes in parenting attitudes among fathers, with 70 per cent of the dads surveyed reporting that they spend more quality time with their children than their fathers had spent with them. “It is very new,” says Adrienne Burgess of The Fatherhood Institute.


Real people “When dads care for their babies, they undergo much the same physiological changes as mothers”

down by about a third each other,” says Burgess. “It’s no longer in the first year and it the doctor marrying the nurse. It’s the - Adrienne Burgess, The Fatherhood Institute really comes down if doctor marrying the doctor.” you’re very involved Richard Turney, 34, is a barrister. in raising the child, co-sleeping and His wife Kate is also a barrister. They things like that. As a result of that, your have two boys – Milo and Nico – both aggressive instincts drop for a while.” under two. For Turney, the feeling of “I don’t think I cried between the compromise – of not being an out-andages of 17 and 33,” says Matt Hill, 34, out breadwinner, but not being a “latte whose wife, Zenobia, gave birth to their pappa” either – creates a kind of daughter, Roxana, five months ago. existential tension. “There are times “But I’ve definitely felt like crying I’ve been really busy with work and a lot more, even if I’m just watching Kate will say, ‘I can collect Milo from some crap TV drama.” daycare.’ And even though that would Hill says that he and Zenobia be the sensible thing to do, I’ll argue “pride ourselves on being fairly gender the toss with her. I’ll leave work early neutral in our roles”, although he just because of the principle.” admits there’s nothing he can do about This is textbook D-ummy breastfeeding. “I’d like to take on some behaviour. The need to prove to yourself full-time care,” he says. “As much as you that, yes, you are doing this and you try to be supportive in terms of cooking will continue to do this. D-ummies can and cleaning, you want to get hands-on also be incredibly thin-skinned. time with the baby.” “I don’t take For all the couples criticism well,” says now committed to Turney. “Last night THE NUMBERS gender neutrality as Kate mentioned she parents, there is still thought Milo’s teeth Studies show that some way to go. The were looking slightly stay-at-home dads State Of Australia’s stained, and that we build stronger bonds Fathers report showed should be careful about with their children, that about 50 per cent how we brush them. yet it’s estimated of the fathers surveyed And I basically lost my with children under 18 shit because his teeth considered themselves are my job: ‘It’s very of new Australian “But there is a clear trend. And it’s on “helpers”, rather than a difficult to brush his dads take extended a continuum, which is great because primary caregiver with teeth, you know!’ Kate parental leave. that means it’s a stable change.” equal responsibilities. was like, ‘Whoa. Where The advantages of both parents Part of the did that come from?’” sharing in childcare will be, to many, problem is that to The thing is, I’ve self-evident. “A father who makes become a D-ummy been doing this for the lunchboxes and knows where certain outside factors almost two years and I all the clothes are? Those tiny things need to be in place. still have a fair bit fathers and sameto go, but I struggle are absolutely vital,” says Burgess. Both you and your sex partners claimed to see a downside. Yes, I can vouch for this. I never knew partner need access to “Dad and Partner I am hormonal, preparing a meal for a toddler and then a degree of flexible Pay” in the first 12 testosterone-deprived placing it into a Tupperware box could working. If you’re months after the and thin-skinned. I be such an act of love. No joke, I would bound by rigid hours, scheme was introduced in exist in a world of lowhappily spend the rest of my life making then you can’t run off 2013/14. level stress and lower packed lunches for my children. And if to take your toddler to back pain, a world in this makes me sound like I’m hormonal, playgroup or the GP. which supermodels are then it turns out that I probably am. The other big This entitles dads to conspicuous only by “Research shows that when fathers driving force has been their absence. But for care for their babies, they undergo equal pay. There is still the most part, I’m very much of the same physiological changes a gender pay gap, but of governmenthappy. Never been in their bodies as mothers,” Burgess for many professions funded pay at the happier. We may be a tells me. “Hormones such as prolactin it’s almost nonnational minimum bunch of D-ummies, and oxytocin enter the body. Bonding existent. “And these wage of $672 per week, before tax. but we’re trying. hormones. Your testosterone comes people are marrying

less than 5%

TOM JACKSON/THE TIMES MAGAZINE/NEWS SYNDICATION

More than 70,000

2 weeks

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MAKING THE BREAK

Laura Wasser, dubbed the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Disso Queenâ&#x20AC;? for her ability to dissolve marriages, is representing Angelina Jolie in her divorce from Brad Pitt (below right).


Celebrity report

THE WOMAN HOLLYWOOD What do Angelina, Britney and Kim have in common? A-list attorney Laura Wasser

TRUNKARCHIVE.COM/SNAPPER MEDIA; GETTY IMAGES

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n a flight from Ireland to New York in June 2004, Britney Spears proposed to Kevin Federline, a backup dancer she’d been dating for about three months. “We were a couple hours into the flight and we’d been talking the whole time, stuff about life, wanting to have kids,” Spears told People magazine shortly afterward. “All of a sudden, I said, ‘What if you want to get married?’ ” She was 22 at the time, and had sold 27 million albums with about $30 million to her name, according to Rolling Stone. She’d also been married before. Six months earlier, Spears had spent 55 hours wed to a childhood friend after making a 5.30am visit to a drivethrough chapel in Las Vegas. When Spears’s management team heard about her engagement to Federline, they set her up with a wedding planner, a jeweller – and Laura Wasser. Wasser, 48, is a partner at the Los Angeles family law firm Wasser, Cooperman & Mandles, which was set up by her father, Dennis Wasser, in 1976, and specialises in helping multimillionaires and celebrities get

married or divorced. She represented Johnny Depp in his acrimonious divorce from Amber Heard, where opposing counsel accused her of waging a “malicious war” to discredit the actress’s claims of domestic abuse. She was instrumental in keeping details of the actor’s finances away from prying tabloid eyes, and engineered a settlement that kept both parties out of court. In September she was hired by Angelina Jolie to manage her divorce from Brad Pitt – their second collaboration, with Wasser also handling the actress’s divorce from Billy Bob Thornton. Wasser wrangled an amicable interim arrangement for the couple’s six children that gave Angelina sole physical custody and Brad supervised visitation rights. Wasser has a big smile and thick brown hair that falls halfway down her back. She’s petite but strong and looks like someone who might have been an aerobics instructor – which she was for a while during college. Along with Spears, Depp and Jolie, Wasser’s client list includes Ryan Reynolds (Scarlett Johansson), Drew Barrymore (Will Kopelman), Denise


Wasser’s clients include (clockwise from left): Johnny Depp in his divorce from Amber Heard; Kim Kardashian (on left, with Wasser); Angelina Jolie when she split from Billy Bob Thornton (as well as Brad Pitt); and Britney Spears in her break-up with Kevin Federline.

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Richards (Charlie Sheen), Nick Lachey hen Spears got (Jessica Simpson), Stevie Wonder engaged, her team was (twice, actually) and at least three eager to introduce her Kardashians. She charges $850 an to the comforts of a hour, requires a $25,000 retainer, prenuptial contract, explains Wasser. and rarely represents people who have “A lot of times what will happen, less than $10 million. particularly with young women, is they Those who can’t afford her fees don’t want a prenup. They’re in love. can consult her 2013 self-help book – This is fantasy time: ‘We’re never going It Doesn’t Have To Be That Way – or to get divorced, and I don’t want her app which is said to launch later anybody, certainly not some old guy in a suit, telling me how it’s going this year and aims to provide members to work out.’ So they bring me in. with her sage but never sugar-coated We have the conversation.” divorce advice. Wasser was tasked with explaining “There’s a mythology of Laura the financial consequences of marriage Wasser in Hollywood,” explains to Spears: California entertainment mogul treats anything acquired Brian Grazer (another during a marriage as former client). “She has a reputation for community property, being tough.” which means everything Celebrity tabloid a couple has earned will be divided evenly website TMZ, which is if they split. “You can sit reported to sometimes - Laura Wasser on the couch and eat follow Wasser around to bonbons while your see which high-profile husband’s at work, and you’ll still get clients she’s meeting with, has half of everything.” nicknamed her the Disso – as in And if you’re an actor or musician “marriage dissolution” – Queen. who earns royalties, those future When Wasser has several clients payments are half someone else’s, too. she knows will wind up on a tabloid “I mean, love, honour and obey – OK, cover no matter what she does, she fine, whatever,” says Wasser. “But the submits their cases together, so media point is, the minute you get married in attention will be diluted. the state of California, every dollar you “I’ll tell my clients, ‘I have someone earn, every page of that novel you write, else, I can’t say who, but you should every painting you paint is communal really wait and file at the same time,’” says Wasser. property. It’s half-owned by your

“Often my clients don’t want a prenup. They’re in love”

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spouse.” That is, unless you have a prenuptial contract that says otherwise. Spears hired Wasser to negotiate her prenup, then married Federline in September 2004. Two years later, when she filed for divorce, she hired Wasser again. Wasser represented her for a year, but left the case in September 2007, during the couple’s acrimonious custody battle for their sons and a very public breakdown by Spears. Wasser won’t say what led to her departure; she still represents Spears’s father, Jamie, who remains the pop star’s legal guardian. “It was an ugly split-up,” is all she’ll say. “We got out of that case.” Since then, the speed with which scandals spread has only increased, making Wasser, who’s as expert at navigating paparazzi as she is at practising law, Hollywood’s complete divorce solution. Divorce is just as heartbreaking for those with a Walk of Fame star as it is for those without one. Plus when you’re famous, divorce can also affect your reputation – and career.


Celebrity report

Clockwise from above: Wasser’s client Drew Barrymore with ex Will Kopelman; Harvey Levin, creator of TMZ, with Wasser; Ben Affleck and former client Jennifer Garner. Below: Denise Richards turned to Wasser for help when divorcing Charlie Sheen.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY GETTY IMAGES; INF. TEXT BY CLAIRE SUDDATH

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asser’s office is clean and modern, with a fur rug and a gold hand grenade for a coffeetable centrepiece. When clients visit, they sit in one of two bright green leather chairs that face her glass-top desk. A box of tissues sits nearby, while behind hangs a framed canvas printed with the words “The End”. She joined the firm in 1995. She was 26, just out of law school and in the process of getting her own divorce after one year of marriage to “a guy from Spain”, as she now puts it. She’d been working at a disabilityrights law firm – “fighting for handrails in public bathrooms, that sort of thing” – when she decided to pursue a legal career that paid better. Wasser turned out to be adept at cultivating celebrity clients, a talent she attributes to her ability to speak their language. She’s funny, stylish, and able to talk about restaurants and movies as easily as she does court cases. “It helps that she looks fabulous, which unfortunately is required of women in Hollywood,” says Rob Shuter, a former publicist for Jennifer Lopez. But Wasser’s greatest skill as a lawyer is negotiating. “You can call Laura and say, ‘I’m so angry, blah blah blah,’ but Laura does not operate in that space,” says Grazer. “She will be calm and logical, and she’ll tell you to think about what you’re saying.” She’s also unflinchingly blunt. One of Wasser’s wealthiest clients likes to complain that when she has custody of her two kids on the weekend, it’s too much work. “I’m like, ‘That sounds like every weekend to me,’ ” says Wasser. “‘Also, you have no job.’” She once

talked another client out of initiating a custody battle because her ex-husband fed a hamburger to their vegan child. “Vegans, man” – Wasser rolls her eyes. This frankness makes her well suited for big-name clients with an incentive to hash out a deal. “You go with Laura to get a deal done,” says Stacy Phillips, a family law attorney who works in the same office building. It was Spears’s case that taught her how high-profile a break-up could really be. “I think there was a change happening at that time,” says Wasser. “There wasn’t social media the way there is now, but there was TMZ, Radar, Perez Hilton. It was so publicised. The counsel for Kevin Federline was very intent on making sure the case got played out to the press. Much more intent than Mr Federline was, really.” Wasser is so tightlipped about her clients that sometimes other partners at her firm have no idea whom she’s working for until they show up in the news. She also urges many clients to negotiate an agreement before filing official documents. “I think we worked on it a year and a half before it came out on TMZ,” says Melanie Griffith, who hired Wasser when she divorced Antonio Banderas in 2014. “And when we did file it, there were some personal things that were agreed upon by Antonio and myself that

we had removed from the official papers so they wouldn’t get out.” The high season for divorce attorneys is January and February. Many file in March after the Oscars; Wasser’s clients don’t want to walk the red carpet alone. “I don’t want you to think I’m antilove, because I’m not,” says Wasser. She still believes that most couples, if they approach their problems honestly and with respect, will probably get through them. “I know plenty of people with wonderful, lifelong marriages,” she says. She often advises friends considering divorce to work things out. But at the same time – well, the other day, she says, she got a call from a woman married for 19 years, who had just found notes in her husband’s office detailing plans for divorce. “I was like, ‘Maybe he’s writing a book?’ And she’s like, ‘No. He’s an investment banker.’ So she’s coming in to talk.” Wasser has not married again. Instead, she prefers long-term, live-in boyfriends. She’s no longer with either of her sons’ fathers, with whom she shares verbal custody agreements, which she’s never felt the need to put down on paper. “Is it a little bit of the cobbler’s son not wearing shoes? Maybe,” she says. “But I don’t want to get married. I don’t like the idea of entering into that contract.”

Divorce high season is March after the Oscars; celebs don’t want to turn up alone

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Can you

CHANGE YOUR LIFE in DAYS?

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Frazzled workaholic Noelle Faulkner tried to find her zen and get her sh*t together â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in just one month


Challenge

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JASON IERACE/RELOAD AGENCY

i, Noelle? This is Katie, I’m a life coach,” a voice sparkled down the phone. “Your mum gave me your number and thought I might be able to help you …” This is a real thing that happens to me. Friends and family have signed me up to home organisation workshops, time management courses, crystal healing sessions and so … many … mindfulness … festivals. Of course, I’ve never taken up these offers: “Thank you but I don’t need help and I don’t have time for it,” is my inevitable reply, faintly aware of the irony of that statement and painfully aware of my mother’s disappointment. You see, in my mind, my life is sorted. I’m a superhuman! A hustler! The mayor of multi-task metropolis! I do celebrity interviews over the phone while running errands, take client calls at the dog park, go on dates during my lunch break, edit documents while at the gym and take advantage of my stress-fuelled insomnia by pulling allnighters to write. “Who has time to do one thing at a time?” I ask myself. “Look at me go! Faster! Faster! Wheee!” To me, this is how success feels. Then there’s the downside. The adrenaline-fuelled highs are inevitably met with anxiety-filled lows. I’m forever complaining about a lack of minutes, overwhelmed with too much to do, and not putting aside time for those closest to me. Hot tip: when your friends start to make jokes about you


Challenge never being around, because “she’s always working”, they’re probably trying to tell you something. And one day, I burned out. All I could do was sleep. Blood tests showed nothing and the doctor told me it was simply “exhaustion” – which I’d always thought was just code for celebrities strung out on drugs. Turns out it’s real. And scary. It was around this time, after losing weeks of my life to naps (and Homeland bingefests), that marie claire sent me a copy of Get Your Sh*t Together by Sarah Knight (Quercus, $29.99) and suggested I try it out to see if my life transformed. Divine intervention? Or did my mother send an email to marie claire? Whatever. This sounded like a challenge that would push me to my limits – which is exactly what I do best. Sign me up.

Obama and Joe Biden memes than you should.” “Have you done your tax yet?” OH, GOD. TAX. There were more, including an intense essay from my mum, but after the life coach incident, you can already guess how she felt. It hit me like a sack of doorknobs – I’m a total, utter mess. So when I found a spare five minutes a week later, I picked up the book. The beauty of Get Your Sh*t Together is that it’s real talk. For example, Knight preaches the “Power of Negative Thinking”, which is kind of like this: rather than buying a toosmall Ellery dress with a mantra of “one day it will fit”, you instead tell yourself, “I don’t want to stare at this dress and feel like a failure.” Masochistic? A little. But it kicks your butt into gear. “Just because you’re doing a ton of shit all day, every day, does NOT mean you have your shit together,” informs my new paperback spirit guide. In order to set the right goal, the book tells me, you must first break down the question, “What is wrong with my life? And why?” For me, this came down to a Josef Fritzl-like relationship with time. I was a prisoner of my own self-made time dungeon. Once I got that under control the rest should fall into line. That was the theory, anyway …

“My inbox has 37,091 unread emails. I’m a prisoner of my own self-made time dungeon”

ADMIT TING I H AV E A P R O B L E M With my typical “I only do things in extremes” drive back in action, I decided (at 3am on a Monday, no less), that the best way to get started was to find out how deep my hot messiness ran. So I sent a group email to friends, family, ex-housemates, co-workers and bitter ex-lovers, inviting them to roast me at their will. The responses flooded in. I received a Cadbury Flake, a YouTube link to Frank Sinatra’s “Call Me Irresponsible”, various screen grabs of texts from me bailing out or running late to events and the following feedback: “Your inbox gives me anxiety.” (OK fine, it does sit perpetually at around 37,091 unread emails.) “You can’t plan three days ahead.” (Yes sure, I did jump on a plane to the US with 36 hours notice last year.) The critiques kept coming. And coming. “You’re forever stressed.” “You only pay bills when the envelope is red.” “You run away.” “You say you’re busy but you seem to send me way too many 44

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O R G A N I SAT I O N OVERHAUL The crux of Get Your Sh*t Together is three simple steps: strategise, focus and commit. I am terrible at all three of those things (with fresh shrapnel clogging up my inbox to prove it). So I did what was asked. I set a goal: make more time for life away from a computer screen, become friends with the clock and get through the week without feeling overwhelmed. Then, I broke the goal down into baby steps, aiming to address one problem at a time. Knight declares the biggest no-go is a “master to-do list”. You know, that single document of Satan that lists

everything you need to achieve in the next five lifetimes. It’s an instant stressor. Master lists lead to anxiety. Anxiety leads to fear. Fear leads to procrastination. Procrastination leads to the dark side and boom! Suddenly you’re 587 days-deep in an Instagram stalk of your neighbour’s ex-girlfriend’s best friend’s boyfriend’s holiday in the Bahamas with his cricket team. So instead I clustered the baby steps into priorities: 1. Deadlines for that week, invoices, daily exercise and urgent emails. 2. Next week’s deadlines, social catch-ups, cleaning my house, organising my computer’s filing system. 3. Seeing a movie, clearing out my wardrobe, getting my car serviced. The idea was to tick off one at a time so the rest moved up the list. I used an app called Wunderlist, which allows you to tag tasks with a deadline date and create categories (it also makes a pleasing “ding” noise when you cross something off. Important). I was already clocking less floor time in the foetal position. Win. Next was establishing an awareness of how the sun works with the earth’s rotation. Time. On Knight’s advice, I started timing tasks – how long it


took me to shower, do hair/make-up, walk the dog, exercise, get coffee, create invoices – everything. The other thing I did was make a sub-list of life admin tasks that took less than 15 minutes to complete (cleaning the kitchen, paying bills, setting up an auto-filing system in my inbox for low-priority emails); I was then able to slot them into my days without breaking a sweat (provided I stuck to the 15-minute allowance). Dividing my day into pieces meant I didn’t have to multi-task or feel overwhelmed. When you have a device ticking down your mortality, suddenly minutes become more valuable and adorable seal pup YouTube binges become less of a diversion.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JASON IERACE/RELOAD AGENCY; GETTY IMAGES. HAIR & MAKE-UP BY NICOLE ABELA/RELOAD AGENCY

R E L AT I O N S H I P REBOOT Then came the tough stuff: actually cleaning up the mess I’ve made for myself. My sinkhole of an inbox was one thing (I put aside an hour every day to tackle it … 28,978 and counting) but being an actual adult – with relationships, responsibilities and a Great Dane who relies on my care – was another. It’s hard to hear that you’re a workaholic with stress-fuelled anxiety that presents as agoraphobia, because you never leave the home-office. I know now I had stopped caring about those around me. So, I re-employed Knight’s “Power of Negative Thinking”. Don’t be a Flake, Noelle, be a Cherry Ripe! Knight points out that relationships are just as valuable as work and finances, and require the same effort and the same brutal culling when they’re not working. Maybe you’re like me – great intentions, but no followthrough and a fear of commitment. Make another list. Who gives you the most joy and is that person getting your time? Are you procrastinating by mindlessly flicking through dating apps with no intention of going any further? Lending energy to toxic people undeserving of your new-found passion for lists? Guilty as charged. So, I strategised, focused and committed. I made a list that prioritised people in my life: 1. Friends I’ve neglected and would hate to lose.

2. Peripheries – the close-but-not-soclose. 3. The energy vampires, Tinder dirtbags, people who only called me when they wanted something. I put aside time to see each and every one of the top tier right away, reached out to the second and dropped the others like hot coals. It felt good. Positive. I had more time for the souls that made me happier and I started to feel more involved in life.

FA L L I N G A T T H E FINISH LINE Now, if you want to mess with a welloiled machine, toss in a match. Around 25 days into my shiny new regimen, I was thrown a curveball in the guise of a triple deadline and an emergency vet bill. The lists shuddered to a halt. The priorities splintered all over the place. I realised that unless one has an ironclad mental capacity for dealing with things that pop up, keeping it all together is fleeting. It was a hard lesson. I had to ask why it was happening and come up with a solution.

This part is still a huge work in progress, but I’m currently training my brain to meditate and put emotional things to the side so they don’t sabotage my day. You know, not using up all my valuable shower thoughts on that Tinder dirtbag I just ditched. Getting yourself out of the mental bunker and into “An Organised Life” is tough, but this method of thinking in negative gear and compartmentalising is ridiculously simple. I could also argue, though, that committing to any type of organisation, be it from a life coach or a Bunnings workshop, would probably have a similar effect (sorry, Mum, you were right). It feels good to be accountable for my own shit and while it wasn’t a magical cure, it’s at least reduced my cycle of too-muchto-do-too-little-time paralysis. I may still be trying to slow down, but I’m happy that clearing the noise has since allowed bigger ideas and a sense of calm to emerge. Now, back to those 21,706 unread emails. marieclaire.com.au

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SECRETS AND LIES

Love in modern India is a war zone with detectives such as Akriti Khatri, 30, hired to uncover the murky truth.

The

LADY DETECTI


World report

JACK PICONE

A

Online dating sites have caused relationship chaos in India and as a result the demand for private detectives is skyrocketing. Abigail Haworth meets the women who are taking the private-eye industry by storm

VES

kriti Khatri is on a stakeout in a busy neighbourhood in New Delhi. It’s a hot Sunday afternoon in August and shoppers are out in force. Khatri buys a watermelon smoothie from a juice vendor and tucks herself against a wall to avoid the cars and motorised rickshaws clogging the street. The chaotic location is ideal. “It’s easy to blend in and secretly watch my target,” says Khatri, a private detective, whose eyes, hidden behind aviator shades, are fixed on a nearby apartment block. “With luck, I will catch the love cheat on camera coming out of the building with his mistress.” For centuries, arranged marriages have been the norm in India, with each partner thoroughly vetted in person by family members and local connections. In such situations, the role of “informal detective” was often taken by barbers who travelled from village to village, gathering intel about a person’s suitability for marriage while they cut hair. “They’d find out things like whether the bride was respectable, and whether the groom was financially stable, and whether both came from decent families,” says Khatri. But now, with couples increasingly meeting on Facebook, Instagram and dating apps like Tinder, the demand for private detectives is skyrocketing. The internet has created “relationship chaos” in the diverse country of almost 1.3 billion people, says Khatri, causing far greater

shockwaves than in nations such as the US due to India’s deeply traditional attitudes. “Now people are falling for strangers online who often make up tall stories,” she says. “There’s much more uncertainty and confusion, as well as conflict with older generations who don’t like their children’s choices.” Moreover, she adds, extramarital affairs are on the rise due to the ease of online dating and messaging apps. “Love in modern India has become a war zone.” Khatri, 30, who exudes a mixture of fearless energy and sharp humour, is one of a growing number of Indian women taking the country’s maledominated private eye industry by storm. She runs her own agency, Venus Detective, with offices in the capital Delhi, Bangalore, and three other major cities. The sleuth and her team of 20 full-time, mostly female field agents launch daring undercover operations to expose illicit love affairs, dating fraud, corporate corruption, and other ills of modern Indian society. In the process, they turn traditional female roles upside down. “We often disguise ourselves as maids, vegetable vendors, college girls, or cosmetics saleswomen to infiltrate homes and offices,” says Khatri. “It’s risky, but so far we’ve never been caught. Targets rarely suspect women of being professional spies.” Delhi-born Khatri opened Venus Detective in 2011 after learning the trade at another firm straight after college. A science graduate with an MBA, she was drawn to the profession “out of sheer curiosity”, she says. “I always loved collecting information

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World report

Chetana Mittal, 30, has gone undercover as a maid and a cosmetic saleswoman to get information (above and left). Below: Tanya Puri, 23, worked her first case when she was 18.

about people. It was like a hobby. When I was a student it took me 30 minutes to get across campus because I stopped to get the gossip from everyone I met.” Dubbed “Delhi’s Nancy Drew” by the Hindustan Times newspaper, demand for her services is booming. She receives 80–100 calls a week from potential clients, mostly about matters relating to love and marriage. Many of Khatri’s clients are women who want to find out if their partners are cheating, or are keen to know if a prospective husband has any dealbreaking habits. “Indian women are becoming much more independent, with their own jobs and social lives,” she says. “They don’t want to tolerate men who deceive them or who don’t meet their expectations.” Hiring a detective not only empowers women to take control of their lives, she adds, it also helps them to avoid mistakes in the first place. After two recent background checks on potential spouses, both her clients broke up with their boyfriends after she discovered that one man’s maths skills were so bad he couldn’t count bank notes, and the other had lied about his family home having an indoor toilet (it didn’t, as Khatri learnt when she pretended to be lost in the neighbourhood and asked to use it). Khatri’s fees start at around 25,000 rupees ($500) for cases taking under 10 days, up to 500,000 rupees 48

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($10,000) for investigations that span months, usually corporate fraud or missing persons. Because the profession isn’t legally recognised – the authorities tolerate such work as long as detectives don’t break any laws, such as illegally obtaining phone or email records – there are no signs outside her businesses. Most clients find her online or through newspaper advertisements.

