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FE B RUA RY 2 0 1 7

Beauty BFFs

GWYNETH ON HEALTH, HAPPINESS &CHRIS

STARS & THEIR SECRET WEAPON STYLISTS

GET YOUR BEST BROWS

Super Style THE MOST STYLISH GIRL IN THE AIRPORT

Lip Service GORGEOUS PINKS & REDS

Fashion We Love CHIC BAGS PRETTY SKIRTS & HOT HEELS


AG ADRIANO GOLDSCHMIED

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©2016 P&G


EYES SHOULD SHOW MISCHIEF. NOT YOUR AGE.

Olay Eyes A collection to fight the look of every eye concern: Brighten, Depuff, Li, Smooth, or Ultimately, all of it. #AGELESS


directo Volume 24 N umber 2 FEBRUARY 20 17

118 y

Proenza Schouler crewneck and earring. Cartier bracelet. Gwyneth Paltrow photographed by Greg Kadel.

ON THE COVER 71 FASHION WE LOVE: CHIC BAGS, PRETTY SKIRTS & HOT HEELS 97 BEAUTY BFFs 106 LIP SERVICE: GORGEOUS PINKS & REDS 112 GET YOUR BEST BROWS

31 Swarovski teams up with Lanvin, Katy Perry designs party shoes, and more fashion news you need to know now

ON DEMAND 39 The next generation of luxe heirloominspired accessories

THE STYLE

120 GWYNETH ON HEALTH, HAPPINESS & CHRIS

43 FUNNY VALENTINE Fernanda Ly

132 THE MOST STYLISH GIRL IN THE AIRPORT

49 FASHION STATEMENT Can fashion be

FEATURES 120 BLOND AMBITION Inside the perfectly imperfect world of Goop guru Gwyneth Paltrow

128 CUFF LOVE Model Aamito Lagum embraces the bracelet

132 THE CHICEST LADY AT THE AIRPORT Rosie Huntington-Whiteley takes travel style to new heights

142 THE LOEWE WAY The Spanish fashion house is back and better than ever, thanks to creative director Jonathan Anderson

146 THE NEW GIRL Deepika Padukone, one of India’s highest-paid actresses, makes her mark on Hollywood

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THE START

I n S T Y L E F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 7

cozies up to the season’s sweetest looks feminist? Eric Wilson joins the movement

THE LOOK 55 BEST DRESS Emma Watson in Dior 56 THE LOOK Bold belts, jungle fever, and creative pattern play

BEAUTY 97 LOCK STARS Meet the pros behind the sleek strands of Kiernan Shipka, Lea Michele, and Olivia Palermo

106 THE PICK Pink and red lipstick 109 TRANSFORMATION Kendall Jenner 110 THE INFLUENCER Pat McGrath 112 BEAUTY TALK Priyanka Chopra 114 THE BUZZ This month’s must-haves

THE LIFE 155 Five tastemakers share the bites and beats that always get a party started

ALSO IN THE ISSUE

60 HER BEST EVER Kristen Stewart

12 HELLO!

62 STYLE CRUSH Nicola Peltz

14 FEEDBACK

64 THE MAN John Legend

18 REAL STYLE

68 AMERICAN VOICES Hailey Gates

INSTANT STYLE 71 WHAT TO WEAR, WHAT TO BUY Pleats, bombers + hoodies, spring bags

20 THE COVER 21 HER STYLE 22 CONTRIBUTORS 52 CAUSE & EFFECT Kerry Washington

88 MY STYLE Tessa Thompson

160 THE SIGN

90 ASHLEY GRAHAM DOES DENIM

164 WHY I LOVE Laura Dern


MY WALL, MYSELF The February issue, bite-size, in my office

Hello! WINE TIME Paltrow and Brown

SO MUCH BAGGAG E With Hun tin Whiteley gtonon set

Welcome to the February issue, or—if I may use a restaurant term—the new InStyle’s soft opening. If you have crazy-good eyesight, you can scan the whole issue from the image above. This is my “mini wall,” and, well, I’m obsessed with it. My staff makes fun of me because even while a shoot is still happening, I will have someone make a mini of a pic from a cell phone. There is something so tangible, and rewarding, in seeing your team’s ideas made real. When February was coming together on the wall, I was bouncing up and down like a kid. That’s when I wasn’t on set for some of this issue’s shoots. First, Gwyneth Paltrow’s cover story, on p. 120 (online you can find a hilarious video where I try— and fail—to be her). Following that, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley’s airport-chic story, on p. 132. When it comes to travel dressing, nobody does it better than Rosie, who creative-directed the portfolio. What can I say? I envy her … baggage. Also in this issue you will see the first looks from the new fashion season—all the fabulous pieces that we dream about—and our revamped Instant Style section (p. 71). Why have only one option for a look when you can have five? (Fashion is for the ggreedy, y, after all.)) And what ggoes with everything? pi A y g A perfect neutral p pink lipstick. I’m always on the hunt for one that makes me look like a more fetchiin ing version of myself. (Or that turns me into Rosie Huntiington-Whiteley.) in Failingg that, a new lipstiic ick will have to do..

PRETTY IN PINK From left: Laura Mercier Velour Lovers Lip Colour in Sensual, $28; lauramercier.com. Tom Ford Lip Color Matte in First Time, $53; tomford.com. Givenchy Beauty Rouge Interdit Lipstick in Urban Nude, $34; sephora.com. Dior Rouge Dior Lipstick in Rose Montaigne, $35; dior.com. Nars Audacious Lipstick in Raquel, $32; narscosmetics.com. Chanel Rouge Allure Long Wear Lip Colour in Séduisante, $37; chanel.com.

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I n S T Y L E F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 7

FOLLOW US ON N TWITTE ER @instyle and follow me @laurabrown99 F ylemagazine and follow me @laurabrown99 FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM @insty yl


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feedback REESE RULES

I couldn’t be more excited to see Reese Witherspoon on the cover of your December issue, rocking her classic yet modern style. It’s always wonderful to see a strong female role model like her shine on the pages of InStyle! —SANDRA KUO-SCOTT, San Jose, Calif.

December #InStyle issue @instylemagazine + some of my favorite nailpolishes @essiepolish today.

Reese Witherspoon relaxes in a Khaite cashmere sweater, a Nina Ricci wool and silk skirt, and Gucci leather loafers.

COCONUTS FOR INSTYLE Editor in chief Laura Brown happened upon an issue in Harbour Island, Bahamas.

—@ACOVEKI

ONE FOR THE BOOKS

Just wanted to say thanks for the cover with Reese Witherspoon—and for showing an independent, talented, and smart woman reading a book on a magazine cover. She’s done so much for the literary world, and it’s great to see the fashion world recognizing it too. —MARCO MARROQUIN, George West, Texas

GET IN TOUCH

Via email Send a message to letters@instylemag.com. (All correspondence may be published and edited for clarity or length.) Via Twitter Tweet us @InStyle to share your thoughts. Via Instagram Tag us using the hashtag #InStyleMagazine with your favorite moments.

HOPELESSLY DEV-OTED

Dev Patel for InStyle’s December issue shows how beautiful this man truly is. Catching up on some reading while I recover from a foot surgery. A MUST read article with Reese & Dolly in the December issue of Instyle. —@FAITHHILL

SWEET HOME SUPERSTAR

I absolutely loved the Reese Witherspoon cover feature [ “The Story of Reese”]. She’s so beautiful and inspiring. I couldn’t peel my eyes off the pages!

—@JDAKARDASHIAN, via Twitter

@InStyleMagazine One of these reads is not like the other. (And one of these models is not like the other.) #WarAndReese —@COHELLE

—ROBYN EIGER, Wantagh, N.Y.

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I n S T Y L E F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 7

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INSTYLE READERS TEST-DRIVE THE TRENDS FROM OUR PAGES

ANNE SAGE, Los Angeles

@citysage

INSPIRED BY Color Crash Course: Moss + Black + Poppy (September 2016) HOW SHE MADE IT HER OWN Sage punched up her earthy outfit with a bright red bag and leopard-print loafers.

SAVANNAH BARRON, Manha attan, att an,, Kan. @savannahbarron INSPIRED BY Instant Style (November 2016) HOW SHE MADE IT HER OWN WN use Barron tied the front of her blouse y and rolled her sleeves for a sexy touch on a sweet look.

LAUREN POTTER, New York City @solopoco INSPIRED BY “Naomie’s Moment” (December 2016) HOW SHE MADE IT HER OWN A graphic T and silver choker added edge to her wide-leg pants.

JADE TOPPER, Portland, Ore.

@jaderoseblog

INSPIRED BY “The End of Fur?” (October 2016) HOW SHE MADE IT HER OWN Ripped jeans and an untucked blouse gave Topper’s luxe faux fur a laid-back vibe.

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I n S T Y L E F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 7

SHOW US YOUR STYLE If one of our stories has inspired you to try a new fashion, beauty, or home idea, we want to know. Send a pic (300 dpi or larger) of your transformation to letters@instylemag.com, or tag us on Twitter or Instagram with the hashtag #InspiredByInStyle


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Paltrow in a look from Dior’s spring 2017 collection

the cover BEHIND THE SCENES WITH OUR FEBRUARY COVER STAR, GWYNETH PALTROW

Gwyneth Paltrow spent Halloween playing dress-up on our Encino, Calif., set. But instead of snacking on candy, or even the catered lunch, she stuck strictly to her goat’s milk cleanse. It was her third day of the all-liquid diet, and Paltrow was ready to get to work from the moment she kicked off her white studded Valentino sneakers. As Beyoncé’s Lemonade played in the background, she posed in spring looks from designers including Prada, Louis Vuitton, and Loewe (she obsessed over a pair of the Spanish label’s loafer-bootie hybrids). After the shoot wrapped, Paltrow gave InStyle editor in chief Laura Brown a step-by-step tutorial on how to live like a true wellness guru—yoga lesson and green juice demo included. 20

I n S T Y L E F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 7

FROM THE SHOOT Paltrow loved Cartier’s 18-karat rose-gold cocktail ring with morganite, spinel, and pearl embellishments ($23,700; available at Cartier boutiques).

COVER CREDITS Above, left: Top and skirt FENDI. Rings and bracelet CARTIER. Above, right: Dress and heels VALENTINO. Bracelets CARTIER and TIFFANY & CO. Rings CARTIER and her own. Photographed for InStyle by Greg Kadel. Styled by Melissa Rubini. Hair Lorenzo Martin. Makeup Georgie Eisdell. Manicure Ashlie Johnson.


CURRENTLY READING How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk, by Adele Faber and Elaine Mazlish, Scribner, $11; amazon.com.

COMPLEXION PICK-ME-UP Vintner’s Daughter Active Botanical Serum, $185; vintnersdaughter .com.

TOP SHOPPING SPOT Hirshleifers in Manhasset, N.Y. (2080 Northern Blvd.; hirshleifers.com).

EYELASH MVP Juice Beauty mascara, $22;; juicebeauty.com m.

SIGNATURE SCENT Goop Edition 01 fragrance, $165/1.7 fl. oz.; goop.com.

BEST HOTEL

Four Seasons Hotel George V in Paris (31 avenue George V; fourseasons .com/paris).

ULTIMATE MEAL

The lobster roll at Son of a Gun in L.A. (8370 W. Third St.; sonofa gunrestaurant .com).

FAVORITE PIECE CE O OF JEWELRY A stack of Jennifer Meyer pinkie rings (18kt gold bands with diamonds, $175 each; at Barneys New York).

See behind-the-scenes video from our cover shoot at instyle.com/paltrow

GO-TO DENIM MiH Jeans, $255; mih-jeans.com.

F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 7 I n S T Y L E

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contributors THIS MONTH’S A-TEAM

Leather jacket, Paige, $975; paige .com.

ROSIE HUNTINGTONWHITELEY

Innisfree Eco Flower Tint Balm in No. 4 Rose, $9; innisfree world.com.

MODEL AND DESIGNER “The Chicest Lady at the Airport,” p. 132 GO-TO OUTFIT Skinny jeans, a T-shirt, a leather jacket, and ankle boots. WORKOUT OF CHOICE Body by Simone, especially if you like dancing. FAVORITE BEAUTY PRODUCT My Rosie for Autograph Amazing Radiance Cream [$23; marks andspencer.com]. It gives your skin a glow that lasts all day. IDEAL DATE NIGHT Dinner in a beautiful setting with great conversation and lots of laughter.

FERNANDA LY

FUN FACT I studied Japanese for five years.

MODEL “Funny Valentine,” p. 43 OFF-DUTY ENSEMBLE Pajamas.

GREG KADEL

GUILTY PLEASURE I really like ice cream, but I’m lactose-intolerant. It’s complicated.

PHOTOGRAPHER “Blond Ambition,” p. 120 CREATIVE INSPIRATIONS Richard Avedon and Irving Penn. I love their simple and timeless approach to photography.

SIGNATURE LIP COLOR Innisfree has a nice red tint. I apply it messily then add a layer of lip balm. STAFF SPOTLIGHT

ART EXHIBITION HE LOVED The Diane Arbus show at the Met Breuer was beautiful. There was a lot of previously unseen work.

CHRISTOPHER BAGLEY

RUTHIE FRIEDLANDER

WRITER “Blond Ambition,” p. 120

SITE DIRECTOR CRAZIEST THING SHE’S EVER DONE FOR A STORY I had my cat, Gracie [pictured], do my makeup. FIRST INTERNSHIP Assisting Laura Brown at Harper’s Bazaar. ALWAYS IN HER BAG Glossier Balm Dotcom Universal skin salve, The Row sunglasses, picture of my g , and a p y niece,, Helaina Gene. Titanium sunglasses, s Oliver Peoples x The Row, $450; oliver $ peoples.com. pe

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I n S T Y L E F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 7

ON HIS NIGHTSTAND Between the Woods and the Water, by Patrick Leigh Fermor [$11; amazon.com]. MOST MEMORABLE INTERVIEW Kanye West. I spent time in his Paris apartment while he was recording Yeezus. It was nonstop drama with occasional Kardashian cameos.


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©2016 P&G

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9 10 O T O

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the start THE NEWS IN STYLE

SPRING FLING When it’s still too cold for bare arms, a cheerful set of geometric earrings from new designer Mercedes Castillo gives heavy sweaters a sunnier perspective. Equally irresistible? The architectural silhouettes and earthenware colors found throughout the brand’s full selection. Enamel-lacquered metal earrings, Mercedes Castillo, $150/pair; mercedes castillo.com.

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THE START S T COLLABORATION ALERT

Swarovski + Lanvin

Inspired by Jazz Age glamour, two iconic fashion houses join forces on Cristaux Déco, a Daisy Buchanan–worthy range of jewels. They’re just the thing to pair with newly appointed Lanvin creative director Bouchra Jarrar’s silky spring dresses. Swarovski crystal and gold-plated necklace, Atelier Swarovski by Lanvin, $1,990; atelier swarovski .com.

LONDON CALLING

With a sultry voice and looks to match, English singer and model Dua Lipa is poised to become the next big thing on this side of the pond. Mark your iCal for February 10, when her self-titled album drops.

DANCE NUMBERS

Pop sensation Katy Perry adds designing to her résumé with an array of party-ready shoes named after her best friends. Meet the Caitlin, a not-sobasic black pump with a playful Rubik’s Cube heel. Suede pumps, Katy Perry, $109; available in February at katyperrycollections.com.

WORKS OF ART See couture beyond the lens of Instagram with Swedish illustrator Mats Gustafson’s artsy ode to the storied French house. Inside, you’ll find 150 dreamy renderings of Dior’s designs from 2012 to 2017 using a vibrant palette of watercolors. Dior by Mats Gustafson, Rizzoli, $95; amazon.com.

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Giorgia To rdini and Gilda Ambrosio

YACHT CLUB INSIDER IN NSI SIDE DER R OB OBSE OBSESSION SESS SSIO ION N

Attico

The front-row set’s new favorite label hits its sophomore season running with slinky color-saturated separates and its first footwear collection. “We wanted to create pieces that feel like little treasures,” the label’s It girl founders, Giorgia Tordini and Gilda Ambrosio, say. “There are ribbons, stones, velvet, and satin—we didn’t go g basic!”

Swimwear company Gottex drops a capsule line of luxurious suits to ring in 60 years of private pools and paparazzi photos. Nylon-spandex swimsuit, Gottex, $218; neimanmarcus.com.

Leather heels with canvas, velvet, and sequin embroidery, Attico, $743; modaoperandi .com.

HOLD YOUR HORSES Introducing the latest take on Salvatore Ferragamo’s iconic Sofia bag. Expect the same supple leather carryall, but washed and tanned with timehonored methods used on Florentine saddles. Leather bag with crocodile handle, Salvatore Ferragamo, $3,700; at Salvatore Ferragamo.

QUICK ON THE DRAW

When Jean-Michel Basquiat wasn’t busy painting, he put pen to paper. This month, see the late artist’s rare sketches IRL at the Cleveland Museum of Art. “Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks” runs through April 23; clevelandart.org.

F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 7 I n S T Y L E

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FOR KEEPS The next generation of heirloom-inspired accessories Plexiglas, crystal, and metal necklace, Prada, $1,715; at select Prada boutiques.

