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EPIC YEAR-LONG GUITAR

MASTER CLASS! GUITAR & BASS Transcriptions METALLICA "Hardwired"

RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS "Can't Stop"

ZAKK WYLDE "Sleeping Dogs"

2017

PREVIEW ISSUE Warren Haynes Zakk Wylde Joe Satriani Steven Wilson & more!

SOUNDGARDEN 25 YEARS OF BADMOTORFINGER

ST. VINCENT GUITAR HERO ANNIE CLARK LEADS US

INTO THE NEW YEAR IN BOLD FASHION


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CON T EN TS VOL. 38 |

NO. 2 |

FEBRUARY 2017

FEATURES

34 SOUNDGARDEN

In celebration of the 25th anniversary of Soundgarden’s breakthrough album Badmotorfinger, guitarist Kim Thayil reflects on how the band used alternate tunings to their advantage and braced for the impact of mainstream acceptance.

42 ST. VINCENT They call her St. Vincent, and she exists among the forwardthinking, boundary-pushing art-pop elite—here, as we look ahead to the upcoming year in music, Guitar World digs in deep with Annie Clark, a modern day guitar hero.

42

54 2017 NEW MUSIC PREVIEW We hunt down some of the top names in guitar to find out what they have coming up in the next 12 months. Warren Haynes, Zakk Wylde, Joe Satriani, Marty Friedman, Suicide Silence and others weigh in and share their plans.

64 EPIC YEAR-LONG GUITAR LESSON! Want to become a better guitarist by the end of 2017? This comprehensive month-by-month lesson program will teach you all sorts of new tips, tricks and techniques to make you a more skilled player by this time next year.

“Hardwired” by Metallica

PAGE

108 “Can’t Stop”

by Red Hot Chili Peppers

PAGE

114 “Sleeping Dogs” by Zakk Wylde

PAGE

120

DEPARTMENTS

12 WOODSHED 14 SOUNDING BOARD

Letters, reader art and Defenders of the Faith

17 TUNE-UPS

Steven Wilson, DevilDriver, Jason Becker, Ty Segall, the Regrettes, Melvins, Dear Guitar Hero with Myles Kennedy

85 SOUNDCHECK

85. Marshall Code50 and Code25 combos 88. EarthQuaker Devices Avalanche Run 90. Ernie Ball Expression Overdrive and Ambient Delay pedals 92. PRA Audio Systems WiC for Guitar 94. Breedlove USA Concert Moon Light 94. Crazy Tube Circuits Time pedal

96 COLUMNS

96. Holcomb Mania by Mark Holcomb 98. String Theory by Jimmy Brown 100. Eclecticity by Alex Skolnick 102. Acoustic Nation by Dale Turner 104. In Deep by Andy Aledort 106. Thrash Course by Dave Davidson

124 SHOP TALK

Dave’s Guitar Shop of La Crosse, Wisconsin

GUITAR WORLD (ISSN 1045-6295) is published 13 times a year, monthly plus Holiday issue following December issue, by NewBay Media, LLC, 28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016. Phone: 212.378.0400. Fax: 917.281.4704. Web Site: www.nbmedia.com. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and additional mailing offices. Newsstand distribution is handled by Time Warner Retail. Subscriptions: One-year basic rate (12 issues) US: $14.95. Canada: US$29.95. Foreign: US$49.95. Canadian and foreign orders must be prepaid. Canadian price includes postage and GST #R128220688. PMA #40612608. Subscriptions do not include newstand specials. POSTMASTER: Send change of address to Guitar World, P.O. Box 469039, Escondido, CA 92046-9039. Ride-along enclosure in the following edition(s): None. Standard enclosure: None. Returns: Pitney Bowes, P.O. Box 25542, London, ON N6C 6B2, Canada. Entire contents copyright 2012, NewBay Media L.L.C. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited. NewBay Media L.L.C. is not affiliated with the companies or products covered in Guitar World. Reproduction on the Internet of the articles and pictures in this magazine is illegal without the prior written consent of Guitar World. Products named in the pages of Guitar World are trademarks of their respective companies. PRODUCED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. SUBSCRIBER CUSTOMER SERVICE: Guitar World Magazine Customer Care, P.O. Box 469039, Escondido, CA 92046-9039. Online: www.guitarworld.com/customerservice. Phone: 1-800-456-6441. Email guitarworld@pcspublink.com. BACK ISSUES: www.guitarworld.com/store REPRINTS: NewBay Media, LLC, 28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016. Phone: 212.378.0414

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STYLING BY PAMELA NEAL; MAKEUP BY JEFFREY BAUM USING THREE COSMETICS

T R AV I S S H I N N

TRANSCRIBED

Annie Clark, with Ernie Ball Music Man St. Vincent in Polaris White, at Studio 1444 in Hollywood on September 20, 2016


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WOODSHED VOL. 38 |

NO. 2 |

FEBRUARY 2017 EDITORIAL

EXECUTIVE CONTENT DIRECTOR Jeff Kitts EXECUTIVE EDITOR Brad Angle TECH EDITOR Paul Riario ASSOCIATE EDITORS Andy Aledort, Richard Bienstock, Alan di Perna, Chris Gill CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jonah Bayer, Joe Bosso, Dave Davidson, Randy Har ward, Joel Hoekstra, Mark Holcomb, Eric Feldman, Greg Renoff, Alex Skolnick, Dale Turner, Jon Wiederhorn SENIOR VIDEO PRODUCER Mark Nuñez

DANGEROUS CURVES

MUSIC

WE’VE NEVER BEEN afraid to go out on a limb, shake things up—toss our readers a curve ball that freezes them at the plate. It’s part of our history, after all—championing the young guns of the guitar community and putting their face in your face in the hopes that they become a regular part of your auditory diet. So when we were looking for a fresh guitarist to represent our 2017 Preview Issue, we knew it had to be someone who could help us kick off the year in bold fashion—someone who has no qualms when it comes to shaking things up and bucking the trends when it comes to music, fashion and guitar design. Readers of Guitar World, meet Annie Clark—known to her faithful followers as St. Vincent. Annie may have grown up listening to and playing metal, but as an adult she’s made her mark in the pop/alt/indie music world, and proven herself to be a forward-thinking, barrier-crashing breath of fresh air. And speaking of curve balls, she certainly tossed one our way with the faux-bikini dress she wore to our photo shoot, not letting us in on her wardrobe choice until ace photographer Travis Shinn’s camera began clicking. As you’ll read in Executive Editor Brad Angle’s revealing interview that begins on page 42, Annie chose her outfit as a sort of funloving protest against our years of featuring models in our bi-annual Buyer’s Guide issues. Touché, Annie—well-played. Annie’s next record, which will be her sixth overall, isn’t due out for a few more months, but she’s just one of many reasons to get excited about the upcoming year in music. Elsewhere in this issue you’ll find out what some of your favorite rockers and bluesmen are planning for the new year. Warren Haynes is hard at work on a new Gov’t Mule album, Zakk Wylde is gearing up to unleash a slew of new Wylde Audio products as well as another Black Label Society album, Mastodon and Suicide Silence have new discs coming soon, Joe Satriani has multiple projects in the works as we near the 30th anniversary of his legendary Surfing with the Alien album, guitar virtuoso and remix wizard Steven Wilson is putting all of his energies into a solo album, and so much more. And this issue wouldn’t be what it is without British superstar guitar instructor Martin Goulding’s insanely comprehensive year-long tutorial that begins on page 66. Featuring 12 months’ worth of tips, tricks and techniques, this epic master class will hopefully put you on the road to becoming a better guitarist by year’s end. Happy new year, now get to work!

SENIOR MUSIC EDITOR Jimmy Brown MUSIC TRANSCRIPTIONIST Jeff Perrin MUSIC ENGRAVER Patricia Corcoran

ART

ART DIRECTOR Mixie von Bormann ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR Tamara Lee CONTRIBUTING DESIGNERS Sandie Burke, Alexis Cook

ONLINE

MANAGING EDITOR Damian Fanelli EDITOR Brad Angle

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PRODUCTION MANAGER Nicole Schilling

BUSINESS

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PRESIDENT & CEO Steve Palm CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Paul Mastronardi CONTROLLER Rick Ng VICE PRESIDENT OF PRODUCTION & MANUFACTURING Bill Amstutz VICE PRESIDENT OF DIGITAL STRATEGY & OPERATIONS Robert Ames VICE PRESIDENT OF CONTENT & MARKETING Anthony Savona CORPORATE DIRECTOR OF AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Meg Estevez SUBSCRIBER CUSTOMER SERVICE: Guitar World Magazine Customer Care, P.O. Box 469039, Escondido, CA 92046-9039 ONLINE: w w w.guitar world.com/customerser vice PHONE: 1-800-456-6441 EMAIL: guitar world@pcspublink.com BACK ISSUES: Please visit our store, www.guitarworld.com/store, or email onlinestore@nbmedia.com

—Jeff Kitts Executive Content Director

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

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SOUNDI NG BOARD Got something you want to say? EMAIL US AT: Soundingboard@GuitarWorld.com

my subscription to Guitar World will not be renewed. —David Swadley

Big ’80s

Holiday Cheers… It was awesome to see Metallica on the cover of the Holiday 2016 issue. I have been a huge Metallica fan from the first time I heard Ride the Lightning. The last album, Death Magnetic, was great and so was the EP Beyond Magnetic. I am hoping that the new album, Hardwired…To Self Destruct, is just as good. Thanks again, Guitar World, for all the great articles and guitar tabs— I’ve been reading and playing for over 20 years. —Travis Zboril

…And Jeers

Hey guys, longtime reader here— love your magazine. I have a few transcription requests, so hopefully you’ll consider these in the future! Dokken, “The Hunter”— beautiful guitar solo; Ratt, “Back for More”—absolutely shredding; Night Ranger, “Don’t Tell Me You Love Me”—so powerful and fun! —Jimmy Batts

Sound Advice I’d ask Mr. Åkerfeldt to go back and re-read Richard Bienstock’s first paragraph from the Opeth feature in the Holiday issue. It sums up what has changed about Opeth better than Mikael believes. There is more to it than just the vocals. At Opeth’s peak, the band produced music that not only defied genres but also had an aura about it that no other band could duplicate. Those albums took you on a ride…twists and turns, ups and downs, and kept you submerged in sonic and songwriting greatness. More has changed about Opeth than just the vocals.