T

h e headquarters for Venus Detective is on the third floor of an office block in a business park in Noida, an industrial-corporate “mini city” on the outskirts of the capital. Khatri’s youthful team monitor their work on laptops. “Everything is digital these days,” says Khatri. “To protect our clients’ privacy, we don’t keep any physical evidence lying around.” There’s rarely any shortage of evidence. In around 40 to 50 per cent of premarital cases, for example, the person Khatri is investigating has fabricated or concealed some details about themselves – in the rush to join India’s increasingly prosperous middle class, it’s tempting for some people to fake a few things to meet the right spouse. “They lie about their education, their health, their assets, even their height,” she says. “On the internet, you

can be anyone you want to be.” In infidelity cases, there are practical reasons to have hard evidence of wrongdoing. “If a client has an arranged marriage, the families on both sides are involved and it’s difficult to divorce or separate without causing a major dispute,” explains Khatri. “But if the client can say, ‘Look, my partner has been unfaithful and here are the photos and hotel receipts to prove it,’ the families cannot argue with them.” Some also lie about their caste – India’s ancient social hierarchy rooted in the Hindu religion. “Caste is critical to some traditional families,” says Khatri. “I get many calls from parents who are worried their offspring are dating someone from a lower caste. Even if the couple is deeply in love, the family will stop at nothing to break up the romance.” Sometimes parents ask Khatri to snare their son or daughter’s partner in a “honey trap” to provide fake evidence the partner is unsuitable. “I always refuse,” she says. “I draw the line at anything unethical.” Others deceive on a much grander scale. Khatri and her staff call these “Oh, my God [OMG]” cases. She gives a recent example of an Indian couple who were based in America. “The wife hired me to find out why her husband was spending so long back in

“Indian women don’t want to tolerate men who deceive them”


JACK PICONE

India,” she says. “We discovered he had three other wives in this country, each with their own house and kids that he’d fathered.” Khatri believes the man had married the women to get money in the form of a dowry from each wife’s family. (The payment of a dowry is illegal in India, but still widely practised.) In another “OMG case”, a woman wanted to know why her boyfriend kept sneaking out of the house late at night. “He told her he couldn’t sleep and was getting some fresh air,” says Khatri. “It turned out he was hiring out his sexual services for cash to an older woman two or three times a week.” Perhaps not surprisingly, Khatri, who is married with a two-year-old son, says a big part of her job involves counselling her distressed clients. “One of the first things I ask people is whether they’re prepared to learn the truth, and what they intend to do with the information we dig up,” she says. Sometimes the answers surprise her, like the time a woman hired her, but said she planned to do nothing with the proof of her husband’s infidelity. “She told me she was just going to keep it as insurance,” says Khatri. “In case her husband caught her cheating on him.” Confirmation that a spouse has been having an affair doesn’t always end badly, however. One of Khatri’s clients, a 30-year-old Delhi resident named Shweta, who does not want her surname published, says hiring a private detective has saved her fiveyear-old marriage. “I was going through a bad time with my husband after the birth of our first child,” says Shweta. “I was depressed and I missed my job in human resources, and my husband and I stopped communicating properly.” Shweta began to suspect her husband was seeing someone. “I hired Akriti and she caught him red-handed checking into a hotel with another woman,” she says. “When I confronted him with the evidence he broke down and apologised. He has treated me like a queen ever since.” Being unfaithful works both ways, of course, and growing numbers of Khatri’s clients are men who want to check up on their wives and girlfriends. Whatever the gender of her clients, she believes female private detectives have

Agencies, such as Khatri’s Venus Detective, investigate anything from premarital checks to corporate fraud. The profession isn’t legally recognised so signage tends to be discreet (above).

the upper hand in dealing with their cases. “Women feel more comfortable telling their problems to another woman,” she says. “While men think that I will understand the mindset and behaviour of their wives.” Baldev Puri, general secretary of the Delhi chapter of the Indian Association of Private Detectives and Investigators (APDI), agrees. “They make excellent investigators, in many cases far superior to men,” says the veteran detective, who has run his own agency for 30 years. “They are highly perceptive, they know how to get access in every situation, and they’re very organised.” Of the 350 agencies that are APDI members, around 15 are owned and run by women, he says, up from “only three or four nationwide” a few years ago. Puri is such a champion of female sleuths that he encouraged one of his two daughters to join the business. At 23, Tanya Puri is the youngest female private eye in the country to run her own agency, Lady Detectives India. “I started working with my father from around the age of 15, and discovered I had a talent for observation and recalling details,” says Tanya. She landed her first big case when she was an 18-year-old college student. “My father was asked to investigate a female student whose parents thought she was seeing someone in secret,” she says. “It was easier for me to follow her without being noticed, so I took the

job.” Tanya tailed the girl on Delhi’s metro and by rickshaw, and was shocked to find that she was working in a high-class brothel. “She looked the same as me so I didn’t expect her to be involved in some kind of sex racket,” she says. “It was an early wake-up call never to make assumptions.” Despite spending their days on the frontline of India’s murky world of romantic lies and deception, both women say they still believe in love. Tanya is engaged to a young Delhi lawyer who is proud that she’s a private detective. “He thinks it’s exciting and boasts about it to all his friends,” she says. As for Khatri, she and her husband, who she married at a “big fat Indian wedding”, have been married for five years. “When I was single, my grandmother told me to lie about my job to find a husband. She said that being a private detective was too threatening to men,” she laughs. But Khatri knew from experience that lying was unwise. She told the truth, and it paid off. “He has no problem with my job,” she says of her husband, who is a banker. In the near future, Khatri hopes to open India’s first school for female private detectives. “Some people think this is not suitable work for women,” she says. “We’re proving them wrong. It’s the kind of job that shows women can be anything we want to be.”

“Men think I will understand the mindset of their wives”

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Sex lives

“ THE REALITY DIDN’T MEASURE UP TO THE FA N T A S Y ”

What’s it really like to “I have sex with a woman?

LUMINA/STOCKSY.COM

Mollie, 37, fulfilled a long-held desire, but it wasn’t what she expected

Research says more than half of women admit to having lesbian fantasies – but what is it like between the sheets? Three women share their same-sex experiences

was in my 20s when an unknown woman sprung forth from my imagination and went down on me in the softest, gentlest and most erotic manner possible. As I masturbated, my mind took me deep into the fantasy and I experienced an orgasm that rocked my body to its core. My first reaction was guilt and confusion. I considered myself straight. ‘So why,’ I asked myself, ‘was I getting off thinking about women?’ “My fantasies became a regular occurrence. Men barely featured at all. But in real life I was still attracted to, and having sex with, men. I never even noticed flesh-and-blood women. It was confusing. Was I in the closet? Was I in denial? Did my fantasies make me a lesbian? marieclaire.com.au

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“After two years of questioning my sexual orientation, I fell in love with a guy who I loved having sex with and we entered a committed relationship. But secretly I knew if we were to break up, I’d have sex with a woman. When we separated eight years later, I knew I had to set my mind at ease. “About a year later, I met Juliet* on a self-development course. She was intelligent, funny and self-aware. During the group sessions she was very open about her sexuality. She wore her hair long and her T-shirts skintight. Juliet looked tough, but her brown eyes had extra long lashes that gave her a sweet prettiness. “I deliberately sought her out at the course afterparty. I knew it would be up to me to flirt with her, because she would think I was straight and wouldn’t make a move. After several drinks my flirting became bolder. I remember touching her leg and leaving it there for an extra moment. I saw something 54

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shift in her eyes as she caught on that I was interested beyond the friend zone. “We went outside and she pulled me behind the main hall. Her lips were soft, but her kiss was hard and passionate. I felt dizzy as she ran her hands over my body in the darkness. When she asked me back to her place I couldn’t resist. I wasn’t nervous, because I felt like I knew what to expect – the fantasy was turning into reality. “In the taxi home, she caressed my thigh, then put her hand up my T-shirt, as she looked straight into my eyes. It was thrilling – I was turned on, but also hyper-aware of her gender. “Inside on the sofa, Juliet turned dominant and slightly aggressive. She stripped me of my clothes, but instead of the slow, sensual sex of my fantasies, Juliet’s fingers were like pistons. I was a bit taken aback by the ferocity. It felt like a guy racing to intercourse with the barest hint of foreplay. However, the harder she did it, the hornier she got.

“I was a bit confused, so taking her cue I did the same to her. She appeared to like it and she came. But her wet vagina didn’t turn me on like mine did to her. It felt kind of foreign. There was no going down, no stroking. Afterwards, we cuddled, but I felt strangely let down. We didn’t have sex again. “After that, I had sex with a few other women and the same thing happened. I felt like a lousy lesbian, as I liked kissing and fondling boobs, but didn’t have the taste for real-life vaginas. One woman even said, ‘It feels like I want to fuck you, but you don’t want to fuck me.’ She was right. “Thinking back, I was just a straight girl testing the lesbian waters, instead of looking to explore a deeper connection with someone. And while the sex didn’t blow my mind I’m still glad I explored my sexuality, as I’m now secure in my identity. But that isn’t to say if I met a woman I connected with I wouldn’t try it again, just to be sure!”

*NAME HAS BEEN CHANGED. PHOTOGRAPHED BY CARLES RODRIGO MONZO/STOCKSY.COM

“I lost myself in touching her body and I understood why men go crazy for the female form”


Sex lives “I COULDN’T B E L I EV E W H AT I’D BEEN MISSING OUT ON” Heather, a 43-year-old from Brisbane, fell in love with her colleague Terrie, 39. They’ve been a couple for six years

“I

never hated sex with men, but I didn’t love it. Straight sex was always so linear and the end result was always penetration and his orgasm. When I had sex with Terrie, I couldn’t believe what I’d missed out on all these years. “I was two years out of a 14-year marriage. As the only other woman in a male-dominated company, Terrie and I were drawn to each other. She was the first ‘out’ lesbian I’d ever met and was in a relationship, meaning our friendship was entirely platonic for the first year. “Then Terrie went away on holiday and I found myself really missing her. When she came back to work, I hugged her and remember feeling the softness of her breasts. It was the spark of something sexual. I started to think about her when I masturbated. “Because we worked together I forced myself to live with my sense of denial. What would it mean if things crossed the line? One night we went out for after-work drinks and ended up alone at the end of the night. ‘I don’t want to go home because I’d rather be with you,’ she said. It filled me with an unfamiliar desire. I wanted her, but it was more than sexual. I replied, ‘I feel the same way.’ This led to us discussing our feelings for each other. ‘Want to come back to my place?’ I asked. “In the taxi, I was nervous. Would I know what to do? Would I like it? Then we were on the back deck at my house, kissing passionately. She was on top of me, pushing the mound of her vagina into mine. There was something about the softness of her. It felt so sensual. “When we were both naked, I lost myself in touching her body and I instantly understood why men go crazy for the female form. The curves are beautiful to touch. I didn’t have any body insecurities, or compare myself to her. I was in ecstasy as I kissed her

breasts. It was so erotic to know exactly how it must have been feeling for her – like we were two people, one body. “Then she went down on me. The whole time she held my hand and maintained eye contact. The pressure was perfect and even. There was no awkwardness, or lying there hoping her tongue would eventually find my clitoris. Then Terri started to masturbate me with her fingers. Another woman just knows how to touch you. I came so hard. “Being with a woman is like swimming out into the softest, warmest ocean, then riding the waves in before paddling out again. We’d make love, come, stop, kiss and cuddle, talk, and make love again. It was the first time I experienced multiple orgasms. “I’d always been passive in sex, now I’m the opposite. I think straight people get fixated on who is the ‘top’, or who is submissive because they think of lesbian sex in the same way they think about straight sex – straight friends are obsessed with who wears the strap-on! Neither of us plays an overly masculine role in our sex life, or any other part of our lives. We’re evenly matched. “I’m in a lesbian relationship, but I hate labels. I fell in love with Terrie and I intend to stay with her my whole life. I don’t regret my relationships with men, but I can’t imagine going back to straight sex after experiencing the joy of being with a woman.”

“There are still plenty of clichés about what a lesbian is supposed to look like. I’m on the feminine end of a very broad spectrum, which means straight girls regularly come on to me when they want to test the Sapphic waters. I’ve popped the cherry of at least eight bi-curious straight girls, I’m totally down with it if I’m attracted to them. (Although there is also a ridiculous expectation that a lesbian will automatically sleep with you just because you ask them.) “Michaela* was part of my friendship circle at uni and had just broken up with her boyfriend. One night she made a not-so-subtle approach by pulling me into a toilet cubicle and demanding I kiss her. She was the high-maintenance, rich princess type. “Sexually, I’m aggressive and I like to be in control. With Michaela, I wanted her to just lie back as I made love to her. I loved teasing her. She had huge nipples that stuck out, I spent so long licking them. She got so horny and was begging me to finger her. Instead, I went down on her. I love making girls wet, it feels so good. Michaela kept gasping, ‘Oh my God, no-one has ever licked me like that before!’ “Then I felt her whole body stiffen. She convulsed and came so hard! I tried to kiss her, but she started crying. I was like, ‘Oh no, she’s got the straightgirl guilt,’ which has happened before. Instead, she softly said, ‘I think I just lost my virginity.’ “‘You’re not a virgin, Michaela!’ I replied. She said, ‘No, that felt like my proper virginity. I think I’m a lesbian.’ “I laughed and said, ‘Let me check,’ and fingered her to another deep G-spot orgasm. That’s the best thing about women, there’s no recovery time. “After that, she declared she was gay and told everyone she loved me. I wasn’t in love with her, but somehow I felt responsible for her feelings. We had sex for about three months and then I broke up with her. Suddenly I was called a ‘player’ who used her for sex! It seemed unfair to me because she was just exploring her sexuality. Anyway, I hear she’s straight again.”

“We’d make love, come, stop, kiss cuddle, talk, and make love again”

“SHE FELL IN LOVE WITH ME” Lily, a 23-year-old from Sydney, identifies as a lesbian. She finds she’s a magnet for bi-curious girls

“I

always knew I was attracted to women. When I was 16 my first sexual experience was with a girl and it felt so natural. I fell in love with another girl at 17 and the sex was incredible. All my straight girlfriends were having mediocre sex with mediocre boys, not coming then feeling used, whereas I was already having multiple orgasms.

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Portfolio

BRIGITTE UNSEEN

She was one of the original – and most loved – blonde bombshells. Now, a new book documents the fashion legacy of Brigitte Bardot, in her own words

GETTY IMAGES

T

he Brigitte Bardot of our collective imagination may be a barefoot, kittenish sexpot with a tousled beehive, a woman of whom Woody Allen once said, “I’m firmly convinced nothing more beautiful exists on earth.” But as far as the fashion world is concerned, Bardot’s greatest talent has to be her knack for invention. The French actress turned animal rights activist championed the off-theshoulder neckline that still bears her name. She rehabilitated gingham, claims she came up with the headband, definitely created the ballerina flat (or at least commissioned the first street-worthy version) and may as well have invented the bikini. Now 82, she has shunned the public life and rarely grants interviews, which makes her commentary on her own fashion legacy in the new book, Brigitte Bardot: My Life In Fashion, all the more revealing.


1960

(opposite page)

On her famous signature style, Bardot says: “I couldn’t get my bun right, and there were lots of strands dangling down and annoying me, so I thought it would be a good idea to tease them so they framed my face. And so I invented the choucroute beehive.”

1961

(left)

Bardot’s own wardrobe was the origin of her screen style. “I wore my own clothes in lots of movies, it made me feel like I was really myself,” says the pin-up, pictured on the set of A Very Private Affair.

1967

(below)

At home in Rome, where she made several films, including 1956’s Nero’s Mistress – for which she first dyed her hair blonde. “It was the only positive thing about the film,” she recalls.

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Portfolio 1953 Aged 18, Bardot, then a natural brunette, attended her first Cannes International Film Festival baring her collarbones. Off-the-shoulder soon became known as the “Bardot” neckline: “Sexy and provocative with that neckline I let slip off my shoulders, it became the top top!”

1963 “I didn’t know how to wear my hair so, on a whim, I used a scarf as a headband and set off a fashion tsunami,” says Bardot, pictured on the set of Contempt at the Cinecittà studios, Italy.

1968 Filming Spirits Of The Dead. Of wearing couture, Bardot says, “I always hated it ... I felt I was pretending to be someone I wasn’t, all stiff and formal.”

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1958

(above)

Ever the style icon, wearing a black bustier evening gown, stole and lace gloves with French actor/director Jean Marais at the ballet in Paris.

1970

KARY H LASCH FROM BRIGITTE BARDOT: MY LIFE IN FASHION (FLAMMARION 2016); CINÉMATHÉQUE FRANÇAISE FROM FROM BRIGITTE BARDOT: MY LIFE IN FASHION (FLAMMARION 2016); GETTY IMAGES

“I never tried to cause a scandal,” says Bardot (pictured in The Bear And The Doll). “I was simply the person I wanted to be.” In 1973, she gave up her career after making 47 films.


1958 Showing off her incredible 20-inch waist in a promo shot for The Female. “There’s always been a Bardot style, and it’s not just about fashion,” she says.

1958 In French singer Sacha Distel’s arms on the Venice Grand Canal during the Venice International Film Festival. Bardot, who has married four times, dated Distel for a year before ending the romance in 1959.

1957 Wearing the Concerto gown by Christian Dior for the Munich Mardi Gras festival. Bardot’s relationship with the couture house continued with Dior’s successors.

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Portfolio

1959

(above)

KARY H LASCH FROM BRIGITTE BARDOT: MY LIFE IN FASHION (FLAMMARION 2016); CINÉMATHÉQUE FRANÇAISE FROM FROM BRIGITTE BARDOT: MY LIFE IN FASHION (FLAMMARION 2016); GETTY IMAGES

With Dario Moreno in Come Dance With Me! “El Mambo! Viva Dario Moreno!” effuses Bardot. “What does it matter where my skirt is from as long as it twirls around me in that frantic rhythm?”

1968

(right)

Making another sartorial statement. In 1987, Bardot auctioned off her incredible couture wardrobe to raise money to set up The Brigitte Bardot Foundation. The animal protection NGO is still her passion today.

Brigitte Bardot: My Life In Fashion by Henry-Jean Servat (Flammarion, $60) is out now.


The

that nearly broke me

2001

“My dad died while I was pregnant” NATALIE BARR, T V PRESENTER The Channel 7 newsreader, 48, was pregnant with her first child when she received a call that decimated her happiness and made those first months of motherhood doubly hard. Only when she returned to work did she begin to see the light again.

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t was around midnight when my brother rang to say my dad had died of a sudden heart attack at 61. I couldn’t comprehend it. It was horrible. “Just a month earlier he and Mum had come to my pregnancy ultrasound. Of course, men in that age group have never seen an ultrasound before. And he was like ‘No, no, I won’t come in, I’ll go and get a coffee.’ But we talked him into it. He couldn’t believe it. He was shocked he could see this little baby moving around. We like to think that’s how he met Lachlan. “After my brother called I woke my husband. I didn’t know what to do. I stayed up all night and got a flight back to Perth and then Bunbury. I was sick

for the full 40 weeks of my pregnancy and so I vomited in the pot plants at the airport and I bawled on the plane. “I was in total shock. Your world stops. The combination of being pregnant and someone you love dying was overwhelming. For so many years you cry. And then you stop crying because you just can’t cry any more. “I looked up to my Dad. He taught me my love of news and I admired him so much. We were as close as a father and daughter could be. “When my son was born three months later, it was happy – kind of – but it was so painfully sad. Three months is not a long time between losing someone and having a baby. “Then, Lachlan didn’t sleep for 18 months. It was a terrible time. I was completely unable to cope. I went to counsellors and they thought I was depressed but the tests said I wasn’t. I was mourning and just finding it so hard to be a mum. “The thing that saved me was going back to work. When I was pregnant,

COURTESY OF NATALIE BARR; ELLIS PARRINDER/CAMERA PRESS/AUSTRALSCOPE

Natalie Barr with her father on her wedding day in 1995.

A lot can happen in 12 months. Four prominent Australian women reflect on a challenging time that led to greater personal strength


First person

“My body told me that enough was enough, and I had a meltdown” CAMILL A FRANKS, DESIGNER Being struck by a shocking and very visible nervous system disorder while in India forced the fashion designer, now 40, to face demons she’d buried for years. The subsequent emotional and spiritual journey was brutal, but it was one she had to have.

I Above: Camilla Franks was forced to focus on her health and wellbeing following a crippling illness.

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everyone said, ‘Once you get that baby in your arms you’ll never want to leave it!’ I was the opposite. I’d lost myself. “When I got the job at Sunrise, one of the first stories we did was interviewing a baby whisperer called Sheyne Rowley. Our switchboard went into meltdown with mums and dads whose babies didn’t sleep. And I thought, ‘There are other people living my horrible first year as well!’ I felt terrible for them but I didn’t have to feel so guilty. “It’s so sad my dad never met my son, who’s now 15, or my other son, Hunter, who’s 11. You grieve for all those years they could have had with their granddad. He also would have loved to have seen everything I’ve achieved. So much of my identity now is being on Sunrise and he never saw that because I hadn’t started on the show when he died. He would have been so proud. “You like to think they’re looking down on you, and they’re looking after you and your kids. And I feel I can’t complain because I have so many wonderful things in my life. “But I lost someone I loved and it still hurts so much.”

t began with headaches. Then one day, all of a sudden I turned around and the whole left side of my face dropped. My team raced me to hospital. They didn’t know if I’d had a stroke or a brain tumour or what. I was absolutely terrified. It was Bell’s palsy, which is an attack on the nervous system. I had spent so many years running around a hundred miles an hour like a racehorse and I finally had a meltdown. “My body was telling me in the most magnificent and grandiose way that enough was enough. “I was forced to stand still. And all of a sudden these other feelings started coming up. My brother died in a shocking accident when he was 14 and I was 17. In our society we’re not taught to feel our feelings and really work through them and so when I finally stood still and was forced to take a deep breath I discovered I was struggling with depression and anxiety. I’d suppressed it for so long and I suddenly realised I was human, goddamn it. “When I got home to Australia I hit rock bottom. My face was shocked for six months and I felt so shy and self-conscious about it. But the Bell’s palsy wasn’t the hardest part. I felt so confused by these emotions and I felt shame and guilt for having them. I had no understanding of what I was feeling and why. “It was like a big wave in front of me and I guess I couldn’t ignore it any more. I made some really hard decisions. I removed the bad energy from my life. I broke off relationships. I dived deep into the world of yoga and meditation and took a big step back from the business for a while to spend time on me and on self-love. “I learnt to surround myself with my tribe; people who celebrate, support, nurture and unconditionally love me. My relationships have become so much more authentic and beautiful and real. “To people who find themselves in that place I’d say to them you’re not just this crazy person. The journey isn’t easy and I don’t want to pretend it is. But do the work on the mind and the body and there will be light at the end of the tunnel.” marieclaire.com.au

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First person

2014

“Parkinson’s disease sentenced me to home detention” LIZ JACKSON, JOURNALIST

The Walkley Award-winning reporter, 66, was diagnosed with the debilitating condition in 2014, suffering pain, panic attacks and an ongoing fear for her future. But her difficult decision to allow her filmmaker husband, Martin Butler, to document her journey with the disease for Four Corners struck a deep chord with many sufferers and their families, and shone a light on the couple’s powerful love.

I

knew so little about Parkinson’s when I was diagnosed that I don’t think I was as concerned as I should have been. I thought, if I don’t have a tremor maybe I’m OK. “I wasn’t aware of the huge impact it would have on my life. I’m not able to look after myself. I’m not supposed to drive a car. I haven’t spent a day on my own since then – if Martin has to go overseas for work we have to arrange for someone to come and live with me. All those things have just been very hard for me as I have been a very independent person all my life. “When the drugs I was taking weren’t stopping my panic attacks, Martin decided to find out why. He’s the sort of person who reads the back of the packet and knows what the drugs are actually doing to me. At first I was a little bit sceptical because I thought, well, you’re not a doctor. I know that sounds conservative but I wanted to know what the doctors would think of [his input], and the doctors took it really well. They didn’t think he was interfering, I think they were impressed. I was impressed too because it just showed a level of commitment in terms of what he was going to do. “I was hesitant to tell my story [on Four Corners]. My two closest friends both had worries about it. They didn’t say no, but they thought the mental and physical strain might be too much. “My sister, who’s a doctor, thought I should be devoting my time to finding good doctors and looking for a cure for the disease. It was difficult to

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make the decision – and I hope I’ve made the right one. “I’ve had some really lovely correspondence [since the show]. I get a lot of stories about people’s relatives – their dads, their uncles, and what’s helped them. And also thanking me for just putting Parkinson’s so squarely in the public domain. [One journalist] wrote a beautiful piece about his father who died from the disease and said they never used the term ‘Parkinson’s disease’ in the house. Never. They said it was because he was ashamed. So, I feel it’s been good to confront that

openly, to say that there’s no shame in Parkinson’s. It’s not a lot of fun, but there’s no shame. “I think I fell in love with Martin all over again when we had children. [Going through this disease] is sort of like falling in love with him again because he’s been so good at looking after me. After the diagnosis I said to Martin: ‘I have Parkinson’s disease. My life will be very different from now on, and yours will be too.’ And he said: ‘I know that.’ I also said: ‘You can say if you want to go, just tell me,’ and he said: ‘No, I don’t want to, I’m going to stick with you till the end.’ That was incredibly reassuring for me. “There are times when I’ve thought that he’d lost interest in the project – ‘the project’ being looking after me, not the film. Sometimes we disagree about what we think we should do but he’s always very clear that it’s not conflict over whether or not he’s on ‘the project’, it’s a conflict about making sure it gets executed as well as it can. “And ‘the project’ is to make my life a little bit easier.”