YOU KNOW YOU WANT IT

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F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 7 I n S T Y L E

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From top: 18kt gold ring ($1,517) and charms with diamonds ($304 each), Loquet London; at Saks Fifth Avenue. 18kt gold pinkie ring, David Yurman, $1,850; davidyurman.com. Amethyst and 22kt gold ring, Marie-HÊlène de Taillac, $1,990; marie helenedetaillac.com.

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ON DEMAND Calfskin handbag ($4,200) and lambskin pouch ($1,300), CĂŠline; at CĂŠline, 212-5353703. Metal sunglasses, Louis Vuitton, $590; at select Louis Vuitton stores. Nylon booties, Fendi, $1,350; fendi.com.


FUNNY VALENTINE FALL IN LOVE WITH FERNANDA LY IN THE SEASON’S SWEETEST CLOTHES photographed by

ANDREAS OHLUND & MARIA THERESE styled by ALI PEW

G I RL O F TH E M O M ENT. TH E LOO KS FO R N OW Sequined blouse and skirt, Rodarte, price upon request; modaoperandi.com. Diamond and 18kt white gold ring (left hand, $3,280) and diamond, onyx, and 18kt white gold ring ($1,740), Chopard; at Chopard.

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THE STYLE

odel Fernanda Ly has a simple dream. “I want to cut my hair,” she says with longing, cozied up on a couch after the day’s photo shoot in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. “I’ve thought about this for so many years. One day it will happen, I guess.” But not anytime soon. Ly’s long, cotton candy–pink manga-princess locks are her calling card. It’s a trademark look that got her discovered at age 17 while strolling the mall back in her native Australia, and it scored her a runway début at Louis Vuitton’s fall 2015 show two years later, along with an ad campaign and a rare three-season exclusive with the house. “I think I was 14 when I started dyeing it. I went through all the colors—red, orange, blond,” says the 21-year-old, now based in New York. But despite wishful thinking (going back to her natural black is also on her fantasy to-do list), the shade suits her idiosyncratic tastes: Ly is an anime devotee—she and Vuitton’s Nicolas Ghesquière love the Evangelion series—and she’s obsessed with playing Tetris-esque games on her phone and binge-watching Chef’s Table. As for her personal style, it’s “whatever makes me happy,” she says, which can mean anything from schoolgirl plaid accessorized with a bondage-lite choker to a frilly dress. While still eclectic, it’s far less conceptual than what she favored during her early days in the business. “I was in a weird phase where I was only wearing white clothes,” she recalls, laughing. “White socks, shoes, skirts, sweaters, shirts... But then my mom complained about washing everything too much!” No matter—one signature has proven to be more than enough. —STEPHANIE TRONG


Jersey shirtdress, Céline, $3,750; at Céline, 212-535-3703. Velvet and leather sandals, Gabriela Hearst, $595; net-a-porter.com. Opposite, top: Silk dress, Marc Jacobs, $2,400; at Marc Jacobs. Leather clutch, Proenza Schouler, $890; proenza schouler.com. 18kt yellow gold, 18kt rose gold, and black rhodium–plated five-link rings with pavé diamonds (right hand), Spinelli Kilcollin, $7,400; spinelli kilcollin.com. Diamond and platinum ring (left hand, top, $18,400) and diamond and 18kt gold ring ($3,450), Van Cleef & Arpels; at Van Cleef & Arpels. Opposite, bottom: Silk dress, Fendi, $3,700; fendi.com. Metal eyeglasses, Miu Miu, $320; at select LensCrafters stores. F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 7 I n S T Y L E

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THE STYLE

Customized denim jacket, Levi’s, $70; at Levi’s Brooklyn Tailor Shop, 718-963-3750. Cotton sweater, Me and You, $55; itsmeandyou.com. Denim jeans, Industry Standard, $125; industrystandardny.com. Lipstick case with chain (worn as cross-body), Valentino Garavani, $1,045; at Valentino. 9kt rose gold ring (right hand, $467) with diamond charm ($327), Loquet London; at Broken English, 212-219-1264. Diamond and 18kt rose gold ring (left hand, index finger, $1,990), diamond, onyx, and 18kt rose gold ring (left hand, middle finger, $1,740), and mother-of-pearl, diamond, and 18kt rose gold ring ($1,740), Chopard; at Chopard. Hair: Dennis Devoy for Art Department. Makeup: Alice Lane for The Wall Group. Manicure: Yuko Wada for Atelier Management.

I was in a weird phase where I was only wearing white clothes.” 46

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FASHION STATEMENT Models and magazines encouraged voter turnout last fall with campaigns like this one from the Independent Journal Review and Rock the Vote, which imagined Kendall Jenner as Rosie the Riveter.

Can fashion be

FEMINIST? With their spring collections, designers clearly had power and politics on their minds as they created wardrobes for modern working women. As the world continues to change in unpredictable ways, however, that message of strength may be more important than ever

BY ERIC WILSON

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InSTYLE

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FASHION STATEMENT

PANTSUITS

PETRA NEMCOVA in Max Mara NAOMIE HARRIS in Dolce & Gabbana

KRISTEN STEWART in Sandro

W

hen the spring collections were first shown last September, some of the standout trends that captivated fashion editors were pretty pink dresses, sporty bandeau tops, and some mightily short skirts proposed by influential designers like Marc Jacobs and Miuccia Prada. The direction was one of femininity, though not necessarily that of the classic ladylike variety. Rather, the shows reflected an underl i desire d i in the creative community to show lying f th he power and rights of women at a support for critical momeent in history. A lot of designers, led by Phoebee Philo of Céline, offered clothes d the complexity and chaos of that mirrored women’s llivess today. Nowhere ccould this women-friendly mesmore loudly and clearly (and litersage be read m ally)) than att Dior, where a new creative d director, Marria Grazia Chiuri, was making a ment as the first woman to hold pointed statem h position iin the company’s 70-year history. that b te to the writer Chimamanda Paying tribut d h e, who was in attendance at the Ngozi Adichie h in Pariss, Chiuri included T-shirts in the show collection thaat were printed with a line from hor’s speeches: “We should all be one off the auth o he designs were well received, esffeminists.” Th ll so in an industry that generally leans pecially p f and, during the U.S. presidential ffar to the left favored and campaigned eelection, had broadly b ffor Hillary Clinton. In fact, not since the days ff gettes have designers and magaof the suffrag o d been so explicit in making their zzine editors b l k n, which might have been a reacpolitics p know tion to how unsettling the campaign discourse had been back home. Although the results were quite the opposite of what most people in media and fashion had imagined, in the end we are entering a season in which clothing can play an unexpected role in how we communicate our viewpoints to the world. Wearing a pantsuit or a pussy-bow blouse suddenly becomes a political act, BEYONCÉ in Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci

open to interpretation. And Dior’s T-shirts now can be construed less as messages of inclusion than as those of protest. But the underlying intention—to celebrate women in some way—remains the same, which is, hopefully, something we all can agree is positive. At her show Chiuri said, “I strive to be attentive and open to the world and to create fashion that resembles the women of today,” which is, after all, one of the foremost functions of fashion, to reflect our times and our desires. The cause of feminism, in particular, benefits when fashion embraces the imagery of strong women, much as Stella McCartney and Donatella Versace have done in their recent collections, because clothing is, in a way, a universal language. And it is becoming less of a stigma for smart women to talk about fashion or embrace feminine clothing in the workplace rather than dress like men to get ahead. Still, many people were surprised when Adichie, known for her novels Americanah and Purple Hibiscus, was hired as the face of a Boots makeup brand, No7, last November. Yet, as she notes, her engagement with style is a great example of how perceptions can change when you ask if a man would be judged the same way. “When we see a man who’s well dressed, we don’t assume that he must be shallow or he must not be a serious person,” Adichie said in an interview in The New York Times. Although one can hardly imagine how feminism will fare in the coming years, fashion’s newfound support sets a good example, particularly when you consider all the negative aspects of this industry that have had a contrary effect for decades. Advertisements and modeling standards, as well as how sizes are represented in stores, play an enormous role in how women perceive ideals of beauty. And this is a responsibility that has rarely been taken seriously by designers of women’s clothing. Yet it is heartening to see how many of them have actually become interested in women’s lives. Prabal Gurung, for one, was so moved by the election that he paid tribute to pioneering women like Emily Dickinson and Gloria Steinem in his collection. A black T-shirt in his show was embroidered with the words of Susan B. Anthony: “They threw things at me, but they were not roses.” During a recent interview with Jonathan Anderson of Loewe for this issue (p. 142), I was tickled when he mentioned he was inspired by


1

3

KATY PERRY

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1 Lena Dunham wore a Madame M e Ovary sweater by Rachel Antonoff. Maria Grazia Chiuri made a pointed message in A to o 2 M her e Dior o début. 3 Katy Perry brrought her voice to Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign gn. 4 Prabal Gurung embroidered a Susan B. Anthony quote in a sweater. 5 Lady Gaga yq protested outside Trump T p p Tower in New York City.

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LADY GAGA

4

Christine Lagarde, the managing director of the International Monetary Fund, who is well known for being one of the most powerful and stylish women in the world. Anderson, who lives in London, has been outspoken in his criticism of the populist tide in Europe that led to Brexit, among other changes in the political order, but he also sees a silver lining. “We are living in this moment when women have harnessed a new kind of freedom,” he says. “As much as it’s very confusing politically, there is also something inspiring in women who are stepping to the forefront, which should have been happening hundreds of years ago.” With culture wars looming on the horizon that will certainly encompass many issues facing women around the world, fashion will increasingly become a means of expression. An example the designer Gaby Basora likes to think about is a family friend who, as a successful edu-

cator with a taste for immaculate clothes, made a point of riding the bus to work every day so that young women might see her and begin to imagine having important jobs of their own. As the founder and creative director of Tucker, Basora often considers how specific items of clothing can be empowering, even if the sense of strength is only what we ascribe to it in our minds. “Ultimately, fashion can be a way to express things about yourself that are more meaningful than just a blouse,” she says. “It’s fascinating how we create illusions.” Whenever she wonders about the point of it all, Basora reminds herself of this larger purpose. “It’s not only the woman who wears the clothes who makes a difference,” she says. “It’s the women who sew the clothes, the patternmakers, and the women who go off to work to support their families. It’s a meaningful ecosystem to be a part of.” Q

For more insider info and analysis from our fashion news director, follow him on Twitter @ericwilsonsays

Fashion can express things that are more meaningful than just a blouse.” —GABY BASORA, FOUNDER AND CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF TUCKER

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CAUSE & EFFECT

The Scandal star and mom of two explains why she teamed up with Purple Purse to help women escape domestic and financial abuse

hen I first heard the term “financial abuse,” I was honestly a bit confused. I understood domestic abuse, but I didn’t realize that in almost all cases, in addition to inflicting physical harm, abusers block their partners from acquiring, using, and maintaining financial resources. It’s part of what keeps victims from simply walking away. Three years ago the Allstate Foundation approached me about designing a bag for its Purple Purse initiative to help raise money for these victims, and I couldn’t say no. I care a lot about female empowerment, and I know a little bit about fashion, so it’s an ideal partnership. Back in 2013 I created a bag that grassroots antiviolence organizations auctioned off. Now I’ve transitioned from designer to creative director to help the project really grow. I recently asked Tory Burch and Christian Louboutin to make bags that will be auctioned off, with 100 percent of the proceeds supporting the cause [follow @PurplePurse on Twitter and Facebook for information on upcoming auctions and how to bid]. Tory has worked hard for women’s empowerment through her Tory Burch Foundation, so getting her involved was a no-brainer. And since Christian has two little girls of his own, he’s really invested in raising awareness about issues that affect women. We make up 51 percent of the population, so we have to ask ourselves, “Why are we still

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“We should be creating social structures that protect [women].” so vulnerable in some situations?” I just filmed a PSA about a woman who had to hide money inside cardboard tampon applicators until she finally had enough to escape. Hearing her story reminded me that when we give abuse survivors money or grants, we give them the ability to save their own lives and the lives of their children. If you or someone you know is a victim of financial abuse, or if you’d like to make a donation to support others, go to purplepurse .com. As a woman and as the mother of a daughter, I always say that we should be creating social structures that protect us. I’m trying to do just that, one bag at a time. —AS TOLD TO DIDI GLUCK

VITAL STATS

in Ratio of Americans who have never heard of the term “financial abuse” Percentage of Americans who say they wouldn’t know if a loved one was in a financially abusive relationship More than

Number of women who have been helped by the Allstate Foundation since 1952

For more inspiring stories about celebrity activism, go to instyle.com/cause&effect


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by y ERIC W WILSON N

BEST DRESS EMMA WATSON in DIOR Behold, there’s a new artistic director in the house of Dior. Maria Grazia Chiuri has made her mark with dreamy eveningwear that incorporates tarot card iconography. And, wouldn’t you know, the bat is a symbol of rebirth. Watson adds subtle sparkle with darling gold and diamond earrings from London designer Jessica McCormack.

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THE LOOK

Buckle Up Talk about knockouts. ay These ladies are punching way above their weight classes with championship belts.

OLIVIA CULPO in Emanuel Ungaro

LE EA LEA MICH HELE CH E in Mis sson s i sso

JENNIFER LAWRENCE b in Elie Saab

MIRANDA KERR in a La Koradior dress and Saint Laurent belt

ZENDAYA in Michael Kors Collection

KAT ATE E BOS O W WOR RTH H in n Jil Sand nd de d er J Sa


TAYLOR SWIFT in A.L.C.

GIGI H HADID in a Roberto Ca avalli coat

KENDALL JENNER in a Nili Lotan dress and Roberto Cavalli jacket

BELLA HADID in a House of Harlow 1960 x Revolve coat

RIHANNA in a Dion Lee shirt and Dries Van Noten pants

OntheSpot There must be a new king of the jungle, given all these twisted takes on leopard. It’s what all the cool cats are wearing.

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THE LOOK

Mi Match

OLIVIA PALERMO in Zara

Pattern play is all the more fun when you start breaking the rules. Stripes and checks? Why not?

MARION COTILLARD in Rochas

SHAILENE WOODLEY in Sophie Theallet

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THANDIE NEWTON in Duro Olowu MICHELLE MONAGHAN in Rosie Assoulin


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THE LOOK

HER BEST EVER “Kristen is the ultimate red-carpet chameleon. In the 12 years I’ve been working with her, we’ve constantly experimented with her look—and that includes her hair. Style is just one of the many ways she expresses herself. She loves the unexpected, like wearing a cutoff Chanel T-shirt to Cannes or Rodarte trousers covered in safety pins. But, really, it’s all about balance: finding a way – A A SWENNEN, NN N, Kristen Stewart’s ’ stylistt to marry the rock and roll with the romantic.” r i ” –TARA

2011: In PROENZA SCHOULER at the Met Gala in N.Y.C.

2013: In CHANEL at the brand’s fall haute couture show in Paris

2015: In ZUHAIR MURAD at the L.A. première of American Ultra

2016: In CHANEL at the Cannes Film Festival

2016: In RODARTE at the New York Film Festival


2013: In STELLA MCCARTNEY at the Met Gala in N.Y.C.

2016: In CHANEL at the Cannes Film Festival

2016: In CHANEL at the Cannes Film Festival

2012: In BALENCIAGA at the American Film Institute Fest in L.A.

2014: In CHANEL COUTURE at the New York Film Festival

HER BEST!

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THE LOOK K

STYLE CRUSH AGE 22. INSTAGRAM @nicolaannepeltz. HOW YOU KNOW HER Peltz landed

don’t want to take it off.” SIGNATURE SHOES “Saint Laurent’s pointy-toe heels

her first major TV role in 2013, starring as the kind but troubled Bradley Martin in Bates Motel. Since then she’s appeared in movies like Transformers: Age of Extinction, Affluenza, and Youth in Oregon; walked the runway for Balenciaga; and cozied up to singer Zayn Malik in his 2016 music video “It’s You.” STYLE MANTRA “I think of fashion as art, and I feel confident when I put on a beautiful piece,” says Peltz. FAVE DESIGNERS “Alexander Wang is incredibly talented. I want to buy everything the minute I walk into his store. Riccardo Tisci also makes super-sexy dresses with an almost boyish twist for Givenchy, and his oversize bomber jackets are so soft.” STREET STAPLES “I love Rumi Neely’s line, Are You Am I, because there’s something cute about each piece. I’m really into the idea of a comfy wardrobe right now too. I have an entire drawer full of Nike leggings, which I wear pretty much all the time, and I’m obsessed with sweatshirts. My brother recently gave me a Vetements one, and I

are so classy. During the day I wear black boots by Dear Frances. I can run around in them without being too careful because they actually look better the more you beat them up.” GO-TO PURSE “My mom gave me a vintage green suede Chanel bag for Christmas two years ago, and I still carry it constantly.” CROWN JEWELS “I like small, delicate pieces that make me feel girlie, like my Jacquie Aiche body chain. I buy her jewelry as gifts for my girlfriends.” RETRO GOALS “I like to think of vintage shopping as a treasure hunt. It’s exciting to come across a unique piece with a story behind it. I’ll definitely splurge on something cool from another era.” FINISHING TOUCH “When I run out of the house makeup-free, I throw Charlotte Tilbury lipstick into my purse and I’m good to go. My favorite shades are Very Victoria and Bitch Perfect.” ULTIMATE ICON “My grandma has the most baller style ever. She rocks sweatpants with the craziest sneakers. I’ve even given her a few fancy pairs from Chanel and Dior so she’s always on trend.” —SAMANTHA SIMON

“I could wear black all day, every day. I’ve always gravitated toward sleek neutrals instead of bright colors.”