I was deeply offended by the profanity in the title of the Holiday issue Woodshed. It is my belief that each person affects everyone around them, so each day we should try to be a better, nicer person. This means standing for good and opposing what is not. Your magazine is sold to all ages, so the f-bombs and now this are inappropriate. Perhaps the music you listen to and the people you choose to hang out with have affected your judgment. Because I will not pay someone to insult me (and God),

It’s the whole sound and experience. And on that note, Mikael should have changed one thing… the band’s name. Thus, preserving Opeth for what it really was…a metal band. —Wayne Braulick

Rockin’ in the Free World While reading Billy V.’s letter in the Holiday issue regarding Tom Morello and politics, I couldn’t help agreeing that this country does offer many great things. Two of the great things that it offers are the right to free speech—for example, putting Soviet Union stickers on a guitar or showing images of Che Guevara—and the right to peaceful protest, such as kneeling during the national anthem. Another great thing this country offers is protection for its citizens from people who try to take away those rights, because trying to stop someone from voicing their opinion is about as unpatriotic an action there is. —Daniel Gerry

politics out of it! Those guys who flipped out reading about Tom Morello need to grow up. Politics is part of life. Your magazine is not political but you covered an artist who is. End of story. Morello is a wildly inventive guitarist, whether or not you like his politics. Thank you for covering current, working, thinking musicians and not just paying lip service to the all-too-frequentlycovered legends of guitar. —Sarah FitzGerald

Ink Spot As popular as they are, PRS Guitars’ logo can trip some people up. Most people think I’m a bird watcher when they see my forearm. I put the tattoo on my left arm so I could duplicate the fretboard when I played. —Jim Woodard

After reading the letters to the editor in the Holiday issue, I want to chime in and say please don’t edit your content to keep

GOT A TATTOO of your favorite band or guitarist you want to share with us? Send a photo of your ink to soundingboard@guitarworld. com and maybe we’ll print it or post it on our Facebook page!

SEND LETTERS TO: The Sounding Board, Guitar World, 28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016, or email us at Soundingboard@guitarworld.com. All subscription queries must be emailed to guitarworld@pcspublink.com. Please do not email the Sounding Board with subscription matters.

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017


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If you created a drawing, painting or sketch of your favorite guitarist and would like to see it in an upcoming issue of Guitar World, email soundingboard@ guitarworld.com with a scan of the image! ED SH E E RAN B Y KELLEEN FOOTE

DEFENDERS

KU RT COBAIN BY KENDRA LANG

of the Faith

Matt Pifer

Jacob Keneagy

Ian McDeid

AGE 33 HOMETOWN Akron, OH GUITARS Fender Stratocaster, Washburn Cumberland Jumbo Acoustic, SX Bass guitar SONGS I’VE BEEN PLAYING Originals: “Honeypot,” “Loose Lips Sink Ships,” “Alabama Space Thing” GEAR I MOST WANT Fender Bassman 410 combo

AGE 18 HOMETOWN Lebanon, PA GUITARS Epiphone Les Paul 100, Dean Dime Black Bolt, Epiphone Thunderbird SONGS I HAVE BEEN PLAYING Megadeth “Holy Wars…The Punishment Due,” Lamb of God “Set to Fail,” Alice Cooper “Eighteen” GEAR I MOST WANT Gibson Les Paul Custom, Marshall half-stack

AGE 15 HOMETOWN Coon Rapids, MN GUITARS 2015 Epiphone Les Paul Traditional Pro, 2003 Fender Stratocaster Made in Mexico, Fender ’74 Jazz Bass SONGS I HAVE BEEN PLAYING Collective Soul “December,” Dwight Yoakam “Fast As You,” Black Sabbath “Paranoid,” originals by my bands Studio 12 and Copy & Paste GEAR I MOST WANT Marshall DSL100H, Gibson ES-335, my dad’s 1999 Gibson Les Paul Classic

Are you a Defender of the Faith? Send a photo, along with your answers to the questions above, to defendersofthefaith@guitarworld.com. And pray! guitarworld.com

15


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TUNE-UPS SHE ROCKS AWARDS

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DEVILDRIVER

20

JASON BECKER

22

TY SEGALL

THE REGRETTES

MELVINS

24

26

28

DEAR GUITAR HERO: MYLES KENNEDY

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(left to right) John Campbell, Willie Adler, Chris Adler, Randy Blythe and Mark Morton

Mikael Åkerfeldt and Opeth, 2016

Steven’s Universe MULTI-TALENTED PRODUCER AND INSTRUMENTALIST STEVEN WILSON IS LOOKING AT 2017 AS HIS YEAR, WITH A HIGHLY FOCUSED NEW SOLO ALBUM ON THE WAY.

HAJO MUELLER

By Alan di Perna

“THIS IS AN EXCITING time for me,” says neo-prog polymath Steven Wilson. “I’ve moved to a new record label, have new management and am working on a new record.” Due out in September 2017, the forthcoming new release from the guitarist, singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and producer will be his first full-length album since 2015’s Hand. Cannot. Erase. and his fifth album overall. Wilson states that the new disc will be different from Hand. Cannot. Erase.

“Different in the sense that it’s a new day and a new direction,” he elaborates. “Of course, it’s still going to sound like one of my records, but it’s a little more songbased, a little more contemporary sounding. And I’m playing more guitar myself this time around, which is very different. Because on the last couple of records I had Guthrie Govan doing most of the guitar Tkk work. But this time around, I’ve gone for a different approach. I’ve played some solos that I’m really pleased with. It’s nice to be

back in the saddle of actually being a guitar player again.” Work on the album got underway on December 15 at the south London studio of Paul Stacey, who is engineering the disc. “I’m really excited about working with Paul on this,” says Wilson. “He’s a tremendous engineer and used to be a member of the Black Crowes and Oasis—a terrific guitar player too. Paul produced the last couple of Noel Gallagher albums as well, and he’s going to be my right-hand man on the record. The musicians will be the band I’ve been touring with for the past 18 months, along with the singer Ninet Tayeb. She sang with me on the last record, but she’s going to be a whole lot more involved in this record.” guitarworld.com

17


NEWS + NOTES

At the time he entered the studio, Wilson had written 17 songs for the project. “I’m going to record them all,” he says. “I don’t know which ones are going to make the record right now. My approach is always to write a lot more than I need and then select the tracks that create the most satisfying flow and album experience. So we’ll see. I’m sure that things like title tracks, structure and running order will become apparent as time goes on.” In years gone by, Wilson has impressed fans and critics with both the broad scope

Ladies In Shred THE SHE ROCKS AWARDS GEARS UP FOR ITS FIFTH ANNUAL EVENT AT NAMM 2017 By Laura B. Whitmore

NOW IN ITS FIFTH consecutive year, the She Rocks Awards is a one-ofa-kind event that celebrates badass, fierce women in the

18

music industry. Taking place on January 20, 2017, during the NAMM show at the Anaheim Hilton in Anaheim, California, this event is open to all, from

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

fans to industry insiders. The 2017 She Rocks Awards will honor guitar queen Lita Ford, Grammy Award–winning bass player Esperanza Spalding and Shirley Manson of Garbage, along with a litany of industry insiders, including Monique Boyer (MAC Cosmetics), Rebecca Eaddy (Roland), Bev Fowler (PRS Guitars), Lisa Foxx (MYfm), Charyn Harris (A Place Called Home), Karrie Keyes (Soundgirls & Pearl Jam), Tracy Leenman (Musical Innovations), Dani Markman (Disney Music Group) and Leanne Summers (LAWIM). Onstage performances will be backed by the house band, Rock Sugah, featuring Divinity Roxx (Beyoncé) on bass, Kat Dyson (Prince, Sting) on guitar, Benita Lewis (Chaka Khan) on drums, and Lynette Williams (Will.i.am, Cee-lo) on keyboard.

The She Rocks Awards will also serve as the launch party for a compilation album of guitar goddesses called She Rocks Vol. 1. Releasing that same day on Steve Vai’s Favored Nations Label and produced by former Guitar World editor Brad Tolinski, the record features tracks by Orianthi, Nita Strauss, Lita Ford, Jennifer Batten, Kat Dyson and others. For tickets and information, visit sherocksawards.com.

L I TA F O R D : J O S H W I T H E R S/AT L A S I C O N S .C O M ; W I L S O N : H A J O M U E L L E R

Wilson hints that some of the material on the new record will touch on current events and issues. “I think it’s difficult to live in this world right now and be aware of what’s going on,” he says. “So let’s just say that the album reflects the world I find myself living in in 2016. There are strands that connect the songs, but there isn’t a story like there was on Hand. Cannot. Erase. That record was very much a narrative from beginning to end. This record will have more of a loose concept, with various strands and themes recurring in the songs.”

and sheer volume of his musiEW PREVI cal work. He’s explored styles and genres ranging from ambiTHE YEAR S IC ent to prog to metal, through bands IN M U and projects such as Porcupine Tree, No-Man, I.E.M., Bass Communion, Blackfield and Storm Corrosion. He’s also noted for his 5.1 surround-sound remixes for deluxe reissues of classic albums by Jethro Tull, King Crimson, Roxy Music, XTC, Yes, Gentle Giant, Simple Minds, Tears for Fears and others. But 2017, he says, will be all about his own new album: “I’ve drawn a line under everything else. I’m not going to be doing any more remix work or other projects until I have this album completely finished. I think one of the problems I’ve had in the past is maybe trying to diversify my work too much. But for the next couple of years, I really want to concentrate on my own work and my own records. I’m committed to making this record, touring it and promoting it, with all the artwork and all the films that are part of a big album project, an album cycle. So I’m afraid all of the other stuff is going to have to take a bit of a back seat right now. I think that’s the right decision for me.” Tour dates have already been booked, and are scheduled to begin shortly after the new album’s September release. “I feel this could be the best album of my career,” Wilson says of the new disc, “which is always a good feeling to have.”