Liz Jackson’s husband, Martin, has been steadfast in his support.

“While going through the disease I fell in love with Martin all over again”


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Cathy Freeman and her mum, Cecelia, who showed her the lifechanging letter on SBS’s Who Do You Think You Are? (below).

“Finding out what happened to my parents changed me forever”

PHOTOGRAPHED BY NEWSPIX; COURTESY OF LIZ JACKSON. AS TOLD TO ALEXANDRA CARLTON

CATHY FREEMAN, FORMER ATHLETE In 2008, the Olympic sprinter and gold medallist, now 43, featured on the SBS show Who Do You Think You Are? As the cameras rolled, Cathy’s mother, Cecelia, showed her daughter a letter she’d received from local white authorities in the 1960s, refusing to let her and Cathy’s father, Norman, travel to visit relatives five hours away from where they lived in Queensland. Under legislation at the time, government officials were given enormous control over the lives of Indigenous people, including travel restrictions (this power was fully repealed by the late ’70s). Although it was just one story of injustice among thousands, discovering her parents’ plight changed the way Cathy saw her background and gave her a new voice.

T

“Afterwards, I thought about it and so many things started to make sense. I understood why people in my family had always carried this feeling of oppression and why some people had these self-defeating attitudes. This is the sort of thing that they’d felt from their parents because this is how their parents had been treated. “It was so recent – I’m a ’73 baby and this was happening only 10 years before. You don’t really know the details when you’re growing up but you can feel something with your parents. “If I’d known this story earlier it would have made me run so much faster. Train harder. When I ran I was already running because of some broad feeling about my Aboriginality, but this would have made me go even harder. Powered me. My time in the 400m in Atlanta was the sixth fastest [of all time] but this would have made me faster. “Now I want to take this story and share it through [social justice law firm] Maurice Blackburn’s ‘Your Right Is My Right’ campaign. Then others might have the courage to share their stories, and together we may all fight for a fair and just society. Through the recounting of a personal experience, we are able to connect on a deeper level and allow people to see with new eyes. My husband and I want to make sure our five-year-old daughter, Ruby, knows about what happened to my family years ago. That she knows stories of her Aboriginality. She already has a strong sense of it, and I want her to grow up and be motivated to stand up for the rights of others as much as her own.”

“If I’d known this story earlier it would have powered me to run so much faster”

he letter was from the local Director of Native Affairs and Superintendent near where my parents lived. It began with my mother and father saying they’d be ‘most grateful if you’d give your approval for us to spend Christmas with family in Woorabinda’. Then came the reply: ‘Your application has been refused.’ This was the type of injustice they faced. On Who Do You Think You Are? you see my real-time reaction. It was shock and anger. I couldn’t believe Aboriginal people were treated this way. “My mum still finds it very hard to talk about the situation. On the show she said, ‘I felt sad. I just wanted to see my mum and dad and brothers and sisters.’ And I said, ‘This is absolutely disgusting.’

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a  e Interview

From star-obsessed teenager to Oscar nominee, Emma Stone has fulfilled her dream of success in Hollywood. Here, she tells Elaine Lipworth how she finally found her voice in her new film, La La Land

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very teenager goes through an “I want to be a Hollywood star” stage. Most parents wait for them to grow out of it. When Emma Stone was 15, however, her parents let her chase the dream. The 28-year-old actress, luminous on this sunny morning with her trademark red hair dyed closer to its natural blonde colour and pulled into an intricate plaited bun, is passionately explaining how she was “absolutely obsessed” with acting as a child, to the point that her parents knew she was for real. “They could tell I was serious, because I kept doing all these plays and acting was my favourite thing in the world. It still is,” laughs Stone. “I would punish my child if they told me they were leaving home. I would not be like, ‘Let’s go!’ I’d be like, ‘Let’s finish high school!’” It’s a backstory that echoes the plot of her latest film, the Oscar-buzzy La La Land, where she plays Mia, an aspiring small-town actress with big dreams to make it in LA. When we first meet her, Mia is locking eyes with Sebastian – a brilliant but broke jazz pianist – on a gridlocked freeway, played by the man everyone would want to meet when stuck in LA traffic: Ryan Gosling. There’s nothing original about the plot – two dreamers take an instant dislike to each other and after a series of false starts, fall madly in love, before hitting problems. But La La Land is exhilarating, a contemporary love story infused with old-fashioned cinematic magic. There are predictions that the movie, from the prodigiously talented 31-year-old filmmaker Damien Chazelle (Whiplash), will herald a return to Hollywood’s musical heyday. “Emma’s got this thing that feels timeless and reminds me of Carole Lombard or Katharine Hepburn; great, old-Hollywood actresses who were witty, sassy and accessible, but also had this marieclaire.com.au

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other-worldly magic that kept them floating a little bit over the air,” says Chazelle. Today, the actress is sparkling with a bit of that very magic, her emerald-patterned butterfly-skull print Alexander McQueen dress accentuating her green saucer eyes. It’s a face that’s immediately so familiar, first coming to our attention in the charming teen flick Easy A (2010) and then dramas such as the 2011 hit The Help. One of Woody Allen’s muses, she appeared in his films, Magic In The Moonlight (2014), and Irrational Man (2015). And she shone in the comic book blockbuster The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (2012) playing Gwen Stacy, opposite Andrew Garfield, her former boyfriend. Currently single, she won’t discuss her love life, although she says her ex is “someone I still love very much”. Romance is the only subject off-limits during our interview. Stone is more than happy talking about her other meaningful relationships, specifically her family. Evidence of her strong family bond is a tattoo on her wrist of “little bird feet” designed by former Beatle Paul McCartney as a gift for her mother, Krista, to celebrate her remission from breast cancer. Stone initially met McCartney, who she describes as “an incredibly kind and cool person,” when she became involved with the charity, Stand Up To Cancer, in 2008. “My mum is a huge Beatles fan, her favourite song is “Blackbird”. Paul drew the feet on paper and then a tattoo artist did the tattoos,” she explains. “My whole family got them, so it was really special.” Krista also helped shape her daughter’s early passion for musical theatre. Growing up in Scottsdale, Arizona, Emily Jean Stone (she changed her name when she started performing professionally) loved nothing more than a mother-daughter trip to New York to see a Broadway show. “I saw Les Mis on Broadway when I was eight. I saw Rent a billion times – I was obsessed. Oh man,” sighs Stone, eyes widening as she reflects on the experiences that shaped her. So west they went, chasing the LA dream. She was homeschooled and credits her “very supportive” parents for providing stability in the midst of an unstable existence, flying between LA and Arizona. “My mum had a cool philosophy that she called ‘reins out’ which meant: ‘I totally trust that you will make good decisions and the only reason that I would pull the reins in, is if you don’t do that,’ ” explains Stone. Ostensibly, it seems that Stone’s career trajectory has been a breeze, but she says it wasn’t that simple. “I auditioned for three years, just getting a couple of guest parts on TV shows.” When she wasn’t driving herself to auditions in her red Volkswagen Beetle, Stone worked behind the counter in a dog bakery – yes, a bakery selling 68

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dog treats – to supplement her meagre acting roles (to this day she loves baking … for humans). Krista must be incredibly proud of her daughter, who is simply mesmerising in La La Land. “The idea of telling this modern story of two struggling artists, but in a 1950s-style musical version of today’s Los Angeles, was intoxicating,” says Stone, in her deep, smoky voice. “We fly, we sing, we dance and it’s beautiful, with scenes that are funny and some that are heartbreaking.” Yet filming La La Land wasn’t without its challenges for the actor, who suffered stage fright as a teenager. “I always had a fear of singing because I would lose my voice a lot,” she admits. Her concerns evaporated when Chazelle told her he “loved it when there was a misstep or something was off-key, he didn’t mind if we were a little raw and rough around the edges”. The connection between Stone and Gosling, who previously generated potent chemistry in Crazy Stupid Love (2011) and Gangster Squad (2013), is paramount in the film. “There is something very poignant about Ryan and Emma,” says Chazelle. “Like the stars of old Hollywood, you’re rooting for them to get together, then when things start not going so well, there’s a sense of loss.” For her part, Stone says it was “wonderful” to be reunited with Gosling. “We respect each other, we rag on each other, we laugh and we get each other as actors. Wait until you see him play piano – he’s unbelievable!” Next up, Stone plays the US tennis legend Billy Jean King opposite Steve Carell in Battle Of The Sexes. It depicts the historic 1973 match in which King, 29 at the time, easily defeated her 55-year-old Emma Stone is reunited with Ryan opponent, retired Wimbledon Gosling in the comedy/ champion Bobby Riggs, fuelling musical La La Land. a global debate on gender equality. “Getting to know Billie Jean [now 73] was fantastic,” says Stone. “It was a privilege to tell her story because she is so inspiring. She was driven from age 12 to become the best tennis player in the world and she made it happen.” Similarly, I suggest, Stone has carved out her own destiny with great success. She disagrees. “You can measure tennis, you can see who wins the game. With a sport, you can prepare and then you either have the talent to execute it or not. With acting it’s more subjective, it’s more a matter of taste. I do know I’ve been lucky to tell stories I feel passionate about.”

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“Ryan and I respect each other, we rag on each other, we laugh and we get each other as actors. Wait until you see him play piano – he’s unbelievable”


Interview One of the central themes in Battle Of The Sexes is equal pay. It relates how King and eight other pioneering women, including Australians Kerry Melville Reid and Judy Tegart Dalton, controversially broke away from the US Lawn Tennis Association in 1970, creating their own organisation due to the huge disparity in prize money paid to male and female players. “Now, 47 years on, we are still having the conversation,” says Stone, incredulously. “Women everywhere are still not paid the same as men, but it’s clear-cut: a woman doing the same job as a man should be paid the same.” Stone applauds her friend Jennifer Lawrence’s 2015 attack on film studios for paying women less than their male counterparts. “I don’t think Jennifer was just talking about Hollywood, she was talking about the world at large,” explains Stone, noting that in Hollywood, the whole issue is more complicated because fees are related to box office. “Jennifer’s much more well-versed in that than I am because she has studied all of it. But I have been fortunate, I have been paid equally to my male co-stars for quite a while now and that just makes sense,” says Stone, whose net worth is reportedly around $10 million a year. The actor admits there’s been an embarrassment of riches in terms of the roles she’s played. “I am a bit spoilt right now, it’s been incredible. Like Billie Jean King, Mia in La La Land takes charge of her life, she does her own thing – she’s a one-woman show and she busts out into a world of her own creativity.” Stone is aware that with her current clout, she’s in a powerful position to advocate for change. “It lights a fire under your ass in the sense that it’s important, our voice needs to be heard,” she says. “You want to be able to articulate the kind of roles you want to see, especially if you are in a position where you can make suggestions.”

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“Women are still not paid the same as men, but it’s clear-cut: a woman doing the same job as a man should be paid the same” Reflective, Stone is also intent on balancing her life away from the film set. She values her close friendships with women. Along with Jennifer Lawrence, her “small group” includes last year’s Oscar winner for Room, Brie Larson. “I have very good friends who I trust so much, a few are in the public eye, who have similar jobs to me, but that is not what we talk about. We stay at home, cooking, watching movies or TV.” At the top of her game professionally, perhaps because she’s achieved so much so young, her current goals don’t concern her brilliant career at all. “Now it is all about having a really comfortable house where my friends can come and spend time … and I would definitely love to have a family. I think my dreams have changed a bit. I’ve come down to earth.” marieclaaire.com.au marieclaire.com.au

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BEHIND The men

the masks

Most are heterosexual men who want to explore their female side, some are gay or transsexual. But they all have one thing in common: the desire to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;a little bit bizarreâ&#x20AC;?, living their lives whenever possible behind latex. Welcome to the intriguing world of Maskers 70

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REAL-LIFE FANTASY

Society

CORINNA KERN

Left: Bear Girl’s passion for masking is a way of living a deeper part of herself as well as looking “beautiful”. Below: Katrina (on left) and Bear Girl stop to take a rest. Temperatures in the latex suits can quickly reach 25˚C-plus.

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Katrina struggles to get out of her car in her full latex bodysuit.

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Meet the Maskers, thousands The degree of masking depends on of mostly heterosexual men and malethe man. Bear Girl prefers to wear a to-female transsexuals, who first latex face mask and torso complete began experimenting with their latex with full breasts along with her regular disguises in Europe in the 1980s. In the clothes, while true latex fetishists, such as Christian, go head-to-toe with early years, Maskers almost exclusively complete bodysuits. Maskers say they practised their fetish in the intimacy of enjoy the sensation of “being a little their homes or in private clubs. But in bizarre”, and some are so devoted to the the past 20 years, the phenomenon has practice that they potentially risk their exploded in popularity thanks to jobs or the support of their families by online. Maskers now connect with each allowing their latex fantasy to trickle other in character on countless into the real world. websites, sharing their Experimenting stories and the with femininity is one photography that thing, but on a purely forms a critical part of the experience. practical level, it’s difficult to imagine In 2014, Sydneyborn, New Yorkwhy anyone would based filmmakers Nick want to make – Nick Sweeney, filmmaker Sweeney and Luke themselves a prisoner Malone produced The of latex armour. Secrets Of The Living Inching into a full Dolls, a documentary that delved into latex bodysuit isn’t easy. It sucks and the masking world. In an interview in constricts the skin and the wearer has Oyster magazine, Sweeney said he was to pull and adjust it like they’re surprised by the level of normalcy in squeezing into rigid stockings. Once their lives. “We were expecting the dolls inside, movement is restricted and can to live extraordinary lives in and be very sweaty, particularly when outside of the suits and masks,’’ he said. temperatures reach 25°C or hotter. “But they lead pretty normal, everyday Many masks only provide two thin lives – most of them have large families slits for eyes making driving almost with lots of kids, they work regular impossible, so Maskers hunt for jobs, go to church, all of that. The discreet parking spots close to their opposite of what you’d expect when you destination before slipping their masks see them cavorting around as dolls.’’ over their heads like a T-shirt. At times,

“They lead normal lives – most have lots of kids and work regular jobs”

CORINNA KERN

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ear Girl paints her heavy lips a bright red, her blonde curls falling gracefully down her back. Around her neck, she wears a silk scarf. Her appearance will soon be one of blank, featureless perfection. But Bear Girl’s lipstick isn’t painted onto her skin, it’s dabbed onto latex. Her curls are a wig while the scarf is more than just an accessory – its main purpose is to hide the base of the mask that’s pulled over her head. Bear was born a male, but identifies as a transsexual woman and she’s getting ready to go out. She wears her mask and costumes at least once a week, transforming herself into “Princess Leyla”, an activity she finds relaxing and a way of relieving stress. Christian is a straight man, who works in a well-known German company, though he won’t reveal more than that. He’s also one of the most prominent members of the German “masking” community. For him, masking has become a lifestyle. He helps younger people create their alter egos and navigate this strange world, where people transform themselves into living dolls. He loves dressing up for photo shoots and gets sexually excited when he puts his “female beauty” on display under the guise of his alter ego, Chrissie Seams.


Society

Above left and left: Katrina often goes out as a “rubber doll” to interact with members of the public. Above: a driver calls out to Christian, aka Chrissie Seams, and Mina while they go for a walk in Augsburg, Germany.

wearers feel so exhausted by the heat and discomfort that they remove their mask and carry it by hand, and getting through crowds is particularly uncomfortable as they battle restricted vision, movement and air supply. Latex garments have to be carefully rinsed and dried after every wearing and baby powder is applied on both sides before it is carefully folded into clean towels. But Maskers are happy to put up with all these inconveniences for the thrill of hiding their true selves behind the smooth, expressionless disguise. It seems to act as a sort of protection, a concealment of the true self. Katrina, a male-to-female transsexual, says she feels “courageous” in latex and that she likes feeling powerful and provocative when she goes out in public in full plastic. “What fascinates me,” she says, “is the anonymity. You’re encapsulated, like in a cocoon, and no one can see if you laugh or cry. That’s what I like. The feeling of being unknown.” Christian loves being swallowed by the latex as well: “I love the physical sensation I experience throughout my entire body when wearing latex. Latex is what drives me. I wonder if my alter ego, Chrissie, would even exist if it weren’t for my passion for latex.” Bear Girl’s obsession with masking was triggered by her fantasy of becoming a beautiful woman, despite the physical restrictions of being born marieclaire.com.au

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Society

“I am not a top model and I don’t have an ideal physique, but I can create an illusion that’s almost perfect” – Bear Girl

male. “I am not a top model and I don’t have an ideal physique, but I can create an illusion that’s almost perfect,” she says. “It’s my only passion. It is a way of living out a deeper part of myself.” Others say their fascination comes from childhood experiments. For Katrina it was in the kitchen. “My fetish started when I was wearing household gloves. I 74

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was 11 and being inside those gloves was a phenomenal feeling. After that, I regularly bought new ones, the very tight ones. At that age, I liked masks but I had no money to buy them. Sometimes, I secretly used my mother’s tights. Maybe I wanted to hide. Maybe I felt that I was not in the right body. The idea that the ‘real me’ was not there fascinated me. This is how I built my own small world.” Germany had a liberal and experimental sex scene between the two World Wars: the word “transvestite” was coined by German physician Magnus Hirschfeld and the first gender reassignment surgery was performed in Berlin after WWI – until it was banned by the Nazis. Yet today, Germany has retained a tolerance to practices that might seem fringe elsewhere. In fact, the government

recently allowed male and female prisoners to dress as men or women, whatever sex they were born with. While masking goes beyond gender play and speaks to something darker, there is an incorrect assumption that it’s linked to extreme sexual practices. (If you Google “maskers + sexuality” you’re directed towards links that take you to “bondage” and “hot female masking”.) “But the practice is not always sexually motivated,” says Luke Malone. “The assumptions that it’s a sex thing, or that all Maskers are gay, are wrong. For some, it’s just about fun, for others, it’s the pursuit of beauty and identity.” But sex comes into it, whether it’s heterosexual men like Christian with his girlfriends, or gay and transgender people having occasional sexual encounters. In the main room of fetish clubs in Christian’s town, people drink and dance, but the back room, which he calls the “play area”, is open for sex, as in many straight or gay clubs. Maskers are humans after all. You may just need to dig a little deeper to find them.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY CORINNA KERN. TEXT BY KATIE BREEN AND CORINNA KERN

Bear Girl in the kitchen of her Munich home. Below left: Chrissie Seams goes out for a walk in public – many maskers would like to do the same thing but aren’t brave enough.


Q&A

frankly SPE A K I NG

with

Michael Kors He’s the New York designer who’s turned an all-American aesthetic into a global business. The dresser to the stars, 57, sits down with Jackie Frank to talk about his life in style

MINI MOGUL When did your interest in fashion first start? You’ve got a wonderful story about your mother, who was a model, getting remarried when you were five years old … JACKIE FRANK:

MICHAEL KORS: For her first marriage, she had eloped and so there was no big bridal gown. For the second, it was going to be a big wedding. My mother ordered a gown from Priscilla of Boston, which was the bridal label at the time, and brought my grandmother and me to her fitting. As soon as she put the gown on my grandmother’s face lit up and she said, “It’s perfect! You’re a fairy princess. It’s fantastic.” I sat in

the corner grimacing and my mum looked at me and said, “What’s wrong?” The dress had zillions of satin bows all over and I said, “The bows are terrible.” JF:

At five?

At five. And my grandmother said, “Oh, he’s five – you know what you are doing.” And my mother said, “Maybe we should clip a few off and we’ll see what it looks like.” They clipped an area of the dress and my mother looked in the mirror and said, “He’s right.” And they clipped the rest of them off. I think I realised I had the power to get women to listen. And I was also surrounded by very opinionated women: my mum, my grandmother, all of my aunts, my cousins. The women I knew never agreed about fashion choices. My grandmother loved lots of

MK:

“You need to find your ethos, your attitude. You should focus on that and forget the bad”

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jewellery, lots of make-up, lots of colour, pattern, print. She wore wigs and travelled with lots of suitcases, whereas my mum was very sporty and very pared down. You went on to open several stores, but tell me about your very first one.

JF:

Oh gosh. I think I was 10, going on 11, and I was very hippie crafty; I did batik and tie-dyes and I made candles and jewellery but I really didn’t know what to do with them all. Then I thought maybe I could open a fabulous little boutique in the basement of our suburban house. I sold everything in about three days and I was out of business. I made some money, but it was then that I realised I was entrepreneurial. Now, I’m going to give you an exclusive, a big exclusive! When I went to summer camp, all of our clothes would come back from the laundry and they just looked terrible and, of course, we were in the middle of the woods.

MK:


Clockwise from right: launching the autumn/winter 1990/91 collection with Christy Turlington and Linda Evangelista; he has just opened a new flagship store in Singapore, the brand’s largest in Southeast Asia; with Kendall Jenner and Joan Smalls at New York Fashion Week in September; with Jennifer Lopez in 2013. Below: a selection from his spring/summer 2017 collection.

HIS “SPORTY LIONESSES”

Lauren Hutton

Jackie Onassis

JF:

How old were you?

and completely revived it.

Oh young. Eleven, What were the big lessons Ali MacGraw you learnt there? probably. I thought there’s MK: Well, as a New Yorker, I no dry-cleaner, no French think New Yorkers can be laundry [a laundry that too practical, very pragmatic about does delicates like linen and lace] everything. I got to Paris and suddenly where you can have your shirts done looked around – maybe my fantasy nicely. So I decided to start one with was that French women would be this other boy. We’d get the shirts powdered, perfumed, dressed up, I almost dry but still damp, then fold don’t know, with scarves. Once I was them. Then we took two planks of there, I realised that most of the women wood and smashed them together to were dressed in a very relaxed way, very make a press, so it looked like it came laid-back, but at the same time they from a French laundry. We did handappreciated their indulgence in life, in done French laundry shirts for anyone fashion. They would buy a white winter who wanted the service and I made a coat and not think it was impractical. nice piece of money over the summer. JF: Wow. Talk about finding a gap in the They’d fall in love with the extravagance market … Now, in the ’90s you were part of it. Whereas women in New York of the wave of Americans who landed would say, “Oh, no, I can’t.” So I think I

GORUNWAY/SNAPPER MEDIA; AUSTRALSCOPE; GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF MICHAEL KORS

MK:

jobs at French fashion houses. As well as doing your own line back home, you went to work for Céline doing ready-to-wear

Right: a love for fashion, and a talent for it, started at a very young age. Far right: Michael grew up surrounded by very opinonated women such as his mother, an ex-model.

learnt about indulgence and how to temper it. I certainly learnt about the power of accessories. For the first time, I was dealing with a truly global brand where accessories were the only thing that cut through climate, nationality and age. So I saw how potent they could be. Prior to that, my idea of global was Toronto and London. I wasn’t thinking about Australia or Singapore or anywhere else, so it opened my eyes.

ALL AMERICAN Tell me about some of the style icons who have inspired you over the years; the women you call “sporty lionesses”. Who are they?

JF:

[Former model] Lauren Hutton, certainly, [actor] Ali MacGraw – always a little bit of both of them. There’s always going to be some Jackie [Onassis]. I loved me some Jackie at every point in her life.

MK:

You’ve got a wonderful story about Jackie from when you were young.

JF:

Oh, I almost fainted! She came into a high-end shop I was working at when I was 18. As soon as she walked into

MK:

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Q&A

STYLE GURU

Clockwise from right: Kate Hudson wears a Kors creation; preparing for his spring/summer 1991 show; Joan Kors cheers on her son, who helped design her wedding dress when he was five (below); Cindy Crawford on the catwalk with Kors in 1990.

What in particular do you love about those style icons?

JF:

When I think about women like Jackie and Ali MacGraw and Lauren Hutton, and I take it to modern times and think of people who look great on the go – whether it’s Kate Moss, Kendall or Gigi – they all have this effortlessness about how they put themselves together that I find very intriguing. I’m never one for lacquered and perfect. When I can tell someone’s spent too much time, it’s a bit of a turn-off. Even if in reality it took three hours to get ready and look effortless, I don’t want to know.

MK:

BIG BUSINESS You’re very much part of America’s celebrity circle, with so many famous connections – Angelina Jolie, Julianne Moore, Halle Berry, the list goes on. Do you socialise with them or do you keep it strictly professional?

JF:

MK: It’s what I call “professionally social”. JF:

Ha! What does that mean?