TOM FORD

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THE MAN Gucci suit and shirt. Etro loafers.

He sings, acts, produces, and makes some mean fried chicken wings. But while Legend is halfway to an EGOT and his career is thriving, his first priority—and creative inspiration—is his family by LEIGH BELZ RAY photographed by EMMAN MONTALVAN styled by SUE CHOI


Burberry shirt. Boss pants. Tom Ford sunglasses. Watch, his own.

ate last year, John Legend performed “Love Me Now,” the propulsive first single off his new album, Darkness and Light, at the American Music Awards. He was decked out like a disco ball in a glittery bomber jacket and stood on a tiered riser three stories above the stage. It was a departure for the 38-yearold. Everything was bigger and bolder— and, most notably, there was no piano. In fact, thanks to his elevation, the performance was likely the first time a

national broadcast audience has ever gotten a good look at his legs. Life is a little different these days for the artist born John Stephens, 12 years after he eased onto the charts with the retro-feeling “Ordinary People” off his neo-soul début, Get Lifted. His empire has expanded. He’s pop: pop songs; pop culture; Papa to the most famous 10-month-old around, daughter Luna Simone. His fans can now make his signature fried chicken wings with spicy honey butter at home (wife Chrissy Teigen’s best-selling 2016 cookbook, Cravings, includes his recipe) and

speak knowingly about Luna’s awwinspiring Halloween costumes. Teigen has always had an unabashedly public persona, and in recent years she’s brought Legend along for the ride. “I think because my personality is kind of mellow and subdued, it’s good for me to have someone who is kind of the other way,” he says. “She’s energetic and passionate and has more emotion. I think she wishes I had more emotion sometimes too. But she makes me have more fun than I would normally have. I don’t think the whole thing of opposites attract is exactly

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THE MAN right—you have to have enough in common. But the combination of the two of us is dynamic and exciting.” Living so publicly has no doubt helped professionally as well: Darkness and Light, his sixth album, rolled out with a media blitz in December, and this year he sets off on a global tour, his biggest ever. But it’s clear that as ambitious as he is, Legend is still trying to find a comfortable place within his new level of fame. Calling from his L.A. home on an early November morning, he speaks of the “opportunity cost” he’s been facing since adding producer, actor, activist, husband, and father to his résumé over the past few years. (You likely saw him in December’s La La Land playing against Ryan Gosling as a bandleader, a role Legend prepared for by studying with an acting coach.) When Legend commits to something, he’s locked in. “I get things done,” he says when asked for his most standout trait. “I’m good at executing, at following through.” But there’s always something that he has to give up by saying yes to a new project. “Now that I have a family, I’m tougher on everybody who works for me,” he says. “There’s more ‘Nope, I’m not going’ and ‘Nope, I’m not doing this.’ I try to stay home as much as I can. I just don’t want to miss out on this important time in Luna’s life.” Luna’s upbringing will likely be substantially different from Legend’s own. He and his three siblings grew up in Springfield, Ohio, with a lifestyle that revolved around their Pentecostal church. “My grandfather was our pastor; my mother was the choir director; my grandmother was the organist; my dad was the drummer and a minister and a deacon,” he says. “So I was raised in that setting. It was strict. And very, very, very Christian.” Though he says he didn’t carry the religion into adulthood, the lessons he learned about character endured. “My parents homeschooled us, and they literally had books called character sketches that were about what it means to be hardworking, determined, loving, patient…and how to succeed in the right way.”

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Burberry jacket and trousers. Boss shirt and tie. Grooming: Ron Stephens. Makeup: Sydney Sollod for The Wall Group.

The other thing that carried over from his childhood in the church was a sense of style. Let’s pause for a moment and imagine little Johnny Stephens dressed in his church suits, made just for him by his mother, a seamstress, and his father, a factory worker and tailor. “I was a very dapper little kid,” he says with a laugh. “I grew up around people who loved clothes and loved making them. I never was a tailor myself, but I’ve been ironing my clothes since I was 6.” (The habit stuck. Teigen famously first stumbled upon Legend ironing his clothes in a dressing room on the set of his 2007 video for the single “Stereo.”) Even now it’s clear that he still prefers a natty look, opting for blazers and suits in classic neutral colors. “My personal style isn’t outlandish in any way,” he says. And no disco-ball jackets when he’s off duty: His mom would surely

notice. “She still comments on my clothes,” he admits. “For things she likes, she’ll say, ‘That’s sharp, Johnny!’” His mom is not the only one with style opinions. “[Chrissy] loves it when I wear a dark suit and white shirt, open with no tie. We’ve had some good date nights with that look.” So between his commendable commitment to having date nights and the Teigen-inspired No. 1 single “All of Me” (“Love your curves and all your edges/Love your perfect imperfections”), it would follow that Legend is a bit of a dream partner, right? “I’m definitely not the perfect husband,” he counters. “I try to remember to buy flowers randomly—that’s a good thing to do. I’m not as romantic as some people might think. I’m working on it.” He laughs. “My friends certainly don’t think I’m some special guru of love.” ■


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THE LOOK HOME New York City AGE 26 HOW YOU KNOW HER As host of States of Undress on Viceland, Gates uses fashion as a starting point to examine women’s rights and socioeconomic issues, sometimes in war-torn nations. WHAT’S NEXT Gates filmed in locales including Bolivia and Mexico for Season 2, scheduled to premiere this spring.

AMERICAN VOICES

HOSTING VICEL AND’S STATES OF UNDRESS SERIES HAS GIVEN THE FORMER MIU MIU MODEL A CRASH COURSE IN GLOBE-TROTTING AND INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING. IN SEASON 2, GATES CONTINUES HER EXPLORATION OF CULTURAL ISSUES, FASHION , AND WOMEN’S RIGHTS THROUGH A DISTINCTLY AMERICAN LENS by SHALAYNE PULIA

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How do you decide what to pack when you head off to shoot a new episode? It’s this weird experience where I think, “I need to wear something cool enough so viewers trust that I know what I’m talking about, but also something practical so I can do all the things I need to.” But not anything so practical that it looks like I’m trying to be Christiane Amanpour in a safari suit during the ’90s or something. What do you think about U.S. fashion now? The Internet seems to have killed American fashion in the sense that everybody has good style but they also look vaguely the same. It’s hard to differentiate creativity from mimicry. Along with covering the intersection of fashion and culture, States of Undress has also shown you searching for tampons on the black market in Venezuela and interviewing cleric Abdul Aziz Ghazi, a sympathizer of the self-proclaimed Islamic State, in Pakistan. How do you find the right balance? It’s like hiding broccoli in ice cream. Maintaining a sense of humor is key to getting people to also focus on the crises at hand. What do you want to achieve with the series in Season 2? This can be a show about fashion moonlighting as a show about women’s rights, but it also can be about the economy in Venezuela and censorship in China. It’s episode- and country-specific. One of my favorite parts is that we’re able to cover it all. As an American traveling abroad, what’s surprised you? Women’s bodies have become a real battleground for politics. Even in Paris, the birthplace of fashion as we know it, there are discriminatory laws based on Islamophobia [e.g., a ban on face veils in public]. What’s your favorite part of the job? I like that we give viewers a sense of what it’s actually like to be in a circumstance, which can give as much information as the reportage. And I’m grateful that the show lets me express my emotions, which is not something journalists, especially female journalists, are always allowed to do on camera. Perhaps I’m breaking all the rules, but I’m very grateful for it.


I spy, with my little eye, something beginning with “S.” Who knows what you’ll see in the backup camera1 of your new 2017 Corolla, but that’s kind of the point, isn’t it? That’s why it comes standard, along with Toyota Safety Sense™ P.2 Because, even though you might see almost anything, one thing we think you should definitely see is safety. How many things can you spy that start with the letter “S”?

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A DV ERT I S EM EN T

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CÉLINE ÉLINE

WHAT TO WEAR, WHAT TO BUY

Pleats, PLEASE

From top: Polyester, Marciano, $198; marciano.com. Polyester, Maje, $325; maje.com. Polyester, H&M, $35; hm.com.

What’s swishy, sophisticated, and Instagram-ready? Fashion’s skirt of the moment, a bold folded number that blows in the breeze. Try it dressed down with w a T-shirt or beneath a voluminous blouse à la Céline.

GIOVANNA BATTAGLIA From top: Satin, Boohoo.com, $40; us .boohoo.com. Polyester, Kate Spade New York, $348; katespade.com.

F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 7 I n S T Y L E

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INSTANT STYLE

Kid suede and grosgrain mules, Chanel, $800; at select Chanel boutiques. GILDA AMBROSIO

KATE FOLEY

JAN-MICHAEL QUAMMIE

THE GREAT

Shoe Debate

Heels or flats? The street-style set is taking sides, stepping out in Chanel’s hanel ha nel s two two-toned toned to ned mules mules and and Vans Vans Old Sk Skool ool sneakers sneak sn eakers ers.. We e say a pai pairr of of each each wi willll sta start rt spr spring ing g off on th the e righ right g t foot. foot..

Canvas, leather, and suede sneakers, Vans, $60; vans.com.

ROSIE HUNTINGTONWHITELEY

DYNAMIC DUO: PINK + PURPLE

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MARC JACOBS

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BALENCIAGA

CHANEL

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VETEMENTS

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SAINT LAURENT

INSTANT STYLE

When it comes to smart styling, the iconic Italian ous game. brand has serious game Try these four win winning ideas ASAP.

Belt an Unzipped Jacket A high-contrast color scheme accentuates the cinched-in shape. Leather jacket, Coach 1941, $1,580; coach.com. Leather belt, Meredith Wendell, $50; meredithwendell.com.

Layer a Bra over a Button-Down To balance a brightly patterned silk blouse, go for a solid on top. Satin bra top, Kuho, $160; at Nordstrom. Silk shirt, Derek Lam 10 Crosby, $425; at Derek Lam 10 Crosby, 646-747-4647.

Wrap and Tuck Your Cardi Leave the top button fastened to hold the neckline in place. Merino wool–blend cardigan, Banana Republic, $78; bananarepublic.com. Silk shirt, Orla Kiely, $248; orlakiely.com. Leather belt, Michael Kors Collection, $290; at select Michael Kors stores.

FOUND: YOUR NEW SATURDAY NIGHT LOOK

Simple but sexy, Saint Laurent’s dressed-up take on denim is a fresh alternativve to the h LBD..

Clash Graphic Prints With a few shades W n common, the two in motifs work as one. m Acrylic-nylon sweater-vest, Forever sw 2 , $18; forever21.com. 21, Cotton shirt, Brooks Brothers, $98; brooks brothers.com.

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Denim jeans, Levi’s, $64; levi.com. Rayon-nylon top, BCBG Max Azria, $98; bcbg.com. Kid leather heels, Jimmy Choo, $695; at select Jimmy Choo stores.


INSTANT STYLE

PERFECT PAIRING

Jacket Triacetate, DKNY, $498; dkny .com. Hoodie Terry cloth, Tory Sport, $150; torysport .com.

Jacket Polyamide, Tommy x Gigi, $295; tommy .com for stores. Hoodie Cotton, Huf x Thrasher, $70; store.huf worldwide.com (available in sizes up to XXL).

Jacket Nylon, Diesel, $598; diesel.com. Hoodie Cottonpolyester, Adidas Originals, $65; adidas .com.

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VETEMENTS

Whether it’s over slim jeans or thigh-high leather boots, as seen at Vetements, this streetwear-inspired combo is cozy yet cool. Jacket Nylon, Alpha Industries, $150; alphaindustries.com. Hoodie Cotton, Tim Coppens, $345; net-a-porter.com.

Jacket Satin, H&M, $50; hm .com. Hoodie Cotton-polyester fleece, Fila, $55; fila.com.

Jacket Nylon, Uniqlo, $80; uniqlo.com. Hoodie Polyestercotton, Ivy Park, $65; available in February at nordstrom .com.


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INSTANT STYLE $150 Gold-plated earrings, Elizabeth and James; shopbop .com.

the score

Cheap thrills to fast-track your style

ELENA PERMINOVA

$129 Viscosepolyester pants, Vince Camuto; vincecamuto .com. $80 Polyester blouse, Ann Taylor; anntaylor.com (available in sizes up to XXL).

$40 Swarovski crystal and gold-plated ring, Jules Smith; bloomingdales.com. $140 Leather and plastic boots, Aldo; aldoshoes.com.

$48 Fauxleather skirt, Lulus; lulus.com. $50 Polyurethane bag with scarf detail, Zara; zara.com.

$115 Stainless steel watch with leather strap, Fossil; fossil.com.

$60 Bovine leather bag, Mango; mango.com.

$43 Acrylicblend sweater, ASOS; asos.com. $70 Canvas sneakers, Tretorn; tretorn.com. $70 Polyesterrayon skirt, Loft; loft.com.

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VERONIKA HEILBRUNNER

$98 Cotton top, Rebecca Minko; rebecca minko .com.


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INSTANT STYLE

Causing a Ruffle

THE SHOULDER T SHOW

Paired d with pointy-toe slingbacks, flo ouncy skirts go from highscho ool-dance sweet to Audrey H Hepb burn levels of sophistication. To T keep the effect casual, add a simple knit top.

Silk crêpe de chine skirt, Altuzarra, $1,795; saks.com. Suede heels, Nine West, $89; ninewest.com.

LAUREN SANTO DOMINGO

Satin-blend skirt, ASOS, $65; asos.com. Calfskin heels, Repetto, $795; repetto.com.

LANVIN

MONSE

Cotton-blend skirt, Milly, $350; milly.com. Leather heels, Dolce & Gabbana, $695; at select Dolce & Gabbana boutiques.

STELLA MCCARTNEY

The latest in décolletage: a flash fl of clavicle on one side, elegantly draped fabric on the other.

Viscose skirt, Zimmermann, $795; intermixonline.com. Leather heels, Marc Fisher Ltd, $170; marcfisherfootwear.com.

THE BEST BASICS: S BLACK BODYSUITS

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Modalspandex, Tuxe, $140; tuxebody wear.com.

Cottonspandex, Kendall + Kylie, $65; tony walker .com for info.

Cottonnylon, Wolford, $250; wolford .com. ISABEL MARANT

Leave tucking (and retucking) behind with a sleek one-piece that won’t create bulk. It looks equally chic with well-worn jeans or slim-fitting skirts (just ask Kendall and Gigi).


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INSTANT STYLE

JUST IN

GUCCI

Straight from the runways, four emerg e ging g trends about to go big bg

Spinel python with gold plate, enamel, and onyx, Bulgari, $5,150; at Bulgari.

P N D PRINTED

Lambskin, Balenciaga, $1,895; available in February at select Saks Fifth Avenue stores, 646344-6300.

Calf leather, Loewe, $3,490; loewe.com.

Leather, Furla, $478; available in February at furla.com.

Poplin canvas, Kate Spade New York, $348; available in February at katespade .com.

GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI

Calf leather, Versace, $1,150; at us .versace.com.

Embossed leather, Rachel Comey, $414; rachelcomey.com. Faux leather, LC Lauren Conrad, $69; kohls.com.

Linen and leather, Little Liffner, $520; goop.com.

Calfskin and suede, Chloé, $1,550; at Chloé, 212-7178220 for info.

Cotton techno, Michael Kors Collection, $990; at select Michael Kors stores.

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RING HANDLE

Nubuck, Simon Miller, $390; simonmillerusa.com.


INSTANT STYLE Satin, Giorgio Armani, $1,295; armani.com. Viscose-silk, Trademark, $598; trade-mark.com.

Leather, Alexander Wang, $595; alexander wang.com.

HANDHELD

Calfskin, Moynat, $2,820; at Moynat, 212-4524696.

LANVIN

Leather, 3.1 Phillip Lim, $550; 31phillip lim.com.

Lambskin, Victoria Beckham, $1,920; victoriabeckham.com.

Leather, Michael Kors Collection, $1,390; at select Michael Kors stores.

Calfskin, French Connection, $78; usa .frenchconnection.com.

Leather, Dooney & Bourke, $398; dooney.com.

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Metal and enamel, Dior, $8,000; at select Dior boutiques.

MINI + M MAXI STRAP

Leather, Frances Valentine, $295; frances valentine .com.

FENDI

Leather, Marc Jacobs, $495; marcjacobs.com.


A DV ERT I S EM EN T

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INSTANT STYLE

RODARTE

mystyle

9 Robert Pruitt’s Be of Our Space World (2009).

WESTWORLD ACTRESS TESSA THOMPSON SHARES A FEW OF HER FAVORITE THINGS Fendi dress. Aurélie Bidermann earrings.