NEWS + NOTES PR EV I EW THE YEAR IN MUSIC

Mike Spreitzer (left) and Neal Tiemann

DevilDriver

AXOLOGY

By Adam Perlmutter

COUNTRY-AND-WESTERN and heavy metal might seem like strange bedfellows, but DevilDriver, the Santa Barbara, California-based metal band, sees a natural connection between the genres. Neal Tiemann, half of the band’s twin-guitar attack, says, “There’s a definite parallel in the stick-to-your-guns attitude and workingclass mentality in most metal and country.” At press time, DevilDriver was working on an album of country covers. The project started out in early 2016, when the band’s singer, Dez Fafara, was thinking about doing punk classics. “I loved the idea of focusing on a single genre, but I felt that country was a better way to go because the songs would give us more ideas to work with,” says coguitarist Mike Spreitzer. Fafara took things a step further and suggested that the band focus mainly on outlaw

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country—songs by George Jones, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson and others. Tiemann says, “While the theme is centered in outlaw country, we’re adding some numbers that go against the grain, rather than fit inside those genre barriers.” As far as how they are planning to fuse the signature elements of country with their own pulverizing brand of metal, Tiemann had this to say: “I think the point is to keep the memorable melodies and lyrics intact while providing an alternate and heavier music bed. It’s easy to get carried away in one of our own riffs, so we’ve been sure to keep refocusing on the essence of the original material.” Though it will essentially be a metal record of country source materials, that isn’t to say the album won’t have a certain twang— thanks to Tiemann’s flourishes. I’m doing a bit of chicken pickin’ in spots and using more

• GUITARS (Spreitzer) ESP Eclipse-IIs with Fishman Fluence Modern or Bare Knuckle Aftermath pickups; (Tiemann) Peavey PowerSlide, Dunable R2s with EMG 85/81 pickups • AMP (Spreitzer) Fractal Audio Systems Axe-Fx II; (Tiemann) Kemper Profiler/STL Tones with Soldano SLO100, Vox AC30 and Marshall JCM800 profiles • EFFECTS (Spreitzer) Mission Engineering EP1-KP Expression Pedal, Alexander Pedals Oblivion, Radical Delay and Golden Summer; (Tiemann) Catalinbread Dirty Little Secret, Katzenkönig, Echorec, and Talisman, Mr. Black SuperMoon, FridayClub The BlackBird • STRINGS (both) SIT • PICKS (both) InTune

slide than I already do. Lap steel is another element that I’ve loved adding to the DevilDriver sound.” When pressed further on exactly how the band is synthesizing metal and country in its laboratory, Spreitzer says, coyly, “You’ll find out when the record comes out.”

JEREMY DANGER

AN ALBUM OF OUTLAW COUNTRY REWORKINGS IS NEXT ON THE AGENDA FOR THE CALIFORNIA METALHEADS.


NEWS + NOTES

INQUIRER JASON BECKER What first influenced you to pick up a guitar? Because my dad played classical guitar, and I thought it was cool. What was your first guitar?  A Franciscan acoustic. What was the first song you learned?  “As I Went Out One Morning” by Bob Dylan from his John Wesley Harding album. What do you recall about your first time playing guitar live? I was in the sixth grade, in front of the class. I just stood there, frozen in fear. I finally started playing and singing after about five minutes. First time playing live with Cacophony was at an L.A. guitar show in ’88 for Carvin guitars. It was a lot of fun, but I danced around too much. When I watched it on YouTube, I was annoyed at myself. “Stand still, you wiggle worm!” Marty couldn’t find a long enough guitar cord, so he was stuck in one spot.

Is there a moment on your new album that makes you particularly proud as a musician and composer? Is there a working title for it? No working title yet. There are a few melodies that give me goosebumps. I do have a vocal tune with a Pink Floyd type of feel. The lyrics are very personal

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and autobiographical. I feel vulnerable with this new way of expressing myself. I would like to get Seal to sing it. Probably won’t happen, but someone good will do it. Do you like the idea of writing challenging parts for all of these ace players, like Joe Satriani, Guthrie Govan and Eric Johnson? Lately I haven’t written the parts for the players. I just write the tune and ask them to solo over it.

What is your favorite guitar or piece of gear? Well, I love my Kiesel/Carvin guitars of course, and my Seymour Duncan Perpetual Burn pickups. When I was still playing, I really dug the Alesis Quadraverb. Do you have any advice for young players? I guess if you love the music you are doing, that is enough. — RANDY HARWARD

PA U L H A G G A R D

Have you ever had an embarrassing moment onstage, or a nightmare gig? I remember [Cacophony singer] Peter Marrino got caught up in my guitar cord, and while trying to get ourselves free, it looked like we were doing a jig together. [laughs] No nightmare gigs, except while in Vancouver recording with David Lee Roth. At night, we sometimes played in clubs. With my progressing ALS [amyotrophic lateral sclerosis], my playing was weak and I could barely stand up. It was rough having people judge me.


NEWS + NOTES PR EV I EW THE YEAR IN MUSIC

Ty Segall THE GARAGE ROCKER GETS A HELPING HAND WITH HIS UPCOMING SELF-TITLED FULL-LENGTH. By Jonah Bayer

WHEN IT COMES TO tracking records, Ty Segall likes to be in control. Since 2008, the prolific, multiinstrumentalist has released eight records under his own name (and dropped even more LPs with a half-dozen side projects) on which he often performs all vocal, guitar, drum and bass duties. However, for his forthcoming self-titled full-length, due on January 27 via Drag City Records, Segall switched things up, brought in a full band and set them loose. The approach added an excitement to the sessions that can be heard on cuts like the album’s fuzz-driven opener “Break a Guitar,” which sounds like it

24

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

could implode at any moment. “That song was done live on the first take,” Segall recalls. “I’m not a technical guitar player but I can play emotively, and the way we made this album really lent itself to that.” Whether Segall is strangling his guitar in the aforementioned track or stretching out on the 10-minute-plus psychedelic romp “Warm Hands (Freedom Returned)” Ty Segall is an album that manages to sound at once fresh and timeless. The transcendence of his sound is due, in part, to Segall’s gear choices, which run from stone-cold classic to offthe-wall boutique. His main guitar is a vintage Gibson Les

Paul with a 1969 serial number and 1959 body shape (the jury is out on when it was actually made) that he got a few years ago for $1,300. Segall’s signal chain for the album—which was tracked over six days with engineer Steve Albini—included an Electro-Harmonix Small Stone Phaser and Death By Audio Fuzz War and Octave Clang pedals all run through his 1972 Fender Quad Reverb. “It’s all about not being afraid to do something far out or fall on your face during a take,” he says of his mindset while recording the new material. Segall is also quick to give credit to second guitarist Emmett Kelly for helping to bring out the musicians’ best performances ( just listen to the impassioned simultaneous dual soloing on “Freedom”). “I’ve only been playing with him for like a year and a half, but he’s one of the best people I’ve ever played with,” he says. “All he wants to do is make the song better and you can hear that on this record.”

ROBERT DELAHANTY

Ty Segall & the Muggers onstage at Pickathon 2016 in Happy Valley, Oregon


BLACK IS THE NEW BLACK

www.ovationguitars.com ©2017 Drum Workshop, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


NEWS + NOTES PR EV I EW THE YEAR IN MUSIC

Lydia Night onstage; (inset, left to right) Sage Nicole, Genessa Gariano, Night and Maxx Morando

The Regrettes L.A. GARAGE ROCK TEENS ARE PRIMED TO BREAK OUT WITH FEEL YOUR FEELINGS FOOL!

HOW MANY OF US can say they knew their life’s purpose at five years old? And rarer still, who actually followed through with that calling? Guitarist Lydia Night is among that exclusive club. “My dad took me to a Donnas concert when I was five, and it was so badass that I decided to sing and play guitar,” says the now 16-year-old frontwoman of Los Angeles garage rockers the Regrettes. Night acquired her first guitar at six, played her first show at seven and formed the guitar/drum two-piece Pretty Little Demons when she was 11. When that duo disbanded in early 2015, Night reconnected with some friends she had met in the L.A. School of Rock program—19-year-old Genessa Gariano (guitar), 19-year-old Sage Nicole (bass) and 18-year-old Maxx Morando (drums)—and the Regrettes were born.

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

After securing management (when a rep from the Knoller Group read about Night on the blog Grimy Goods), the Regrettes landed an unexpected, and ultimately life-changing, meeting with a heavy hitter from Warner Bros. “Our managers set up a meeting with this person I didn’t know at all, Mike Elizondo [producer of Dr. Dre, Avenged Sevenfold],” says Night. “I didn’t think much about it, but I met him and was like, ‘Oh my god I love this person!’ And two days later he offered us a deal.” With Elizondo’s blessing, the label booked studio time for the Regrettes to record the material that would become their debut album, Feel Your Feelings Fool!, which is due out on January 13. Night wrote the lion’s share of the new disc—with her 1956 Fender Sonic Duo

and Silvertone guitars and a Fender Hot Rod Deluxe amp—which ranges from super-catchy Sixties girl-group rock to defiant, grungy punk-pop and features Night’s whip-smart lyrics and head-turning singing style. Because Night is currently homeschooled, the Regrettes have had limited ability to tour (mostly in California, where they’ve opened for acts like Kate Nash and Sleigh Bells). But the young guitarist is on track for early graduation in 2017, which will allow her to put all her energy into the band. “I’ll have my entire year of being 17… and not in school!” she says, excitedly. “A national tour would be amazing. I’d love to tour with the Kills because they’re one of my favorite live bands and [singer] Alison [Mosshart] is so nice it’s insane.”

N I G H T: N O R M D E V E Y R A ; G R O U P S H OT: J E N R O S E N S T E I N

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Jimmy Eat World


SETLIST

BUZZ OSBORNE OF THE MELVINS VENUE: Cain’s Ballroom DATE: September 14, 2016 LOCATION: Tulsa, OK Interview by GREG RENOFF

“MR. RIP-OFF”

“JANUS, JEANIE, AND GEORGE HARRISON”

“Steven McDonald, our bass player, also plays in Redd Kross. ‘Janus’ is a Redd Kross song that Steven sings. A lot of our fans probably don’t know the song, but that’s okay. It’s a great one. The last time we toured, Jeff Pinkus of the Butthole Surfers played bass, and so we played a couple of Butthole Surfers songs. I love doing that kind of stuff, because there are no rules. We can do whatever we want.”

“Sometimes you can get your inspiration from very strange places. We were at our practice space, and there was another band practicing nearby. I didn’t like what they were doing, but I liked the overall vibe they were getting. So I said, ‘I’m going to write a song like that, with that kind of vibe.’ So then as a joke, Dale [Crover] and I called it ‘Mr. Rip Off,’ as if we’d ripped someone else off. Really, I just took what they were doing and improved on it.”