Am I going to say, “Hey, do you want to come over and hang out in your underwear and have a pint of ice cream with me?” No, the odds are very slim, but when I see them, is it a laugh? Do we have a good time? Is it silly? Yes. Even if you’re walking a red carpet with someone, the minute you get off the carpet do you both laugh about it? Is it fun? Yes. Most of the celebrities I know are upbeat and excited about what they do, they have an optimistic outlook. I’m the same. MK:

“When I can tell someone’s spent too much time getting ready, it’s a bit of a turn-off ”

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You are also a fashion billionaire, thriving when others have crashed. What’s been the biggest challenge?

JF:

MK:

People – fashion people, not real

people – can look at things that are wearable and accessible and scoff at them and say, “That’s so commercial. He’s so commercial.” Well, I think commercial means that people want to wear it, want to use it, want to live with it. So it’s a great compliment and I have never caved in and said, “OK, let’s make a jacket with three sleeves, let’s make a handbag so heavy you can’t lift it, let’s make a shoe that you can’t even walk or sit in.” And at the end of the day the customer votes. What have you found makes women feel most confident about themselves?

JF:

I have to say that every woman, even if she’s a supermodel, has something that she doesn’t love and everyone, even if they beat themselves up, has something that they like. In today’s world we all have too many pictures of ourselves, but you can literally look at your phone and say, “Wait a minute, every time I show my legs I feel good about myself, or every time I show my shoulders, or every time I wear red, or every time I wear white or gold, or when I put on a floral I feel happy.” You need to find your ethos, your attitude. You should focus on that and forget about the bad.

MK:

AUSTRALSCOPE; GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF MICHAEL KORS

the store, all the other sales assistants ran away, they were so afraid. So I walked over and I pretended to be composed – I wasn’t. She was looking for jeans for herself and for [daughter] Caroline and I figured that it was best if I took her into a private office, so she didn’t have to use the regular changing room. I went into the room a few minutes later to see how she was doing and she couldn’t get her boots off – they were stuck – and I said, “Do you need any help?” And she said, “That would be wonderful.” I pulled the boots off!


FA N TA S I E L I N G E R I E . C O M

FANTASIE LINGERIE IS PART OF THE

GROUP.


world wrap MUTUAL TRUST

Above: Kerry Gibbs and Jake are success stories. Far left: Canine CellMates’s Larry hands over Fletcher to his new owner.

THE US

MAN’S BEST FRIEND

An inspirational program in Atlanta, Georgia, may be the answer to America’s prison rehabilitation crisis America is in the midst of a recidivism dilemma, with research suggesting that 68 per cent of prisoners will be re-arrested within three years of release. But one woman thinks she has the solution: pairing inmates with rescue dogs who would otherwise be put down. The program is called Canine CellMates, and was founded three years ago by Susan Jacobs-Meadows in the Fulton County Jail in Atlanta, Georgia. Men are recommended for the program by prison officials and are schooled by volunteers in how to communicate and train their assigned pooch. After that, the pair live together for eight weeks, attend training workshops and the

MC FACT 80

men help present the rescue dogs to prospective pet adopters. At the end of the eight-week cycle, both the inmates and their canine companions “graduate” from the program. “Our goal is that all the dogs are adopted by the time they graduate, and then their adopters get to come to [the ceremony],” says Jacobs-Meadows. “They get to meet the men who trained their dogs. It’s a very meaningful and powerful experience for everybody who comes to it.” Of the 160 inmates who have taken part in the program, only 15 men have been re-arrested since their release that Canine CellMates knows of. And it’s all down to the empowering nature of man’s best friend.

Within five years of release, about three quarters, or

marieclaire.com.au

“Dogs have this innate ability to look inside people, find the good that exists in there, and then help that person to believe it themselves,” says Jacobs-Meadows. “And that’s when change starts to happen. That’s when that person starts to believe that there is something good about them.”

Dogs and inmates learn from each other with the help of volunteers at Fulton County Jail (above left). Kimmie enjoys all the attention (above).

76%, of freed prisoners in the US had been re-arrested.*


IRAN

A STAR IS BORN Golshifteh Farahani was exiled from her home country for being too provocative. Now the actress fights for freedom through film

PHOTOGRAPHED BY KELLY KLINE; GETTY IMAGES; DARREN TIESTE. TEXT BY HELEN BARLOW; HANNAH-ROSE YEE. *NIJ. GOV/TOPICS/CORRECTIONS/RECIDIVISM/PAGES/WELCOME.ASPX. †GLOBALSLAVERYINDEX.ORG/COUNTRY/CAMBODIA

In a world where celebrities can be a tad dull, Iranian actress Golshifteh Farahani stands out. She’s a defiant woman, who shaved her head as a 16-year-old so she could pass as a boy on the streets of Tehran, spoke out about her restrictive home country (“I wasn’t what Iranian society wanted me to be: a good girl,” she has said), and appeared nude in a French magazine. The only problem is Farahani’s nationality. The actress was a big star in Iran until she was banned from further film work for not wearing a headscarf at the premiere of Body Of Lies (starring Leonardo DiCaprio). She fled to France, where she has lived on and off for the past eight years. But once she appeared nude in that magazine she knew she could never return to her homeland. Does she regret the nudity? “I never regret anything, because it was

good at the time,” says the 33-year-old actress. “When I look back at all the horrific things that happened to me, from the exile to the interrogations to the difficulties of embracing another culture, I realise it was all for the good.” Her country factors in her new film, indie auteur Jim Jarmusch’s Paterson. A hit at the recent Cannes and Toronto film festivals, Farahani plays Laura, the wife of Adam Driver’s poetic bus driver protagonist. “My character is making cupcakes and painting curtains – turning being a housewife into art,” says Farahani. “On some of the curtains there is Persian poetry, which I wrote with bleach. And you have photos of my grandparents and photos of me and my brother in the scene. When I first saw the movie I was so moved that we brought a piece of Iran into Jim Jarmusch’s film.” Paterson is in cinemas now.

CAMBODIA

ON THE GROUND Actress Danielle Cormack has traded film sets for a charitable mission in South-East Asia to help underprivileged children

MC FACT

Cambodia is ranked

Golshifteh Farahani as Laura in new movie Paterson.

Since heading to Cambodia earlier this year, Danielle Cormack has been swamped with requests for travel tips and advice. Unfortunately, she doesn’t have that many to give. “I went off the beaten track,” laughs Cormack. “It was not your tourist Cambodia.” As an ambassador for global charity ChildFund, the Wentworth star was on the ground to witness the work the organisation does, overseeing child-specific literacy, sanitation and health projects. While there, Cormack was able to help distribute some of the Gifts for Good products, such as bikes and reading

lamps, donated by Australians to children in the impoverished nation. The actress, 46, has been a ChildFund ambassador for more than eight years. She’s very passionate about child sponsorship, sponsoring two herself. “Your money is not just going to that child, it’s going to a whole community,” she explains. “I’m a mother to a sixyear-old,” adds Cormack. “And every morning I get him off to school, pack his lunch, take him to tennis or swimming … Some families don’t have that privilege. I believe that every child should have those opportunities.”

3 out of 167 countries on the Global Slavery Index, behind North Korea and Uzbekistan.† marieclaire.com.au

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BEHIND THE FACADE

World wrap

Below: protesters at an LGBT parade in Hong Kong in 2015. Elsie Liao and Mayu Yu were turned away from the registry office in Beijing in 2013.

CHINA

THE MARRIAGE PLOT

China’s LGBT communities are turning to fake weddings in order to protect their sexualities In a country where homosexuality was illegal just 20 years ago, gay men and women have found a unique way to stay in the closet: fake marriages. Out of an estimated 20 million gay men in the country, as many as 80 per cent are in fake marriages. Most gay men marry straight women, but a new option is gaining popularity. Instead of finding a straight spouse, lesbian women and gay men are marrying each other. Supporters of what are referred to as “cooperative marriages” say this option avoids putting straight people into potentially painful situations, and allows gay people more freedom. The earliest known Chinese personals ad from a gay man seeking a lesbian wife appeared in a newsletter in 1995. Today, the internet helps the LGBT community form cooperative partnerships.

MC FACT 82

Only

One such forum is run by Xiao Xiong, a lanky self-described tomboy from Dongbei in north-east China. Xiao, who organises a support group for LGBT people in her area at discreet locations, like suburban McDonald’s restaurants, “knew all her life” that she only liked women, but still assumed that someday she would marry a man. “When I turned 25, eight years ago, my parents started to really pressure me to get married. So I looked on the internet for help. My search for ‘lesbian

FACT

Most cooperative marriage partners do not live with each @E96C2ñ6CE96 wedding

needs fake husband’ was how I ended up finding both my fake gay husband and my real girlfriend,” says Xiao with a grin. “I was so relieved that there was a way to please my parents without getting trapped in a marriage with some poor straight man.” But it wasn’t easy to find the right fake husband. Xiao spoke to men who wanted her to grow out her buzz cut or move to a different city to live in the same house as her fake in-laws. So she decided to start her own forum to help herself and others look for suitable partners. On her site participants describe their expectations and needs. It also provides anonymous chat functions to explore possibilities before arranging to meet a potential fake spouse in person. The forum has led to at least 60 matches in the eight years it’s been running – and inspired

similar sites in cities like Shanghai and Guangzhou. Xiao found her “husband”, a high-school maths teacher 10 years her senior. They married in the autumn of 2012, and have become good friends. They live separately, with Xiao sharing a home with her girlfriend Jing Jing, a medical practitioner who has her own fake gay husband. Their story is typical – surveys show most cooperative marriage

21% of China believed in accepting homosexuality, according to a Pew Research Center study.*

marieclaire.com.au


MA

E

MAD G A DI FFE RE

NC

E PHOTOGRAPHED BY GETTY IMAGES; JIMMY POZARIK. TEXT BY HANNAH-ROSE YEE; JOANNA CHIU. *EDITION.CNN.COM/2014/11/26/WORLD/ASIA/CHINA-RAINBOW-FLAG

NC

KIN

partners do not live with each other. Some maintain an apartment that they use to host visiting family or leave their belongings in each other’s apartments to make it appear as if they are cohabiting. During holidays and other special occasions, Xiao and Jing separate to spend time with their respective parents and husbands’ families. But it’s a small price to pay, spending some days pretending to be a dutiful wife, when that allows them to be together the rest of the year. But China’s first openly gay lawyer, Shanghai-based Zhou Dan, counsels caution. “Some think that because the marriage is fake they won’t have any problems. But it can become very messy if down the line the couple disagrees on issues such as shared property or whether or not to have children.” At one of Xiao’s gatherings, they all agreed that change would be slow to come to China. “The US Supreme Court’s decision to support same-sex marriage is really inspiring, but I don’t think China will follow suit anytime soon,” said a petite 27-year-old who is married to a gay man in his 30s. “LGBT people don’t have many good options, so I think just choosing what makes us happiest is already a revolutionary beginning.”

G A DI FFE RE

MA

Matt Pearce (left) and Adrian Smith (right) wore wedding dresses as a protest during a Hong Kong marathon.

KIN

NOT JUST SKIN DEEP This charity uses beauty therapy to help restore the self-esteem of cancer patients Step into a Look Good, Feel Better workshop and you’ll find a room full of women sharing their beauty secrets. They’ll be showing each other how to tie a turban, they might be trying out different scarves and wigs, they might be comparing their make-up kits and using a new brow shaper to pencil in their eyebrows. There’s a spirit of camaraderie in the room. All of the women in these workshops are cancer patients. And Look Good, Feel Better provides them with beauty treatment workshops to help them regain their selfesteem after debilitating chemotherapy. “Self-esteem is the first thing you lose when you are diagnosed,” explains Julie Carriol, the charity’s Australian founder. Herself a breast cancer survivor, Carriol first experienced Look Good, Feel Better’s work when she attended a workshop after her diagnosis in New York.

“It was the most amazing experience,” she recalls, describing the transformation of attendees from apprehensive, dejected patients into confident women. In 1990, when she returned to Sydney, she petitioned the board members of hospitals and cosmetics companies to set up a local arm of the charity. Today, some 180 venues are involved, with 125,000 cancer patients taking part. Patients receive a bag of cosmetics and skincare called a Confidence Kit donated by some of the biggest brands (think Revlon, Estée Lauder and L‘Oréal). Volunteers give tutorials in how to apply make-up tailored for cancer patients. After that, it’s “playtime”, as Carriol puts it. “They look in the mirror and they see a different person. And that’s the whole point: to give them back their sense of self.” To find out more information, head to lgfb.org.au.

Left: Jan Caitlin-Auld shows patient Rowena how to use a headscarf. Above: cancer patient Margaret before and after a Look Good, Feel Better workshop.

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play

EDITED BY HANNAH-ROSE YEE

GIRL OF THE MOMENT

In this month’s M. Night Shyamalan thriller cinema has found its new scream queen Anya Taylor-Joy likes to joke about it, but it’s true: she really did go to the Sundance Film Festival and never came home. It was there, in 2015, that her first film – an eerie, unsettling Salemera period piece called The Witch – premiered to rapturous acclaim. Since then the 20-year-old has filled her résumé with movies that go bump in the night; from sci-fi thriller Morgan to this month’s Split, an M. Night Shyamalan number (he of The Sixth Sense) in which she stars alongside a terrifying James McAvoy. The role is sure to cement her as cinema’s new scream queen (of the Jamie Lee Curtis and Janet Leigh variety). “Madness,” says Taylor-Joy, when trying to sum up the past two years. “I can’t believe that I’m on this adventure.” Born in Miami, Florida, and raised in London, Taylor-Joy got her first taste of showbiz as a model, scouted by Sarah Doukas, the woman who discovered Kate Moss and Cara Delevingne. This year, she hints, will be her biggest yet, with a new project she “can’t really say anything about, but I’m pretty pumped”. Before that there’s the premiere of Split at Los Angeles’s Chinese Theatre. “That was the first place I ever went on holiday in LA. And now my film will be screening there,” she says. “That’s been the biggest pinch-me moment so far.”

WATCH IT!

Split is in cinemas on January 26.


@Play arie #m c

oo esb ks

e lair lov

YOUR SUMMER BOOK SHELF … SORTED

Beach season brings with it the best books: breezy reads, gripping thrillers and epic novels. Pack one of our 10 picks in your bag THE WANGS VS THE WORLD by Jade Chang

THE RIVER AT NIGHT by Erica Ferencik

Penguin, $32.99

This adrenalin-pumping page-turner has no fight sequences, guns or twodimensional ex-military heroes … Just four BFFs on a white-water-rafting holiday gone horribly, fatally wrong. Out January 1

When patriarch Charles Wang loses the fortune he’s slowly built up since emigrating from China, he packs his family into a car and drives from California to New York. Road trips always make for hilarious, side-splitting tales, and this debut novel will definitely have you laughing out loud. Out January 3 HOLD BACK THE STARS by Katie Khan Doubleday, $32.99

Gravity meets One Day – yes really – in this futuristic romance, told in reverse as a set of star-crossed lovers plummet through space with only 90 minutes of oxygen. Debut author (and Paramount Pictures exec) Khan has skilfully fleshed out her novel’s dystopian future. Out January 30

LEE BROOMFIELD; PHILIP LE MASURIER

THE HOUSE AT BISHOPSGATE by Katie Hickman Bloomsbury, $27.99

This historical melodrama has all the right elements: masterful descriptions of Renaissance England, a raunchy affair and an epic plot (Colonialism! The Orient! A legendary diamond!) Out February 1

Bloomsbury, $24.99

MISS TREADWAY EADWAY & THE FIELD LD OF STARS by Miranda da Emmerson

dead loved ones. It’s strange, suspenseful and surprisingly sexy. Out February 8 THE GIRL BEFORE by JP Delaney Quercus, $32.99

Looking for the next The Girl On The Train? We’ve found it. This tale follows a woman renting her dream house in London … only to discover the last tenant was murdered. Cancel all your plans to stay in and read this book. Out January 31 THE SLOW WALTZ OF TURTLES by Katherine Pancol Allen & Unwin, $29.99

Pancol’s first novel saw a pair of sisters pen a

literary sensation, thrusting them into the spotlight. This easy, breezy sequel follows the duo as they navigate the new-found trappings of success in farcical, charming Parisian fashion. Out January 3 CRAZY BUSY GUILTY by Lauren Sams Nero, $29.99

marie claire contributor Lauren Sams perfectly encapsulated the working mum’s struggle in her debut novel, She’s Having Her Baby. Her latest book treads common ground g with her hapless, endearing heroine juggling business and babies like a pro. Out January 3

4th Estate, $29.99

An American rican actress goes missing one night in Soho, and her assistant attempts to track her down. This theatrical al novel perfectly evokes ’60s 60s London in the middle of winter, in case you need d to escape the summer heat. Out now THE BOOK OK OF MIRRORS by E.O. Chirovici Century, $32.99

A thrillerr within a thriller unfolds in this story about an n unsolicited manuscript ript detailing a grisly, covered-up vered-up crime from the author’s Ivy League college days. Out January 3 THE POSSESSIONS SSESSIONS by Sara Flannery Murphy Scribe, $29.99 9.99

There aree echoes of Vertigo and Eyes Wide Shut in this psychological sychological slow burner about bout a secret organisation tion that channels the spiritt of its clients’

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Yr

HOLIDAY

There’s never a better time to see a film than in the

ALLIED

TO BE ON THE EDGE OF MY SEAT

WITH A TRUE STORY

WITH A FANTASY EPIC

WITH MY GIRLFRIENDS

WHAT’S YOUR BAG?

WANNA LAUGH?

SET TODAY

PATRIOTS DAY A stirring action flick based on the events of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing poised to fill the American Sniper-sized hole in your movie picks. Out February 2

SET IN THE PAST

THE GREAT WALL OK, we did say “true” story and, technically, this film does look at the building of the landmark in China. But there are also dragons … and Matt Damon in a ponytail. Make of it what you will. Out February 16

COMPUTER GAMES

MONSTERS AND ZOMBIES

ASSASSINS CREED

RESIDENT EVIL: THE FINAL CHAPTER

One of the world’s most beloved video games gets the Prince Of Persia treatment with Marion Cotillard and Michael Fassbender. Out January 1

There’s plenty of both of those in this sci-fi thriller, number six in Milla Jovovich’s kickass franchise. Out January 26

THE GREAT WALL

PATRIOTS DAY

NAH

YES!

ALLIED

WHY HIM?

If sweeping historical narratives with spies who have questionable motives is your bag, Brad Pitt and Marion Cotillard’s Allied is just the ticket! Out now

You’ll squirm in your seat with this raunchy comedy about a girl introducing her uncouth, rich boyfriend (James Franco, who else?) to her parents. Out now

ALLIED

RESIDENT EVIL


@Play

MOANA

MOVIE GUIDE

LA LA LAND

summer break. But how to pick what to watch? We’re here to help …

What do you want? TO ESCAPE THE SUMMER HEAT

TO BE SWEPT AWAY

WITH THE KIDS DISNEY PRINCESSES ARE OUR THING

WITH ROMANCE

WE’RE MORE INTO ANIMALS

IN SPACE

WITH A TRUE STORY

IN THE ’20S

MOANA

SING

PASSENGERS

With Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and a young unknown as Disney’s first Polynesian princess, plus music by Hamilton’s LinManuel Miranda, taking the kids is just an excuse. Out now

X-Factor … but for animals. We’re not kidding (and we actually think this looks kinda cute). Out now

If you were Chris Pratt, the only one awake on a spaceship full of sleeping humans, what would you do? Wake up Jennifer Lawrence, of course. And then fall in love. Out January 1

NOT NECESSARILY

YES PLEASE

TRY A FRENCH FANTASY

FIST-PUMP INSPO

ROSALIE BLUM

HIDDEN FIGURES

LIVE BY NIGHT Prohibition gets a Ben Affleck update as he directs and stars in this epic drama. Out January 26

IN LOS ANGELES … SING

This totally charming French film about a small town and its kooky inhabitants will make you smile. Out now

WHAT ABOUT A FAMILY DRAMA?

You’ll cheer as you watch this tale of three African-American women who worked at NASA in the ’60s. Out February 16

TEARS GUARANTEED

LA LA LAND

PASSENGERS

Sure, Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling make eyes at each other all through this film, but the real romance is with the City of Angels, which looks gorgeous. Out now

MANCHESTER BY THE SEA

MANCHESTER BY THE SEA There’s a doozy of a relationship breakdown in this gritty family drama. Bring tissues. Out February 2

LION You’ll be sobbing in your seat after watching a little boy lose his family in a train station and spending the rest of his life looking for them. Out January 19

LION


MARIE CLAIRE ADVERTISING FEATURE

AGENDA OUR PICK OF THIS MONTH’S MUST-HAVES

GIFT IDEA Whatever the occasion, you’ll find the perfect gift with ECOYA, like the new Limited Edition Sweet Strawberry & Blackberry Leaf (pictured right). RRP $39.95. Visit ECOYA.com.

SMOOTH FOR SUMMER SmoothSkin Bare gives you smooth skin quickly. With 100 unlimited flashes per minute, you can treat your whole body (lower and upper legs, bikini line and underarms) in less than 10 minutes – plus, it’s easy to use. Available exclusively at Shaver Shop. Visit shavershop.com.au.

BOLD VISION Exclusive to Specsavers, the ELLERY eyewear collection includes 14 optical glasses and six prescription sunglasses. The stylish range features strong, architectural silhouettes. Two pairs single vision from $199. Visit specsavers.com.au/ELLERY.

BEAUTIFULLY CRAFTED Put your best foot forward with the R.M.Williams Burnished Adelaide boot. Handcrafted from one piece of leather in the company’s Adelaide workshop, each pair is one of a kind. RRP $650. Visit rmwilliams.com.au.

STYLE WITH STAYING POWER Get your fashion fix with Heidi Klum Intimate’s new Solutions line. This dressing tape is your secret weapon for securing dresses and straps, which will help you avoid awkward mishaps. RRP $16.95. Available at heidiklumintimates.com.

LEGENDARY LOOK The legendary Signet is making a comeback. Created in 1953, it’s one of the most recognisable styles in the Ray-Ban Icon family. Compact metal profiles, high-definition details and unique shades define the irreverent soul of this completely stylish and iconic design. RRP $250. Visit sunglasshut.com.au.

CREATE LATTE ART Bring the barista-style coffee experience home with the new Nespresso Creatista Plus. The Creatista Plus is the first Nespresso machine that allows users to personalise their milk texture and temperature to create silky smooth latte art, thanks to its innovative automatic steam wand technology. RRP $799. Available now in Nespresso Boutiques and online at nespresso.com.

LIGHTEN UP Colgate Optic White High Impact White contains 2% hydrogen peroxide, the whitening ingredient that dentists use. It delivers four shades whiter teeth with twice daily brushing for six weeks. RRP $9.99. Visit colgateopticwhite.com.au.


Fashion SUMMER LOVE

SIMON UPTON

Whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re poolside, beachfront or bar bound, staying chic in the heat has never been easier: throw on a bikini, team with a cool cover-up and embrace prints aplenty (see more ideas from page 90). Then, take a roundthe-world trip with our spring/summer 2017 international runway review on page 118.


POOL PARTY

Team printed bikinis with full-bolt colour and make a splash in fun fashion fit for the beach, bar or holiday afar PHOTOGRAPHED BY SIMON UPTON STYLED BY JANA POKORNY


Red/white scarf and blue/ white dress, approx $1970, both by Monse at Net-aporter.com; bikini briefs, $250, by Zimmermann; bag by Chanel. Opposite page: silk dress, POA, by Christian Dior; swimsuit, $289, by Mikoh; shoes and socks both by Marni; hat by Hatmaker; bag by Salvatore Ferragamo.


Top, $750, by Maticevski; bikini top, $80, by Calvin Klein; embroidered cotton/ lace skirt, $3375, by Marni; hat and bag all by Chanel; earrings by Kenneth Jay Lane at Pierre Winter; ring modelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own. Opposite page: top, $730, by Tome; bikini top, $169, by Stella McCartney Swimwear; skirt, POA by Dolce & Gabbana; belt by Chanel; bag by Salvatore Ferragamo.


Dress, approx $2640, by Johanna Ortiz at Modaoperandi.com; bikini top, $315, by Eres at Sylvia Rhodes; hat by Hatmaker; bag by Coach. Opposite page: jacket, $9140, and bikini top, $630, both by Chanel; scarf and bag both by Salvatore Ferragamo.


Jacket, $8395, and silk shirt, $1325, both by Burberry; bikini top, $8, and briefs, $8, both by H&M; scarf by Louis Vuitton. Opposite page: blouse, $580, pants, $455, and scarf all by Max Mara; bikini top, $380, by Eres at Sylvia Rhodes; sandals by Christian Dior; sunglasses by H&M; earrings by Kenneth Jay Lane at Pierre Winter Fine Jewels; ring modelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own; bag by Todâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.


Shirt, $380, by Karen Walker; bikini top, $25, and briefs, $15, both by H&M; skirt, $179, by Country Road; earrings by Marni; bracelet by Christian Dior; bag by Fendi. Opposite page: dress, $450, by Thurley; bikini briefs, $90, by Seafolly; hat by Double Rainbouu; cuffs all from Harlequinmarket.com; bag by Marni. See Directory for stockist details. Hair by Alan White/M.A.P using R+Co. Make-up by Kellie Stratton/M.A.P using Victoria Beckham for EstĂŠe Lauder. Model: Montana/IMG.


Silk dress, $1195, by Bianca Spender.