6 My go-to outfit is a silk slip and Stan Smith sneakers. Sometimes a dress is more comfortable than jeans. 7 When I’m feeling down, I listen to my father’s band, Chocolate Genius Inc. It reminds me of home. 8 To get my creative juices flowing, I light a candle. I’ve never nev er met a Diptyque Diptyq Dip tyque ue scent scent I didn d idn t didn’t like. lik enjoy alone ne tim time, e, so art artist istt e. 9 I enj joy my alo Robert Rob ert Pr Pruit uitt’s t’s de depic pictio tions ns of wom women en p in soli solitud tude e reall really y spea speak to me. me. p k to 1 Studded leather booties, Rodarte, $1,242; at Curve NY, 212-966-3626. 2 C Cowshed S y Sleepy C w Cow C g Calming B h Bath S , Salts, $ ; $29; h d cowshed c com. .com.

3 8 Diptyque Rosa Mundi Candle, $68; diptyque paris.com.

7 Truth vs. vs Beauty, by Chocolate Genius Inc., $11; available on iTunes.

1 I love Rodarte. Their pieces always have a sense of humor. Every season they make a heeled bootie that I wear to the ground. 2 I’m a big bath person. Adding salts to the tub is a great way to relax. 3 Morocco has the most inspiring style. I daydream about moving there. 4 I’m currently reading Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan series (from $10 each; amazon.com). Each book is impossible to put down. 5 To escape the daily grind, I stay at Eleven, a quiet two-room inn on the coast in Bolinas, Calif. (from $165/night; 11wharfroad.com).

I don’t believe in being underdressed or overdressed. If you feel good, you look good.” 88

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4

5 6 Silk dress, Ganni, $255; at Kirna Zabête, 212-941-9656. Leather sneakers, Adidas Originals, $75; adidas.com.


INSTANT STYLE

DOES DENIM THE SUPERMODEL ON FIT, FRAYS, AND UPDATES TO TRY RIGHT NOW THE JEAN J UPDAT UPDATE Acetate and metal sunglasses, Prada, $520; at Sunglass Hut, 212-759-3720.

I like to wear a cropped top with high-rise jeans to really show off my hourglass shape.”

THE COATED JEAN Coated denim, Universal Standard, $100 (10–28); universal standard.net.

THE RAW EDGE JEAN Denim, Good American, $169 (0-24); good american .com.

In an NYDJ top and jeans.

WE ALL HAVE A GO-TO O JJEAN, the t eo one e pair that looks so good, you pretty much stop wearing everything else. For me it’s a high-waist skinny jean. Notthing g plays up my curves better than that cla assic cut,, so I’m always shopping for fresh takes, t like lace-up p detailing or cool, waxy finisshes. After yearss of sticking to dark washes,, I’ve been loving g lighter shades of blue lately y too, especially y the cropped frayed styles that t show off my y sneakers and sky-high boo oties. I always look for jeans with a little bit of stretch and then I go down a size, which helps minimize e that dreaded w waist gap. An n nd when n fit is still an issue,, there are e lotss of brands that will w customiz ze z a pair to your exa act measure e ements. You can also pick p th he wash, rise, and even the pocket et depth, which is big g for me because eI usually cut the pockets out of alll of my jeans. It’ss Embossed leather bag, my secret to a Saint Laurent, nice, flat front. $2,790; ysl.com.

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Diamond, gold vermeil, and 18kt gold earring, Lara Melchior, $1,895; nordstrom .com.

THE LACE-UP JEAN Denim, True Religion, $269 (23–34); truereligion.com.

Studded leather booties, Giuseppe Zanotti Design, $1,595; giuseppe zanotti design.com. THE HE CUST M TOM JEAN AN Denim, eShaktti, $ $80 (0–36 ) 6W); eshakti.com.


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Kiernan Shipka and Ashley Streicher

lock stars

WHAT DO KIERNAN SHIPKA , LEA MICHELE, AND OLIVIA PALERMO HAVE IN COMMON? LUSTROUS HAIR, FEARLESS STYLE—AND A COLLABORATIVE RELATIONSHIP WITH A MASTER HAIRSTYLIST. HERE, THE WOMEN BEHIND THESE GORGEOUS RED-CARPET LOOKS TALK TO THEIR FAVORITE MUSES

beauty P H OTO G R A P H BY E M M A N M O N TA LVA N


BEAUTY

KIERNAN SHIPKA & ASHLEY STREICHER INSTYLE: Do you ever work on your own hair? KIERNAN SHIPKA: Oh my gosh, no! It’s so bad. I don’t

GO-TO PRODUCTS

even know how to work a curling iron. I literally pull my hair up in a little mini-bun and leave it at that. I let my hair dry naturally and part it to the side. I’m happy that Ashley is so talented, because I could never do my hair myself. IS: What’s your relationship like? KS: It’s an older sister/younger sister vibe. I’ve always felt close to her. We love to laugh. We’re so silly—it’s like a sleepover every time she does my hair. ASHLEY STREICHER: We collaborate so well. Kiernan has amazing, chic taste, which really made me want to work with her. She has a unique style: classy with a modern edge. IS: I’m told that you have the perfect spot to do your hair and makeup. What’s it like? KS: There is a little “getting ready” room in my parents’ house that I always use. It used to be a dusty old attic, but we made it super-fun. Ashley brings me a coffee, and we listen to the Blood Orange Pandora station. IS: What was your biggest hair risk? KS: I love the crazy Mohawk vibe, and also extensions, like the ones I wore for the SAG Awards. Six months ago I went to a disco punk–themed birthday party, and we did the wildest, giant crimped hair for it. No one else dressed up, so it was slightly awkward, but the hair was great. IS: In 2014 you dyed your hair brown. Do you like to play with color? KS: That was for a role, and then I had to go platinum blond right after. There’s a lot of changing hair color in this industry, but I find it fun—as long as my hair doesn’t sn’t fa fall doesn’t out! Since Mad Men, I’ve been blond—it just ffeels like me. Most people don’t know that I have naturally b h ly brown ly hair. IS: What was your favorite look on Kiernan? an n?

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Sachajuan an n Dr Dry y Sha a poo ampoo Powder Sh S amp o ncrred nc r ible redibl e It gives in nd text texture ure volume and e aving av hair irr without lea a ing g ha rty rt y or or dry. dry.. feeling dirt $3 35;; davi 35 avid d rrot rotttta. ta.com com.. pirr

Striiike in Beverly Hills

AS: It was for the Laura Mercier dinner at the London [West

Hollywood] last year. I worked with my sisters [makeup artist Jenn Streicher and brow artist Kristie Streicher] at our Striiike salon. Kiernan was wearing the cutest collared Valentino dress that inspired the French knot look. We even gave her a red lip, which she never wears. KS: I told them, “Do your magic.” I took a risk, and it turned out great. For the Costume Designers Guild last year, I wore a lavender McQueen dress, and the hair was so simple and nice. That was the emblematic Ashley hairdo. IS: What’s your look for 2017? KS: I feel much more comfortable in my own skin now, and I want to show that off. Maybe dyeing my hair red, purple, and pink, just the full rainbow. Why not? Maybe do a bang. I want nt to be open-minded about trying something new and sseein ng if I like it. You Y gett to t know k lf more that way. yourself

GH HD H Platinum Stylle lerr E ut Easy to use withou causing creases orr crimps, it creates nd “cool-girl waves” an ht-ht doubles as a straigh er. ener, says Streiche

Reverie Milk R Anti-Frizz Treatment ““Squeeze through dam d mp ends and let air-d air -d a dry for a natural textture,” t ttex she says.

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BEAUTY

LEA MICHELE & SARAH POTEMPA

GO-TO G O TO PRODUCTS

INSTYLE: What’s your favorite look that Sarah created for you? LEA MICHELE: I went to Elton John’s Oscars party, and she did the most beautiful hair. I felt like a princess. I also did a television show called Who Do You Think You Are? and Sarah did my hair for the entire week—each day we had a different look. She also did my hair for the Tonys when Spring Awakening was nominated, and for the first upfront for Glee, before anybody even knew who I was. SARAH POTEMPA: The Oscars look was gorgeous. I did a peekaboo braid down the middle, and it was so chic and stunning. It was blown out and flat-ironed, but it had this natural feel that went into a low pony. It felt very carefree but also very sophisticated. IS: What is your collaboration process? LM: We look at a lot of inspiration photos and decide what style we want. I trust whatever she does. Sarah always encourages me to try different looks, and working with her puts me in the best mood. SP: Lea gives me the opportunity to be creative. She was one of the first celebrities I did detailed braids on. I feel like I’ve had all these great moments with her over the years. IS: Sarah created the Beachwaver product line five years ago. Were you the first to try it? LM: Yeah, she definitely tried out the Beachwaver on me. It’s the most incredible tool. It’s a game changer. You can take two minutes and have a cool hairstyle. SP: People always wanted me to re-create Lea’s hair from the red t so I thought th ht there th e needed to be a tool that d carpets, women h l n can use at home to re-creaate the looks theemselves.

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When I launched the Beachwaver and the Wrap Up, Lea was literally the first one to try them and Instagram it. IS: How do you maintain such healthy hair? LM: When I’m not working, I give my hair and skin a break. I don’t wear any makeup, and I do not touch my hair. No heat, no product. It’s important because my hair and skin need time to breathe. IS: What has been your biggest hair risk so far? LM: When I cut my bangs! Sarah helps me take risks with my hair. That was probably the best risk I’ve ever taken. I think I want bangs again! IS: What’s next for you? LM: Right now it’s a toss-up between doing that or going lighter again. When I finish Scream Queens, Sarah and I have an appointment the next day, so I’ll definitely have a new look for the new year. y ar. n

Oribe Surfcomber Orib Tou usled Texture Mousse A sho sho ot of this lightweigh wei gh ght mousse adds the sl slig ig ghtest bit of grit to fre fresshly washed hair.

R+Co Outer Space Flexible Hairspray This long-lasting spray leaves hair touchable and soft. Perfect for strands that have just been “beach-waved.”

$38; oribe.com. $3

$29; randco.com.

The Beachwaver Co. Beachwaver S1.25 For a beautiful, consistent wave every time, this tool, available in three sizes, rotates in both directions. $129/1.25" barrel; beachwaver.com.


BEAUTY

OLIVIA PALERMO & LACY REDWAY

GO-TO PRODUCTS P RODUCTS

INSTYLE: What do you love about experimenting with hair? OLIVIA PALERMO: I’ve always been into beauty and fashion. Hair and makeup really pull everything together. A braid, for example, gives the look a different feel that I love. LACY REDWAY: I have been braiding ever since I was a kid. I was the girl in school braiding everyone’s hair. It’s part of my foundation, so I love incorporating braids into my work with Olivia. IS: Describe your relationship. OP: She’s part of the family. It’s really important with creative people to let them do their own creative thing. Somehow, we are always on the same page. We tell our story through beauty. LR: We don’t pull references. We like to innovate things like nontraditional braids and updos in a collaborative effort. Olivia is not normal: She can pick an outfit and have a look together in five seconds and blow everyone away. Sometimes with our biggest red-carpet events, I don’t know what I am going to do, but she trusts me and gives me the freedom to play. Some of our best looks have been on the fly and they organically come together. IS: Tell us what inspired the FUNhawk look. LR: A couple of days ago, it was raining, and she was going to the Footwear News Achievement Awards. I knew I wanted to put her hair up because of the weather, so I made up a FUNhawk. It’s a take on the faux-hawk, but I didn’t know how that was going to end up. Luckily, Olivia allows me to bring out the best in my work. IS: What’s important to know about Olivia’s hair? LR: It’s very soft. Olivia takes care of her hair very well.

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She uses good-quality products like Phyto clarifying shampoo and volumizer and never has split ends. OP: I think it’s really important to maintain your hair even if it’s a little dusting of a haircut every three weeks so it’s healthy. I just keep my hair clean and wash it. IS: What’s a favorite look of yours? OP: Recently, Lacy and I did this quick topknot bun with a braid in the back, which was really cute, and then we saw it referenced a few days later. We always want to do something different. Your hair and texture are different each day, so you can’t make it the same. A slight change is important. LR: I don’t particularly like copying other people’s work. I think that’s why Olivia and I have such good chemistry: She understands that too. It’s not that we set out to make trends or anything like that. We just create our own lane and path, and we have fun with it.

Wella Professionals W E EIMI Ocean Spritz ““It’s like bottling the oc cean,” says Redway. Sp o Spray from midshaft to e d of curls and scrunch end h for beach hair.

Ph hyto PhytoVolume Actif Volumizing Spray Spr the roots before S e Spritz blo b ow-drying to help lift tthe hair and create vo volume and bounce.

L’’Oréal Paris Elnett Satin Hairspray “I use it on all hair ttypes,” she says. It provides a strong hold yet can easily be brushed out.

$19; wella.com.

$30; phyto.com.

$15; lorealparisusa.com. $


Booties and bonnet by Irulea

Four generations of family Coins to commemorate Charlotte’s birth

A shawl of fine merino wool

An heirloom for a christening gown

PICK UP A COPY EVERY WEEK OR SUBSCRIBE AT PEOPLE.COM


BEAUTY 2 8 1

SHOP SOPHISTICATED PINKS AND SHOWSTOPPING REDS TO REV UP YOUR VALENTINE’S DAY photographed by

BRIAN HENN

1. Giorgio Armani Beauty Rouge Ecstasy is vibrant yet moisturizing (in 304, $34; giorgioarmani beauty-usa.com). 2. The honey-nectar oil in Maybelline New York Color Sensational Inti-Matte Nudes has a creamy feel and a matte finish (in Honey Pink, $7; maybelline.com).

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3. This rosy YSL Rouge Volupté Shine manages to be bright as well as sheer (in N. 57, $37; yslbeautyus.com). 4. A liner and lipstick in one, Benefit They’re Real Double the Lip creates a fuller pout in one step (in Fuchsia Fever, $20; benefitcosmetics.com).

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5. The silk extract in Tatcha Kyoto Red Silk Lipstick keeps lips smooth ($55; tatcha.com).

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6. Clinique Pop Matte Lip Colour + Primer promises up to eight hours of wear (in Icon Pop, $19; clinique.com).

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7. Dior Rouge Dior Lipstick delivers a dose of plumping hyaluronic acid (in #775 Darling, $35; dior.com). 8. Charlotte Tilbury K.I.S.S.I.N.G. Lipstick is the perfect pink neutral (in Valentine, $32; charlottetilbury.com).

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BEAUTY

2013

2010

2011

2012

T R A N S F O R M AT I O N

Kendall Jenner

2016

“If it were up to Kendall, she’d always look like her Kimoji—no makeup, hair down and parted p in the center,” says her hairstylist Andre ew F Fit itzs zsim imon ons. s. B But ut the model isn’t shy about turning g it u up p fo forr th the e re red d carpet. “I never have to talk h herr in he into to a lloo ook, k,”” says Estée Lauder global pro m keup mak akeu p artist Victor Henao. “She’ e’ss th e’ the e fir first st to suggest a smo k eye moky ky ye.” .””

2014

2015

2016

2015

See hundreds of gorgeous transformations at instyle.com/transformations

2014

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THE INFLUENCER

PAT McGRATH’S

Golden Touch WITH A NEW COSMETICS LINE AND A HUGE SOCIAL-MEDIA FOLLOWING, THE ICONIC MAKEUP ARTIST IS MORE IN DEMAND THAN EVER by GLYNNIS MACNICOL

“HELLO, LOVE!” says Pat McGrath, her British-

accented voice warm and cozy. It’s no wonder the most super of supermodels, from Kendall Jenner to Naomi Campbell, call her “Mother.” She’s just returned to her New York City home after an assignment with her longtime collaborator, the photographer Steven Meisel. When asked how it went, she purrs, “Amazing. An amazing day creating looks.” “Creating looks” is a modest way of describing what she does. List the best of the best from every field— Madonna, Oprah Winfrey, Karl Lagerfeld, Tom Brady— and McGrath would be part of that pantheon. It might sound like hyperbole, but she is the most important and influential makeup artist in the world today. Stella McCartney has said she is a genius. McGrath refers to herself as a lucky beauty junkie. Each season, McGrath works on the makeup direction for dozens of fashion shows—Anna Sui, Diane von Furstenberg, DKNY, Givenchy, Louis Vuitton, Maison Margiela, Prada, and Tommy Hilfiger, just to name a few. Her wildly imaginative Technicolor work for Dior during the John Galliano era elevated the concept of catwalk beauty. Dressed in her trademark all-black outfit, from her headband down to her custom sneakers, McGrath is a reassuring presence backstage for both designers and models. When she’s around, they know magic will happen. Skin is transformed by her touch (she famously prefers her fingers to brushes), and the makeup is always modern. Her perfectionism and preparedness are legendary. Her army of assistants is known to arrive with as many as 75 pieces of luggage, packed with a Sephora’s worth of fake lashes and rainbows of pigment—and

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1 Metalmorphosis 005—shown here in Copper— includes an opaque cream pigment that gilds lids in a single swipe. 2 Gigi and Bella Hadid pose backstage at the spring Anna Sui show.