“HALO OF FLIES”

That’s an Alice Cooper song, but it’s not one that would normally be covered, so that attracted us to it. Alice is one of my all-time favorites. Covering that song was a fierce undertaking because it has about a million parts. I’m always relieved when I make it through it without fucking it up! Fortunately Steven had [Cooper’s] Killer at home so he knew the song. We’ll probably play it for the rest of this tour, and then, I’m not sure when we will play it again. But I love that song.”

“HIDEOUS WOMAN”

“NIGHT GOAT” “THE DECAY OF LYING”

“That one’s also on Basses Loaded. I thought everyone would know that title was an Oscar Wilde rip-off, but nobody’s mentioned it. Oh well! It’s in my top-10 favorite songs that I’ve ever written, so I hope it’s one we’re going to keep playing for a long time.”

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

“It’s one of our most popular songs. About halfway through this tour we started having Hozoji MathesonMargullis, the drummer from our support act, Helms Alee, come out and play it with us. Then, a couple shows later, we decided, why not have their whole band come out and play? And we did, and it morphed into something really great.”

“It’s on our newest album, Basses Loaded, the one we did with Steven. It’s in C-G tuning. That’s one I stumbled upon that I really like: The low E string is in C and the A string’s in G. It’s got some good riffs in it, but I don’t know how much longer we’ll play it after this tour. We’ll probably trade it in for something else.”

PHOTOS BY SHANE BROWN


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PA U L J E N D R A S I A K /AT L A S I C O N S .C O M

DEAR GUITAR HERO

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017


MYLES KENNEDY

He’s the lead singer and rhythm guitarist of Alter Bridge and occasionally Slash’s right-hand man, but what Guitar World readers really want to know is... Interview by Chris Butera

WHAT GUITAR TECHNIQUES HAVE YOU LEARNED BY WATCHING AND PLAYING ALONGSIDE SLASH? —KEITH KIRBY One of the techniques that I’ve incorporated recently in the last year is when he’s playing in a higher register, he tends to lift his guitar up so that, basically, as opposed to being horizontal to the ground, it’s more vertical so he can have better access past the 12th fret. That’s something I never thought of before because there were a lot of times where I would get into that register and improvise or do a lead and it would be uncomfortable for my left hand. Watching him and noticing he would do that, it suddenly made sense. Another thing I’ve learned from him is the way he attacks the strings and the way he gets the sound, and I’ve learned that through [Alter Bridge guitarist] Mark Tremonti as well. There’s something to be said about how you hit the strings with your right hand and how that affects the sound. I was always about economy of motion when I first started playing, and a lot of the players I was influenced by were a little more delicate with their touch. Slash is definitely more aggressive and I like the way that sounds, so it’s definitely something I’ve learned.

How did you and Slash start working together? —Anthony Curtis He reached out to me in 2009 when he was working on his solo record. He sent me a demo of what would eventually become “Starlight,” which was the first song we collaborated on together. That was really the genesis of the relationship. You collaborated with Jimmy Page, Jason Bonham and John Paul Jones for a project that for some reason never saw the light of day. What happened and will any recordings ever come out? —Jose Rodriguez We did get together and rehearse,

and we jammed on a few songs, but there was nothing ever officially recorded. That was eight years ago, so I think everybody’s gone and forged different paths at this point. How did you wind up in an on-screen role in the movie Rock Star? What was that experience like? —Cutty Powell I believe the genesis for that was a tribute to Brendan O’Brien, the producer and mixer—he actually mixed the very first album I did for a major label in the late Nineties for the Mayfield Four. He was one of the music producers on that film and they were looking for that character for a while, and

he suggested that they reach out to me. That was ultimately how it started and I definitely owe Brendan a lot for that. Obviously I looked a little goofy wearing that wig, but I had a blast doing the movie. What was it like when you played Guns N’ Roses songs with Slash for the first time? —Terry Howard It was a trip. It was definitely wild singing those songs and then looking to my left and seeing the guy who helped create them. There were times where we’d be standing onstage in front of tens of thousands of people somewhere and I’d look over and there’s Slash and we’re playing

“Sweet Child O’ Mine.” It was definitely crazy. How do you come up with your lyrics? What goes into writing an Alter Bridge song? —Nicholas Barnes The lyric process generally is absorbing what’s going in the world around you or your own world and just trying to spit it out in poetry. As far as the overall song process, it’s essentially just stockpiling ideas when we’re touring separately and then coming together and piecing them together. If Mark has a chorus, or I have a chorus and the other guy has a verse, we put it with the other guy’s musical idea and piece it together almost like a puzzle. When we wrote “Blackbird,” which for a lot of fans is their favorite song, that took months and months and months to put together. We’d been massaging that for maybe eight or nine months until it finally came together. Do you have any pre-show rituals? —Cleon Woodbine I have to warm up a lot, especially if I’m playing guitar and singing with Alter Bridge. I’ll start the vocal part about two hours before a show. I’ll do a 30-minute vocal warm-up, then put it away for a while then usually play guitar, which I’m doing for most of the day anyway. That’s part of the ritual. Then some stretching and whatnot, but the warm-up is paramount. I have a series of exercises that evolve from the “bel canto” opera technique—they’re a series of scales and arpeggios using different vowels and different parts of my voice to get the blood flowing to that part of my body and making sure that everything’s in line guitarworld.com

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DEAR GUITAR HERO

WHO WAS YOUR BIGGEST INFLUENCE GROWING UP?

—SAM ELLIS

Probably Jimmy Page. He showed me how important it was to be a versatile guitar player and musician. Not just a specialist, but a generalist because he was a session player. He was very well-rounded and you can hear that in the music that Zeppelin made. It wasn’t just about the bombastic hard rock, but also the well-crafted acoustic songs and many different genres assimilated into their sound. That was very inspiring for me, so I did my best to spend as much time as I could trying to learn as many different techniques and different genres as I could and trying to incorporate that into myself as a musician.

when I go onstage. I owe a lot to the old opera masters. What’s the weirdest thing on the Alter Bridge concert rider? —Michael D’ambrosio I don’t know if it’s still there, but at one time we had oxygen tanks. The reason for that is the same reason that Van Halen didn’t allow brown M&Ms back in the day—it’s basically to make sure the promoters are reading it and staying on top of it. Is it true you used to be a guitar teacher? —Albert Hughes Yes, and I enjoyed it very much. There were parts that I loved, especially with students that enjoyed

32

playing and wanted to learn, and I thrived off of that and it made me a better musician as well. The hard part was that occasionally you’d get students who weren’t really sure why they were there. Maybe their parents dropped them off for a half hour or something. That’d be really awkward because you’d have to entertain someone for 30 minutes that generally didn’t want to be there. Fortunately, that didn’t happen too often. Tell me about the current Alter Bridge album, The Last Hero. Is it true that you and Mark split the lead guitar duties in the studio? —Paul Hunt Yes. I think that with each record there tends to be more lead guitar on my end. I don’t know if it’s

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

You’re known to be an avid reader. What are you currently reading and what would you recommend to someone looking for a good book? —Larry McCoy I just got something on Amazon the other day. They had bunch of free books and I got something called The Millionaire Next Door. I don’t even know why I read it. It was basically the study of how people think about finances. I was compelled to read it for some reason; I think I read it in a day. I’ll read books like that and then I’ll turn around and read an Aldous Huxley book. Slash turned me onto his writing. I just read a Huxley book called Brave New World which I absolutely loved. It’s very much like what George Orwell did with

1984. I love books like that where it takes place in a dystopian future. Reading for me helps a lot with the lyric-writing process; it helps expand your vocabulary and gives you ideas and keeps your brain fine-tuned. How did you get involved with the International Fund for Animal Welfare? Are you involved in other types of philanthropy? —Clifton Powell That was a few years ago when we wrote a song called “Beneath the Savage Sun” that Slash and I did. Slash had some connections there, and he reached out to them to let them know that we had this song and it blossomed into the relationship from there. I have a few different things that I’m involved with besides that foundation. I’ve got a foundation at home called the Future Song Foundation which is helping to basically bring music to kids who don’t have access to it, be it through private instruction or instruments because obviously there have been so many cuts in schools with music programs. My wife and I are pretty passionate about that. I tend to be more hands-on at a local level where I live, like being on the board at a food bank, but being a part of IFAW is great. Globally, you just help where you can.

R I C H A R D B O OT H

something we’re extremely cognitive of or if it just kind of happens. A lot of times I’ll be in the studio and Elvis [Michael Baskette], our producer might say, “Hey, why don’t you throw a lead over this part?” during the arranging process or Mark might just pass a solo my way and say, “This really sounds like it would work more for your style.” It really just depends on the song, the feel of the song or which player and their musical vocabulary might shine brightest over each chord progression.


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Kim Thayil strikes a pose during soundcheck for the RIP Magazine party at the Hollywood Palladium on October 5, 1991

E D D I E M A L L U K /AT L A S I C O N S .C O M

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In celebration of the

35

25th anniversary of SOUNDGAR DEN’S

breakthrough

album Badmotorfinger , guitarist K I M T H AY IL

reflects on how the band used alternate tunings

to their advantage and braced for the impact of mainstream acceptance. BY

hese were songs that had tempos and changes and movements that did not accommodate most social exchanges…other than perhaps conversation and drugs,” says Kim Thayil with a laugh, discussing Soundgarden’s breakthrough 1991 album, Badmotorfinger. At the time, the Seattle four-piece, who had already achieved some success with their first majorlabel release, 1989’s Louder Than Love, were the leading lights of the then very nascent grunge movement, which was just starting to rear its head on a national level (for context, Nirvana’s Nevermind was released just two weeks prior to Badmotorfinger, and had yet to fully impact the mainstream). And yet, even as Soundgarden were coming to