L AG OON

Take flight towards paradise and relax in a wardrobe of barely there island wear and hot dresses for balmy nights PHOTOGRAPHED BY SIMON UPTON STYLED BY BREE MCDONALD


Bikini top, $99, and briefs, $99, both by Farron; necklace by Melissa Harris. Opposite page: dress, $499, by Morrison; bikini top, $148, by Mikoh; bikini briefs, $66, by Fella Swim; sunglasses by Gucci; necklace by Sarah & Sebastian.


Dress, $3750, by CĂŠline. Opposite page: bikini top and briefs, $430, both by Marysia at Pam Pam; skirt, $150, by Seafolly; hat by Communitie Marfa at Mychameleon.com.au; earrings by Paspaley; sandals by Ammos.


Capiz shell halter-neck top, $695, by Lisa Carney at My Island Home.


Bikini top, $120, and briefs, $120, both by Matteau; shell necklace stylistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own. Opposite page: top, $299, by Manning Cartell; pants, $540, by Christopher Esber; earrings by Melissa Harris; vintage armband from My Island Home. See Directory for stockist details. Hair by Michael Brennan/The Artist Group using Oribe. Make-up by Sarah Tammer/ Creative using MAC Cosmetics. Model: Bella B/ IMG. Special thanks to Pacific Island Air; Nanuya Island Resort; Tourism Fiji.


101 ideas Get a move on this new year with sports inspired threads so good theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re worthy of wearing well after your workout

TOP, $189, by Frame; JACKET, $149.95, by Seafolly; PANTS, $299, by Viktoria & Woods; BALL, $24.99, by Nike at Rebel Sports. 1 TOP, $29.95, by Fila at Factorie.com.au; PANTS, $69.99, by H&M; SHOES, $59.95, by Vans; EARRINGS, $110, by Petite Grand; BAG, $149, by Lacoste. 2 LEOTARD, $58, and CROP TOP, $26, both by American Apparel; PANTS, $49.99, by H&M; EARRINGS, $110, by Petite Grand. 3 VEST, $59.95, by Bonds; CROP TOP, $26, by American Apparel; SHORTS, $60, by The North Face; SHOES, $139.99, by Reebok; LEG WARMERS, $250, by Acne Studios. 4 JACKET, $140, by Adidas by Stella McCartney; TOP, $89, by Lululemon; SKIRT, $85, by Reebok at Stylerunner.com; SHOES, $100, by Converse; SOCKS, $10, by Wilson; BAG, $500, by Acne Studios.


STYLE TIP Logo T-shirts are a necessity for every wardrobe at the moment. Easy, instant, update!

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101 ideas JUMPER, $390, by Acne Studios; PANTS, $49.99, by H&M; SHOES, $235, by Porselli at Mychameleon. com.au; BAG, $179, by Kipling. 1 JUMPER, $249, by Grey State; DRESS, $495, by Ephemera; SHOES, $140, by Adidas at Stylerunner.com; WATCH, $225, by Calvin Klein Watches; BASEBALL BAT, $59.99, by Rawlings at Rebel Sport. 2 SHIRT, $119, by Lacoste; PANTS, $90, by Adidas at Theiconic.com.au; JACKET, $65, by Puma; BRACELET, $165, by Petite Grand. 3 JACKET, $220, by Adidas by Stella McCartney; LEOTARD, $84.95, by Wear Moi by Bloch; SKIRT, $220, by Bassike. 4 JACKET, $420, by Bassike; LEOTARD, $69.95, by Wear Moi at Bloch; SHORTS, $80, by Adidas by Stella McCartney; SHOES, $119.95, by Vans.


101 ideas TOP, $369, by Frame; SHORTS, $149, by The Upside; EARRINGS, $152, by Petite Grand; WRISTBAND, $7, by American Apparel; BAG, $35, by Fair Go Trading. 1 JUMPER, $290, by Acne Studios; SHORTS, $240, by Bassike; SHOES, $130, by Adidas Superstar; SOCKS, $14, by American Apparel; EARRINGS, $110, by Petite Grand; TENNIS RACQUET, stylist’s own. 2 JACKET, $50, by Boohoo.com; DRESS, $420, by Matin; EARRINGS, $152, by Petite Grand; BOTTLE, $59.95, by S’well at top3 by design; BAG, $335, by Karen Walker. 3 TRENCH COAT, $499, and TOP, $189, both by Viktoria & Woods; LEGGINGS, $29.95, by Cotton On Body; SUNGLASSES, $251, by Elizabeth and James Eyewear. 4 T-SHIRT, $29.99, by H&M; JUMPER, $64, by American Apparel; PANTS, $30, by Boohoo. com; SHOES, $140, by Converse; EARRINGS, $110, by Petite Grand; BAG, $299, by State Of Escape at Modesportif.com.


SEE DIRECTORY FOR STOCKIST DETAILS. PHOTOGRAPHED BY SEBASTIAN KRIETE. STYLED BY TARA MORRIS. HAIR BY RICHI GRISILLO/WORK. MAKE-UP BY JASMIN LO USING DERMALOGICA. MODEL: KATY/WORK

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Try relaxed pants with a speed-stripe detail â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they subtly hint at sportswear in all the right ways.

STYLE TIP

Shop the looks at styledbymarieclaire.com.au.

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3 ’s a trend! T H E U LT R A F L AT S H O E

MIU MIU S/S 2017

DOLCE & GABBANA S/S 2017

EMILIA WICKSTEAD S/S 2017

Embrace what’s left of summertime by adopting the runways’ favourite shoe cue. Slip on and slide into chic.

Lanvin x Swarovski, $999

MEE T MOCHI

An ethical brand with a worldly vision – what’s not to love? Each season Mochi is inspired by the textile artisans of a new destination, working alongside them for collections rich with cultural references. Spring/ summer 2017 sees the nuances of Morocco come to life. Shop it at Modaoperandi. com.

When Lanvin and Swarovski come together, only good things can come of it, and for Lanvin’s S/S 2017 collection, they certainly did. THE

fashion edit L E ATHER GOODS

SEE DIRECTORY FOR STOCKIST DETAILS. PHOTOGRAPHED BY GORUNWAY/SNAPPER MEDIA. TEXT BY BREE MCDONALD

MC LOVES

Direct from LA comes quiet achiever ARE Studio. Designer Cecilia Bordarampe’s efforts are concentrated on ensuring the brand’s simple and timeless ethos is at the core of each collection. Purchase via charming New Zealand online store themercantile onlinestore.com.

Hart of hearts

This season, Jess Hart, one of Australia’s hottest beach babes, teams up with Seafolly, one of the nation’s favourite swimwear brands. Don’t let summer end …

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LET’S HEAR IT FOR NEW YORK

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A BALLROOM

Gigi, Kendall and Bella were there, and where there is a #squad, there’s a party. From the candy-coloured dreadlocks to the sky-high platforms, Marc Jacobs made sure there was enough sparkle to light up even the darkest mood.

CROONING AT KORS

As performer Rufus Wainwright set the mood serenading show-goers with “Get Happy”, models stepped forth with a breezy confidence. The upbeat lyrics perfectly reflected Michael Kors’s cheerful collection of nipped-waist frocks, floral prints and bright colours.

J. C R E W ’ S CREW Diversity was the jumping point for this season’s perfectly wearable collection as J.Crew cast family, friends (and friends of friends) as model muses.

GORUNWAY/SNAPPER MEDIA; GETTY IMAGES

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ECKHAUS LATTA

Home to some of the industry’s most influential names, this city’s brash personality shone bright.

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RACHEL COMEY

Designers took a bite of the Big Apple by showcasing their S/S 2017 collections alfresco. Rachel Comey commandeered a stretch of sidewalk, Ralph Lauren built a custom-glass runway on Madison Avenue, while Kanye West’s Yeezy took over Roosevelt Island.


Fashion

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Your city-to-city guide to what’s trending on and off the catwalks

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Down at Pier 16 at South Street Seaport, among the ferris wheels, cotton candy and hot dog stands, Tommy Hilfiger revealed his seenow-buy-now collaboration with Gigi Hadid to hordes of enthusiastic revellers.

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E Heralded as the champion of modern street-style photography, the late Bill Cunningham was remembered on day one of NYFW as photographer friends and peers donned his famous blue jacket in a heartwarming homage.

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LACOSTE

Far beyond track and field, athletic touches were applied with cool-girl charisma and effortless attitude. DION LEE

ALEXANDER WANG

BOSS WOMEN

DKNY

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SPORTS CLUB


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A hotbed for creative talent, the fashion in London felt lighter, brighter and particularly bolder than usual.

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ROKSANDA

London was awash with a pretty palette coupled with florals, frills and balanced by the city’s unique brand of grit.

PREEN BY THORNTON BREGAZZI

FULL ON FEMININITY

GORUNWAY/SNAPPER MEDIA; GETTY IMAGES; SPLASH NEWS

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J.W.ANDERSON

For Molly Goddard’s first LFW runway show, she made sure to play out the “show”, literally. After gracing the runway in frothy tulle frocks, models danced away the finale, hands high in the air.

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The second collection from Mulberry’s newly minted creative director, Johnny Coca, affirmed his vision for the British house. The accessories were a standout as was his edit of incredibly on-point fabrications.

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A few seasons in and still going strong, mismatching your ear candy to create unusual pairs is still the jewellery cue du jour.

W H AT A CROC! The fashion world stood still as pairs of Crocs slapped their way down the runway at Christopher Kane. It is a testament to the collection that it led us to wonder, “Are bejewelled Crocs that bad after all?” Jury’s still out.

SI NEIGUM

ARTISTS TS COLLAB COLLLAB

Infused with South American influence, the pieces at Peter Pilotto were also strewn with artwork by the house’s good friend, artist Frances Upritchard.

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SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

Milano offers its unique brand of sartorial style served with a healthy side of Italian attitude.

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Not so much an accessory as a sculpture, big bags ruled the runways in Milan. The trick? Resist overfilling.

TOD’S

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This chic silhouette means business – clean lines, cinched waists, and neutral tones leave little to chance.

BOTTEGA VENETA

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Fashion RUNWAY LEGENDS

Bottega Veneta was celebrating more than a 50th anniversary, asking us to stop and appreciate beauty at every age. Working hard to bridge the generation gap, Ajak Deng, 26, Karen Elson, 37, and Eva Herzigova, 43, took to the runway, while an ever-radiant Laura Hutton, 72, closed the show arm-in-arm with Gigi Hadid, 21.

PRADA ON FILM A parade of ostrich-feather-clad ensembles flounced past show-goers as a purpose-made surrealist film by David O. Russell played on screens throughout the space.

A firm favourite among the fashion set, Consuelo Castiglioni of Marni stepped down as creative director of the brand she founded in 1994. Although she hands over the reins to Francesco Risso, who joins from Prada, her deft hand and expressive take on how women want to dress is an enduring legacy.

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FAREWELL CONSUELO

CARB L OADING Dolce & Gabanna makee a case for all of our shes! favourite Italian dishes! Stock up on pizza, pastaa and gelato â&#x20AC;&#x201C; for thee rdrob be! pantry and the wardrobe!

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SPRING/ SUMMER 2017

LANVIN

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Arguably the most fashionable city, all eyes were on the Parisian houses after a mass changing of the guard.

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An inspired pired use of colour was certainly ertainly the most prevalent valent notion at designer er Phoebe Philo’s collection. ection. From the ge to French artist homage lein, pressed onto Yves Klein, the front ront of ice-white ses, to the oddly dresses, ming mismatched charming shoes on n the models’ feet, her non-conformist n-conformist voice was loud and proud. Watch this space to see world wardrobes if real-world adopt this wrong-footed cue. You never know, when Philo speaks the on world listens. fashion

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CHRISTIAN DIOR CHRIS

CT BRAND BRAN TO KNO KNOW

SAINT LAURENT

Anthony Vaccarello moves on to Saint Laurent, Bouchra Jarrar at Lanvin and Maria Grazia Chiuri named as creative director at Christian Dior, can you imagine? And the talented trio didn’t disappoint …

What a girl wants and what a girl needs can be two very different things. But when the likes of Chloé and Valentino propose we take a load off with their selection of micro bags, what a girls wants and what a girl needs, quickly becomes the same thing.


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TURNING J A PA N E S E Eastern influence was a source of inspiration across Parisian runways with many designers, including Kenzo, Valentino and Haider Ackermann, offering their interpretations.

Guests arrived to a runway flanked with Azuma Makoto’s floral ice sculptures. The show opened with Australian model-of-the-moment Amber Whitcomb and finished with a sheer black dress emblazoned with florals imitating the ephemeral ice sculptures.

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High-voltage colour in wildly unexpected combinations made a loud and proud statement during Paris Fashion Week.

STELLA MCCARTNEY

COLOUR CLASH

BALENCIAGA

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Louis Vuitton has a way of making cool girls around the world collectively crush. This season, Nicolas Ghesquiere turned the brand’s signature Petite Malle bag into a phone case. Add to cart. Now.

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Laying good foundations is a fashion-must. We suggest paying as much attention to what lies beneath with this, our ultimate lingerie edit

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STYLE TIP Usually wear nude under your lightcoloured garments? Swap it out for sheers in pretty pastels.

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ELIE SAAB RESORT 2017

6 1 BRA, $49.95, and BRIEFS, $39.95, both by Palindrome. 2 BRA, $160, and BRIEFS, $95, both by Agent Provocateur. 3 BRA, $59.95, and BRIEFS, $34.95, both by Elle Macpherson Body at Myer. 4 BRA, $69.95, and BRIEFS, $39.95, both by Heidi Klum Intimates. 5 BRA, $24.99, and BRIEFS, $9.99, both by H&M. 6 BRA, $9.99, and BRIEFS, $14.99, both by H&M. 7 BRA, $110, and BRIEFS, $50, both by Lonely. 8 BRA, $409, and BRIEFS, $228, both by Eres at Sylvia Rhodes.


Fashion 3

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STYLE TIP PHILOSOPHY DI LORENZO SERAFINI RESORT 2017

Try playing with contrasts and team a black bra under your favourite white top for an instant hit of attitude.

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1 BRA, $89.95, and BRIEFS, $49.95, both by Kisskill. 2 BRA, $114.95, and BRIEFS, $74.95, both by Fantasie. 3 BRA, $125, and BRIEFS, $65, both by Lou. 4 BRA, $169.95, by Love Stories, and BRIEFS, $64.95, by Wacoal. 5 BRA, $199.95, and BRIEFS, $69.95, both by Love Stories. 6 BRA, $65, and BRIEFS, $50, both by Christie Nicole. 7 BRA, $135, and BRIEFS, $86, both by Yasmine Eslami at Mychameleon.com. au. 8 BRA, $80, and BRIEFS, $55, both by Lonely. 9 BRA, $14.99, by H&M, and BRIEFS, $59.95, by Nancy Ganz.

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1 BRA, $89.95, and BRIEFS, $49.95, both by Kisskill. 2 BRA, $34, and BRIEFS, $21, both by ASOS. 3 BRA, $79.95, and BRIEFS, $44.95, both by Heidi Klum Intimates. 4 BRA, $124.95, and BRIEFS, $64.95, both by Heidi Klum Intimates. 5 BRA, $174.95, and BRIEFS, $99.95, both by Stella McCartney Lingerie. 6 BRA, $59.95, and BRIEFS, $34.95, both by Elle Macpherson Body at David Jones. 7 BRA, $89, and BRIEFS, $69, both by Kate Sylvester. 8 BRA, $114.95, and BRIEFS, $54.95, both by Wacoal. 9 BRA, $49.95, and BRIEFS, $34.95, both by Palindrome.

SEE DIRECTORY FOR STOCKIST DETAILS. PHOTOGRAPHED BY PHILIP LE MASURIER. COMPILED BY MONICA RUSSELL

STYLE TIP Be bold and integrate jewel-hued lingerie into your outfit – go ahead – purposely flash a little colour for fun.


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DKNY S/S 2017 SEE DIRECTORY FOR STOCKIST DETAILS. PHOTOGRAPHED BY EDWARD URRUTIA; GORUNWAY.COM. TEXT BY SHERINE YOUSSEF

GLITTERBUG

From runways and red carpets to Instagram feeds, the obsession with dark lipstick continues. At the spring/ summer 2017 collections, the most striking iterations sparkled, like the pinot pouts at DKNY that make-up artist Pat McGrath likened to an accessory. Wearing lipstick like jewellery? Bling it on. For more catwalk trends, turn to page 132. MAC Glitter in Reflects Blackened Red and Red, $29 each, and Satin Lipmix, $29.

Beauty


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Hair and make-up looks to fall in love with. By Sherine Youssef

1.COLOUR BLOCKING

The yellow ear make-up at Proenza Schouler? Quirky and strictly runway. The arty streaks of rainbow eyeshadow everywhere else? Beautiful and real-life wearable. “This look is about taking a primary colour and extending the traditional winged eye,” explains Ross Andrewartha, YSL Beauté’s Australian director of artistry. Positioning is key: “stick close to the lashline for an office-friendly look, and take colour further above the crease and outward for something more daring – but stop when you hit two finger widths away from the hairline”. Try this: Andrewartha’s favourite iteration is vibrant yellow with lashings of black mascara, or red for those that truly want to embrace the trend.

TOP TIP: “Cream eyeshadows are more pigmented and easy to apply, while powders give 2D@ñ6C3=@H?@FE 6R64EZD2JD/)" Beauté’s Ross Andrewartha.

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BOTTEGA VENETA S/S 2017

2.DEEP HAIR PART

Where a middle part is romantic (see number three, overleaf ), a dramatic side part has “a sexier vibe – one eye peeking through a mass of hair always looks seductive”, explains stylist and RAW Salon founder Anthony Nader. Deep parts give a fuller shape around the face that works a treat on fine hair, while those with thicker strands can pull off the more textured styles. Do this: “For added impact, keep the side with the least amount of hair tucked back super-tight,” suggests Nader. Use a bobby pin, hair slide or ample amounts of strong-hold hairspray. Get the look: “For the fuller style seen at Michael Kors, start with a volumising foam or mousse with medium-hold, part, then blow-dry as usual,” says Nader.

TOP TIP: A deep part exposes @?6D:56@7E967246 >2<:?8:E6DA64:2==J ^2EE6C:?8@?E9@D6 H:E9@G2=@C4:C4F=2C 7246D92A6D 7

VERSUS VERSACE S/S 2017

MICHAEL KORS S/S 2017

6

VICTORIA BECKHAM S/S 2017

GORUNWAY/SNAPPER MEDIA; EDWARD URRUTIA

PROENZA SCHOULER S/S 2017

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO S/S 2017

MAX MARA S/S 2016

Beauty

1. Make Up For Ever Aqua Cream in Turquoise, $38. 2. shu uemura Pressed Eye Shadow in Vivid Yellow, $22. 3. Sisley Phyto-Eye Twist in 12 Emerald, $55. 4. Maybelline New York EyeStudio Color Tattoo 24hr Cream Gel Shadow in Painted Purple, $11.95. 5. NYX Primal Colors Eyeshadow in Hot Red, $9.95.

6. L’Oréal Professionnel French Girl Hair French Froissé, $34. 7. Gliders Bobby Pins, $3.99 for a pack of 36.

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VALENTINO S/S 2017

SPRING/ SUMMER 2017

The key here is a weightless leave-in spray … and that’s it. “Hydrate the hair, and don’t overbrush which will only flatten what should be seen as intentional frizz,” explains Nader. Get the look: Blend a cream blush in a warm pink hue on the apple of the cheeks and out towards the temple, and press the excess on to lips for a radiant finish,” says Andrewartha. 1. ModelCo Hailey Baldwin Volume Lash Mascara, $35. 2. Endota Spa Colour Instant Brows, $32. 3. Sephora Wonderful Cushion Healthy Glow Cream Blush, $20. 4. Davines This Is A Dry Texturizer, $36.95. 5. Dior Addict Lip Glow Pomade, $49.

ROLAND MOURET S/S 2017

1

2

Soft hair and sheer make-up will always have a place on the runways, and this season was no exception. Pink was a popular shade, and Gucci took things up a notch with rosy brows and eyeshadow (for the latter, “blend pink powder from the base of the lashes to the crease using a fluffy brush,” suggests Andrewartha). Hair was equally sweet, with fly-aways framing the face for a halo effect.

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3.ROMANCE

ERDEM S/S 2017

3


Beauty CHANEL S/S 2017

8

4.THE ’80s

MOSCHINO S/S 2017

7

KENZO S/S 2017

6

9

Blue eyeshadow wasn’t the only 1980s trend that was resurrected on the runways. Side ponytails and draping, aka bright blush applied high on the cheekbones, both appeared at Chanel. Nader thinks the side pony could be tricky (“I’ve never seen a grown woman pull this off ”), but “the coloured hair ties are fun and you could even double-up with different shades”, he says. For the sculpted cheeks, “use a cocktail of powder blushes in matt dusty rose and caramel tones on and above your cheekbones”, suggests Andrewartha. Get the look: For retro slick hair, wax works on shorter hair; on longer strands, “apply liquid gel into damp hair and blow-dry smooth with a brush, then use a hot tong to shape your hair so it falls easily into place”, says Nader. 6. Chanel Joues Contraste Powder Blush in Hyperfresh, $73. 7. M.A.C Lip Pencil in Spice, $30. 8. Revlon Sculpt + Highlight Contour Kit, $24.95. 9. Sebastian Shine Crafter Moldable Wax, $38.95.

Matt took a backseat this season as skin and hair glistened with a mirror-like patina. For all-day radiance, start with a primer and dewy foundation, then tap an illuminator on the high points of the face including “the cheekbones, bridge of the nose and Cupid’s bow – women often skip this spot, but it adds a youthful glow and showcases any lip colour”, explains Andrewartha. Thicker hair types in particular can pull this look off, as “it shows dimension and texture more so than fine hair”, says Nader, adding that hair with multifaceted colour will also appear extra healthy and lustrous. Top tip: For skin that looks glowy and not greasy, apply highlighter judiciously and “steer clear of the forehead and chin”, says Andrewartha. 10. Zoeva Strobe Gel in Halo, $17. 11. Nudestix Sheer Eye Color in Stardust, $35. 12. Joico K-Pak Color Therapy Dry Oil Spray, $29.95. 13. Nude by Nature Sheer Glow BB Cream, $29.95. 14. Rodin Olio Lusso Luxury Body Oil, $190.

10

BALMAIN S/S 2017

5.SHINE

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12

13

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THE ROW S/S 2017

SPRING/ SUMMER 2017

1

6.PE ACH

Subtler than orange, but with more bite than apricot, peach took out the award for “colour we want to wear everywhere”. “It’s a very youthful shade, helps warm sallow skin, adds freshness to dull skin and looks beautiful against blue eyes,” says Andrewartha. Warmer skin tones can pull off almost any shade of peach, while those with rosy undertones will find neutral blushes with peachy undertones complementary. Try this: If you’re pressed for time, use a peach cream blush on cheeks, eyes and lips. 1. O.P.I Nail Lacquer in Freedom of Peach, $19.95. 2. 3CE by Stylenanda Eyeshadow Palette in Bitter Sweet, $33. 3. Napoleon Perdis Dévine Goddess Lipstick in Niki, $38. 4. Bourjois Sweet Kiss Gloss in Sand-sation, $22. 5. Elizabeth Arden Ceramide Cream Blush in Nectar, $52.

MISSONI S/S 2017

2

4

5

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GUTTER CREDIT XXXXXX

TOP TIP: Y&6249>2<6FAH@C<D with either matt or dewy 4@>A=6I:@?DD@A6C764E J@FCAC676CC6532D6 367@C6255:?84@=@FCZ says Andrewartha.

J.W.ANDERSON S/S 2017

3


Beauty 6

7.SHARP HAIR

ALBERTA FERRETTI S/S 2017

/S 2017

bristles,â&#x20AC;? explains Nader. Finish with a blast of cool air, gliding the dryer down the hair shaft. Do this: â&#x20AC;&#x153;If your ends are looking frail and you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have time for a haircut, go over them with a blowdryer and a narrow, bristle-heavy round brush â&#x20AC;&#x201C; this will temporarily â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;bandaidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; the ends,â&#x20AC;? explains Nader. Get the look: Those with fine hair who want a razor-sharp bob should keep the length at the jawline or higher; those with thicker strands should avoid altogether, otherwise you run the risk of the dreaded pyramid effect.

N

R AT U

9

S/S

201 7

GY UD

EYELINER

ALTU Z AR R

017 /S 2

6. Moroccanoil Boar Bristle Round Roun Brush, er Bullet K2 Hairdryer, Hairdr $97.50. 7. Silver $149.95. 8. TRESemmĂŠ Hold Hairspray, ESemmĂŠ Extra Ho $7.99. 9. ghd Style Straight & Ta Tame Cream, $24. 10. John Frieda Frizz Ease Forever Smooth Anti-Frizz Primer, $15.99.

E T RO

AS

SM

7

AL HAIR

Christophe Robin Purifying Hair Finish Lotion, $60.

10

SEE DIRECTORY FOR STOCKIST DETAILS. PHOTOGRAPHED BY GORUNWAY/SNAPPER MEDIA; EDWARD URRUTIA

USH

YSL BeautĂŠ Vernis Ă&#x20AC; Lèvres Vinyl Cream Lip Stain in 405, $55.