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even art and fashion reference books. McGrath has also dabbled in cinema (remember Rooney Mara’s punkish visage for The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo?), and then there are the countless advertisements and influential editorial spreads. After years of lending her brilliance to others’ ventures—helping create the cosmetics collections for Dolce & Gabbana, Giorgio Armani, and Gucci, and working on CoverGirl and Max Factor as the


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creative-design director for Procter & Gamble—she finally struck out on her own this past October with Pat McGrath Labs. The tagline: “Where unadulterated experimentation meets raw glamour.” Rather than an entire range, Pat McGrath Labs is a series of carefully curated limitededition kits, dropped one at a time and announced via Instagram to McGrath’s one million–plus followers. The début release, Gold 001, featured a cake of sumptuous pigment, mixing liquid, and a spatula. The 1,000 sets sold out in a flash, as did subsequentt products. “I didn’t think it would have resonated through the world the way that it did,” says McGrath. “It’s so much fun to watch and to be part of.” With each new item—inky eye gloss, hot-pink eye “blush,” a shiny highlighting stick, a dual-ended d marker, microfine glitter—McGrath is revealing the tricks of her trade. Want to re-create Bella Hadid’s ruby slipper–inspired lips from Versace’s last couture presentation? Now you can with Lust 004 in Vermillion Venom. How about her sister Gigi’s luminous skin from Miu Miu spring? Snag Skin Fetish 003 in Nude. Beauty aficionados are obsessed, as a glimpse at social media reveals. YouTube is filled with tutorials and reviews, and McGrath is tagged on countless Instagrams and Snapchats featuring her products. ts. She even re-grams her favorites, from both aspir iring makeup artists and famous fans like Kate Hud dson.. (For even more McGrath, check out her secre h ret stash of conceptual brand videos on Vimeo.) It’s been quite the journey for this formerr club c b kid, whose single mom, a Jamaican immigrant, would wo ld go from drugstore to department store in search of the perfect foundation, her daughter in tow. “My mother was obsessed with makeup,” recalls McGrath, who grew up in Northampton, outside London. “You couldn’t find anything in those days for dark skin. She would make her own colors.” McGrath says her mother’s passion and DIY ingenuity certainly inspired her career path. Despite her massive success, it took time for McGrath to break through. “I couldn’t get arrested. I remember my mother, after many years, saying, ‘Are you sure you don’t want to get a real job?’” It’s hard to envision the young Pat, just on the cusp of greatness, struggling to get bookings. Thank goodness she didn’t give up. Imagine the fashion world without her incredible body of work. “Nothing’s meant to be easy, so you just keep going,” she says. “I always felt that it was meant to be.” Q

3 A galactic eye created for a shoot with Supreme Management. 4 McGrath bleached Kendall Jenner’s brows for a 2014 runway. 5 McGrath hand-made crystal masks for Givenchy’s spring 2014 sshow. 6 Metalmorphosis 005 com omes with a dual-ended eyeliner.

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PAT’S T THREE STEPS TO TO… THE PERFECT RED D LIP

A FLAWL WLESS BASE

1. Use a lip pencil to outline lips using light, feathery strokes, correcting any asymmetries you find along the way. 2. Create an even base by filling in lips with the same pencil. 3. Dab lipstick on your finger and press the color onto lips using your fingertips; blot with tissue and repeat.

Prep skin by b removing flakes 1. P with a sscrub; follow with w turi moisturizer. 2. Apply a dot of foundation on your forehead, nose, chin, and each cheek, then use your fingertips to blend from the center of the face out toward the ears and down the neck. 3. For any trouble spots, dab a small dot of concealer over the area and tap in a stippling motion with your fingertip until blended.

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B E AU T Y TA L K

SHE PLAYS A BADASS FBI AGENT ON QUANTICO, ROCKS DAYTIME RED LIPS LIKE IT’S NO BIG DEAL, AND FEARLESSLY GOES FOUNDATION-FREE (KILLER CONFIDENCE ASIDE, SHE STILL CRIES WHEN SHE GETS A HAIRCUT)


BEAUTY

Trolls on Twitter say I’ve had my lips done. I’m like, ‘You guys, please see my baby pictures. I mean, come on.’” rowing up in both India and Queens, N.Y., you were teased about your looks? Yeah. I became

Miss India at 17, and I had very, very low self-esteem. I used to be called Brownie. I was always made to feel conscious of my skin color: in America because I was Indian and in India because I was dusky—darker. Everybody here wants a tan, and everybody there wants a whitening cream. Grass is greener on the other side, much? So what can American women learn about beauty from Indian women?

Listen to your elders. My grandmother used to massage my scalp with coconut oil then braid my hair really tight because she said that made it stronger. It clearly worked. What’s your current favorite hair product? I love Pantene Smooth &

Sleek shampoo because I can wash my hair daily without stripping it. My hair is my superstrength. I become less strong when I cut it. So you’d never go short? I did last year! I went in for a pedicure and came out with a bob. My hair was waist-length and luscious. I don’t know what came over me. I just

chopped it. Then I cried—a lot. My dad used to hate me cutting my hair, so I think I cried more because I thought he would be really upset with me. I lost him three years ago to cancer. The last time I cut my hair, he didn’t speak to me for two weeks. It did look incredible, though. It was longer on one side. I wouldn’t let the stylist cut the second side because I got scared. I was like, “Leave one side long!” She was like, “Huh?” I just owned it. Then finally she said, “It’s been a month. Let’s make it even.” What’s your eyebrow secret? I prefer er threading because it gives you a more precise shape. I also lift my brows to fill them in so the hair covers the pencil lines. It’s an amazing trick. And now I’ve told the whole world about it.

PRIYANKA’S MUST-HAVES Bobbi Brown Skin Foundation Stick in Honey, $46; bobbibrowncosmetics .com. Pantene Pro-V Smooth & Sleek Shampoo, $5; at drugstores. StriVectin Illuminating Serum, $89; strivectin.com. MAC Cosmetics lipstick in Ruby Woo, $17; maccosmetics.com. La Prairie Skin Caviar Luxe Sleep Mask, p $330; laprairie.com.

I read that you eat what you want and don’t exercise. True? It’s not a good thing. I have two active careers on two continents. I’m always on flights, always dehydrated. So I compensate. I drink lots of water and get enough sleep. I should exercise. My metabolism is not as amazing as it was in my 20s. I can’t be doing KFC every day, as much as I would love that to be my life. —SUZANNE ZUCKERMAN

DECEMBER 2012

NOVEMBER 2013

MAY 2015

SEPTEMBER 2016

“I wore this beautiful sari, and there was so much going on with it, I made my hair straight. Your hair and makeup shouldn’t compete with your clothes.”

“There was a lot of glitter in the outfit, so it needed something cooler to not look too ‘lady’— hence the funky mermaid fishtail braid and the pink lip.”

“That’s the shortest my hair has ever been. With this cut, your ends need to be a little unruly and rock-starry. Otherwise, it’s easy for this to become a boring bob.”

“Iconic. The sun was perfectly lighting the dress, which matched the red carpet and my mouth. The lipstick was Lady Danger by MAC. It turned out so beautiful.”

Try on many celebrity looks with our Hollywood Makeover Tool at instyle.com/makeover

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BEAUTY

TRANSFORMERS Expand your lip wardrobe with Cha Ch C ha an ne nel el el’s ’s Th hey ey g gllliid gli ide de new Rouge Coco Gloss topcoats. T oc crre ea eat at ate easily over any gloss or lipstick tto llum umina um ina nate te tes esss.. a new hue. Shimmer-flecked gold iilllum ple p le da le darke darke rk kens ke ns. n ss.. Neon orange brightens. And purp ur lliip col ur olo o llo or And “they bring dimension to you he e ssha sh ha h ade de, de, e,” by adding vibrance or deepening th Lee ee. says makeup artist Kate Le Lee Chanel Rouge Coco Gloss Illuminating g To Top C Coat oat oat oa at at in in IImpulsi mpu mp m pu pu ulsi lssiio ls lsi on, on n n,, in Excitation, Colour-Enhancing Top Coat Ca C Cav aviiar av arr, and Colour-Intensifying Top Coat in Cavi $30 each; chanel.com.

Tracie Martyn Face Resculpting Cream, $127; tracie martyn.com.

Glow Time

For the 15th year in a row, Tr Tracie cialistt Martyn, the New York fac Meryl favored by Emma Stone, M y Streep, Tilda Swinton, and Kate e n Los Winslet, is setting up shop in demy Angeles right before the Acad y Awards. Some devotees visit ass mony many as three times pre-cerem y ncing for Martyn’s radiance-enhan g combination of microcurrrent,, ygen, radio frequency, red LED, oxyg and pulsing amber light. “They’re ve so coming off planes, they hav many fittings, and they want to look k won’tt rested,” says Martyn. She w ut for reveal the L.A. price tag, bu arpet $450 you can book a Red Ca p t n. For Facial at her N.Y.C. salon at-home pampering, try GlamG oliate Glow’s Youthmud Tinglexfo com). Treatment ($69; sephora.c

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NAILING IT If you’re up for a major award, one of the first calls you make is to manicurist Deborah Lippmann. She’s regularly booked by the likes of Amy Adams, Lady Gaga, and Lupita Nyong’o for her magical manicures. No doubt a few nominees will be wearing Brand New Day ($20; deborahlippmann.com), Lippmann’s gorgeous new sheer beige that works with any skin tone—and won’t clash with your statuette.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION (CONTINUED) Serious and/or immediate allergic reactions have been reported. They include: itching, rash, red itchy welts, wheezing, asthma symptoms, or dizziness or feeling faint. Get medical help right away if you are wheezing or have asthma symptoms, or if you become dizzy or faint. Do not take BOTOX® Cosmetic if you: are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® Cosmetic (see Medication Guide for ingredients); had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc®(rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport®(abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin®(incobotulinumtoxinA); have a skin infection at the planned injection site. Tell your doctor about all your muscle or nerve conditions, such as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease, myasthenia gravis, or Lambert-Eaton syndrome, as you may be at increased risk of serious side effects including difficulty swallowing and difficulty breathing from typical doses of BOTOX® Cosmetic. Tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including: plans to have surgery; had surgery on your face; weakness of forehead muscles: trouble raising your eyebrows; drooping eyelids; any other abnormal facial change; are pregnant or plan to become pregnant (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic can harm your unborn baby); are breast-feeding or plan to (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic passes into breast milk). Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Using BOTOX® Cosmetic with certain other medicines may cause serious side effects. Do not start any new medicines until you have told your doctor that you have received BOTOX® Cosmetic in the past. Tell your doctor if you have received any other botulinum toxin product in the last 4 months; have received injections of botulinumtoxinsuchas Myobloc®,Dysport®, or Xeomin® in the past (tell your doctor exactly which product you received); have recently received an antibiotic by injection; take muscle relaxants; take an allergy or cold medicine; take a sleep medicine; take aspirin-like products or blood thinners. OthersideeffectsofBOTOX® Cosmetic include: discomfort or pain at the injection site; headache; and eye problems: double vision, blurred vision, drooping eyelids, and swelling of your eyelids. For more information refer to the Medication Guide or talk with your doctor. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088. Please refer to Summary of Information about BOTOX® Cosmetic on the following page. © 2016 Allergan. All rights reserved. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners. APC61BB16


PROMOTION

INSIDER PRODUCTS, PROMOTIONS & EVENTS

#STYLEYOURLIFE SHOPPING EVENT Tanger Outlets treated style influencers to an afternoon of fashion, food and fun on Thursday, November 10. Guests had the opportunity to shop the hottest holiday trends alongside InStyle style correspondent, Dana Avidan Cohn. tangeroutlets.com


ART DECO COLLECTION

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E F F YJ E W E L R Y.C O M

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feb. From Rosie at the airport to Gwyneth at Goop, this season’s clothes were built for adventures Ellery dress. Marc Jacobs bag (in background).

P H OTO G R A P H E D BY T X E M A Y E S T E


B LO N D A M B ITI O N She has an Oscar but is building an empire—even if she has to personally do every new cleanse in order to get it. Inside the perfectly imperfect world of Gwyneth Paltrow by CHRISTOPHER BAGLEY photographed by GREG K ADEL styled by MELISSA RUBINI


Proenza Schouler cotton crocheted crewneck, feathered pencil skirt, and leather platforms. Cartier diamond and 18kt gold bracelet, worn throughout.

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Loewe cotton-blend top with leather inserts, silk-blend jacquard skirt, brass earrings, and crocodileembossed leather and suede sock boots. Pinkie ring, her own.


Prada jersey shirt and wool skirt with feathers.

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Dior cotton twill top, viscose knit bra, and denim pants. BEAUTY BEAT To get Paltrow’s glow, prep skin with Goop by Juice Beauty Revitalizing Day Moisturizer ($100; shop .goop.com).


he first time I met Gwyneth Paltrow, back in 1994, she was smoking cigarettes and telling dirty jokes. It was lunchtime on the set of the period drama Jefferson in Paris, and Paltrow, then 22, had the role of Thomas Jefferson’s daughter Patsy. Although she was fully convincing on camera as a prim 18th-century teenager, over lunch Paltrow quickly reverted to her true persona, that of a saucy New Yorker. Quick and fun and raspy-voiced, she traded barbs with director James Ivory as well as the sound guy, and they both seemed a little besotted with her. The second time I met Paltrow, this past November in Santa Monica, she was sitting in a corner office at the headquarters of her lifestyle company, wearing a black Chloé suit and drinking matcha tea while looking over spreadsheets in preparation for a board meeting. She used terms like “topline revenue” and “verticals” with evident ease. In the 22 years between our two encounters, plenty of things have happened in Paltrow’s life, and a lot of them are known to basically everybody. To recap: Paltrow won a best actress Oscar (in 1999 for Shakespeare in Love), almost married Brad Pitt, did marry English rock star Chris Martin, had a daughter named Apple and a son named Moses, and launched an influential lifestyle and e-commerce venture called Goop. Those accomplishments have brought Paltrow plenty of fame and admiration, sometimes along with their close cousin, ridicule. There’s something about Paltrow’s perfectly curated world of vegan-friendly throw pillows and bee-sting facials that tends to invite esteem and envy in equal measure. But today, despite looking every inch the poster child for clean living, Paltrow still exhibits signs of her playfully naughty, imperfect old self. She still likes to swear, and her big, mischievous smile is not that of a Hollywood ice queen but that of a teenager who’s just put a whoopee cushion on your seat. Yes, she’s just coming off an eight-day cleanse, during which she ingested nothing but raw goat milk, plus some herbs that were custom-blended for her after she sent a blood sample to a doctor in New Mexico. But when she’s not in detox mode, Paltrow tells me, she defies the advice of her various healers pretty much every night by having a cocktail or a glass of wine (sometimes with bread and cheese). Occasionally, when she’s feeling the pressures of overseeing a 65-person staff, she even second-guesses her decision to become an entrepreneur. “I’ll think, ‘Oh my god, I used to have the life of a spoiled movie star.’” She laughs. “What the f—? Why did I do this to myself?” Those are the bad days, which are rare, she says. On the good days she’s “more excited and fulfilled” than she ever was

on a film set. Her acting career has inched down her list of priorities and is currently somewhere below Transcendental Meditation sessions and meetings with venture capitalists. Asked how it feels to go in front of the camera nowadays, she ruminates for a moment and then says, “I don’t think I like it anymore.” Paltrow is contracted for additional Marvel Studios franchise films (she has played Pepper Potts in the three Iron Man movies and The Avengers), but, tellingly, she’s not exactly sure which ones they are. “I think it’s Avengers,” she says. “Or Captain America. One of those.” Every weekday morning, after finishing her 90-minute Tracy Anderson workout, Paltrow pulls up to her office in an unmarked one-story building in Santa Monica. Inside, under a white neon Goop logo, dozens of young women work on various components of the brand that began nine years ago on Paltrow’s laptop as a weekly bulletin she sent to friends. “Back then,” she says, “if I was busy on a Thursday, I could just not send it, and I’d wait a week. What were people going to do? But now I have issues tied to advertisers. The newsletter is our biggest driver of revenue, so I can’t not send it.” Paltrow still signs off on every photo and line of text in the newsletter and on the website, but lately Goop’s longtime mainstays—from the latest kimchi recipes to advice on which sunscreens are best for airplanes—have been sharing more screen space with a new range of revenue generators. There’s Goop Label, the fashion line of high-end basics that she started in September after seeing a void for pieces that are “made in Italy with amazing fabrics and beautifully tailored” but priced more modestly than most luxury goods (between $200 and $1,000). “We use the direct-to-consumer model, so we don’t have to mark everything up six times,” Paltrow says. Last March Paltrow also launched an organic skin-care line, a venture that to some on the Goop team seemed almost like a matter of life and death, given the quantity of chemicals routinely found in everyday cosmetics. “I mean, it’s shocking to me that the government doesn’t regulate this stuff,” Paltrow says. “How many of my friends have had fertility issues? How many of my daughter’s friends have had precocious puberty? Well, maybe that’s because we are putting endocrine-disrupting hormones in everything.” Fragrance is another area that Goop is tiptoeing into, with a new line of sophisticated but all-natural scents. “Most fragrances are full of chemicals, probably carcinogens, and they just let us spray them all over ourselves.”