RICHARD BIENSTOCK

define the sludgy, Zeppelin-and-Sabbath-andStooges-on-steroids sound of grunge, they were already moving beyond its boundaries with Badmotorfinger, an incredibly varied and inventive— or, to use Thayil’s word, “quirky”—effort. The album’s songs were stuffed with odd time signatures that often shifted on a dime and, most notably, were played in an array of nonstandard guitar tunings, including one where every string was assigned to varying E octaves. Of that particular tuning, which was employed for the song “Mind Riot,” Thayil says with a laugh, “It was definitely a difficult one to maintain in terms of intonation, so I wouldn’t recommend it.” But, he adds, “It was also a lot of fun to play around

guitarworld.com

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with.” Despite its unusual makeup, Badmotorfinger also catapulted Soundgarden—Thayil, singer and guitarist Chris Cornell, drummer Matt Cameron and bassist Ben Shepherd—to mainstream success: the band scored an MTV smash with “Outshined,” as well as notched modest hits with two other tracks, “Jesus Christ Pose” and “Rusty Cage” (the latter later covered by Johnny Cash). Additionally, Soundgarden supported Badmotorfinger by touring with everyone from Guns N’ Roses to Skid Row, and also landed a prime slot on the traveling 1992 Lollapalooza festival alongside the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Ice Cube and Pearl Jam. In recognition of this pivotal moment in the band’s career, Thayil has now helped to put together a new Badmotorfinger box set, which is available in four formats, including a massive seven-disc super deluxe version that features the full remastered album, a disc of studio outtakes, the twoCD and DVD Live at the Paramount, recorded at Seattle’s Paramount Theatre in March 1992, the video document Motorvision + More, a Bluray audio disc in 5.1 surround sound and a 52-page book with unreleased photos, new liner notes and reinterpreted album art, among other goodies. Thayil sat down with Guitar World to discuss the new package and the making of the original Badmotorfinger. He also took some time to look back on the music landscape of 1991— including the rise, and ultimate mainstreaming, of grunge—and examine whether, with Bad-

motorfinger, Soundgarden had strayed too far from their roots. “We definitely got some blowback from the indie community,” Thayil says. “But, you know, fuck ’em! They all came back.” He laughs. “Well, most of ’em came back.” It’s been 25 years since Badmotorfinger was first released. Now that you’ve spent some time with the album again while putting the new box set together, what sticks out to you about it?

Well, for one thing, I’ve been listening to this material a lot for the past half-year, and you’d think I’d be really saturated from hearing it. But on the contrary, I noticed that the opposite thing happened. I just become more and more attracted to the record. And I’m not sure why that is. I think because I started listening to it again without my “MTV ears” on—I wasn’t just hearing it in the context of the heavy rotation of “Outshined,” or in the context of people commenting on the amazing drums on “Jesus Christ Pose.” I started

listening to the other tracks in conjunction with those songs, and in that context it gave me more understanding of how incredible the album is. I’m saying this as a fan as well as someone who obviously created it. Before, I would listen to “Jesus Christ Pose” or “Outshined” or “Rusty Cage” and be like, “Ah, yeah, that’s a cool single…” But then I’d be reminded—“Oh, ‘Slaves and Bulldozers,’ that’s on this album, too!” Or, “ ‘Room a Thousand Years Wide’—of course!” Or “ ‘Searching with My Good Eye Closed’ and ‘Holy Water’—I forgot those were on there.” I mean, I know conceptually what the track listing is, but just listening to it I realized, My god, so many of these songs have kind of become standards in our set through the years, and a lot of them have had strong responses from fans. When people talk about songs that were important to them a lot of times it ends up being not “Outshined,” but rather “Slaves and Bulldozers” or “Searching with My Good Eye Closed” or “New Damage” or “Mind Riot.” So it’s pretty impressive.

You’re not going to be holding your sweetie or walking from campus to the local café to ‘Outshined.’

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

As far as hard-rock acts go, Soundgarden was always a somewhat quirky band. But those quirks became more pronounced on Badmotorfinger. Specifically, I’m thinking about the odd time signatures and the altered tunings, which were such a big part of that record. Can you point to how that developed?

Well, we always did stuff in weird time signatures, going back to the very beginning. But then early on we got Scott Sundquist on drums, and he was more of a bluesy, swingy, groove drummer. He was really comfortable with that Santana, Hendrix-y thing, playing in fours and threes and sixes. And so we started writing more like that. We really didn’t focus on the things in five and nine, which might have been a little tougher for the band to interpret. But once we got Matt Cameron in the band, Matt can play anything. And so gradually that kind of writing started to return, and it just kept progressing on each album. Now, the tunings, we always did stuff in standard, of course, and then we started doing a lot of stuff in drop D. But around the time of Badmotorfinger we started playing around with things like dropping the low string to A, or doing what we called “digga digga” tuning, which was when you drop the two lowest strings to D and G. And then we also explored unison strings and open tunings— part of that came when Ben Shepherd joined the band [prior to Badmotorfinger]; he was acquainted with open tunings because he was a big Stones fan. But the unison nature of some of the string pairings in open tunings wound up facilitating some of the writing. It would make the octave perhaps easier to reach and access. That’s one of the standouts of “Rusty Cage,” certainly; by tuning the E string down to B we were able to access the octave and do that whole-step slide between the two adjacent strings. That was a really cool thing that Chris


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came up with. It was definitely very inventive. There were a few other Badmotorfinger songs in drop B as well, like “Holy Water.”

Yes. Although on “Holy Water” the tuning is used in a way that’s a little more conventional and bluesy in approach. Whereas “Rusty Cage” is kind of a few steps into the future in terms of the way it sounds. But we were all playing around with these tunings. In fact, I don’t know that there’s anything on the album in standard. Oh, no— there’s “Drawing Flies.” But that might be the only track. Nowadays, tons of metal bands tune down to B, whether by dropping the low E string, tuning the whole guitar down or just playing a seven-string. But back in 1991 it was pretty novel to go that low.

E D D I E M A L L U K /AT L A S I C O N S .C O M

Right. Now you have the fivestring basses and the sevenstring guitars and everyone does it. Back then, I think maybe Metallica had done some songs where they tuned everything down, though I’m not sure if they just did the low string or if they did the whole guitar. So there were definitely other bands that had done things like that to augment the heavy. But I think in our case, what was different was that we were doing things to facilitate playing strange chords, or to get unusual unison sounds from having two adjacent strings tuned the same, or to do weird octave moves. We were moving past tuning down just to make something sound heavier. You can’t have a discussion about guitar tunings on Badmotorfinger without talking about “Mind Riot.” For that one, you guys tuned your guitars so that all six strings were in different octaves of E.

Yeah. And again, with a tuning like that, even though it seems very strange and it seems like we invented it, it had been around before us. If anything maybe we just used it for the

38

Soundgarden 1991: (left to right) Ben Shepherd, Chris Cornell, Matt Cameron and Thayil

first time in a rock context. But tuning everything to one note, that was Chris’ idea. And I’m not really sure what the purpose is. Obviously you can get some weird overtones and these cool harmonic dynamics. But I think he just kind of saw it as an experiment. Like, “What if everything was tuned to E? How would you go about writing something?” I think it was a challenge. And it was definitely difficult in terms of maintaining intonation. So it’s the only song we have in that tuning. [laughs] But, I don’t know, maybe I should try to do something in it now! Badmotorfinger was released at a fairly pivotal moment in rock. When you issued your previous album, Louder Than Love, grunge hadn’t yet been embraced by the mainstream. By the time of Badmotorfinger, it was becoming a full-on phenomenon.

That’s right. Early on, the Seattle sound, or what started to be called grunge, was characterized by Soundgarden, Mudhoney, Tad, a lot of other bands that were coming out on Sub Pop. Nirvana had just come out, but they were a younger band. And you also had the Melvins, of course. So there was an identity with Seattle, of this combination of punk, alternative, indie, metal, classic rock, psy-

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

chedelic, however you might want to characterize it, and the grunge bands were looked at as sort of “slowed down,” as far as how we were playing this stuff. And then Nirvana did this leapfrog, making this incredibly beautiful, poppy and heavy record, and the term grunge went to the masses, as did Seattle’s identity. So Seattle went from being known as Tad, Mudhoney, the Melvins and Soundgarden to being known as Nirvana, Alice in Chains, Pearl Jam and Soundgarden. But the thing is, I don’t think the term grunge was applicable to Alice in Chains or Pearl Jam or really us at that point. I mean, Mudhoney is like the prototypical grunge band. And Nirvana was sort of a poppier version of that. But the term was, I think, just a marketing idea. It was a way to utilize retail space in a record store. Grunge just meant stuff from Seattle. But Badmotorfinger doesn’t have a lot in common with grunge, I don’t think. At that moment in time, Soundgarden also sort of straddled the line between hard rock and metal and what would become known as alternative. You did the Lollapalooza festival for Badmotorfinger, but you also toured with Skid Row. Did that feel like a weird fit for you?

There were definitely conversations had, as well as, I think,

some hesitation as far as touring with a band like Skid Row. And, by the way, those guys are fantastic—Sebastian Bach, Dave Sabo, they’re just great guys. But there was hesitation in terms of thinking, you know, maybe their crowd will just be girls in the front row wanting to check out the nice hair and the cool power ballads. Whereas we were used to seeing kids with torn-up blue-jean jackets or maybe a horizontally striped shirt, and the guys in the front row were usually guys in other bands. So we wondered, Is this really our audience? But we thought it’d be good for us because these bands had bigger draws, so we’d get the chance to play for more people. And I remember many of our friends said, “You know, you guys kinda do a punk thing, you do a metal thing, you sort of straddle that fence. But now you’ve toured with Skid Row— it seems like you’ve jumped over that fence into this metal/hard rock world.” And I thought, Okay…but we’re still ourselves! We just want the opportunity to play for other people. But we haven’t changed who we are. As a matter of fucking fact, Badmotorfinger is a lot quirkier than Louder Than Love. At the same time, there were also people who thought that with Badmotorfinger we were starting to sound like Rush, because they were

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just picking up on the proggier elements. But if you listen to it, there’s still this darkness, and also this weird psychedelic thing. It was strange, but it was very much us. Speaking of quirkiness, “Outshined” was the big song from Badmotorfinger, but “Jesus Christ Pose” was actually the first single released from the album. That’s a weird one to lead off with.

It is. And you couldn’t dance to it, so it wasn’t going to be played in clubs or anything. And, look, “Smells Like Teen Spirit”

is a beautiful song. But it got played in rock halls, it got played in bars, it got played in dance clubs, too. There’s nothing on Badmotorfinger that would ever get danceclub time. Not because we had any animosity toward a club demographic, it’s just that you can’t dance to something in seven or five. And, as a matter of fact, what the hell is “Outshined” played in? Doesn’t it go between sevens and fours or something like that? So you’re not going to be holding your sweetie or walking from campus to the local café to “Outshined” either, you know?

What was your main setup on Badmotorfinger?