8

TOP TIP: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play with your hair during the day â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the oils in your palms will weigh hair down and make :E=@@<8C62DJZ H2C?D$256C

T LIP COLOUR C

S CHS ET O

CHRISTIAN DIOR S/S 2017

V

AN R B I

N IE

Precise ponytails, parts, braids, buns and bobs were seen in every city, spotlighting healthy strands and ends. This requires rigorous maintenance: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to have your ends cut every six weeks, and invest in a shampoo and conditioner that has a little silicone for extra smoothness,â&#x20AC;? says Nader. For sleekness that lasts, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about the blow-dry. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Apply a straightening lotion, use the nozzle attachment, and choose a large, flat paddle brush with cushioned boar

)*""*($$G

Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;OrĂŠal Paris Color Riche Le Smokey Eye Pencil in Black Velour, $22.95.

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Beauty world

A ROU N D T HE

EDWARD URRUTIA; GETTY IMAGES

marie claire international editors nominate the products they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live without

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Beauty The best … OFFICE ESSENTIALS

1

SARAH RASHEED

2

beauty editor, marie claire Arabia in Dubai

3

Dior Flash Luminizer Radiance Booster Pen (1), $72. “It has an amazing pearly texture that blends and holds on to the skin.”

4

5

Chanel Rouge Allure Velvet Lip Colour in Rouge Feu (2), $52. “I love the richness and vibrant colour of this shade.”

Charlotte Tilbury Charlotte’s Magic Cream (3), $125. “Adds a healthy, non-shimmery glow.” Guerlain La Petite Robe Noir EDP Intense 50ml (4), $143. “The opening is fresh and it mellows out to a sweet, warm and slightly powdery scent.” NYX Blemish Control Blotting Paper (5), $6.95 for 100 sheets. “It never fails to combat shiny skin.”

The best … RADIANCE BOOSTING PRODUCTS Caudalie Vinosource Overnight Recovery Oil (6), $32. “A rich, non-greasy oil that maintains moisture and brightens skin.”

LULU CUI senior beauty editor, marie claire China

7

6

La Prairie Skin Caviar (7), $550. “It reduces my pores and makes my complexion more resilient.” Bioderma Hydrabio Intense Moisturising Sérum (8), $45.99. “Like a drink of water for skin.”

8

Shiseido Ultimune Power Infusing Concentrate (9), $125. “Gives skin a protective shield.”

“Hydration goes hand-in-hand with radiant skin”

9


Beauty

The best … T R AV E L P R O D U C T S

2 1

Bioderma Sensibio Make-up Removing Micelle Solution (1), $20.99. “Make-up artists across the world swear by it. I love this adorable size.”

beauty & health director, marie claire US

SK-II Mid-Day Miracle Essence (2), $75. “All the goodness of SK-II’s wonder line in a portable spray that’s great for refreshing skin on-the-go.” Ole Henriksen Clean Truth Cleansing Cloths (3), $22 for 10 sheets. “Convenient face wipes are allimportant when traveling; these are the cream of the crop thanks to glow-inducing vitamin C.”

5

6

“An hour before landing, I like to apply a face mask so I look somewhat fresh upon arrival”

The best … WEEKEND PRODUCTS Chanel Le Volume de Chanel Waterproof Mascara in 27 (4), $54. “I can’t go past a brown mascara for understated definition.”

4 Clinique Moisture Surge Overnight Mask (5), $52. “I like to give my skin a head start for the week ahead by wearing a mask to bed on Sundays.” 7

8

Revlon Cream Blush in Smitten Éprise (6), $26.95. “Weekends are for pared-back make-up. But I still need

LUCY ADAMS beauty director, marie claire Australia a hint of colour on my lips and cheeks.” Tom Ford Brow Sculpting Kit in Medium (7), $110. “This luxe kit defines, fills in, highlights and … basically helps my fair brows.” Bottega Veneta Eau Sensuelle EDP 50ml (8), $155. “Jasmine and gardenia are my floral favourites. This scent bottles them.”

SEE DIRECTORY FOR STOCKIST DETAILS. PHOTOGRAPHED BY EDWARD URRUTIA

ERIN FLAHERTY

3


The best … NIGHT ROUTINE PRODUCTS 9

LISA OXENHAM beauty & style director, marie claire UK

10

This Works Sleep Plus+ Pillow Spray (9), $47. “Spritz over your pillow and … zzz.” 11

Sisley Supremya Baume At Night Anti-Aging Cream (10), $850. “Packed with precious oils and a patented cellrenewing complex, my skin is rejuvenated, quenched and protected all night.” Origins Drink Up Intensive Overnight Mask (11), $37. “Once a week I put my skin to work at night by wearing this rich face mask.” Estée Lauder Advanced Night Repair (12), $98. “This serum delivers the good stuff: plumping hyaluronic acid, cellenergising algae and skinbrightening ingredients.” SkinCeuticals Resveratrol B E (13), $182. “Evenings are for the antioxidant big boys. Resveratrol is a concentrated, grapederived antioxidant that boosts cellular repair.”

12

“I also use this SkinCeuticals serum after my cycle to work in polluted London”

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143


LONGING

MORE

for Whether you’re growing out last season’s

lob or looking to add a few centimetres, is it possible to grow longer,

stronger hair – faster? The experts weigh in … 144

marieclaire.com.au

THE TRICHOLOGIST

David Salinger, director, International Association of Trichologists Genetics will determine how long your hair will grow and the rate of growth. However, if you’re suffering excessive loss or breakage, your hair is falling out prematurely and therefore not growing to its full potential. Some genetic conditions can affect the hair structure and the length of the growth cycle, so see a professional if you have any concerns. Diet is critical to healthy hair. A well-balanced intake – protein with every meal, fruit, vegetables, nuts, and grains – should be enough, but malabsorption can lead to

nutritional deficiencies, so the cause would need to be pinpointed. Protein, iron or zinc deficiency can slow the rate of hair growth. Once blood tests have confirmed this, supplements can make a big difference and results should be apparent in three to four months. Other ways to encourage healthy hair growth: increase your intake of sulphur and silica (if there is a deficiency), and reduce exposure to excessive heat (from styling tools), ultraviolet light (from sunlight), and chemical processes (like hair colouring).


Beauty

THE HAIRST YLIST

Caterina Di Biase, L’Oréal Professionnel ambassador

WA S H In the same way a tree needs healthy roots to flourish, you need nourishment at the scalp to help hair grow healthier and stronger. Massage also keeps the scalp and root fibre healthy.

STYLE

Try this: A satin pillowcase minimises friction, meaning less tangles and hair breakage.

Use good-quality heat-styling tools and brushes, and replace them occasionally as tools can become extra hot over time and damage hair more easily. And always use a heat-protecting lotion or spray, preferably one that also hydrates. If you’re growing out a lob, working in a few layers and framing the face takes the edge off the squareness. For fringes, ask your hairdresser to angle the edges so they blend into the side lengths; with longer fringes, feather the edges to create softness and control the shape.

CUT

SEE DIRECTORY FOR STOCKIST DETAILS. PHOTOGRAPHED BY EDWARD URRUTIA; FRÉDÉRIC FARRÉ/VOTRE BEAUTÉ/PICTURE MEDIA. TEXT BY SHERINE YOUSSEF. *DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS SHOULD NOT REPLACE A BALANCED DIET. CHILDREN, PREGNANT OR BREASTFEEDING WOMEN AND THOSE WHO HAVE RECENTLY HAD A HEART ATTACK, SURGERY OR MAJOR ACCIDENT SHOULD NOT CONSUME THIS PRODUCT WITHOUT MEDICAL ADVICE. IF SYMPTOMS PERSIST CONSULT YOUR HEALTHCARE PRACTITIONER. USE ONLY AS DIRECTED

Not cutting your hair and thinking that will make your hair grow longer is wrong – regular trims remove any damaged or split ends, and help hair to grow stronger and healthier.

THE LONG GAM E Six ways to give your strands a fighting chance

1

Beloved by supermodels, Viviscal Maximum Strength Hair Growth Supplements (1)*, $69.95 for 60 tablets, contain fish proteins to encourage healthy hair. They won’t, however, speed up growth and may not work for everyone, so see your doctor first.

2

Sulfate-free cleansers keep hair supple (try Not Your Mother’s Way To Grow Long & Strong Shampoo (2), $16.95).

3

A healthy scalp creates the right environment for resilient hair. Massage Kérastase Initialiste (3), $68, into roots of clean, towel-dried hair for 1–2 minutes to stimulate circulation.

4

Temporarily strengthen weakened lengths with a mask, like L’Oréal Professionnel Pro Fiber Reconstruct Mask (4), $35, or a leave-in treatment like TRESemmé Platinum Strength Stay Soft, $10.99.

5

Stay cool: Alterna Caviar Anti-Aging Photo-Age Defense (5), $52, shields against sunlight, while Goldwell Kerasilk Reconstruct Regenerating Blow-Dry Spray (6), $34.95, offers thermal protection.

6

The pliable plastic bristles of the Tangle Teezer Salon Elite (7), $29.95, gently detangles all hair types – without snapping strands.

1

6 3

2

5

4

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TM

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PalmersAustralia Palmer’s Coconut Oil Formula Body Oil. WINNER Best Body Product (steal category) Prix De marie claire 2016

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THE

beauty edit OSCAR DE LA RENTA S/S 2017

1

2

EYE-CONIC As if the lagoon-inspired shades of Dior Spring Look Star Product 001 Blue Gradation, $105, weren’t striking enough, the eyeshadow palette also features pretty pleating.

TURMERIC This spice works in two ways: when ingested, studies show it can help minimise ageing caused by UV radiation; applied topically, it’s an antiinflammatory, antibacterial and antioxidant.

MAK E-UP MATHS Refresh your base with this equation for complexion perfection

SEE DIRECTORY FOR STOCKIST DETAILS. PHOTOGRAPHED BY EDWARD URRUTIA; GORUNWAY/SNAPPER MEDIA; GETTY IMAGES. TEXT BY SHERINE YOUSSEF

Find it in: Aveda Tulasara Wedding Masque Eye (1), $74; Bobbi Brown Remedies Skin Salve (2), $66; Pukka Turmeric Gold Tea, $7.95.

Inspired by “Blue Zones” (global hotspots where humans live longer), Chanel Blue Serum, $155, harnesses the power of Costa Rican green coffee, Sardinian olives and Greek lentils to keep skin healthy.

Estée Lauder Illuminating Perfecting Primer, $50

IN THE ZONE

LIGHTEN YOUR LOAD Lightweight formulas to get you through summer The weightless NARS Sheer Pop Multiple in Motu Tane, $57, delivers colour that can go from subtle to standout. Ultra-thin Benefit POREfessional Minimizing Makeup, $52, camouflages imperfections and pores, and keeps oil and shine at bay. La Mer The Revitalizing Hydrating Serum, $340, adds moisture without the weight.

Shiseido Synchro Skin Glow Cushion Compact, $72

Becca Aqua Luminous Perfecting Concealer, $52

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Beauty 1

HOW-TO

Master

“Do your eye make-up, including curling lashes and mascara, before applying false lashes,” says Manicare adviser Liz Kelsh.

THE BASICS

ANNA SUI A

– Manicare’s Liz Kelsh

FRINGE BENEFITS

ST I L L WA RY ?

TRY

ONE O

F THESE

G MASCARAS

marieclaire.com.au

-O

NIN

148

EYE

4. Maybelline New York The Falsies Push Up Drama Mascara, $21.95. 5. Max Factor Voluptuous False Lash Effect Mascara, $27.95. 6. It Cosmetics Superhero Elastic Stretch Volumizing Mascara, $38.

3

KNOW THIS

DO THIS

“As a final step, reapply mascara to blend your natural and false lashes,” says Kelsh.

2

1. Strip: “These give a full lash effect and look best with stronger make-up, like smoky eyes or heavy liner,” explains Kelsh. shu uemura Natural Volume False Eyelashes (1), $25. 2. Individual: The most versatile, but they do take a little time to master. 1000 Hour Black Flared Short Individual Lashes (2), $9.49. 3. Half strip: Gives a natural or dramatic result, depending on thickness and length. “Use liner and mascara to blend with your lashes,” she says. Glam by Manicare Eva Lashes (3), $12.99.

PE

1. For individual lashes, place a dot of lash glue on the back of your hand and wait approximately 30 seconds for it to go tacky. 2. Using tweezers, pick up a lash and gently dip the pointy tip in the glue. “Starting at the outer corner of the eye, place the lash at the base of your natural lashes and use the tweezers to tap the lash into place,” says Kelsh. 3. Repeat the process until you get to roughly the centre of the eye, then switch to shorter lashes, continuing along to fill in the lash line. 4. For strip lashes, “measure the lash up to your eye and trim accordingly”, explains Kelsh. 5. Next, dot the glue along the strip lash, wait for it to go tacky, then apply and tap in place using tweezers.

“For natural looking falsies, apply different lengths of individual lashes to mimic and enhance your natural fringe”

4

5

6

Kelsh suggests doing a dry run (or three) to get your positioning technique down pat before going near lash glue.

SEE DIRECTORY FOR STOCKIST DETAILS. PHOTOGRAPHED BY EDWARD URRUTIA; GORUNWAY/SNAPPER MEDIA. TEXT BY SHERINE YOUSSEF

FIRST

/W 2016/17

FALSE LASHES


“As an international stylist and educator, I create tools that are unique, save time and deliver superior performance & quality.” Fernando Romero Founder & President of Bio Ionic

EXPLORE YOUR CREATIVITY

Bio Ionic uses a proprietary mineral complex within their tools that breaks down water molecules to infuse hair with moisture. Available at your local BIO IONIC PROFESSIONAL SALON Australia 1300 764 437 New Zealand 0800 456 426 Available online: bioionic.com

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Beauty

1

2 1. THE BODY SHOP Ethiopian Honey Deep Nourishing Mask, $39.95. 2. HERBAL ESSENCES Honey I’m Strong Conditioner, $6.49. 3. CATWALK BY TIGI Oatmeal & Honey Intense Nourishing Hair Mask, $33.55. 4. THE JOJOBA COMPANY Blemish Control Serum, $29.95. 5. NUXE Rêve de Miel Face and Body Ultra-Rich Cleansing Gel, $29.99. 6. SWISSE Manuka Honey Detoxifying Facial Mask, $17.99. 7. TRILOGY Firming Body Lotion, $25.95. 8. TOUCH IN SOL Feel Like Honey Moon Skin Base, $39.99. 9. GUERLAIN Abeille Royal Honey Smile Lift, $107. 10. LANOLIPS Lano Allover Golden Dry Skin Salve, $28.99. 11. KIEHL’S Pure Vitality Skin Renewing Cream, $84. 12. BURT’S BEES Moisturizing Honey Lip Balm, $6.95. 13. OLE HENRIKSEN Truth Sugar Glow Polishing Mask, $52. 14. L’OCCITANE Hand Cream 150ml, $42.

Fashion has long been abuzz with hive-inspired looks at Alexander McQueen’s S/S 2013 show (right) and apiarian embroidery on Chanel’s S/S 2016 couture catwalk (below right).

3

6

4 9

7

8

5

10

INSPIRATION BOARD

12

13

SEE DIRECTORY FOR STOCKIST DETAILS. PHOTOGRAPHED BY EDWARD URRUTIA; GORUNWAY/SNAPPER MEDIA; GETTY IMAGES. COMPILED BY SHERINE YOUSSEF

THE BEE’S KNEES

11

Bees have become a hot topic recently as climate change and exposure to agrochemicals and disease have caused their population to dwindle, but honey has long been on the beauty radar as a natural skin salve, with women harnessing its antibacterial and antioxidant properties to manage acne and soften skin (Cleopatra was said to take regular milk and honey baths). Honey is what led New York-based Kiehl’s to New Zealand’s manuka flower and its legendary nectar, which is brimming with clinically proven cell-repairing, collagenboosting, and anti-inflammatory goodness. Sweet, indeed.

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HERE&NOW THIS MONTH’S UP-TO-THE-MINUTE ESSENTIALS

MAKE IT A MASTERPIECE The Creatista is the first Nespresso machine that allows you to conveniently personalise your coffee’s milk texture and temperature to create latte art. Combining Nespresso’s coffee expertise and quality with Breville’s unique automatic steam wand technology, the Creatista machine helps Australians re-create the barista-style coffee experience at home. The Nespresso Creatista is available in two colours: Black and Royal Champagne. RRP $699.

DELICIOUS DIPS With the highest-quality ingredients, Chris’ Heritage Dips offer enticing flavour combinations including Goats Cheese & Black Truffle and Blue Cheese, Fig & Pistachio. Made with real cheese, they’re ready to plate up in reusable terracotta pots. Available in Woolworths Deli, Coles and independent supermarkets.

GENTLY DOES IT

THE SEDUCTRESS Discover BOSS THE SCENT For Her, the new seductive fragrance for women. Inspired by a journey of powerful seduction, this luxurious fragrance exudes a sublime feminine elegance, a beautiful warmth and a captivating allure that envelops the woman who wears it.

The new Sensitive Precision™ Beauty Styler from Veet is designed to gently trim and precisely shape your sensitive body parts, such as face, underarms and bikini. RRP $49.99. Available at leading supermarkets, pharmacies and independent retailers.

SALON RESULTS Say hello to at-home salon styling with the new Luxe duo from Remington. Intelligent PROheat Technology delivers the optimum level of heat for high-performance salon results and longer-lasting styles to create a gorgeous look that lasts all day. Priced from RRP $129.95. Available from Harvey Norman, Myer, Priceline and Shaver Shop. For more information, visit remington-products.com.au.

SLIM, FIRM & SHAPE With powerful key ingredients, Alpha Keri’s Body SlimFit Heat Activating Slimming & Firming Serum helps to reduce the appearance of cellulite and firm your skin. Feel the treatment working via the heatburn, which enables rapid penetration of key ingredients for maximum results. RRP $49.95.

BE SURPRISED WITH EVERY BOX The Parcel by marie claire is the musthave beauty box. For only $25, you’ll receive a selection of mass, premium and niche beauty samples valued at over $80 and delivered to your door. Visit beautycrew.com.au/the-parcel *Products photographed are indicative only and will vary


Wellness CELEBRITY

FITNESS

SPECIAL

SIMON UPTON

NEW YEAR, FITTER YOU!

Vintage Wildflower Dance Bralette, $89.95, Vintage Wildflower Leggings, $109.95, and Silver Hoodie (worn around waist), $149.95, all by Seafolly, seafolly.com.au.

With airbrushed skin, killer figures and megawatt smiles, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be forgiven for thinking celebs are an alien species. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not. Sure, they did OK in the genetic lottery, but looking this healthy and happy takes lots of work. This month, Jess Hart (pictured), Robyn Lawley and Rachael Finch share their go-to fitness tricks and food philosophies so you too can achieve that flashbulb glow just in time for 2017.


CELEBRITY

FITNESS

SPECIAL

Jess Hart

This natural beauty credits running, Pilates, personal training and a healthy dose of lollies for her covetable body

MY WORKOUT

J

ess Hart’s iconic gap-toothed smile has been gracing magazine covers for more than 15 years, while her body has reigned as the quintessentially Aussie mix of athleticism, sexiness and “leggy blonde”. Hart admits genes play a part in how she looks, but mostly, she says, it’s hard work. “I’m more likely to spend seven days in the gym than eliminate anything from my diet!” Hart recently returned to one of her favourite spots, the Whitsundays, to appear in Seafolly’s new campaign – her second time as ambassador for the iconic Aussie brand. Here, she took time-out from frolicking on the beach to share her fitness and nutrition secrets.

“I like to switch up my routines. Not only do I get bored, but if your body gets used to doing the same thing over and over, you don’t advance. You get more effective results if your muscles don’t know what’s coming next. I’ll try all the fitness trends, but I mostly work with my trainer, Edmond Adams [of C75NYC, New York]. Before a big job, I’ll do a minimum of four days per week of training. “I also really believe in Pilates, which engages those tiny

little muscles in your stomach. I love that you can progress to different levels, but more significantly if your core isn’t strong, there’s only so far you can go with your fitness. When doing a push-up for example, if your core is not strong you won’t have the right form and won’t reap all the benefits of the push-up. It took me years to learn that. “When I’m travelling and if I have time (we shoot for up to 15 hours a day) I might do a little circuit in the hotel room: planks


“Things you’ll always find in my fridge: coconut water, Natural Confectionery Co lollies and Babybel cheese; my go-to snack is hummus and crudités. “I don’t have a food philosophy – I just love eating. If I spend a few days dining on whatever the hell I want – whether it’s pasta, burgers – then my body will go, ‘OK, it’s time for salads and protein.’ “Don’t get me wrong. I’ve been through it all. I tried the no-wheat diet, due to my digestion ... I don’t have the greatest system ‘down there’. If I have too much wheat, it slows everything down. For a long time, I was wheat-free, but didn’t want to live like that forever, so

THE HART DESIRES Green smoothie or coffee?

1 2 3

GR

E

Cheese or chocolate?

C

ESE

Bollinger or mineral water?

B

OL

LINGER

“It’s a fallacy that models are just genetically blessed. Nothing comes for free and as you get older, your body’s not going to stay how you want it to if you don’t work at it. “I need to work out as soon as I get out of bed in the morning – I get it out of the way. If I schedule a workout later in the day I’ll probably end up cancelling it! Pre-paying sessions also works for me. I don’t like spending the money then cancelling. If you buy a pack of, say, 10 yoga sessions that you need to complete within three months, you’ll go. You need to find what motivates you beyond your own willpower. “I don’t feel ‘pressure’ to maintain my body. I like working out and being healthy and feeling great – it’s not something I do for my job. It’s just something that I enjoy. When something like [this photo shoot] comes up, I love it because I can use it to drive me even more. But I think health and fitness is something everyone should be focusing on.”

HE

PHOTOGRAPHED BY SIMON UPTON; GETTY IMAGES. AS TOLD TO HANNA MARTON

“It’s a fallacy that models are just genetically blessed. Your body’s not going to stay how you want it to if you don’t work at it”

SM O OTHIE

and sit-ups, including bicycle sit-ups lunges and push-ups. That’s something I can do without any help or equipment. “Before the shoot [pictured above], I was in New York and had two weeks to prepare. I said to my girlfriends, ‘I’m going to be training every morning, I’ll do it super early, so you can all go to work after.’ Edmond had four of us training in a room in the bottom of my building doing full-circuit training. Generally, it’s something I’d prefer to bang out by myself, but it was so much fun.”

I reintroduced it and now I am able to process it a lot better. “I just did a seven-day liquid fast with my sister, Ash, as part of the Henri Chenot program at Palace Merano, Italy, which was amazing. We weren’t even hungry, and had the most incredible time. On the menu was detox drinks containing things like psyllium husks and prune powder, carrot juices and soup. I had daily colonics. Mentally, we felt on top of the world.”

EN

MY PHILOSOPHY

M Y FOOD

Wellness

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CELEBRITY

FITNESS

SPECIAL

Robyn Lawley She’s strong-willed and fighting fit, so it’s no surprise kickboxing is this model’s exercise of choice

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Wellness

pumpkin spice raw smoothie Serves 1

PHOTOGRAPHED BY GETTY IMAGES. AS TOLD TO SARAH GRANT. ADDITIONAL REPORTING BY HANNA MARTON

In a blender, whizz up: 1–2 frozen ripe bananas juice of 1 fresh young coconut, scrape out the flesh if you wish ½ cup chopped pumpkin or butternut squash ½ cup cashew milk (see below) spices, such as nutmeg and cinnamon, to your taste To make the cashew milk: 1. Soak 2 cups of raw cashews overnight in a bowl of water. 2. Drain and rinse cashews well. 3. In a blender, combine cashews with 4 to 5 cups of water (do it in stages if your blender is small). 4. Add a dollop of honey, agave, or maple syrup, plus a pinch of cinnamon and nutmeg. Store in an airtight container for up to three days. Note: If you want a consistency more like cow’s milk, use a piece of cheesecloth to gently strain the cashew milk.

“I kickbox whenever I can. When a workout goes so fast, and you don’t even notice the time, that’s when you’ve found your sport. “I’ve been kickboxing for about five years. I used to kick arbitrarily and throw my arms around, looking like an idiot, then I finally started working on my technique … leaning back, turning the foot, punching correctly. I became a much better fighter. It’s so much fun and I think that every girl should try it. “Everest and I occasionally book a babysitter and go to a kickboxing class together – he loves it. He was a pro basketball player so needs to get back into his fitness. I love working out with him; it encourages both of us.”

“When I published my cookbook of decadent dishes, we were eating, like, three cheesecakes a day. I had to try everything. If I did another cookbook today, it would start with, ‘Grow your own …’ “I don’t bake as much as I used to, but I still crave sugar and chocolate. I think it’s better to indulge than to become obsessive. Eat what you want, but in small amounts.

“We’ve been growing our own vegies in Topanga [California] for more than a year. Any chef will tell you homegrown produce tastes so much better. And I love seeing the bees, hummingbirds and dragonflies enjoying my garden. I’m a big greenie. “I know that gardening can be challenging, but just start. Put some soil in a little pot and grow herbs on your balcony.”

“Getting back to nature is so important. Nature’s a proven antidepressant. Kids especially need to see green, they need to understand how things grow”

“Meditation is really helpful with all kinds of illnesses, so I’m trying to get back into it. I’m not the biggest fan of Kundalini yoga but I like the movement of it. I also see a yoga-specialist therapist, and she makes me say mantras such as, ‘I’m happy and healthy in my body today.’ I think it’s super important to live happy and not focus on my illness. What I went through was torture; I wouldn’t wish it on my worst enemy. But having that experience and not growing from it would have been worse. I try to remember every day how lucky I am. If I bring more awareness to autoimmune conditions, maybe it will help support research to effectively treat it, or get rid of it.”