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Since the beginning, Paltrow has been an eager guinea pig for almost any new item Goop tries out, whether it’s a workout (she recently added regular sessions of Taryn Toomey’s The Class to her regimen) or a chemical-free deodorant. “When a product comes in,” she says, “my officemates always say, ‘Give it to Gwyneth—she’ll try it.’ And I will.” Paltrow never used to think of herself as a pioneer, but over time she’s shown a consistent knack for embracing esoteric treatments years before they go mainstream. Remember when she sparked a media frenzy by showing up at a 2004 film première with a bunch of dark circles on her bare shoulders? Once everyone had finished speculating about which satanic cult she had joined, Paltrow was able to explain the ancient practice of cupping and its relationship to acupuncture; before long, Oprah was devoting a segment to it. Last summer at the Rio Olympics, when Michael Phelps and other champion swimmers paraded around the pool, their skin was covered with the same telltale spots. “I’ve learned how the cycle works,” Paltrow says. “It used to be that I would talk about something or write about it, and people would be like, ‘What the f— is she talking about? She’s a witch!’ And then later it would sort of catch on. So now I just recognize it: OK, I’m going to talk about this, and people will think it’s weird, and that’s how it goes.” Before my interview with Paltrow, one of her friends told me that she’s the rare Hollywood creature who has genuinely figured out a way to not care what other people think of her. I ask Paltrow if this is true, and her eyes light up. “One hundred percent,” she says. So what’s the big secret? Part of it, she says, is simply getting older. “When I turned 40, I felt like I got thisfree software upgrade thatI wasn’texpecting. It just happened. Suddenly I was like, ‘Oh, this is fantastic: I don’t care! I like myself, and I’m just going to live my life. I’m going to stop worrying and tearing myself down.’” She also embraced the idea that “pushing the needle” on wellness issues is her real purpose in life and that being teased is an unavoidable part of it. “It’s like, this is my role, I’m here to do this,” she says. “A friend told me if you’re a trailblazer, you’re the first one through, and you get the cuts because you’re hacking the path.” Another key turning point for Paltrow came three years ago, when she and Martin announced their decision to “consciously uncouple” by separating in an amicable way while preserving their family (the process had already been outlined in a book by Katherine Woodward Thomas). Within hours, the snickers could be heard around the world. “It’s such a beautiful concept, but it was such a divisive thing,” Paltrow recalls. For a while she couldn’t understand what fueled the vitriol: Was it schadenfreude? Eventually she realized that for many people who’d gone through a painful divorce themselves or who’d grown up in a broken household, the paradigm of a happy, harmonious breakup was hard to imagine, let alone attempt. “So I was like, ‘OK, this

negative reaction has nothing to do with me,’” she says. “Maybe the idea is going to be triggering for some, but ultimately, it will be healing. And now you see people writing about it all the time, and not in a pejorative way. So I honestly think Chris and I have contributed something positive to the culture of divorce.” Whatever the opinion of the rest of the world, Paltrow says the arrangement has worked perfectly for her family; she speaks of Martin almost like a beloved brother. “He’s at my house every single day. We each have our own lives, but we still have our family life. And to this day, Chris would take a bullet for me, even though I’m not his wife.” It helps that her current boyfriend, TV writer–producer Brad Falchuk, is fully down with all this. “He has his own version of it, his own family where it’s not a couple but it’s a family.” Paltrow’s newfound indifference to criticism comes at an apt moment, in an era when that ultimate mean-girl sandbox—social media—has become an arena for all sorts of celebrity feuds and megameltdowns. Although she allows herself to read anti-Gwynnie comments now and then, she says she’s able to shrug them off within a millisecond. “If you post something on Instagram and somebody who doesn’t know you writes something mean, it literally cannot be about you because that person doesn’t know you,” she says. “You’ve just flicked a wound in them that’s already there, and they’re just responding.” As for quantifying one’s self-worth based on likes or followers, she says, “that’s the perfect trick of the devil. Like, how can we get humanity so entrenched in their own egos that they’re not paying attention, not doing any spiritual work, and the world is going to hell?” Of course, Paltrow’s public persona is fully intertwined with her business, and therefore with her paycheck, so some judicious self-branding is inevitable. But faking it just doesn’t work, Paltrow says, at least not for her: “You have to be totally authentic, and either you’ll resonate with people or you won’t.” And if being authentic involves raising another $10 million for her growing empire or investigating the latest vaginal steaming treatment—or, in Paltrow’s case, perhaps doing both, on the same afternoon—then so be it. Before Paltrow walks me out of her office, I ask her to predict the next big wellness trend of 2017. Her first answer: bacteriotherapy, aka fecal transplants. Yep, that’s when a doctor puts someone else’s fecal matter in your intestines in order to restore microbial balance. “People are really starting to realize how important gut health is,” Paltrow says. “Even the most Western of Western doctors is understanding it.” (The subject is explored in depth in Goop’s latest book, Clean Beauty.) So, certainly, Paltrow has tried the procedure already. Hasn’t she? She laughs out loud. “I have not,” she says, shaking her head. “I think that might be a bridge too far, even for me.” Q

To this day, Chris would take a bullet for me, even though I’m not his wife.”

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Louis Vuitton velvet lace embroidered top and leggings with skirt panel and calf-leather boots. Hair: Lorenzo Martin for The Wall Group. Makeup: Georgie Eisdell for The Wall Group. Manicure: Ashlie Johnson for The Wall Group. Set design: Bette Adams for Mary Howard Studio.


Embrace the bracelet. Model AAMITO LAGUM gives us a crash course in the season’s best wristwear photographed by HANNA TVEITE styled by SAM BROEKEMA

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Ana Khouri diamond and 18kt gold bracelet (left). David Yurman diamond and 18kt gold bracelet. Valentino georgette gown. Opposite: Louis Vuitton brass bracelet (top). Buccellati 18kt gold bracelet. Louis Vuitton velvet lace embroidery dress and lambskin bodysuit.

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AurĂŠlie Bidermann marble and gold-plated bracelet (top). David Webb 18kt gold bracelets. Bottega Veneta cotton sweater.

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hen Ugandan model Aamito Lagum decided to pursue a career on the runway, she knew it might raise a few eyebrows. “Because the fashion scene in my country is so small, you can’t support yourself modeling—it’s more a hobby than a profession,” she explains. “Now it’s become this stereotype of someone with no ambitions, no job, who wants free things and a rich husband.” Unsurprisingly, for someone known to shut down racist Internet trolls with one succinct Instagram comment (google it!), she wasn’t afraid to challenge this perception by entering— and winning—the first-ever season of Africa’s Next Top Model in 2014. She’s since relocated to New York and parlayed that victory into an international career, booking gigs with Gucci and Marc Jacobs and building a reputation outside the shows for her eclectic street style. A jeans-and-T-shirt gal at heart, Lagum says her daily uniform usually revolves around her favorite Frame jeans, “a nice, soft T from Club Monaco,” and to amplify the look, “one statement item, such as my Balenciaga coat or Givenchy bag.” Her wardrobe is also filled with local Ugandan labels, including vibrant creations from Gloria Wavamunno and Ras Kasozi’s sustainable tree-bark cloth pieces. So what’s changed since her reality-show days? “It’s a lot tougher. I’m competing with millions of girls as opposed to just 12, and everyone is gorgeous. I’m grateful I had that experience beforehand, though. It prepared me for New York, for fashion week, for this!”

Vahan Jewelry diamond and 14kt gold bracelet (left). Thyreos Vassiliki Art and Fine Jewellery House 18kt gold bracelet. Bally wool-silk twill jacket and viscose-blend top. BEAUTY BEAT For a flash of sheen, makeup pro Daniel Martin dabbed Dior Diorshow Fusion Mono Eyeshadow in No. 881 Hypnotique ($31; dior.com) onto the center of lids. Hair: Dennis Devoy for Art Department. Makeup: Daniel Martin for The Wall Group. Manicure: Casey Herman for The Wall Group.

—ALISON SYRETT

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TH E CH ICEST L A DY AT TH E A I RPO RT With a new design collaboration to add to her growing brand, supermodel and style icon of the skies ROSIE HUNTINGTON-WHITELEY is cruising at high altitude

Balmain crystal bead–embroidered poncho and mesh-viscose pants. On table: Gucci floral matelassé jacquard bag. Bertoni 1949 orange calfskin bag. Marc Jacobs patterned python bag.


by STEPHANIE TRONG photographed by TXEMA YESTE styled by JESSICA DE RUITER creative direction by ROSIE HUNTINGTON -WHITELEY

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Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci polyamide-blend crĂŞpe coat and trousers and leather bag. Jimmy Choo kid leather sandals.

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Rosie HW x Paige polyester foil jumpsuit. Derek Lam suede wedges. Levi’s c/o Off-White denim jacket (on suitcase). Tumi carry-on suitcases.


Bottega Veneta cotton-silk jacket and pants with patent calfskin belt. Vuarnet stainless steel and acetate sunglasses. Bertoni 1949 calfskin bag. BEAUTY BEAT Revive jet-lagged hair with Moroccanoil Dry Texture Spray ($28; moroccanoil.com).

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Chanel silk crĂŞpe de chine blouse, polyurethane tweed skirt, and lambskin (on lap) and calfskin bags.


Chloé cotton top and skirt. Hermès technical silk duffel bag (on suitcase). Chanel calfskin suitcase. Smythson deerskin bag.

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Gucci Lurex jacquard coat. Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci crocodile bags. Altuzarra embroidered napa leather pumps. Hair: Adir Abergel for Starworks Artists. Makeup: Kate Lee for Starworks Artists. Manicure: Ashlie Johnson for The Wall Group. Set design: Cooper Vasquez for The Magnet Agency.

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hen Rosie Huntington-Whiteley was a fashion-obsessed 15-year-old living in her rural hometown of Devon, England, aka “the middle of nowhere,” she cold-called her way around London looking for someone, anyone, in the industry to give her an internship as part of a workstudy program at school. A small modeling agency in Soho said yes, and she promptly spent a week at its offices emptying ashtrays and making photocopies. And although she wasn’t entirely sure what she wanted to do yet—design, yes; styling, maybe—not once did it occur to her that she had what it takes to make a career in front of the camera. “I remember the models walking in, and they were like

inherently relatable, likable even, about this blond bombshell with the pillowy lips. It’s a feeling that she’s one of the girls and, above all, nice. “I like to keep things real,” she says. “I certainly don’t strut around my house in lingerie every night with four sets of eyelashes.” Displaying a good amount of savvy, HuntingtonWhiteley has found a way to parlay this approachable glamour into a growing business. In addition to modeling— and appearing in blockbusters like Transformers: Dark of the Moon and Mad Max: Fury Road—she serves as the global women’s ambassador for Ugg and has a four-yearstrong line, called Rosie for Autograph, with U.K. mass retailer Marks & Spencer that includes everything from

goddesses to me,” says Huntington-Whiteley, now 29 and based in Los Angeles. “They were so stylish and elegant with their beautiful skin and blasé attitude. I just remember being like, ‘Oh my god, these girls are like swans.’” It wasn’t that Huntington-Whiteley was unattractive (though she claims her fair share of awkward-phase afflictions: a layer of baby fat, spotty skin, and overplucked eyebrows); it was simply a matter of how she was raised. “I don’t remember people saying, ‘You’re so pretty,’ or, ‘You’re gorgeous,’” she says of her childhood. “You were praised for getting good grades or winning the race. Being aware of how you look was never encouraged. I feel lucky for that.” One could argue that this foundation—a sense of selfworth and confidence derived from actions over artifice—is crucial to her enduring appeal in a business that doesn’t always go all that deep. Because even when she’s gazing back at you from glossy magazine covers or high-profile ad campaigns (Burberry and Versace, to name two), or walking the Balmain runway in a sparkly minidress, there is something

lingerie to loungewear to cosmetics. And this month sees the release of a 17-piece capsule collection she designed in collaboration with Cali cool-girl label Paige, which she’s fronted for two years and counting. “Whenever I look to partner with someone, I ask, ‘Do I like this brand? Have I worn it? Do I use it?’” she says. “There has to be that authenticity for me.” Here’s a story: Before Huntington-Whiteley got involved with Paige, she was a fan. She’d been wearing the company’s jeans for years when one day, while she was out shopping in London, a woman approached her. It was Paige Adams-Geller, the equally blond, equally statuesque founder of the line, who just wanted to say hi and thanks. But no sooner had they started a conversation than they realized they were, quite hilariously, dressed nearly identically in Paige jeans and the same Balenciaga leather jacket. “It was one of those unbelievable moments!” says Huntington-Whiteley. “Paige and I have become really close friends and collaborators over the past few years,” she adds. “She’s a woman in

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business who’s happy to share and has taken me under her wing in many ways.” Together, the duo have created a wearable line based on items from Huntington-Whiteley’s own closet. Think the perfect linen T, just-right skinny jeans, and one-shoulder numbers that don’t feel, as she puts it, “red carpet-y”—pieces laced with rock and roll sex appeal. “I get inspiration from people like [Vogue Paris editor in chief] Emmanuelle Alt and [Spanish stylist] Barbara Martelo,” Huntington-Whiteley says. “Women who dress elegantly and feminine but not girlie.” Of course, Huntington-Whiteley herself is the object of many a wardrobe crush. Her uniform of skinny trousers, louche blouses, smart jackets, and heels is the stuff of “model

door is safely sealed from prying eyes and camera lenses, she changes in the bathroom. Off goes the supermodel getup and out come the cashmere pants, T-shirt, and slippers. And for the record, the loo in first class is just as small and cramped as the one in coach. “I’m usually falling over and stuck between the walls,” she says of her makeshift method. Another pro tip that’s worth considering even for those of us who won’t be photographed upon landing: She always brings an extra shirt in case of midair spills. To be sure, in-flight Rosie—girl-on-the-go Rosie, neverin-one-place-for-a-long-time Rosie—is a mode HuntingtonWhiteley knows all too well. Lately, though, as she moves into her 30s, she’s been wondering what it would be like to

“People probably think I’m overdressed,” says HuntingtonWhiteley. “But a great outfit is my armor. I feel confident and ready to face the world.” off-duty” Pinterest-board legend. But lately, and rather amusingly, she’s emerged as the foremost trendsetter of a timely subgenre: Google her name with the term “airport style” and you get no less than 787,000 results. Hence the photos on these pages, for which Huntington-Whiteley gamely contributed creative direction. “Looking back to the ’60s and ’70s, travel had a real glamour to it because only the rich and famous could afford it,” she says, citing the Rolling Stones’ heyday of cavorting around with Jerry Hall and Anita Pallenberg. Add the fact that Huntington-Whiteley averages about four to six flights a month—some with her ruggedly handsome movie-star fiancé, Jason Statham—and you’ve got paparazzi at every gate. “People probably think I’m overdressed for the airport,” she says, though she’s quick to point out that she doesn’t get any more gussied up for the occasion than she would for a day of meetings or running around. “But that’s just me—a great outfit is my armor. I feel confident and ready to face the world.” OK, but the woman is no dummy. Once the cabin

be less nomadic. “I sometimes feel like the last 13 years were spent in the air,” she says, adding that having her feet planted on more solid ground would allow her to cement meaningful new friendships and relationships, as well as tend to existing ones. “I look forward to starting a family,” she says, describing her bond with Statham as the “most cherished and sacred thing in my life.” She’d also like to see her two younger siblings, Florence and Toby, more often, as well as her parents. “The greatest gift they ever gave me was the freedom to go out and explore when I was young,” she says. “Now that I’m getting older, I feel more keen to spend time with them.” Whatever the future holds, Huntington-Whiteley isn’t going to wait for it to come to her. “I’ve always had a clear idea of what I wanted to achieve next,” she says, sounding not far from the teen who hustled her way to London. “I’m very driven, and I visualize what I want for my life.” And if that means fewer frequent-flier miles, we’ll just have to get our airport-style inspo from somewhere else. Q

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It took a brash designer with an unconventional approach to jolt a sleepy Spanish luxury house back into the big leagues by ERIC WILSON photographed by BILLY BALL ARD

In a bright alcove of his new Casa Loewe flagship in Madrid, Jonathan Anderson has finally realized one vision of his dream for the Spanish label: a store where art, ceramics, and even a flower shop fill out his idea of what fashion can be. Behind him, on a sunny afternoon just before the opening in November, is an early example of a Richard Smith “kite painting” that decorated a Mr Chow restaurant in London in the 1970s. Downstairs, facing the entrance, is a large-scale print of abstract spots by the British painter Howard Hodgkin, whom Anderson has admired for years. Korean moon jars from various decades are potted amidst a rainbow display of leather handbags that have names like the Puzzle, the Hammock, and—who could not love it?—the Elephant, a small coin pouch shaped like an origami animal. “The art is from all different periods,” says Anderson, 32, who became the cre-

*Loewe (LOH-eh-vay) The 170-year-old label has been reinvented by wunderkind creative director Jonathan Anderson.