I think I was using Peavey amps and cabs. The heads were VTMs. I remember we toured the Peavey factory, in Mississippi, I think, before that album. So Chris and I both used their amps. Before that we were using Music Mans. Then later on we went to Mesa/Boogie. And my main guitar was my Guild S-100, and I used a couple of Gibsons as well. And Chris was using primarily Gibsons and a few Fenders. How about effects?

Prior to Badmotorfinger, like on [1987’s] Screaming Life and [1988’s] Ultramega OK, I would use an Ibanez Tube Screamer and a Stereo Chorus. And around Badmotorfinger I started using a Rotovibe. And I might have started with a Cry Baby around then, too. I also had a boost—I think it was a Rat—for my solos. I used that basically for volume and gain on my leads. Because prior to Badmotorfinger I was really the only guitarist in the band. But around Louder Than Love Chris started playing guitar on more songs, especially the songs he wrote. Which made sense. So I started using gain pedals to cut through the other guitar onstage. Finally, Soundgarden’s most recent studio album was 2012’s King Animal. Where do things stand as far as any new material?

Well, we’ve been working on a new album over the past year. It’s been interrupted by Pearl Jam tours [drummer Matt Cameron is also a member of that band] and Chris’ solo touring. Now we have another little pause while Temple of the Dog [with Cornell and Cameron] go through their motions. After that, we’ll find time for the four of us to continue fleshing out some of the ideas that we’ve demoed over the past year. And we probably have a good dozen songs. So we’ve got material. We just need the time to let these things develop and breathe. But that pause also gives me time to do things like attend to the catalog and supervise the Badmotorfinger box set. Back in August we remastered and put out the vinyl issues of Louder Than Love and [1996’s] Down on the Upside. Then next year there will be a remastered version of Ultramega OK coming out on Sub Pop. We were never that enthused with the way that album sounded—it was very thin and transistor-y. So [producer] Jack Endino and I remastered it. And thankfully, the warmth and strong bottom end that Jack brought to early Nirvana and Soundgarden and Mudhoney, he’s now bringing to Ultramega OK. These are all things I’ve been doing, along with a couple others I haven’t mentioned yet. So, yeah, there’s a lot coming up.

Jenn Wasner of Wye Oak knows you can’t be an original if you’re playing what everyone else is. Visit reverendguitars.com to start your journey.

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ST. VINCENT


MARCH O F

T H E

S A I N T ❈ They call her ST. VINCENT, and she exists among the forward-thinking,

boundary-pushing art-pop elite—here, as we look ahead to the upcoming year in music, Guitar World digs in deep with ANNIE CLARK, a modern day guitar hero.

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BRAD ANGLE ❈ PHOTOS BY TRAVIS SHINN]

STYLING BY PAMELA NEAL; MAKEUP BY JEFFREY BAUM USING THREE COSMETICS

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❈ ANNIE

CLARK IS OFFICIALLY one step ahead of us. We’ve always suspected as much, but this fact was confirmed the moment she emerged from hair and makeup for her inaugural Guitar World cover shoot holding a guitar…and wearing a dress that featured a print of a bikini body, just like the kind you’d find hanging in the window of a kitschy beach shop.

principal goal for all guitar players: she’s found a unique voice. Like all noble pursuits, it took time (and a lot of woodshedding) to develop her style. That work began three decades ago under the wide-open Texas sky.

ANNIE CLARK was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in 1982, but grew up outside of Dallas, Texas, which is where she first discovered her innate connection to the guitar. “Guitar was one of those things, those callings,” she says. “It just hit me. I would draw guitars, and make guitars, when I was five ❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈ years old. I was completely obsessed with the ❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈ ❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈ shape. I loved it. I was in love with it even ❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈ before I started to play it.” When she eventually picked up a guitar in her teens, Clark consumed a steady musical diet of grunge, rock Now, a little background may be in order: For years Guitar World and metal, as well as some jazz courtesy of her uncle, guitarist Tuck published a one-off magazine, a buyer’s guide that featured—you Andress of husband and wife jazz duo Tuck & Patti. The Andresses guessed it—models posing with musical equipment. That mag may played a significant role in the young guitarist’s upbringing. Initially no longer be in production, but the internet remembers all and prothey offered her a sneak peek into the life of a touring musician vided Clark with some ripe source material for her cover concept. when they brought her on for a stint as a roadie, and later, when she “I did a quick Google search of women on the cover, and all I approached high-school graduation, they strongly urged her to furreally saw was girls in bikinis holding guitars like they’ve never held ther her musical education at the university level. a guitar before,” says Clark. “I started thinking about that and just Clark recalls, “I remember very pointedly Tuck and Patti called wanted to make my own absurdist comment on it. I couldn’t really and said, ‘She needs to be a musician. She should go to Berklee and let it slide without poking a bit of fun and taking the piss a little!” get additional training.’ ” Clark’s sly comment on the magazine—literally on the cover of She heeded their advice, and headed to Boston to begin coursethe magazine—is definitely a kick-ass meta move. But her disrupwork at the Berklee College of Music. Clark spent three years dutition of the status quo doesn’t stop there. Performing as the enigfully studying theory and performance at Berklee, but ultimately matic, experimental St. Vincent, she has become what might best be grew tired of the curriculum and dropped out. Following a brief described as a postmodern guitar hero, and for the last decade has layover in New York where she failed to gain traction in the music been subtly injecting some truly exciting guitar playing into the pop scene, the crestfallen guitarist made her way back to Texas. music landscape. In broad strokes, the music of St. Vincent—heard on her five stu“Since I was a five-year-old kid I knew I was going to play music. I dio albums—is an expertly crafted blend of art rock, indie, jazz and was just going to do it,” she says. “So when I had to move back home progressive pop. Clark constructs songs in which haunting meloafter dropping out of college it was depression that I had never felt in dies, syncopated rhythms and dissonant chord progressions set the my life. Like, Oh, I’m a failure. This was not part of the plan.” stage for her insightful observations of life in the digital age, which But her disillusionment was short lived. Not long after she she delivers in a detached, yet surprisingly vulnerable, singing style. returned to Texas, a friend who played with Dallas-based orchestral psych-pop group the Polyphonic Spree mentioned they were Clark is an exacting songwriter whose deft guitar playing is put on expanding their ranks, and got Clark an audition. She landed the gig, display only when it’s in support of the song. But when the song calls and was soon whisked away into the life of a touring musician. for it—often at the most unexpected times—she can unleash a torrent “I was on tour in Europe for a month, opening for Brian Wilson of heavy grooving two-handed tapping or the kind of searing effectat the Hollywood Bowl, working in Pachyderm [Studios] where Nirladen solo that will send shivers up your spine. And for as cool and vana recorded, and at Steve Albini’s place in Chicago,” she recalls. “I complex as her songs can be, Clark’s approach is also imbued with an was in it. I was in the game, you know?” endearing playfulness. So it’s not surprising that Dweezil Zappa has The Polyphonic gig provided the jumpstart that Clark’s career said young listeners looking for a pathway into his late father Frank’s needed, and kicked off a decade of an entirely different musical quirky, far-out catalog should listen to St. Vincent. schooling on the road, which first saw her supporting indie artClark draws from an aptly diverse range of influences—from ist Sufjan Stevens before she transitioned into near non-stop world Robert Fripp, Steely Dan and Marc Ribot to Nick Cave, Nirvana and touring as St. Vincent. Dimebag Darrell—without mimicking any of them. Instead she’s In the last few years, Clark has surfaced all across the pop culcreated an inventive, sophisticated approach to contemporary ture landscape: fronting the surviving members of Nirvana at the guitar playing and composition and achieved what might be the

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EW PREVI THE YEAR IN M U S IC

Annie Clark, with her Ernie Ball Music Man St. Vincent guitar in Stealth Black, in Los Angeles on September 20, 2016


ST. VINCENT

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, performing with the Dallas Symphony The success of the launch, coupled with the personal connecOrchestra, making a rocking guest appearance at a Taylor Swift gig, tion she’s developed with the Ernie Ball team, has Clark excited covering “The Star-Spangled Banner” for an NFL promo spot, cutto explore future gear collaborations with the company. “Well, ting a record with Eighties art punk David Byrne, performing at the Sterling [Ball] is like my third father,” she says, with a laugh, of the behest of David Lynch at the director’s Festival of Disruption and company’s CEO. “They’re a family company and they’ve made me appearing onstage at the Grammys to collect the Best Alternative part of the family. So as far as I’m concerned I’m a lifer.” Album award for 2014’s St. Vincent. But at the moment Clark’s primary focus is on completing the follow-up to St. Vincent. The process for recording the new asIn 2015 she also found the time to conceive and develop a signature yet-untitled album (which is due for release this spring) has been guitar, which debuted as the Ernie Ball Music Man St. Vincent model at more drawn out than past efforts, but has produced what she the 2016 NAMM tradeshow. The St. Vincent six-string—which boasts a describes as a “real sea change” in her sound. unique, asymmetrical body shape, custom St. Vincent Music Man Mod“I’ve been able to step back and reflect and not just be in the ern tremolo, all-rosewood neck and three DiMarzio custom mini humtour, record, tour, record cycle that I’ve been in buckers—has become one of the brand’s best-selling gui(top) Clark performing at for about 10 years,” says Clark. “I think it’ll be tars, and has inspired a who’s-who of taste-making artOutside Lands Festival in the deepest, boldest work I’ve ever done. I feel ists, including Beck, Dave Grohl, Josh Homme and TaySan Francisco on August 7, 2015, and (bottom) Pitchfork the playing field is really open for creative peolor Swift, to request St. Vincent models from Ernie Ball. Music Festival in Chicago on ple to do whatever you want, and that risk will July 19, 2014 be rewarded—especially now that we have such high stakes from a political and geo-political standpoint. The personal is political and therefore the political can’t help but influence the art. And only music that has something pretty real to say is gonna cut the mustard.” For the following interview, we meet Clark at the Ivory on Sunset, a small restaurant discretely tucked beneath the chic Mondrian Hotel in West Hollywood. Over a beer and a cappuccino (“My perfect combination. I don’t like drug drugs, so coffee’s my best upper.”), the guitarist reflects on the roads she’s traveled and reveals where she’s headed in 2017.

I wanted to do something particularly special, a new kind of performance piece, as pretentious as that sounds. [laughs] I had these dancers who I’ve worked with before, and they dressed as weird blonde twins and did this postmodern version of the Blue Velvet scene with Dennis Hopper and Isabella Rossellini, the one with the oxygen mask. It was so fun! Lynch’s work, both musical and cinematic, speaks to left-of-center thinkers. You grew up in Dallas, which is pretty conservative. Was it a struggle to find likeminded musical weirdos?