MY PHILOSOPHY

WHAT ROBYN MAKES

MY WORKOUT

MY FOOD

T

here’s nothing typical about Robyn Lawley. She grows vegies, has her own plus-sized swimwear label, authored a cookbook and is such a fan of the Alien franchise that she named her daughter after Sigourney Weaver’s kick-ass heroine, Ripley. Lawley herself is a fighter – both in the gym and out. Shortly after giving birth in 2015, Lawley was diagnosed with a rare autoimmune condition that affected her ability to walk or talk. She endured relentless pain. These days Lawley is well, but the health scare inspired her and partner Everest Schmidt to eat less cheesecake and grow more produce. Here’s how horticulture and kickboxing are key to the success of this self-confessed “feminist leftie”.

H2?E>@C6ÊVisit the official marie claire YouTube channel at youtube.com/ marieclaireau to watch our behind-the-scenes video with Robyn’s health tips. marieclaire.com.au

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CELEBRITY

FITNESS

SPECIAL

Rachael Finch

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“I’ve been practising yoga since 2007, when I first moved to Singapore for a modelling contract. The agency welcomed me with a pass to a yoga studio, and I thought I’d better make use of it. I literally had nothing in my bank account, and this was free! I took four to five classes a week and fell in love with it completely. I do Bikram, Hatha, Vinyasa, Power Flow. Having Violet, I mostly practise at home. “I don’t follow a strict routine; the type of yoga

I do depends on my mood. After a big day mentally with work, I’ll do balancing and calming poses, such a ‘tree pose’. If I’ve had a big day physically, I’ll open my hips and joints. After a quiet day I’ll do Power Flow – which is dynamic – to build heat and momentum in my body. “Michael and I dance together two to three times per week: cha-cha, rumba, salsa, samba. Dancing is mentally challenging; my mind has become sharper.”

PHOTOGRAPHED BY PETER BREW-BEVAN. AS TOLD TO HANNA MARTON. *HAPPY, HEALTHY, STRONG (HARPERCOLLINS, $35)

R

achael Finch has more plates in the air than a Michelin chef. With her first book, Happy, Healthy, Strong* (see recipe right), fresh from the printers, she and husband Michael Miziner (Dancing With The Stars) will this month launch online fitness program BOD. Finch is also baking a sibling for daughter Violet, 3. So how does this shiny beacon of health keep fit and calm when her diary is packed?

MY WORKOU T

The model, presenter and author – who’s expecting baby number two in March – reveals how yoga helps her find balance and strength


Wellness MY FOOD

“Only the intensity of my exercise routine has changed during pregnancy. I don’t push myself as hard”

“Figuring out what’s good for you is a journey of self-discovery. As a teenager, I worked at a fast-food chain, indulging in burgers and thick shakes. I think it’s normal for young people to not be inquisitive about nutrition. I competed for the state in athletics – my goal was to be in the Olympics – and was very focused on training, but wasn’t educated from a nutritional point of view. Then, as a model, I switched. I became so strict with my diet and fitness, I stopped menstruating for months. I cut carbs; the weight came off straightaway. I was vague, moody, lacked energy and constantly craved sweets. Your body needs carbohydrates to survive. “But I grew up and became more respectful towards my body, understanding how to fuel it properly. Listening to your body is key – particularly during pregnancy. If I want four pieces of fruit a day instead of two, I’ll have them. If I’m pouring Violet milk and think it looks nourishing, I’ll pour myself a glass. I would never normally drink a random glass of milk! I give my body what it needs.”

MY PHILOSOPHY “I love meditation, but I refer to it as ‘tuning in’. A couple of years ago, I was talking to my dad about meditation. I said, ‘I find I’m so still and enjoy every moment of my day.’ And Dad’s like, ‘Meditation? Yeah, I tune in every day.’ It wasn’t like he was there in a cross-legged position with palms facing up. ‘I stand here, I water the garden, I watch the water drops fall on the leaves, listening to the cars go by and the dogs barking,’ he explained. Dad made me realise you can mediate anytime, anywhere.”

R AC H A E L’ S G O -TO D I S H

chicken and pesto zoodles Serves 1

2 zucchinis olive oil for frying 1 organic chicken breast fillet 1 large handful rocket shaved parmesan cheese to serve pesto 1 cup tightly packed basil leaves ½ cup olive oil ¼ cup pine nuts ¼ cup grated parmesan cheese 1 clove garlic juice of half a lemon 1. To make pesto, place the basil, olive oil, pine nuts, grated parmesan, garlic and lemon juice into a blender and blitz until just combined, adding a little water if needed. 2. Run the zucchini through a “zoodle” machine (or, peel zucchini into fettuccineshaped strands). 3. Heat ½ tablespoon of olive oil in a frypan over a medium-high heat. Add the chicken and cook for 4 min each side, or until golden brown and cooked through. Cut into bitesized pieces. 4. Add a pinch of salt to a saucepan filled with water and bring to the boil. Add the zucchini noodles (zoodles) and cook for 30 seconds; remove, strain and transfer to a serving bowl. 5. Pour pesto over the zoodles, add chicken and rocket; stir through. Serve topped with shaved parmesan.

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Wellness Rich in vitamins and fibre, the mangosteen isn’t just a pretty face. University of Queensland scientists are even looking at this tropical fruit as a potential treatment for schizophrenia.

what’s new

What gets you out of bed in the morning? My anxiety, coffee and, of course, my work.

marieclaire.com.au

MC LOVE S

HEALTHY EATING

Keep your knickers to yourself with Lorna Jane’s game-changing Nothing 2 See Here tights, which ensure zero transparency. “I’ve been in far too many yoga classes where I’ve seen more than my fair share of sheer tights … it was my responsibility to find a solution,” says Lorna Jane Clarkson. In full-length, 7/8 and shorts, these fancy pants will stay opaque no matter what position you’re in. Visit lornajane.com.

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WITH

Charlie de Haas, founder of thecleantreatsfactory.com

OUT OF SIGHT

You won’t find bone broth recipes in Joanna McMillan’s Get Lean, Stay Lean (Murdoch Books, $35). The accredited practising dietitian isn’t a fan of food fads; instead, McMillan offers sound nutritional advice and recipes, such as noricrusted salmon and festive frozen yoghurt log. Delicious.

5 minutes

HERE’S THE RUB

Why do you love collaborating? I’ve learnt that if you want something, first you have to give – and you can learn more from passionate people who are better than you at something!

Endota Spa’s newest treatment, the Deep Recovery Massage, taps into all your senses. Using hot jade stones and aromatic balms of mint, clove and arnica, it’s a holiday for your muscles and your mind. Visit endotaspa.com.au.

What’s your go-to mantra? Find softness in your strength and strength in being soft.

ST YLE AND SUSTENANCE S’well’s chic stainless-steel water bottles keep drinks cold for more than 24 hours, while proceeds from each sale support WaterAid. From $44.95, biome.com.au.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF LORNA JANE; JAMES SENEVIRATNE. TEXT BY HANNA MARTON

What are you most grateful for? Where I am today. Not long ago, I didn’t even have an office, but now I have an office, a production kitchen and six staff.


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Y O U R G E T- R E A L G U I D E T O C A R E E R & F I NA NC I A L S U C C E S S

The best

MISTAKE I ever made Sometimes doing something thing wrong can be a blessing for your career

“NOT PAYING ATTENTION TO DETAIL”

“I used to be an account manager at a food magazine. There were tight deadlines and a recipe went to print with the wrong photo next to it. My first priority was to make it up to the client, which I did by calling them to take full responsibility. After admitting my mistake, I ended up building a very strong relationship with the client. “It taught me that honest communication is everything; you have to own up to your mistakes. It also made me realise attention to detail is vital. You need to be prepared for any situation. “At Mon Purse my team would describe me as insanely organised. I have regular WIPs (work in progress meetings) and identify any missing parts before it’s too late. My mistake was horrible, but a lesson well learnt.” 164

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FREDERIC CRESSEAUX/ADVANTAGES/PICTURE MEDIA

L A NA HOPKINS CEO and founder of Mon Purse


@Work “LISTENING TO THE HATERS” L OL A BE RRY Nutritionist, author and yoga teacher “I was working in a smoothie bar after graduating from my nutrition degree, as well as presenting a smoothie segment on The Morning Show, and a nutrionist M that I really looked up to in the indus industry came in. I was completely starst starstruck and said, ‘I just want to say: you’re a huge inspiration to me!’ She replie ‘I know you. You’re that girl off replied, morn morning TV.’ Then she said – in front of que of five people waiting for their a queue smoo smoothies to be made – ‘You are a disgrace to the nutrition industry. How could anyone take you seriously by the th you dress on the show?’ way that

“I held back tears and just replied ‘Thanks for your opinion, I’ll pass that on.’ When she left, I served the rest of the people waiting for their smoothies in silence, then I ran out the back, closed the door and started crying. I thought, I can let this lady tell me I’m a disgrace to the nutrition industry and believe it … Or I can back myself and believe in what I know is true: that I was doing something I loved and was passionate about, and that the way I dressed didn’t make me any less of a nutritionist than anyone else. That was a huge turning point for me, knowing that I will never impress everyone, but that I always have to believe in who I am.”

“PEOPLE PLEASING”

“NOT TRUSTING MY INSTINCTS”

D R LI B BY WEAVER Auth and nutritional biochemist Author

NIC O L A H EP EN S TA L L Managing director of Hall & Partners Open Mind and board member of Clemenger Group

“When I released my first book, my clinic went through a rapid growth phase. I’d book people in for super-early or evening appointments went to bed at 1am and was up ments, by 5a 5am. I stopped listening to my body w compromising my health. and was “M “Many of the women coming to see w me were trying to fit more into their lives and had no downtime – and if they did rest, they felt guilty because there were always emails to be answe answered and bills to be paid. Like them, I’d become a ‘Rushing Woman’. “I realised many women were going through a similar thing and now kne how to support their health I knew back to optimal. As with most ‘mistakes’ it was a blessing in disguise.” Dr Libby Li Weaver’s latest book Women’s Wellness Wisdom is out now. For more Wellne information visit drlibby.com. inform

T H E O N E M I S TA K E NOT TO MAKE

Passionate about setting up your own business even though people think you’re crazy? Here’s why you shouldn’t be afraid to take that leap – and how to make it a success.

WHY “The things that resonate with you do not happen by accident, but because they’ve struck a chord,” says Jack Delosa, founder and CEO of education institution for entrepreneurs, The Entourage. “You need to know what you’re great at and care about.”

HOW “Start by finding a ‘hungry crowd’ – a problem that needs solving,” explains Delosa. “The bigger the problem you find, the bigger the business you might build to help solve that. Then research and understand what goes on in the heart and mind of your consumer. If you can understand that, you can create a very powerful business.”

WHEN “When I was part of a senior management team, I felt the founder of the business was inspiring, but also challenging in terms of their belief that their way was the only way – there was a culture of ‘I’ not ‘we’. Despite the fact I knew in my gut there were fundamental issues that needed to be changed, I felt unsure of my ability to question their judgement. “Due to a corporate restructure, I’ve become Managing Director of the company. I have learnt to listen to my staff – everyone has a voice. The enthusiasm of my team speaks for itself; over the last year staff turnover has gone from 69 per cent to six per cent. Now I know how important it is to trust my instincts.”

“I don’t buy into the irresponsible mentality of quitting your day job,” says Delosa. “Start by building a plan outside of business hours. Slowly transition by increasing time spent at your own business and reducing time spent at your current job. Have proof of concept before you jump ship.”

IF IT GOES WRONG… “As a business owner you need to embrace failure,” says Delosa. “This is how you learn! The key to success is being able to move and look for the next opportunity.”

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ME @WORK PART T NE NERS RSHI HIP

7

REBECCA JAMES Senior executive at industry super fund-owned bank, ME

AVOID THE TRAVEL BLACK HOLE Dreaming about an overseas adventure? You’re not alone. ME research shows 76 per cent of Gen Y delay “settling down” to travel overseas. But along with great memories and a suitcase full of souvenirs, 40 per cent of overseas travellers arrive home with their finances in poor shape, removing that holiday glow quickly. A few simple steps can be the key to avoiding a fiscal black hole while travelling. First, map out a daily spending allowance (something that fewer than half of us do). It can be easy to underestimate even basic expenses like dining out, so head online to get a firm idea of various costs before leaving. Prepay accommodation and transport fares where possible. This is a great way to secure early bird discounts leaving you with more cash to spend on unforgettable experiences.

MEBANK.COM.AU

DEADLY

management

Business coach Simone Milasas reveals what you should never do when you’re the boss

1

Micromanaging

“Just because you have the top job, it doesn’t make acting like a tyrant acceptable. Micromanaging sends the message that you’re focused on only one way of thinking. Show staff you respect their opinions by inviting them to share their own insights and ideas.”

2

Hiring the wrong staff

“Hire staff who can contribute what you can’t – not those who are the same as you. Aim to have movers, connectors and creators in your team. Movers act in ways today that will benefit the business tomorrow. Connectors are problem solvers, and creators are the visionaries. Work out which qualities and skills are important for your business and hire staff accordingly.”

3

Being inflexible

“Businesses that aren’t adaptable are

SINS

limited greatly. If you planned to have a business that sold orange juice and spent months planting the seeds only to find the trees grew lemons, would you cut the trees down or change your business? Being open to change is key for a successful business.”

4

Being a narcissist

“As a leader you should trust your gut, but this doesn’t mean having a big ego. Narcissistic CEOs often make more impulsive decisions, according to a US study. Assertiveness does not have to come with grandiosity.”

5

Judging people around you

“Judging staff, clients and customers is never a good thing. Some business owners will evaluate the likelihood of a client spending money with thoughts like, ‘They’re not our customer profile.’ When

you make judgments like these you drive away business, regardless of whether you make the feelings heard or not.”

6

Having unrealistic expectations

“Putting pressure on your staff through unfair deadlines or delegating tasks inappropriately will lower the performance of your employees. Aim for the ‘quality not quantity’ approach. Not being overloaded at work helps your staff perform at their best.”

7

Thinking you have all the answers “It’s OK to say, ‘I don’t know that right now, let me find out.’ Making snap decisions might make you appear like an expert, but can lead to mistakes. Take the time to consider all options and do your research before making important decisions.”

SEE DIRECTORY FOR STOCKIST DETAILS. PHOTOGRAPHED BY PHILIP LE MASURIER; GETTY IMAGES. TEXT BY KATHERINE CHATFIELD. FASHION COMPILED BY MONICA RUSSELL.

The

LEADERSHIP


@Work HOW TO WEAR

RUFFLES

Feminine frills just got a promotion! Get serious and add a little flounce to your office attire 3

STYLE TIP Want preppy rather than pretty? Look for wardrobe staples such as shirts for a more classic take.

5

4 1 2

TOME RESORT 2017

6

1 TRENCH COAT, $925, by Karen Walker. 2 DRESS, $260, by Vale. 3 BLOUSE, $449, by Trelise Cooper. 4 PANTS, $69.99, by H&M. 5 KNIT, $168, by Boden. 6 SKIRT, $199, by Isla.

WEAR WITH

Furla, $222, at Shopbop.com

Gucci, $780, at Net-a-porter.com Salvatore Ferragamo, $2890

Thomas Sabo, $399

Meandher, $490 Shop the look at styledbymarieclaire.com.au.

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Faux

A MODELCO

Glow

LOTION Lotions are the most moisturising option of all tans. Try ModelCo INSTANT TAN Lotion $16, for a hydrating formula that dries within minutes with an instantly bronze hue that continues to develop deeper over a few hours. ModelCo NATURAL TAN Lotion $16, is perfect for those with particularly dry, sensitive or mature skin as it glides on like a body moisturiser and rubs evenly into the skin.

is the only glow Follow these expert tips to achieve a    

1

TO PREP YOUR SKIN: For the perfect tan, exfoliate with new ModelCo EXFOLIATE DOUBLE SIDED BODY WIPES $13, concentrating on dry areas such as knees, elbows and ankles. ModelCo TAN-TOX COFFEE BODY SCRUB $20, is a 100% natural exfoliating blend of pure Coffee granules and Sweet Almond Oil.

GRADUAL

ModelCo GRADUAL TAN EVERYDAY BODY MOISTURISER $16, is perfect for first time tanners or these wanting a daily top up to an existing self-tan base.

SPRAY

2

SELECT YOUR TAN:

MOUSSE

Tinted and an easily blendable, buildable formula, a tan mousse is perfect for those who like full control over their desired colour. For a fast-acting, dark tan, choose ModelCo ONE HOUR TAN $20. This revolutionary express selftan formula allows you to control the colour of your tan by choosing when you shower.

Spray formulas are perfect for those hard to reach places (ModelCoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s iconic TAN AIRBRUSH IN A CAN $36, has a unique 360-degree nozzle) and are great for topping up an existing selftan. Delivering a mist of instant glow that develops further over a few hours, we love a spray tan for adding a little extra colour on your dĂŠcolletage or legs before going out.

3

BLEND: Use ModelCo SELF-TAN BACK APPLICATOR $14, to make tanning your back effortless.This reusable, premium applicator ensures an all over even application.

get ready for your best #modelcotan yet modelcocosmetics.com


Lifestyle THE GREAT OUTDOORS

Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no better time to get outside and steal a little me-time in the fresh air, with your favourite magazine marie claire, of course. Vitra Panton Chair in Chartreuse, $480, from livingedge.com.au.


NAUGH T Y

an ice

Looking for a sophisticated way to cool down? Try one of these iced desserts – they’re simple and sweet and always soothing PHOTOGRAPHED BY LOUISE LISTER RECIPES & FOOD STYLED BY KATY HOLDER

coconut, mango and lime log


Lifestyle

bellini sorbet

NOTE If you don’t have an icecream machine, pour mixture into a shallow freezer-proof container and freeze for 5 hours, or until almost frozen. Tip into a food processor and blend until smooth then refreeze. Repeat twice, adding whisked eggwhite (cherry ripple ice cream only, see page 172) during the final beating. Freeze until frozen.

bellini sorbet MAKES 1 LITRE 1 cup caster sugar 4 ripe peaches, halved ½ cup prosecco, plus extra to serve 1 eggwhite

1. Place 2 cups of water in a saucepan and add the sugar. Bring slowly to the boil, stirring occasionally, to dissolve the sugar. 2. Add peaches and simmer for 10–15 minutes or until very tender. Using a slotted spoon, remove peaches and leave to cool. Reserve the poaching liquid. 3. Peel peaches and remove stones. Place flesh in a blender and blend until smooth. Add reserved poaching liquid and prosecco and blend briefly.

4. Pour into an ice-cream machine (see note) and churn according to the manufacturer’s instructions. When almost frozen, whisk eggwhite for about 20 seconds until frothy, add to ice cream and churn until frozen. 5. To serve, scoop into chilled glasses or glass bowls and pour over prosecco immediately before serving.

coconut, mango and lime log MAKES 1 LITRE COCONUT ICE CREAM 3 /4 cup shredded coconut 2 cups pouring cream 1 cup milk ½ cup caster sugar 4 free-range egg yolks about 10 ice cubes

MANGO AND LIME SORBET /3 cup caster sugar 2 mangoes, flesh roughly chopped finely grated zest of 1½ limes 2 tbsps lime juice 1 eggwhite ¼ cup toasted, shredded coconut to serve

1

1. To make the coconut ice cream, line a 6-cup-capacity loaf tin with cling film and place in the freezer to chill. Heat a large dry frypan over a medium heat, add coconut and toast for 2-3 minutes, shaking the pan regularly, until coconut is toasted. Transfer to a heatproof bowl. 2. Place cream, milk and half of the sugar into a saucepan. Cook on a low heat, stirring occasionally, until just below boiling and sugar has


Lifestyle cherry ripple ice cream

food processor until smooth, return to freezer for 2–3 hours, then blend again. Whisk eggwhite for about 20 seconds until frothy. Add to mango and blend briefly. Spoon mango puree over the coconut ice cream then freeze until frozen. 10. To serve, briefly dip the base of the tin into hot water, then turn out onto a serving plate. Cut in slices and sprinkle with toasted coconut.

cherry ripple ice cream MAKES 1 LITRE 2 cups pouring cream 1 cup full-fat milk ½ cup caster sugar 1 vanilla pod 4 free-range egg yolks about 10 ice cubes

dissolved. Remove from heat and pour over toasted coconut. Set aside to infuse for an hour. Meanwhile, start making the mango sorbet (see step 8). 3. To finish the coconut ice cream, place a sieve over a saucepan and pour cooled coconut mix through, pressing down to extract as much flavour as possible, discard coconut. Bring mixture to just below boiling over a medium heat then set aside. 4. Place remaining sugar and egg yolks into a bowl and whisk using electric beaters for about 2 minutes or until the mix is pale and creamy. 5. Whisk 172

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½ cup of the hot cream mixture into eggs and whisk to combine. Add remaining hot mixture and whisk briefly to combine. Return to the pan and place over a low heat for 8–10 minutes, stirring regularly, until a custard forms. Do not allow the mixture to boil at any point. The custard is ready when it thickens and coats the back of a spoon. Pour into a bowl. 6. Place ice cubes in a larger bowl, add ¾ cup of water then sit the bowl of custard on the ice. Cool for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent a skin forming. 7. Once cooled, pour mix into an

ice-cream machine (see note, page 171) and churn according to manufacturer’s instructions. Spoon into the lined tin, smoothing the top. Freeze for 2 hours, or until firm. 8. To make the mango sorbet, place sugar in a small saucepan with 2/3 cup of water. Bring slowly to the boil to dissolve sugar. Simmer for 2 minutes then cool. Place mango flesh in a blender and blend until smooth. Next, add lime zest, juice and cooled sugar syrup. Blend briefly. Transfer to a separate freezer container and freeze for 2 hours or until slushy. 9. Remove and blend in a

1. Place cream, milk and half of the sugar in a medium saucepan. Split vanilla pod down the middle lengthways and using a blunt knife scrape out the seeds into the pan. Then add the whole pod. Heat over a low heat until just below boiling. Remove from heat and leave to infuse for 30 minutes. 2. Place remaining sugar and egg yolks in a medium bowl and whisk using electric beaters for 2–3 minutes until pale and thick. 3. Return vanilla-infused cream mixture to the heat and bring to just below boiling point. Whisk ½ cup of the hot cream mixture into the sugar-egg mixture. Then pour remaining hot mixture over egg mixture, whisking briefly to combine. Return to the pan over a low heat for 8-10 minutes, stirring regularly until

PROPS STYLED BY JANE ROARTY. PRODUCED BY BIANCA MARTIN

CHERRY RIPPLE 300g cherries, halved, stones removed, roughly chopped 1 /3 cup caster sugar


gin and citrus crush

a custard forms. Do not allow the mixture to boil at any point. The custard is ready when it coats the back of a spoon. Pour into a medium bowl. 4. Place the ice cubes in a larger bowl, add about ¾ cup of water then sit the bowl of custard on the ice. Cool for about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent a skin forming. Remove vanilla pod. 5. While ice cream is cooling, place cherries and sugar into a medium saucepan. Cook over a low heat to dissolve

the sugar, this should take about 5 minutes. Simmer for 10–15 minutes until cherries are syrupy. Cool then chill in the fridge. 6. Pour cooled vanilla cream into an ice cream machine (see note, page 171) and churn according to manufacturer’s instructions, until it is thick, but still soft enough to easily scoop. 7. Place ice cream in a freezer-proof container. Add the cherries and syrup and stir a couple of times to create a ripple effect. Freeze until frozen.

gin and citrus crush MAKES 1 LITRE 1¼ cups sugar ¼ cup gin 450ml tonic water finely grated zest and juice of 1 lemon finely grated zest and juice of 1 lime 1 eggwhite finely grated zests of lemon and lime to serve

1. Place sugar and 1½ cups of water in a saucepan and bring to the boil, stirring to dissolve sugar. Once dissolved, boil for 2 minutes

then remove from heat and cool. 2. Add gin, tonic, zests and juices. 3. Pour into a 1 litre freezer-proof container and freeze for 6–8 hours. Tip into a bowl and mix with a fork to break up ice and zests. Return to container and freeze again. When almost frozen repeat process, then whisk eggwhite for about 20 seconds until frothy and stir through crush and freeze until frozen. 4. To serve, scrape crush into chilled glasses and garnish with extra lemon and lime zests.


Travel

HOTSPOT: HAWAII, USA Best for: Surfing, snorkelling and beautiful beaches, so you can be as active as you like (or not).


E TA W AY G G P

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ON TOUR H O W T O P L A N A H O L I D AY W I T H Y O U R B E S T I E S

We’ve done the groundwork so your next group holiday is smooth sailing, or skiing, or restauranting ... By Fleur Bainger TIP 1

GETTY IMAGES; INSTAGRAM/TAYLOR SWIFT

PICK A LEADER – A GOOD ONE Trying to get your friends to book flights, accommodation, transport and tours separately can be like herding cats. Far better is to appoint one person to coordinate the lot, says Claudia Rossi Hudson, who started work in the holiday trade 45 years ago and is now managing director of luxe Sydney agency, Mary Rossi Travel. That person needs to be across everyone’s likes and dislikes, which activities they’ll be devastated to miss and the

experiences they’re most excited about, so the trip can be tailored to meet everyone’s expectations. They’ll also need to get on top of personal deal-breakers, such as no wi-fi or no air conditioning. Pick someone who has excellent organisational skills, plenty of patience and is a good communicator. Oh, and they might need a resilient sense of humour – Rossi Hudson warns it can be a thankless task. “They have to put up with the frustration of gathering money and paying the deposit when not all the money is in, which is stressful,” she says.