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Model Mica Arganaraz wears a cotton top with an attached neck piece, a cotton skirt, brass earrings, a napa leather belt, and a suede tapestry pouch.


in. It was very old-fashioned in terms of approach, which ative director of Loewe in 2013, just five years after startwas ‘I designed this aesthetic, so this aesthetic belongs to ing his wildly popular J.W.Anderson collection in London. me.’ My whole thing is that fashion doesn’t belong to anyone. “It’s just, like, how do you do it in a way that is a bit wrong? You don’t come up with a concept. You recycle it. The best And sometimes the taste is, well, maybe not everyone’s thing to do is design something and get rid of it.” taste. But I suppose that’s the point.” In one example of his ability to synthesize his own ideas Anderson’s ascent in the fashion world has been remarkwith those of others, Anderson created a 2015 advertising able not only for its speed but also for its potency. In his brief campaign for Loewe using Steven Meisel photographs of kids tenure at the Spanish luxury goods company, he has changed on a beach taken from a 1997 magazine editorial, because the perception of Loewe from a second-tier player within the they expressed his feelings so LVMH conglomerate to one perfectly that there was no of its most powerful names. reason to make something He has altered the dynamic of else. Anderson describes his his personal narrative as well. obsession with collecting such Not long ago, Anderson was visual references as both a seen as a budding enfant terstrength and a weakness, as rible for his gender-bending this desire for information can runway shows that featured sometimes lead to more and men in flouncy bloomer more convoluted layers of exshorts and lace dresses and ploration. But his latest collecwomen in cartoonish leg-oftions have shown that he is mutton sleeves. Today, at also capable of editing those Loewe, he is bringing focus ideas into a crystal clear preback to artisanal craftsmansentation of femininity for the ship and womanly glamour. modern age. In fact, his taste, embracing “Now I find the simplest both the good and the bad, is things more exciting than the quite exceptional. heavy architectural layers,” he “Three years in, I think I says. “I’m suddenly very into a finally feel the confidence to black dress, which had never keep going, if that makes occurred to me in my entire sense,” says Anderson, whose life of working in design, bemakeover of Loewe (previcause I think there’s someously designed by Narciso thing new in it.” Rodriguez and Stuart Vevers, Anderson describes the creamong others) has at moative process as dipping into ments bordered on auda“a giant patchwork of informacious. “The great thing is that tion,” and this philosophy the brand has so much hiscould be seen literally in the tory,” he says, before adding At Casa Loewe in Madrid, Jonathan Anderson (above) designer’s spring collection, slyly, “and you can make up sits before a ceramic installation by artist Gloria García Lorca. Phillipa Hemphrey models his spring collection which included a jaw-dropping history as well.” in the city’s botanical gardens (opposite). shirtdress made from hunAnderson, who was born in dreds of swatches of fabric, all Northern Ireland, represents taken from the discards of his previous designs. One of the a major shift in a new generation’s approach to fashion, espemost talked-about pieces from that show was a whimsical cially that of a tightly knit community of designers based in necklace in the shape of a bat, which was actually something London who are less precious about ownership of ideas and Anderson found in a flea market in Beijing and jokingly gave openly sample one another. At the same time, he stands apart as a gift to an assistant. During a model fitting, they decided to for his outspokenness and competitiveness (his father, Wiladd it to the show. (In a similar act of spontaneity, he showed lie, is a former rugby player and current coach). So it’s perhaps a skirt made entirely of knotted rubber bands for fall.) not surprising that Anderson’s comments, while refreshingly “Sometimes I feel like I can, out of my own isolation, make frank, often flick at sacred cows and industry taboos. things overly intellectualized,” Anderson says. “It’s nice to “Since I started at Loewe, I went on a crusade,” Anderson focus on things that are relatable. If it works, it works.” ■ says. “I felt like fashion was not reflecting the period it was

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Cotton coat and silk-blend corset top (top left). Cupro dress, napa leather belt, brass earrings, leather bracelets, and suede and embossed leather sock boots (bottom right). Calf-leather bags (top right and bottom left).. Hair: Elena Tebar for Kasteel. Makeup: Gato for Kasteel.


DEEPIKA PADUKONE is one of India’s highestpaid actresses—and you’re about to find out why photographed by JOHN AKEHURST styled by JESSICA DE RUITER

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Altuzarra viscose sweater and nylon skirt.


Prada jersey dress. BEAUTY BEAT Love Padukone’s soft red lipstick? Get the look with L’Oréal Paris Colour Riche Le Matte Lip Pen in Mad for Matte ($10; lorealparisusa .com).


Loewe polyamide dress. Charlotte Olympia suede sandals.

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Victoria Beckham cotton top and velvet skirt. Hair: Christian Wood for The Wall Group. Makeup: Kate Lee for Starworks Artists. Manicure: Marisa Carmichael for Streeters.


hen 31-year-old actress Deepika Padukone was cast in XXX: The Return of Xander Cage, it wasn’t just the prospect of being in a Hollywood action movie that intrigued her. It was also the idea of relocating to Toronto, 7,755 miles away from her mod duplex in a Mumbai skyscraper. “I was anxious before I left to start filming,” she recalls. “But I wanted to move out of my comfort zone and start over.” It’s not as though she needed to reinvent herself— back in India, Padukone is as big as they come. A former model with 30-plus Bollywood films on her résumé, Padukone made Forbes’s 2016 list of the 10 highest-paid actresses in the world, outranking fellow Indian superstar Priyanka Chopra. At home, she’s not only among the wealthiest actresses but also one of the most popular, with a Kardashian-like social following nearly 30 million strong. But don’t come to her feed for makeup-free selfies: Her highly posed fashion shots and film stills attract hundreds of thousands of likes apiece, yet they reveal very little about her personal life. “I think my fans understand that I’m very private and I like to keep a lot of things to myself,” she speculates. “I connect with them over work and about my projects, but I don’t feel the need to share every detail of my life. Who really cares what I had for breakfast or what I’m wearing today?” If Instagram comments are evidence (and, yes, she reads them), it turns out people not only care—they’re obsessed. Witness the raging debate over the widebelted Monisha Jaising ensemble she wore to the MTV Europe Music Awards. Feedback ranged from loving appreciation to angry calls for her stylist’s head. “Look, I’m aware that it was a departure for me, but part of the red-carpet game is to take risks,” Padukone says. “Sometimes people love it, and sometimes people hate it. In this case, I felt like a million bucks, so it didn’t matter how anyone else reacted.” In some ways, it was a relief for her to hide out in an extended-stay hotel apartment in Toronto while filming Xander Cage. There, Padukone found a level of anonymity that doesn’t exist for her in Mumbai—at first, anyway. “Initially, Canada’s Indian community knew

I was there, but over time that number increased,” she says. She doesn’t mind being recognized, as long as it doesn’t put anyone else out. “Sometimes fan encounters can be an inconvenience for the people around me, unless, of course, the people around me are more famous,” she says, referencing outings with her Xander Cage co-stars Vin Diesel and Nina Dobrev. With her move to Toronto, Padukone left behind perks like an entourage and a security team and now focuses on the basics herself: making her own scrambled eggs and ordering Indian takeout. “I received an allowance and had to find my own accommodations while we were filming,” she says. “I had never even been to Canada before, so I spent the first two weeks settling in and learning to do my own laundry.” Along with Diesel’s colossal muscles, Padukone’s international profile helped make Xander Cage one of this year’s most anticipated action films. The story follows a government operative, played by Diesel, and his

“As important as it is for me to push the envelope with how I dress every so often, I’ll always feel most comfortable in a sari.” thrill-seeking cohort, Padukone, on a mission to save the world from deadly weapons. The trailer alone got a record-breaking 100 million views in just two days. None of it intimidates Padukone, who rejects the oft-touted notion that Bollywood films are less relevant than Hollywood ones. In fact, India’s film industry has become the second-highest-grossing in the world, right after ours. “The content of the job was exactly the same in both countries,” she says. “That says a lot about how much Indian cinema has evolved.” Other common ground she’s discovered between Eastern and Western cultures: the emphasis on personal style. “The way people view fashion is identical,” Padukone says. “Indian designers may embrace ethnic-inspired designs more than American designers do, but ultimately, women use fashion as a vehicle for self-expression in both places. And as important as it is for me to push the envelope with how I dress every so often, I’ll always feel most comfortable in a sari.” —HANNAH MORRILL

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the life Because a memorable party starts with the music, five hot scene-makers reveal their favorite songs, what what’ss to eat, eat and who who’ss coming over for d dinner

rator King collabo has ld “Karl Lagerfe —not taught me a lot t ou necessarily ab sic but fashion and muproaching ap t ou more ab ys Gaubert, s,” say things, f ld g rfe erre with Lage en he see ja dja (centter) and Na ha ann. “He ass erma Aue g ing ghtnesss of be ” a lig e b e.” stibl tthat’ss irresist

Best track to get ready for work “She Works Hard for the Money,” by Donna Summer. Best song to drive the crowd crazy “I Can’t Go for That,” by Hall & Oates (played at the spring 2017 Chloé show). Best album for cooking A Seat at the Table, by Solange.

Best tune for plant watering “Here Comes the Sun,” by Nina Simone.

Michel Gaubert

If there’s anyone who knows how to get people going, it’s Parisian DJ Michel Gaubert, fashion’s most sought-after mix master. Gaubert started spinning 30 years ago in local clubs. Now he’s curating playlists for Nicolas Ghesqiuère, Karl Lagerfeld, Raf Simons, and others. His secret? “Everyone loves a guilty pleasure,” he says. Here’s one: the remix of Soul II Soul’s “Back to Life” with George Michael’s “Freedom” he played at Céline. Follow him on his cult Instagram account, @michelgaubert, and see the next page for more of his favorite mood enhancers—because everyone needs a special song to go with dessert. A futuristic remix of Summer’s 1977 disco hit “I Feel Love” set the tone for Chanel’s technologythemed spring runway show.

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THE LIFE FE Dotolo (left) and Shook, creators of the Flower Child pie Sound S d ntial essen ud oAudio Technica Techn headphones headp p ($ audio($199; h ica techn ). .com).

Song that never grows old “Walk on the Wild Side,” by Lou Reed. Definition of feel-good music It makes you warm inside or shed a tear, or it brings you back to that night you cannot even tell your friends about.

VINNY DOTOLO + JON SHOOK

Snacks while working Raw coconut water, tea with ginger, nuts of any kind.

vodka, and listening to Ennio Morricone, French soundtracks, and whatever my guests are into.

Perfect dinner party At home with friends having shrimp cocktail, caviar, salmon, and

Sweetest dessert song “I Know What Boys Like,” by the Waitresses.

Cellist Arthur Russell is music’s most underrated artist, says Gaubert.

Long lines at their newest eatery, mod pizza spot Jon & Vinny’s, are a tip that this hot L.A. restaurant duo is doing something right— like, pretty much everything, including their genrespanning playlists. No-fail dinner-party dish Dotolo: A roasted chicken will win people over forever. What to belt to in the car Shook: Biggie, old Coldplay, Outkast, Bone Thugs-nHarmony, Tom Petty.

DJ Misty Rabbit Favorite workout song “Domino,” by Oxia, from the compilation album Kompakt: Total 7.

Easy salad dressing Sesame oil, vinegar, soy sauce, and a touch of honey. Dress code if you’re coming over I like people to put effort into what they

I n S T Y L E F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 7

Last meal on earth Dotolo: A Hickory Burger from Apple Pan [L.A.] to a hip-hop mixtape. Shook: Breaded and fried pork, veal, or chicken with James Taylor.

The dining room at Jon & Vinny’s in L.A. (412 North Fairfax Ave.)

By day, this London- an nd Pa Paris ris–ba –based sed so sophi phisti sticat cate e is is Mimi Mimii Xu, principal of a full-service i music i studio t di di to t the th fashion f hi and film industries. By night, catch her making the art-scene rounds as half of the experimental performance duo Carnet de Voyage. But by far our favorite version of Xu is her alter ego, DJ Misty Rabbit, runway sound virtuosa for brands including Acne Studios, Emilia Wickstead, and Mary Katrantzou. Here are her party tricks. Perfect table head count Six. People can talk to each other and not shut down with one or two others.

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Table essentials Porcelain plate, Bernardaud, $1,905/12; bloomingdales .com. Stainless steel cutlery, Alessi, $53/5 pieces; alessi.com. Crystal glass, Saint-Louis, $435; saintlouis.com.

When the music works Shook: You look over at a table and people are singing like they’re lost in it.

wear, but I have a no-shoe policy at home, so heels would be a waste. Playlist For aperitifs, soul and R&B. For dinner, blues and jazz so people can talk. During dessert, upbeat, happy tracks from disco to soul to electronic.

Chefs’ essentials A sharp knife (Global, $100; williams-sonoma.com) and Pandora. (Don’t be surprised to hear the Bee Gees or Billy Joel blasting in the kitchen.)


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THE LIFE

Harley VieraNewton

Model and DJ Harley Viera-Newton has worked in front of the camera and behind the turntable for Calvin Klein, Dior, and DVF—and now she is a design phenom in her own right. Her HVN line has been spotted on Alexa Chung and Margot Robbie, but, really, everyone needs at least one of her breezy print dresses. Morning ritual My cat, Tarzan, wakes me up like an alarm clock every day. Favorite chef Anthony Bourdain. He appreciates uni [sea urchin] as much as I do. Sound idol English DJ John Peel. Sonically, it’s impossible to pin him down or know what to expect from him next.

What gets a crowd excited You can never go wrong with anything Prince or Mariah Carey. Other go-tos include Beyoncé, David Bowie, and TLC.

Viera-Newton’s dream guest list: Chandler Bing, Olivia Pope, and Bad Gal Riri.

Favorite meal You can’t beat a full English breakfast. Always in my purse Clé de Peau concealer.

Mood essentials M Velvet armchair, Anthropologie, $1,198; antthropologie.com. Purple Rain, by Prince.

Can a dress have a soundtrack? This silk number by HVN ($625; matches fashion.com) does: “Somebody’s Baby,” by Jackson Browne.

My ideal d dinner party t would ld be in a cozy room with velvet chairs and a playlist of ’60s girl groups.”


by y SUSA SAN AN M MILLER R

holds two eclipses, on the 10th and d 26th, and these moments are alwayss the initiators of great change. The e first, a full-moon lunar eclipse, will fall in Leo, your house of true love e. The Th second, a solar eclipse on th he 26th, h h, will encourage you to wo ork on a sec cret c product or service..

AQUARIUS

TA TAURUS T S

JAN. 20–FEB. 18

APRIL 20–MAY 0 20 0 The rrecent new

moon that appeared a at the very end of January has lit li your career prospects brilliant ntly, so you may be having g seriou ous talks about a promotion orr job j switch soon after the mo onth begins. This is the most impo portant time of the year to move e ahead with your career, so take ke offers seriously. Also early in the he month a great deal of activity y appears to be centered behind cl closed doors. You may be perfecting a plan or strategy but won’t show it to the world until March 10, when Mars enters Taurus, a highly favorable time for you to take action.

At the very end of January, on the 27th, you experienced an annual event, an important new moon in Aquarius. Never underestimate the power of a positive new moon, especially when setting out on a venture, whether for business or in your personal life. This month your ruler, Uranus, will be sweetly angled to Saturn, suggesting your actions will have weight and long-lasting benefits, so with all the planets moving into an ephemeral but perfect position, there is no time for you to hesitate. Grab life with both hands and begin.

GEMINI

DAVID YURMAN 18kt gold bracelet, $5,500; david yurman.com.

PISCES ES

FEB. 19–MARCH H 20 As the month h

starts, you’ll be in a meditative m mood.. Do a bit of creative daydr ydreaming g and imagine your life as if it were w e a film you’re directing. Now think: nk k: How do you make your dream year in reality? The idea is to enter your birthday year with a clean slate or, if that’s not possible, with a plan to work toward building a strong mind, body, and spirit. You’re experiencing a long trend of heightened creativity, for your ruler, Neptune, the planet of imagination, will tour Pisces until 2026, a place it took up in 2011. An even bigger moment will arrive at the

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new-moon so olar eclipse in Pisces on the 26th. Neptune Ne will conjoin the Sun and m moon, opening a new path in the w weeks and months ahead.

ARIES ARI

MA ARCH 21–APRIL 19 As you begin

F February, your social life will be lively and vibrant. The Sun is warming your friendship sector, and the new moon on January 27 sent sparkling aspects to Mars in Aries. To underscore this trend even further, Venus will enter Aries on the 3rd and remain there all the way until June 6. Make any changes to your appearance now; don’t wait until March. This month

MAY 21–JUNE 20 This will be a key month for communication. Both your third and ninth houses, governing intellectual concepts and debate, will be accented. Mercury, your ruler, is in a great mood all month, and this is good news for you, as it gets you motivated to achieve much on the 16th. On the 21st, Mercury will be in elegant angle to Jupiter, allowing you to sign an important contract or make a promise that benefits both parties. Mercury won’t be done: On the 23rd it will signal Saturn, ensuring that plans and promises stick. This is very unusual, leading to a fantastic February.

CANCER

JUNE 21–JULY 22 Your career will take

your full attention this month. You have both Venus and Mars at the tip-top of your chart in early February, a sure sign of popularity with influential people whose support you’ll need to get ahead. Your focus will be drawn to your salary at

I L LU S T R AT I O N BY B R U N O G R I Z ZO


the important full-moon eclipse on the 10th. This eclipse will bring up sudden talks, so you won’t expect what arises; but it appears you’ll be happy about the developments. The solar eclipse of the 26th may set you traveling far and wide. This new moon will open up an adventurous, intellectual spirit in you, and you’ll be ready to spread your wings.

LEO

JULY 23–AUG. 22 This month the fullmoon lunar eclipse in Leo on the 10th is likely to bring on a major life event. The Sun governs Leo, so aspects involving it are very important to you. In February there are four aspects involving the sun, all of them very positive. Watch these dates: the 9th, when the Sun and Uranus will be beautifully aligned, giving you happy surprises; the 10th, when the Sun and Jupiter will be in sync and travel and contractual agreements may bring a profitable outcome; the 14th, when the Sun and Saturn will support each other, adding stability; and the solar new-moon eclipse of the 26th, when the Sun and Neptune will be very close, igniting your imagination.