Music has always been the key. I was really shy and nervous growing up. But I had like a “put me in coach” mentality with music. The thing that’s so great about it is that you meet all manner of different people playing music. The first band I played in was a metal band with junior high guys. Oh nice. What kind of stuff were you playing?

It was Maiden, Megadeth, Metallica, Rage [Against the Machine] and AC/DC covers, and I played an iridescent purple Ibanez bass. Because when you’re 13 there’s a circle of people who all play music…but no one wants to play bass! [laughs] Everyone wants to be the lead guitar player. But I just wanted to play.

B OT TO M : R O G E R K I S BY/ G E T T Y I M A G E S ; TO P : J E F F K R AV I T Z / F I L M M A G I C

First things first, I gotta ask: How was that recent gig at David Lynch’s Festival of Disruption? That looked like a wild night.


ST. VINCENT

Did joining the metal band mean you were stuck in that clique? Or were the peer groups less strict back then?

TRANSCENDENCE IS THE GOAL. YOU CAN DO IT WITH BLUNT FORCE OR YOU CAN DO IT WITH A SCALPEL.

Was that Ibanez bass the first instrument you picked up? Or did you play guitar first?

Well, I think context is important. This My uncle is a guitar player called was the early Nineties and we were coming Tuck Andress, and we had his Kay out of this jocks, freaks and nerds thing in from the Sixties, and it was always the Eighties. Like that John Hughes movie around. But the action was so thing. Then all of a sudden Nirvana hapinsanely high it was basically Fort pened and all the kids who were playing Knox. [laughs] I started playing violin football were wearing Nirvana T-shirts and in the school orchestra. But I would growing their hair out. So it was cool to play just learn Nirvana and Peter Frampmusic. But I don’t know when it was ever ton on the violin, and that’s when I uncool to play music. was like, Maybe this isn’t the instru❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈ But yeah there’s a particular kind of ment for me. [laughs] So I picked up ❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇ ❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇ Texas freak. It’s a magic place. There’s the guitar at 12. ❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈ ❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈ space, and also people are genuinely generous. But there is a lot to rebel against. The This was all before online tablature Butthole Surfers couldn’t have come from and YouTube guitar tutorials. How any other place; because they were railing against the religiosity… did you go about learning the instrument? the acid trip shit was great! Yeah this was pre-internet. This was buying guitar magazines and learning to play “Stairway to Heaven” and [Steely Dan’s] “Reelin’ in the Years.” That’s how I learned, and also by ear. I did have a lovely Did you personally go through a rebellious phase? guitar teacher too. My mom and step dad would drive me to the I was like the kid who had e e cummings [poetry] quotes on my wall local guitar shop in Garland, Texas, and I would take my 30-minute and refused to call anyone “ya’ll.” I got out and left Texas when I lesson with this guy called Tommy Wyatt who passed away a couple was 18. I was on the East Coast and then New York for a little, then years ago. He was a really sweet dude and had King’s X posters all back to Texas and then on the road for 10 years. But I love Texas. over. I’d bring in a song and he’d write the tab out. So it was nice that I fucking love it. I love the culture and the people. I’m still great the point of entry was being able to learn the songs that you love. friends with a lot of people that I grew up with.

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ST. VINCENT

Clark with her Ernie Ball Music Man St. Vincent guitar in Heritage Red016

THE FIRST BAND I PLAYED IN WAS A METAL BAND WITH JUNIOR HIGH GUYS.… WE PLAYED MAIDEN, MEGADETH, METALLICA AND AC/DC. ❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇ ❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇ ❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈ ❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈ ❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇

My aunt and uncle, Tuck and Patti, were very instrumental. My family was always very supportive…of everything. All of us played all the sports and did theater. But I don’t know that they knew the extent that I was completely obsessed with music. And this was jazz college. [laughs] You studied at Berklee for three years, but left before graduation. Looking back now, what were the pros and cons of going the academic route?

There were things I really enjoyed about it. Once we got into the really heavy cerebral harmony— which felt like philosophy and physics—that really interested me on a theoretical level. As far as ever having that entire lexicon under my fingers? No, I didn’t. There is an athleticism that is necessary to play certain music. It’s incredible and admirable if that athleticism is put to expression that is transcendent. High-fives all around. But I’m as moved by the Stooges as I am by Coltrane. Transcendence is the goal. You can do it with blunt force or you can do it with a scalpel.

You mentioned your uncle Tuck. He’s a pretty heavy-duty player. Was he an early source of inspiration?

I would go and watch my uncle play [with Tuck & Patti]. I specifically remember a Hot Licks VHS video. You remember those? I was 12 and just learned “Aqualung” by Jethro Tull. I was feeling pretty good about it, so I pop in this Hot Licks VHS of Uncle Tuck and it was like he was speaking Martian. [laughs] He’s the most next-level genius of a guitar player. The way his mind works and how he can put a symphony together in this micro world is unbelievable. So I put in the video for maybe 10 minutes and then I was like, Okay… Pause. Eject. Thanks Uncle Tuck. Maybe I’ll revisit this in 10 years. [laughs] Tuck also pointed you in the direction of Berklee. Was your immediate family as supportive of your choice to attend music school?

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You eventually landed a spot in the orchestral group the Polyphonic Spree, which performs with like 20 musicians onstage. What did that configuration teach you about guitar?

There’s a whole textural palate that I wasn’t exploring in my years in Berklee—well, excerpt for distortion, playing in a noise band called the Skull Fuckers. So when I got into [the Polyphonic Spree] it was like, “Okay, this part needs to sound like an acid trip.” There wasn’t a lot of jagged stuff in there. It was about how to be texturally supportive, and how to be a performer. The whole show is about high-octane religious fervor from start to finish. So learning how to be a performer while you’re doing all this sonic stuff was fun. It seems like each of your recent albums has a very specific personal story surrounding the recording, which directly influences the music. On Actor, from 2009, you were burnt from touring behind your debut [2007’s Marry Me] and watched a lot of films to reset your mind. Then 2011’s Strange Mercy was created in a sort of monastic, isolated way. How would you describe the


ST. VINCENT

difference between recording the last record, St. Vincent, and what you have going on now with the forthcoming one?

It’s deeply different. But it’s funny to think about a younger version of myself saying, “Oh I was so burnt out from touring,” after the first record. I hadn’t seen anything yet. [laughs] I didn’t know anything. But touring in a band is grueling. I’ve done it in a mini van, station wagon and 12-passenger van. Seen it. Done it. Love it. Strange Mercy was a deeply depressed moment. I was on such a roll from Strange Mercy to the tour with David Byrne and that record [2012’s Love This Giant]. I was in a very manic frenzy of writing and I had set a pace for myself that was really intense. I just kept it going. I didn’t stop at all. I basically toured the last record for two years straight. This time around it’s been a very different process. It’s been slightly more protracted. I came off the last tour and I wanted to do something creative but I didn’t want to jump right into making a record. I saw my family and friends and did human stuff. It’s way more of a holistic process…and I hate that I just used that word. [laughs] But it’s life integrated and, How does this make me feel? Is this achieving the thing emotionally that I’m going for? It’s exacting in a way that’s not persnickety. It’s just trying to go for the ultimate emotional payoff. On a granular level, what specifically does the process look like? Do you work when inspiration hits, or do you adhere to a set schedule to maintain structure?

I’ve done a lot of that on this record. I’ve done the Nick Cave take the briefcase to work at eight and check out at six. But I’ve also let a whole lot of air in the room, which I’ve honestly never done before. It’s been very cerebral. Make sure that every note matters and has an intention. That’s been the difference. Does this serve the song? No? Okay, mercy killing. Is this melody strong enough? Is it evocative; does it hit you in the right spot? It doesn’t? Fix it. Is this lyric exactly what I’m trying to say? Is there a better way to say this? No? Great, then it’s in. Are you as exacting with getting sounds from your guitar?

For a long time I was very inspired by the idea of a guitar sounding like anything but a guitar. And this time I’m having so much fun playing and discovering and being as emotional as possible with the instrument. I’m psyched for the guitar to sound like a guitar. I love the sound of guitar. I love David Gilmour, you know. Just believe in it. It’s a wonderful thing; just let it sing.

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Are you mostly using the new Ernie Ball St. Vincent signature guitar in the studio?

It’s the only one I play when I play. It’s such a friendly instrument. And the tremolo is excellent. You’ve toured with Kemper profiling amps in the past. Will they be making their way onto the album?

Because I’ve been recording in L.A., New York and Texas—in a proper studio and sometimes on the go—I have been using the Kemper modeling amplifier. It’s very good sounding, and also a low barrier for entry for inspiration. I can just jump in and get an idea down very quickly with a sound that is inspiring.

FOR A LONG TIME I WAS VERY INSPIRED BY THE IDEA OF A GUITAR SOUNDING LIKE ANYTHING BUT A GUITAR. ❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇ ❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇ ❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈ ❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈ ❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇❈❇

Your last record was widely praised by critics and earned you a Grammy. Are you feeling any extra pressure as a result?

I weirdly feel less external, or internal, pressure than any time before. For better or for worse I’ve always just made things that I’ve loved and believed in. If it’s gotten me to a certain point, why in the world would I second-guess it now? But, obviously, pride proceedeth the fall. It’s not as if I’m like, “Well, anything I’d do is going to be great.” That’s not the case. You’ve been quoted as saying that listening to Turkish music around your last record influenced your approach on a couple solos. Have you been inspired by

any specific sources like that this time?

I love that Kendrick Lamar record, To Pimp a Butterfly. It was a message that people had been waiting to hear, and it was presented in a totally new way. I feel the way music is moving there’s a lot of interesting production you find in, say, hip-hop that really marries the hi-fi and lo-fi, like here’s a sample and then here’s something pristinely recorded and here’s something chopped up and modulated. I think we’re wide open for art right now. Things are wide open for players too. There’s a real player-ly thing coming back, which is really cool. And I’ve also been listening to my friend Cate le Bon for songwriting. She’s really great. I know you’re a fan of Nick Cave. [The inspiration for Clark’s stage name comes in part from a line in Cave’s song “There She Goes My Beautiful World” that references the death of poet Dylan Thomas at St. Vincent’s hospital in New York.] Have you heard his latest, Skeleton Tree? In terms of the emotional impact you mentioned it’s crushing.