Taylor Swift (second from left) and her girl squad in Hawaii.

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Travel

HOTSPOT: NEW YORK, USA Best for: Art and culture as well as amazing food. Shopping is also likely to be on the agenda.

Make sure to reward them for their troubles. “Maybe they should get the pick of the rooms.” G R O U P H A C K : Delegate tasks that play to each member’s strengths. Appoint your foodie friend as chief restaurant researcher, your map sleuth as the directions queen and make your punctual friend responsible for getting everyone out the door on time. Handing out specific roles makes everyone feel important.

TIP 2

WEED OUT C O M M I T M E N TPHOBES

HOLIDAY TIP

Plan time out from the group. “No matter who you travel with, people get on each other’s nerves. Grab some alone time when things start to get tense. It helps you, and everyone around you,” says travel blogger Dianne Bortoletto. Beyoncé with sister Solange on yet another yacht getaway.

Before you go ahead and start booking, you need to know your buddies are on board. Kylie Bartle runs boutique luxury cruises for The Great Escape Charter Company, and says pledging cold hard cash is the best way to weed out tyre kickers. “Ask your friends straight up for a 20 per cent deposit because you’ll know who’s serious, and who’s not straightaway,” she says. G R O U P H A C K : Rossi Hudson says having a no-refund policy is a smart move. “If someone pulls out and they haven’t put any money in, then it costs more for everyone

HOTSPOT: THE CARIBBEAN Best for: Cruises offer the ultimate girl-getaway by visiting the finest beaches around.

else, which is not very fair. Work out what is a fair deposit and agree on cancellation clauses within that – it could be flexible and if you get someone to replace yourself, you might get your money back,” she adds.

TIP 3

S P L I T A N D S AV E An unexpected bonus of a group trip is scoring discounts or added extras for buying in bulk. Tassie-born blogger Brooke Saward from World of Wanderlust says you’ve got nothing to lose from asking for the best deal, and tips that a personal approach is most effective. “I’d suggest making a phone call to the hotel or tour operator, rather than emailing or booking online,” she says. Groups should be able to score up to 25 per cent off accommodation, while tour prices are a bit more variable, says Lyndall Hewitt, personal travel manager with TravelManagers Australia. “A small group tour that generally takes 20 people where you can book out the whole bus should give you a reasonable discount,” she says. “But it would also give you more flexibility and they might personalise it to target exactly what your group wants to do. That’s happening a lot more these days.” G R O U P H A C K : Following booking sites on social media will get you front row to any deals, discounts or specials, with reductions often announced on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram first.

TIP 4

FOOD FIGHTS For many, devouring their body weight in local delicacies is a huge part of the trip, but others will be just as happy snacking on cheese and biscuits. Then there’s the challenge of sating a 176

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Kim Kardashian (centre) and friends love a beach holiday.

5 the best of

HOTSPOT: HAMILTON ISLAND, AUSTRALIA

Jennifer Lawrence (top row, far right) and Amy Schumer (bottom row, far right) staying cool with friends at sea.

Best for: Nature lovers who want to soak up their surroundings along with a bit of sun and a spa treatment or two.

are we going for dinner’,” she says. “The only decision you’ve got to make is ‘Should I have a glass of Veuve or Moët?’”

TIP 5

GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF AIRBNB; INSTAGRAM/BEYONCÉ KNOWLES; INSTAGRAM/AMY SCHUMER

N AV I G A T I N G T H E AW K WA R D “MONEY ” ISSUE vegetarian/vegan/pescetarian when the rest of you are carnivores. Saward, who’s spent the past four years flitting about the globe, says it’s best to compare food preferences pretrip and even pick out a few must-dine locations. “Eating out is often the hardest part about travelling in groups. Do a little research in the beginning to find a selection of restaurants that everyone is happy with,” suggests Saward. G R O U P H A C K : Remove the decision-making all together by booking a holiday where all meals are included. Bartle believes that’s one of the highlights of holidaying on water. “Being on a boat where there’s no shops makes it really easy because it’s whatever the chef is going to dish up – people don’t have to talk about ‘where

No matter how tight knit your squad, the issue of dollars and cents can still ruffle feathers. The answer, says Rossi Hudson, is to create a pool of money. “Don’t be afraid to build in a few hundred dollars each to the overall trip cost so you’ve got a kitty,” she says. It could cover everything from art gallery entry to train tickets, grocery shopping and even meals out, so you’re not constantly dividing up costs – just be sure you’re all on the same page. “You need to have some understanding about if somebody drinks and somebody doesn’t,” says Rossi Hudson. “You don’t want to be there at the end of the night saying ‘You had three drinks and I had one.’” G R O U P H A C K : Factor in extra dollars to cover international money transfer costs, as many booking sites are based overseas and will charge in a different currency.

TRAVEL WEBSITES

1

trafalgar.com

Groupfriendly destinations Byron Bay Check out the luxe and lovely girls’ group deal at The Byron at Byron. Visit thebyron atbyron.com.au.

Makepeace Island Going to Noosa? You and up to 19 of your closest friends can enjoy your own island idyll. Visit makepeace island.com.

Let the experts carefully craft a unique travel experience and find all the best deals with all your group’s needs in mind.

2

airbnb.com Airbnb aims to let travellers live like a local by staying in a real home. There are more than 80,000 listings in Australia alone.

3

onefinestay.com You’re met at the door, handed an iPhone to make local calls and offered 24/7 support at these exclusive homes.

Sumba Island Nihiwatu resort offers tree-house accommodation, all inclusive meals and daily yoga classes overlooking the ocean. Visit nihiwatu.com.

Margaret River Galleries, wineries and beaches, what’s not to love about a holiday in WA? Visit margaretriver.com.

4

villas.com This subsidiary of booking.com lists 540,800 villas, holiday homes and apartments in 11 countries around the world.

5

theluxurytravelbook.com Your key to ultra-glam apartments, villas and chalets set in prime locations.

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TRY THIS!

S TA N D I NG LAMPS

SLEEPY HE AD

On average, you spend around 229,960 hours of your life asleep, which is an excellent argument for indulging in beautiful bed linen. Check out Lamb & Stine – its luxurious weaves are naturally non-allergenic, antibacterial, and most importantly, soft and sumptuous. Linen sheet set, $345, visit lambandstine.com.

It’s tequila, but not as you know it ... Shake up your summer cocktails with the luxe Sesión Blanco. Visit sesiontequila.com.

Elliot floor lamp, $219.95, domayneonline. com.au.

Sesión Blanco tequila, $90, vintagecellars.com.au

EDITED BY CLARE PATIENCE

JUST ADD WA T E R Good news for fiddle leaf and philodendron fanciers: you can now buy gardening gear as beautiful as your greenery. Garden Glory Diamond watering cans, $125 each, from theminimalist.com.au.

MC LOVES

kikki.K’s new collection of notebooks come in a delicious pastel palette with added monogramming, from $14.99, for a personal touch. Notebooks, from $54.95, kikki-k.com.

Pinocchio floor lamp, $407, lightly. com.au.

MONOGRAMS

Chunga Round, $119, copperandcross.com

Follow your nose to the new Bondi Wash flagship store, located, of course, in the iconic postcode of its namesake. Boasting native scents, essential oils and a pared-back interior, it’s just the place to clean up your act. Visit 76 Gould Street, Bondi Beach, or bondiwash.com.au.

MC LOVE S

Think outside the rectangle when it comes to art. We love the texture and colour of a Chunga Round. It’s a pretty pop of fun for blank walls.

Moni floor lamp, from $1875, articoloarchitecturallighting. com.au.

SHOP SP OT

what’s new

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY SIMON UPTON. ALL PRICES QUOTED IN THIS ISSUE ARE CORRECT AT THE TIME OF PUBLICATION. MARIE CLAIRE TAKES ALL REASONABLE ENDEAVOURS TO ENSURE THE PRICES ARE PRINTED AS PER THE MARKET VALUE PROVIDED BY SUPPLIERS OR MANUFACTURERS. MARIE CLAIRE CANNOT ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY FOR PRICE FLUCTUATIONS

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G O T H E D I S TA N C E W I T H O U R C O O L - G I R L C A R G U I D E

3 the best

C AR: Mazda MX-5 ROUTE: Hunter Valley, NSW RE VIE W: There’s a special kind

of

of tranquillity that arrives with nightfall in the Hunter Valley. It’s not silence, but the peaceful, distant sound of Australia’s native wildlife. A lazy two-hour drive from Sydney’s CBD, your route carries you through the tree-lined streets of the North Shore before joining the freeway at Wahroonga. The perfect set of wheels for this journey is the Mazda MX-5 RF (from $38,550), the Japanese giant’s most popular two-seat convertible. The roof is like a piece of origami art, which folds away at the touch of a button. The MX-5 RF features the same luggage capacity as the softtop version, so you can fit two carry-on size bags in the boot. Leave the freeway at the Cessnock exit and look for a left turn marked Freemans Drive. Here, the true talents of the lightweight roadster are revealed, as it skips over the tree-ringed Mount Vincent, the call of the local bird population competing with the revving of the engine in your open-air cabin.

1 Country Road, $89.95, at Myer. 2 Sarah J Curtis, $270. 3 Hatmaker, $420.

980,433 car sales in Australia car sales in USA 14.5m 21m car sales in China

LL SUV

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15, 493 SALES

M AZDA CX-3

20,702 SALES

MA

ME

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21 ,642 SALES

DIUM

H OLD EN COMMOD ORE

ME

TOYOTA CAM RY

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18,678 SALES

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TOYOTA COROLLA

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A handful of models account for most of Australia’s new car sales. Here are 2016’s top-selling cars in each category*.

CIT

H YU NDAI ACC EN T

WHEELS WE LOVE

CRO

2357 SALES

MI

15, 378 SALES

Almost a million new cars were sold in Australia in the first 10 months of 2016, which is up 2.5 per cent on 2015’s record-breaking numbers. How does that compare with the world’s biggest markets?

MITSUBISHI MIRAGE

SEE DIRECTORY FOR STOCKIST DETAILS. PHOTOGRAPHED BY GETTY IMAGES. TEXT BY STEPHEN CORBY. *TO NOVEMBER 2016

THE BIG NUMBER

RG

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12 , 365 SALES

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MAZDA CX-5

2

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S T R AW H A T S

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y 20 –

8

AQUARIUS

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ru Feb ar

Janu

Horoscopes

Power dates: February 14 & 21

Affirmation for the month: For every ending,

THIS MONTH, PRIORITISE …

PISCES February 19 – March 20 February finds you more secretive, or maybe just not inclined to share your feelings; others should respect this. If you’re feeling lost or lonely, solace may be sought through drugs or alcohol. You may hear from people from the past – whatever happens, make some quiet time just for you.

ARIES March 21 – April 20 Step cautiously – particularly around the 15th, when your emotions run wild. Perhaps your inner voice isn’t as all-knowing as usual. It may therefore be wise to listen to others. Not everything is cause for concern; the cosmos sets the scene for romance. With finances on side, the odd luxury is a must.

TAU RU S April 21 – May 20 It’s a time to nurture those you love. You may also feel a need to have a place of your own. Money may be spent on entertaining at home, with some DIY thrown in for good measure. Just avoid the usual 182

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Emma Roberts; Jennifer Aniston; Lauren Conrad

tendency to overdo. Don’t overspend and don’t promise more than you can deliver.

GEMINI May 21 – June 21 If you’ve anything to announce to the world, do it now. You’re in the mood to tell it like it is. Insights come out of the blue, so dream big. At the same time, collaborate your way towards success. Just be sure to give everyone equal attention to avoid hurt feelings.

CANCER June 22 – July 22 No-one has a completely drama-free existence – we’ve all made mistakes. Consider “errors” of judgement as learning tools towards wisdom and compassion. Forgive others and yourself – leave the old baggage behind and keep moving forward. There is so much more to experience and love.

LEO

minds, stop and listen. You can learn from others, though, if necessary, you can go on the offensive. Social invitations become easier to accept. A curiosity might also be satisfied by travel or romance.

VIRGO August 23 – September 22 Early February may not go as you would like, which could leave you feeling uneasy. But don’t get into a tizz. Remember that energy follows thought: what you think or feel is what you get. The more positive your thought and actions, the better.

LIBRA September 23 – October 22 Does the past seem more alluring than the present? Don’t be too stuck in nostalgia; it can shut out today’s reality. If you’ve experienced a loss, this is a normal stage in mourning. But come back soon, you’re needed in the here and now.

July 23 – August 22

SCORPIO

It’s a Leo kind of month – all fire and action. Should you find yourself up against determined

October 23 – November 21 This is a courageous month for Scorpios, especially when

Realising ambitions. There’s no better time for achieving goals. Don’t let the fear of failing stop you from trying.

it comes to travel and new ventures. If prepared, you may soon be treading more lucrative paths. But there’s still risk involved, so be sure to make provision for sudden detours. If plans are delayed, don’t let this ruin a potentially fun month. The best things in life are still free.

S A G I T TA R I U S November 22 – December 21 It’s great to be loved, but Sagittarians can also feel trapped – usually when they’re being taken for granted. In this case, you might want to take a leave of absence. Right now, too, you want the truth, and will look for answers. What you discover could leave you speechless.

CAPRICORN December 22 – January 19 Who’d blame you for giving up on love? But sometimes you expect too much. Occasionally, our protective mechanisms hide vulnerabilities, but can also shut out others. Free the chains and you have a chance of finding your soulmate. At work, keep colleagues away from private matters.

ILLUSTRATION BY ELISA MAZZONE. PHOTOGRAPHED BY GETTY IMAGES. HOROSCOPES BY TANYA OBREZA. VISIT TANYAOBREZA.COM

Aquarians are ambitious, but even though both skill and social connections have value, success also depends on commitment. So when you make a new plan, stick with it. Socially, you’re a natural. The planets boost intellectual vigour, but also the occasional challenge. The old cliché about catching more flies with honey than with vinegar springs to mind. It’s also a great time to update your image. If any caution is needed, it will involve finances. Thanks to a spend-happy cosmos, you suddenly want everything you see – including new playmates.

CELEBRITY AQUARIANS

there’s a new beginning.


DANIELA FEDERICI/CORBIS VIA GETTY IMAGES

LIFE STORIES

ANNA NICOLE SMITH Ten years on from her death, the larger-than-life blonde is still making headlines, says Helen Gent


IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Clockwise from left: Anna Nicole in 1993; at the MTV awards in 2005; modelling for Guess; with son Daniel and husband Billy Smith in 1986.

T

he woman sashayed onto the stage, her blonde hair spilling down towards a pair of voluptuous breasts encased in a pink and silver dress. “You know, this show has been kind of boring,” she drawled into the microphone as she pushed the straps of her dress down to expose two MTV stickers strategically placed over her nipples. While the audience erupted into a cacophony of hollers and wolf-whistles, the laughing blonde lifted her arms above her head and jiggled her naked breasts at the crowd. This was Anna Nicole Smith on the night of March 3, 2005, when she was on stage at Sydney’s Luna Park to present an award at Australia’s first MTV Music Video Awards. It was classic Anna Nicole – bubbly, shocking, headline-grabbing. Like everything she did – posing for Playboy, marrying an octogenarian oil billionaire, starring in her own outrageous TV reality show – she made people sit up and take notice.

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Love her or hate her, Anna Nicole was a force on the media landscape, coming at you with her surgically enhanced 36DD breasts through TV talk shows and tabloid newspapers. Rarely out of the spotlight, life for Anna was one big photo opportunity, but as addiction to prescription drugs took hold and tragedy struck, it was increasingly harder to watch. She sold graphic video footage of her daughter’s caesarean birth to TV news channels and, just days later, after her son, Daniel, overdosed at her hospital bedside, she sold a photo of her with him to a tabloid for a reputed half a million dollars. Anna Nicole craved attention and even in death she got it. In the 10 years since she died, aged 39, she’s been the subject of four sensational court cases, with a supporting cast that included former lovers, an estranged

mother and a histrionic judge. Books, films and an opera have been made about her. It’s everything that she would have wanted. “I’ve always liked attention,” Anna Nicole once said. “My whole life revolves around my breasts. Everything I have is because of them.”

B

orn Vickie Lynn Hogan on November 28, 1967, in Houston, Texas, she grew up without a father and with an “evil” mother, a deputy sheriff, who she claimed starved her of love. She was a plain, mousy-haired, flatchested teenager who dreamt of being famous like her idol Marilyn Monroe. She dropped out of school to work at a roadside restaurant, married chef Billy Wayne Smith at 17, but left him, claiming he was abusive, when their son, Daniel, was just a toddler. Still in Houston, she got a job as a lap dancer. She saved her earnings plus, it’s alleged, extra money she made giving blow jobs to pay for breast enlargements when she was 23. She also had liposuction to counteract her love of junk food. A year later, while performing at Gigi’s Cabaret, her new breasts caught the eye of J Howard Marshall, a twice-married oil billionaire. When she told him she couldn’t accept his

She was a plain, mousyhaired, flat-chested teenager who dreamt of being famous like her idol Marilyn Monroe


GETTY IMAGES; SPLASH NEWS

Anna Nicole was named Playboy Playmate of the Year in 1993. Right and below: she wed oil tycoon, J Howard Marshall in 1994 amid much controversy. He died a year later of pneumonia. It was then that Anna Nicole’s “whole world collapsed”.

offer of lunch the following day because she had to work, he gave her an envelope stuffed with dollars “and it was the last time I ever danced”. Marshall showered her with gifts – on one shopping trip she racked up $2 million worth of jewellery on his credit card – but never committed to move into his Bel Air pad. She continued to reinvent herself, adding platinum hair and a wellpractised Marilyn Monroe pose to her arsenal. When Playboy received her test shots, they flew her out to LA for a shoot and in March 1992 she landed the cover, followed by the centrefold in May 1993. The shots were spotted by Paul Marciano, then CEO of Guess, and, impressed with her bombshell looks, he handed her a million-dollar contract, replacing supermodel Claudia Schiffer. “I didn’t know what Guess Jeans were,” admitted Anna Nicole. “I just shopped at Wal-Mart and Kmart.” On June 27, 1994, 26-year-old Anna Nicole wed 89-year-old Marshall at a private ceremony at Houston’s White Dove Wedding Chapel. Barely more than a year later, on August 4, 1995, her husband died of pneumonia. It was then, said Anna Nicole, that “my whole world collapsed”. But even before Marshall’s death, her mental state was fragile. Four months before her wedding, she’d collapsed in a hotel after downing a bottle of tequila and a cocktail of prescription drugs. Then, on the back

Life stories

Howard K Stern and son, Daniel, the reality show was pure car-crash television, with 1.4 million viewers tuning in to watch Anna Nicole feeding Prozac to her poodle, Sugar Pie, and wandering around her rented Hollywood apartment clutching the urn of her dead husband’s ashes. For a brief moment, there seemed the possibility of normality for Anna Nicole when she gave birth to daughter Dannielynn (the father was unknown) in the Bahamas on September 7, 2006. But heartbreakingly, three days later 20-year-old Daniel died in her hospital room. Following an autopsy report that showed methadone and antidepressants in his system, Daniel’s death was recorded as an accidental overdose. It was the beginning of the end for of her modelling work, Anna Nicole Anna Nicole. Nearly a year on and still tried to move into acting, but grieving, she was set to be evicted from spectacularly failed in a number of her Bahamian mansion after failing to roles – her incoherent performance in make loan payments. Her fight for 1994’s Naked Gun 33 1/3: The Final Marshall’s money – which had been in Insult earned her a Razzie Award for and out of the courts for years – was Worst New Star. At an Oscars night wearing her down (the case finally party in LA in March 1995, she flashed ended in August 2014, when a Supreme celebrities then threw up in the toilet. Court judge ruled against Anna Nicole, With Marshall gone, so was thus leaving daughter Dannielynn everything else. The houses he’d lavished without an inheritance). on her were sold, the $50,000 a month She also had another court case allowance was severed and his family pending, this one concerning Trim-Spa vowed she’d never Inc, the company get a penny of his for which she had $1.6 billion fortune, been advertising half of which she weight-loss pills claimed Marshall and was now, along had promised her. with Anna Nicole “As soon as herself, the subject – Anna Nicole Smith Howard died, my of a class-action story wasn’t so lawsuit alleging pretty,” said Anna Nicole, who comfort false or misleading marketing. ate her way to 101kg. She popped With pressure mounting, Anna antidepressants along with painkillers Nicole succumbed to a series of health to relieve the discomfort of faulty problems. Two months after the birth breast implants and after almost dying of her daughter, she’d been hospitalised from an accidental overdose in with pneumonia and a collapsed lung November 1995, she checked into the and she was now suffering flu-like Betty Ford Clinic. “I was f ****** symptoms after recent surgery to repair one of her breast implants. bloopers,” she admitted at the time. “I After Daniel’s death she’d also tried to was having wild, crazy dreams about take her life twice. butterflies and Pepsi machines.” Anna Nicole’s life finally ended on An often disorientated and February 8, 2007, in a hotel room in incoherent Anna Nicole was back on Florida, where she was staying with the radar on August 4, 2002, when The Stern, who she’d “married” in a Anna Nicole Show debuted on cable commitment ceremony the previous TV. Also starring her lawyer/agent

“My whole life revolves around my breasts. Everything I have is because of them”

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Life stories

LARGER THAN LIFE

year. Her death was recorded as an Birkhead then went accidental overdose. She’d been on a to court with Stern and cocktail of 11 different prescription Anna Nicole’s estranged drugs including ones for weight-loss, mother to vie for custody seizures and depression. Medical of Anna Nicole’s remains. records showed that in her final weeks The now-infamous she’d taken as many as 600 pills. televised court case was presided over Later, Stern and two doctors, by Judge Larry Seidlin, who rambled Dr Sandeep Kapoor and Dr Khristine throughout the court proceedings and, Eroshevich, went on trial for supplying at its closing summary, broke down in drugs to a known addict. Dr Kapoor tears. In March 2007, Anna Nicole was was acquitted of all charges in 2010 finally laid to rest beside her son at while Stern and Dr Eroshevich, who Lakeview Memorial Gardens in Nassau. were initially convicted, had their n February 2011, the spirit of charges dismissed in 2015. Anna Nicole rose again with As one reporter commented: the premiere of the opera Anna “Anna Nicole Smith has become a Nicole in London. Writer Richard phenomenon, a woman whose story Thomas says: “I wanted the audience grows more unbelievable at every turn.” to love Anna Nicole [played by Dutch First her burial had to be delayed until opera singer Eva-Maria Westbroek] paternity of her daughter had been from the first moment she appeared proved. Cue a battle with a cast on stage. Anna of potential fathers Nicole was fearless including Zsa Zsa because she had Gabor’s husband, few choices but she Prince Frédéric von Anhalt, who was determined to claimed he’d had an make a name for affair with Anna herself. She seized Nicole in the ’90s. opportunities with A DNA test a ferocious energy – Pol’ Atteu, Anna Nicole’s stylist finally confirmed but those opporLarry Birkhead, a tunities turned out photographer who’d dated Anna Nicole to be curses in disguise. I wanted after they first met at the Kentucky audiences to come out weeping for her.” Derby in 2004, as the dad. Birkhead The opera, adds Thomas, wasn’t a has raised Dannielynn, now 10, out of documentary, but “a zeitgeist tale about the glare of the media spotlight. His good and bad choices and the law of one concession to fame so far has been unintended consequences. Despite her to allow his daughter to model for a story being so well covered, it was hard 2013 Guess Kids campaign so she could to find the true, real Anna Nicole. How “share something with her mother”. much did we really know about her?”

I

“Whether you were a maid or a producer, she treated you the same. If she liked you she went to bat for you”

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Two of the people closest to Anna Nicole were Pol’ Atteu, her stylist and the creator of the pink couture gown Anna Nicole was buried in, and his husband, Patrik Simpson. Speaking to marie claire, Atteu says: “There were two sides to Anna Nicole. There was the sexy, vivacious Anna Nicole who ‘turned on’ when there were cameras in front of her. She loved to entertain people. It made her feel good to know that people were having fun watching her antics. Then there was the Anna Nicole who loved watching gory horror films and playing poker. She was always someone you could count on. Whether you were a maid or an executive producer, she treated you the same and if she liked you and respected you she went to bat for you.” She wasn’t, says Atteu and Simpson, who together authored Anna Nicole Smith: Portrait Of An Icon, a dumb blonde but a “puppet master” who controlled every aspect of what was revealed to the media. “She had a true gift for keeping herself relevant. Anna Nicole knew how to work any situation to her liking or benefit. She knew when to shock the world and with what. Everything was calculated. She always knew how to keep her name alive in the media and I think she’s up in heaven now, looking down on all of us and rolling in laughter at all that has happened since she passed away.”

GETTY IMAGES; PATRIK SIMPSON/ANS/GETTY IMAGES

Clockwise from left: Anna Nicole with son Daniel in 2004; her erratic behaviour at Oscars afterparties was legendary; Howard Stern and Anna Nicole with Dannielynn after their commitment ceremony; Dannielynn with her father, Larry Birkhead, in July 2016.


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Marie Claire Australia - February 2017