VIRGO

AUG. 23–SEPT. 22 This will be a busy

month, for as you begin, the recent January 27 new moon in Aquarius will stir up daily activity at the office, studio, or lab where you work, and many new assignments will pour in. The new-moon solar eclipse on the 26th will find you deeply inspired by your partner and ready to make a commitment. If you’re married, your mate will have news, and the pace of any plans will be stepped up. Single? You might love Valentine’s Day this year, when Saturn, the ruler of your true-love sector, will send a shimmering beam to the Sun. If you meet someone on this day, the alliance is likely to last.

be, so Venus and Mars usually have to be satisfied with gazing at each other from afar, across a twinkling, star-studded sky. Now these two are within touching distance, only 5 degrees apart, and being that Venus is your ruling planet, this will benefit you more than it will most other signs.

SCORPIO

OCT. 23–NOV. 21 Your work life will be unusually busy in February because one of your rulers, Mars, will be lighting your professional sector. You’ll achieve a career victory around the time of the full-moon lunar eclipse on the 10th. This full moon will crystallize years of work, bringing a rare golden triangle of harmony in the night sky, linking the full-moon eclipse in Leo in the pinnacle of your chart to Saturn in Sagittarius in your house of salary. If you don’t actually get the promotion, you’ll have a series of six eclipses due to bolster your professional sector every six months from now, until early 2019. These eclipses will likely have a cumulative effect, where one paves the way for the next.

CAPRICORN

NOV. 22–DEC. 21 As the month opens,

DEC. 22–JAN. 19 Your first order of business as you enter February should be to ask for a raise. The new moon of January 27 opened a door wide for you to get that increase, but you must ask for it during February’s first few days. You have plenty on your agenda, but the new-moon solar eclipse on the 26th will open up your schedule for a quick trip. Choose a place near water or snow, as you will have the Sun, new moon, Neptune, and Mercury all crowded in Pisces, a sign ruling the sea and all bodies of water. Eclipses are the most dramatic tool that the universe has to create important change. Plan something memorable.

seek out a change of scenery. February has two major eclipses, one on the 10th, in Leo, that will be broad-

For more of Susan Miller’s forecasts, go to astrologyzone.com.

SAGITTARIUS

Happy Birthday, Aquarius! Alicia Keys, Jan. 25

LIBRA

SEPT. 23–OCT. 22 February, appropri-

ately enough, will be one of your most magical months for love. The new moon of January 27 set the agenda, and during the first week of February, Venus and Mars will be orbiting within range of each other in your marriage/ partnering sector, a big advantage. These two little lovey-dovey planets adore being together but rarely can

ening and will direct your mind to things going on in a foreign country. This eclipse will also bring news that surprises you or an offer that will come suddenly and without warning. No matter what comes, good fortune Jupiter will be smiling on you. Saturn is being supportive too, giving your efforts a firm foundation. An eclipse that is this friendly is unusual, so even if changes result, you will benefit in the end.

Chloë Grace Moretz, Feb. 10

Jennifer Aniston, Feb. 11

AQUARIUS SAYS, “I INNOVATE.” Aquarius is all things that start with i: individual, independent, imaginative, innovative, and even a little idiosyncratic—and that’s what everyone loves about you. Your year ahead The coming birthday year will be a banner one for you, dear Aquarius. Jupiter, the giver of gifts and luck, is in Libra, a place it took up in September 2016, and this beneficent planet is due to stay until October 10. Having Jupiter in Libra, an air sign like yours, is a great advantage. Your health will become robust, and your optimism will grow. Jupiter will begin to brilliantly light your 10th house of fame and honors from October 10, 2017, to November 8, 2018. Pay special attention to October 26, 2017, the luckiest day of the year, when you’ll have a superb chance to make a professional breakthrough thanks to the conjunction of Jupiter and the Sun. If you need to move or renovate, lay the groundwork in March or in the first three weeks of April. Chances for enjoying romance will be very strong when Mars lights your house of true love from April 21 through June 4. Kick up your heels, Aquarius, for this landmark year will be one you will long remember.

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CREDITS Cover: Greg Kadel; hair: Lorenzo Martin/The Wall Group; makeup: Georgie Eisdell/Juice Beauty/The Wall Group; styling: Melissa Rubini; manicure: Ashlie Johnson/Chanel Le Vernis/The Wall Group; set design: Bette Adams/Mary Howard Studio; production: GE Projects p. 10: Clockwise from top right: Brian Henn (2); Billy Ballard; Greg Kadel p. 12: Clockwise from top left: courtesy Laura Brown (2); Brian Henn; courtesy Laura Brown p. 14: Clockwise from top right: Thomas Whiteside/Eiger Agency; no credit (4) p. 18: Clockwise from top right: courtesy Savannah Baron; TIPS (3); Giovanni Giannoni/Rex/Shutterstock; TIPS; courtesy Anne Sage; Thomas Whiteside/Eiger Agency; courtesy Lauren Potter; courtesy Jade Topper; no credit p. 20: From top: no credit; courtesy Cartier p. 21: Clockwise from top left: courtesy Hirshleifers; courtesy Scribner; TIPS; courtesy Vintner’s Daughter; courtesy MiH; courtesy Jennifer Meyer; courtesy Son of a Gun; courtesy Goop; TIPS; courtesy Juice Beauty; courtesy Four Seasons Hotel p. 22: Clockwise from top left: TIPS; Kevin Tachman/Trunk Archive; Txema Yeste/Pancho Saula Management; courtesy Paige; courtesy Christopher Bagley; courtesy Oliver Peoples; courtesy Ruthie Friedlander; courtesy Greg Kadel p. 31: Courtesy Mercedes Castillo p. 32: Clockwise from top left: courtesy Swarovski (2); Nicole Nodland Photography; no credit; courtesy Mats Gustafson (3); courtesy Katy Perry; Stéphane Cardinale/Corbis/Getty p. 35: Clockwise from top right: courtesy Gottex; Mark Woods; courtesy Salvatore Ferragamo; courtesy Attico (4) pp. 39–41: Jeffrey Westbrook; styling: Judith Trezza/RJ Bennett pp. 43–46: Andreas Öhlund & Maria Therese/Lundlund; hair: Dennis Devoy/R+Co and R Session Irons/Art Department; makeup: Alice Lane/MAC Cosmetics/The Wall Group; styling: Ali Pew; manicure: Yuko Wada/Dior Vernis/Atelier Management; model: Fernanda Ly/DNA Models p. 49: Courtesy Rock the Vote p. 50: From top: Mehdi Taamallah/NurPhoto/ Getty; JB Lacroix/WireImage; Steve Zak Photography/Getty; AP/Matt Rourke p. 51: From left: Randy Shropshire/Getty; Estrop/ Getty; Neilson Barnard/Getty; Dominick Reuter/ AFP/Getty; Noam Galai/FilmMagic p. 52: Maarten de Boer/Contour by Getty p. 55: David M. Benett/Getty p. 56: Clockwise from top right: Fame Flynet; Kevork Djansezian/Getty; Timur Emek/Getty; AKM-GSI; Rex/Shutterstock; AP p. 57: Clockwise from top left: Splash; GC Images; Splash (3) p. 58: Clockwise from top right: Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic; Rex/ Shutterstock; Patrick McMullan/Getty; Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic; Brian Killian/WireImage p. 60: From left: Kevin Mazur/WireImage; Zuma; George Pimentel/WireImage; Frazer Harrison/ Getty; Jamie McCarthy/Getty p. 61: From left: Venturelli/WireImage; Broadimage/Rex/ Shutterstock; Fame Flynet; Jason Merritt/Getty; Lars Niki/Corbis p. 62: Clockwise from top left: Taylor Hill/FilmMagic; Dimitrios Kambouris/ Getty; Taylor Hill/FilmMagic; Richard Buxo/ Splash; Vince Flores/Startraks pp. 64–66: Emman Montalvan/Tack Artist Group; hair: Ron Stephens II; makeup: Sydney Sollod/Peter Thomas Roth/The Wall Group; styling: Sue Choi; production: Kelsey Stevens Productions p. 68: Jeff Henrikson p. 71: Clockwise from top right: courtesy Boohoo; courtesy Kate Spade; Christian Vierig/Getty; courtesy H&M; courtesy Maje; courtesy Marciano; Peter White/Getty p. 72: Clockwise from top left: Christian Vierig/ Getty; Vanni Bassetti/Getty; Jason Jean/Blaublut Edition; Brian Henn; INF; Victor Virgile/Getty (2); Estrop/Getty; Victor Virgile/Getty; Peter White/Getty; Richard Bord/Getty; courtesy Vans p. 74: Rex/Shutterstock; Dyad Photography; styling: Sabrina Grande; Pietro D’Aprano/Getty; Catwalking/Getty; Dyad

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Photography; styling: Sabrina Grande; courtesy Jimmy Choo; courtesy Levi’s; Catwalking/Getty; Kate Lacey (2); styling: Sabrina Grande ; Pietro D’Aprano; Dyad Photography; styling: Sabrina Grande p. 76: Clockwise from top left: Kate Lacey; styling: Sabrina Grande; Kristy Sparow/ Getty; Kate Lacey (5); styling: Sabrina Grande p. 78: Clockwise from top left: Timur Emek/ Getty; courtesy Ann Taylor; courtesy Vince Camuto; courtesy Elizabeth and James; courtesy Rebecca Minkoff; courtesy Aldo; Christian Vierig/Getty; courtesy Loft; courtesy Tretorn; courtesy Mango; courtesy ASOS; courtesy Fossil; courtesy Lulus; courtesy Jules Smith; courtesy Zara p. 80: Clockwise from top left: Dyad Photography (2); styling: Sabrina Grande; courtesy Stella McCartney; Estrop/Getty; Victor Virgile/Getty; Estrop/Getty; courtesy Wolford; Dyad Photography; styling: Sabrina Grande; courtesy Tuxe; courtesy Repetto; courtesy ASOS; Kate Lacey; styling: Sabrina Grande; Sandra Semburg/Blaublut Edition; courtesy Nine West; courtesy Zimmermann; courtesy Marc Fisher p. 82: Clockwise from top left: Catwalking/Getty; courtesy Bulgari; Dyad Photography; styling: Sabrina Grande; courtesy Furla; Dyad Photography; styling: Sabrina Grande; Estrop/Getty; Dyad Photography (3); styling: Sabrina Grande; courtesy LC Lauren Conrad; courtesy Balenciaga; Dyad Photography; styling: Sabrina Grande; courtesy Little Liffner; courtesy Rachel Comey p. 84: Clockwise from top left: Estrop/Getty; courtesy Alexander Wang; Dyad Photography (2); styling: Sabrina Grande; courtesy Victoria Beckham; Estrop/Getty; Dyad Photography; styling: Sabrina Grande; courtesy Dior; Dyad Photography; styling: Sabrina Grande; courtesy Marc Jacobs; Dyad Photography; styling: Sabrina Grande; courtesy Moynat; courtesy Aigner; Dyad Photography; styling: Sabrina Grande p. 88: Clockwise from top left: Estrop/Getty; courtesy Tessa Thompson; Be of Our Space World (2009), Robert Pruitt, private collection, courtesy Koplin Del Rio, Seattle; courtesy Diptyque; courtesy Chocolate Genius Inc.; courtesy Ganni; courtesy Adidas; courtesy Eleven B & B; courtesy Elena Ferrante; courtesy Cowshed; courtesy Rodarte p. 90: Clockwise from top left: Frankie Marin; Kate Lacey; styling: Judith Trezza/RJ Bennett; courtesy Lara Melchior; courtesy Prada; Kate Lacey; styling: Judith Trezza/RJ Bennett; courtesy Giuseppe Zanotti Design; courtesy eShakti; courtesy True Religion; courtesy Saint Laurent p. 97: Emman Montalvan; hair: Ashley Streicher/ Forward Artists; makeup: Jenn Streicher/ Forward Artists p. 98: Clockwise from top right: Emman Montalvan; courtesy Striiike; courtesy Reverie; courtesy GHD; courtesy Sachajuan p. 100: Clockwise from top right: Emman Montalvan; hair: Sarah Potempa/The Wall Group; makeup: Kira Nasat/The Wall Group; courtesy The Beachwaver Co.; courtesy R+Co; courtesy Oribe p. 102: Clockwise from top right: Mark Lim; location: courtesy Crosby Street Hotel; TIPS; courtesy Phyto; courtesy Wella p. 106: Brian Henn p. 109: Clockwise from top

right: Gary Gershoff/WireImage; Julien M. Hekimian/Getty; Taylor Hill/FilmMagic; Timur Emek/Getty; Jon Kopaloff/FilmMagic; Kevin Mazur/WireImage; Stefanie Keenan/Getty; Gregg DeGuire/FilmMagic; Jerod Harris/ WireImage; Kevin Mazur/WireImage p. 110: Clockwise from top right: courtesy Pat McGrath; TIPS; Brian Henn; Anthea Simms p. 111: Clockwise from top right: courtesy Pat McGrath (3); Brian Henn; TIPS p. 112: Thomas Whiteside/ Trunk Archive p. 113: Clockwise from top right: TIPS; Jon Paterson (5); John Shearer/WireImage; Monica Schipper/FilmMagic; Rex/Shutterstock; Didier Baverel/WireImage p. 114: Clockwise from top right: courtesy Chanel (3); TIPS; courtesy Deborah Lippmann; courtesy Tracie Martyn; Jon Paterson; TIPS p. 119: Txema Yeste/ Pancho Saula Management pp. 120-127: Greg Kadel; hair: Lorenzo Martin/The Wall Group; makeup: Georgie Eisdell/Juice Beauty/The Wall Group; styling: Melissa Rubini; manicure: Ashlie Johnson/Chanel Le Vernis/The Wall Group; set design: Bette Adams/Mary Howard Studio; production: GE Projects pp. 128–131: Hanna Tveite; hair: Dennis Devoy/R+Co and R Session Irons/Art Department; makeup: Daniel Martin/ Dior Beauty/The Wall Group; styling: Sam Broekema; manicure: Casey Herman/Leafgel Premium/The Wall Group; model: Aamito Lagum/DNA Models pp. 132–139: Txema Yeste/Pancho Saula Management; hair: Adir Abergel/Starworks Artists; makeup: Kate Lee/ Starworks Artists; styling: Jessica de Ruiter/The Wall Group; set design: Cooper Vasquez/The Magnet Agency; production: Kelsey Stevens Productions p. 140: From left: JOCE/BauerGriffin/GC Images; SMXRF/Star Max/GC Images; GVK/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images (4) p. 141: GVK/ Bauer-Griffin/GC Images (4) pp. 142–145: Billy Ballard; hair: Elena Sahuquillo/Balmain Paris Styling Line/Kasteel Artist Management; makeup: Gato/Maybelline New York/Kasteel Artist Management; production: Rosco Production; models: Mica Arganaraz/DNA Models; Phillipa Hemphrey/Premier pp. 146– 151: John Akehurst/Serlin Associates; hair: Christian Wood/Oribe/The Wall Group; makeup: Kate Lee/Starworks Artists; styling: Jessica de Ruiter/The Wall Group; manicure: Marisa Carmichael/Chanel Le Vernis/Streeters; production: Kelsey Stevens Productions p. 155: Counterclockwise from top left: courtesy Michel Gaubert; no credit; Victor Virgile/GammaRapho/Getty; no credit; Dana Edelson/NBC/ NBCU Photo Bank/Getty; no credit p. 156: Counterclockwise from top left: courtesy AudioTechnica; David M. Benett/Getty; no credit; courtesy Bernardaud; courtesy Alessi; courtesy Saint-Louis; courtesy Global; no credit; Jon & Vinny’s Italian; Sarah St. Clair Renard/courtesy Animal; Matteo Prandoni/BFA p. 159: Clockwise from top left: Angela Pham/BFA; courtesy Harley Viera-Newton; courtesy Anthropologie; no credit; Melodie Jeng/Getty p. 160: Illustration: Bruno Grizzo; Brian Henn p. 161: From top: John Palmer/Media Punch; George Pimentel; WireImage; Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic p. 164: From left: courtesy Laura Dern; Brian Henn

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Why I Love by LAURA DERN My grandma Mary was the most sassy, prideful woman I’ve ever met, and she had a really specific look—no makeup except for a very Dern with her strong lip. Back in her grandmother, circa 1971 day, wearing bold lipstick was a feminist statement. Grandma Mary didn’t have a million brands to choose from in her small Alabama town, but they had a local Avon lady, so her lipstick was always Avon. I remember borrowing tubes to play dressup and trying to mimic her posture, leaning over the bathroom sink with an arched back, to put my lips on. I even tried to emulate her look in David Lynch’s Wild at Heart. I still keep a few Avon True Color lip balms in my makeup drawer, and I recently found my 12-year-old daughter, Jaya, applying a vibrant pink. I told her that Avon was the first lipstick I ever wore. Jaya never met Grandma Mary, but she’s a legend in our house because of how she taught me to be comfortable in my own skin. We have to honor the women who made us fierce.” Dern currently stars in HBO’s Big Little Lies.

Avon True Color Lip Balm in Pink Pucker and Coral Crush, $4 each; avon.com.

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InStyle USA - February 2017