I haven’t heard it, yet. Is it shattering? I’ve been listening to [Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds’] The Boatman’s Call a lot. Artist and writers like that can just slay you in a line. He can do that super sexy alpha male thing that’s not like Nickelback. It’s so sexy and powerful. The way that he writes about sex encompasses the highbrow and the lowbrow, the desire and the humiliation of all of it. That is the human experience. It’s not some fucking porn shit. It’s real. At least that’s life as I have experienced it.

And he gets after it. Musicians like Nick Cave work their asses off, and find killer players to help them realize their visions.

That’s why somebody like Bowie was Bowie, because he was an incredible visionary and curator. He was like, “You, Robert Fripp, come on in. Hey Tony Visconti and Mike Garson. Hey Nile Rodgers and Stevie Ray.” And I know he got a lot of flack for that Let’s Dance record, but it’s great. You seem to share a similar willingness to take on interesting collaborations.

It’s fun. I’ll be the producer/executive producer of this new record. So I’m selectively bringing in different people for songs and ideas, because everyone has different talents and strong suits. I’m so lucky that I get to do it for a living. That’s never lost on me. There’s something about being raised, in a sense, by Tuck and Patti: They worked their asses off. It’s a blue-collar work ethic and the most rewarding thing. Get in the game. Fucking do it! The world needs it.


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DONNY LITTLE / PAOLO NUTINI

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1 0 2 GUITAR WORLD HUNTS DOWN SOME OF THE TOP NAMES IN GUITAR TO FIND OUT WHAT THEY HAVE COMING UP IN THE NEXT 12 MONTHS. WARREN HAYNES, ZAKK WYLDE, JOE SATRIANI, SUICIDE SILENCE AND OTHERS WEIGH IN AND SHARE THEIR PLANS. GUITAR WORLD

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It should come as no surprise that Joe Satriani, one of the hardest working men in rock guitar, has a diverse array of projects planned for 2017. At the top of his agenda is new music. In February, Chickenfoot will release a deluxe live album featuring material drawn from their 2010 Get Your Buzz On concert film. The set will also include one very special bonus track, “Divine Termination,” which stemmed from a Satriani song idea. “Even though Chad [Smith], Mike [Anthony] and Sam [Hagar] are really great at avoiding me,” Satch jokes, “I keep sending them fresh material anyway.” The result represents the quartet’s first new studio output since 2011. Meanwhile, Satriani will spend the early part of the year hard at work with his solo band. After finishing up a string of Asian tour dates in February, the guitarist will begin work on a yet-unnamed solo album—the sixteenth of his career—scheduled for release later this year. New gear, too, is coming from Satriani. Along with a fresh run of white-bodied Ibanez JSART2 guitars, this summer Satriani will roll out a new Marshall combo to complement his popular JVM410HJS 100-watt signature head. He explains, “A 100-watt head’s like a Ferrari. It doesn’t do well in small-town traffic. But as we all know as guitarists, most of the stuff we do is small town: places like your bedroom, basement or rehearsal room.” The result of the collaboration is an all-tube, three-channel amp, one that Satch promises will boast features unique among Marshall’s offerings. Despite a packed schedule, Satriani is looking forward to his annual G4 Experience guitar retreat, to be held in Carmel-by-the-Sea in late July. It will offer what the guitarist describes as “four full days of total immersion into the world of guitar,” and will feature instruction from guitarist Paul Gilbert and Satriani himself. And to celebrate the upcoming 30th anniversary of Surfing with the Alien (released in October 1987), Satch will be joined at the G4 retreat by three of his key collaborators from that era: producer John Cuniberti, bassist Stu Hamm and drummer Jonathan Mover. For Satriani, the entire event is particularly rewarding because it offers him the unique opportunity to both teach and learn. “I personally get more out of doing G4 than a clinic,” he says, “because I’m hanging around other players that I really respect and admire and who do tons of stuff I don’t know how to do. I can blend in and be a student for most of the day until it’s my job to get up onstage and be the teacher.” —Greg Renoff guitarworld.com

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CHAPMAN BAEHLER

The shred legend prepares for a jam-packed year of new music, new gear and another G4 guitar retreat.


PR EV I EW TH E YE AR IN MU SIC

MASTODON

The Atlanta extremists turn tragedy into triumph on their upcoming seventh release. “It seems like with each passing year there’s all sorts of tragedies and unfortunate events and those definitely influenced the writing of this album,” Mastodon guitarist Bill Kelliher says of the band’s seventh full-length, due out later this year. “Not to say that the album is completely about one tragic thing; it’s more of a concept about how we personally deal since there’s always something terrible happening somewhere to one of us.” Back in August the band’s other guitarist Brent Hinds predicted to Guitar World that Mastodon’s next release would be a double-album, but Kelliher says that ultimately the group was able to condense the material into one hard-hitting disc. “We took out everything that didn’t need to be there and it came out to about

56 minutes with 12 songs,” he says, adding that the tracks that didn’t make the cut will be released in the future. The as-yet-untitled album was recorded in just four weeks with Crack the Skye producer Brendan O’Brien, and features, Kelliher says, “a lot of intricate clean parts and spacey Pink Floyd moments. So I wanted to make my guitar thick without having to layer too many guitars.” To accomplish this, Kelliher mainly used his new ESP LTD Sparrowhawk guitar through his Friedman Butterslax Bill Kelliher Signature head. “The amp has got such a good crunch to it that I used it as much as I could, primarily on my rhythm tracks,” he explains. For the album’s more experimental sounds, Kelliher utilized everything from the Chase Bliss Audio Warped Vinyl pedal to vintage phasers. “Everything was like an adventure [in the studio],” he says of his experience recording the new work. “It was like, ‘What cool new weird pedal are we going to fuck with today?’ ” —Jonah Bayer

Brent Hinds (left) and Bill Kelliher

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WARREN HAYNES With the upcoming Gov’t Mule release, Haynes embraces a wide assortment of musical styles, lyrical themes and guitars.

Calling in from Willie Nelson’s Spicewood, Texas, recording studio, Warren Haynes sounds like he’s surprising even himself describing the scope of the new Gov’t Mule album he’s in the midst of recording. The still-untitled project, which includes two songs co-produced by Don Was, has taken some turns that Haynes hadn’t really anticipated. “You never know where a record is going to go until you make it,” says Haynes, who has explored a wide array of genres with Gov’t Mule, the Allman Brothers Band and solo albums that have touched on r&b and country-tinged folk. “It feels like we’ve got one foot in the future and one foot in the past. We’ve revisited some of the early Mule approaches and also explored more places we’ve never gone before. The album will capture a lot of different musical direction, no matter which songs make the final cut.” The new areas of exploration include two country-flavored songs, one of which Haynes describes as “Rolling Stones country,” the other of which he says is “more Marshall Tucker,” New Orleans funk and “Gov’t Mule soul music.” “We’ve also got some straight-ahead


(from left) Warren Haynes, Matt Abts, Danny Louis and Jorgen Carlsson

“WE’VE REVISITED SOME EARLY MULE APPROACHES AND ALSO EXPLORED PLACES WE’VE NEVER GONE BEFORE.”

—W A R R E N H A Y N E S

ZAKK WYLDE

The scruffy one prepares to unleash a slew of new Wylde Audio products while readying new Black Label Society music. “I’m always creating, always doing something,” says Zakk Wylde, “and it all centers around music. I love it man, and I wouldn’t change my situation for anything.” The fiercely bearded Black Label Society leader spent the last two months of 2016 “taking it easy,” which in Zakk’s vacation-averse world basically means pounding Valhalla Java coffee, lifting weights and writing riffs at his home studio north of Los Angeles. “We’re getting ready to work on the next Black Label album here at the Black Vatican,” he explains. “I’m really looking forward to it.” Though there’s no official release date yet for the follow-up to 2014’s Catacombs of the Black Vatican (Wylde released a solo album, Book of Shadows II, in 2016), the guitarist assures Guitar World that the album will be out sometime in 2017, with a lengthy tour to follow. “I’ve been listening to a lot of early Madonna, when her music was riff-driven and bluesbased,” he says, chuckling. “So that’s what we’re going for with this record— back to that early stuff, when she was more influenced by Cream and Led Zeppelin.”

Additional plans for 2017 include an eye- (and ear-) popping array of new guitars and amplifiers via Wylde Audio, the gear company Zakk officially launched last year. “We’ll be rolling out some heads and some practice amps, and some acoustics, as well,” he says. “And with the electrics, there will be new models, different paintjobs, different finishes, different

“YOU CAN’T SAY THE SKY’S THE LIMIT, BECAUSE THERE IS NO LIMIT —IT’S WHATEVER WE THINK UP!” —Z A K K W Y L D E

wood grains; we’re doing tiger tops, we’re doing bird’s-eye tops, quilted maple, spalted maple, whatever, you know?” Wylde continues, “I’ll look at a coffee table and go, ‘Dude, what kind of wood is this? Let’s make some tops out of this thing!’ It never ends, and we’re working on some new body shapes, too. You can’t say the sky’s the limit, because there is no limit—it’s whatever we think up!” —Dan Epstein guitarworld.com

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rockers, one tune that’s like Hendrix meets gospel and one which I’m really excited about that has a lot of instrumental, tempo and key changes and ends in an extended jazz-like section,” says the guitarist. The songs’ diversity also extends to their lyrical scope, which Haynes says cover everything from contemporary politics and the American social climate to self-reflective explorations of maturing relationships. He took a similarly varied approach to his guitars, playing two Gibson SGs, two Firebirds, Les Paul and Firebird 12-strings and his “new” 1959 Les Paul, which he played in the studio for the first time. The Gibson-obsessed guitarist even played a Charles Whitfill Telecaster on two songs One thing that didn’t change: the Mule recorded most of the tracks live together, including Haynes’ solos. The album also includes a few songs with Danny Louis trading in his keyboards for an SG. “I wanted to record a few songs with two guitars and no keys and I love the way it came out,” he says. —Alan Paul


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JOHN 5

(from left) Chris Garza, Mark Heylmun, Eddie Hermida, Dan Kenny and Alex Lopez

Deathcore architects construct a new sound on their upcoming fifth album. Even when they were universally categorized as a brutal deathcore band, Suicide Silence claimed they were heavily influenced by Korn, Deftones and other nu-metal outfits. So it shouldn’t come as a complete shock that the Riverside, California, five-piece’s self-titled fifth album—due out in April—features slower tempos, meandering counter-rhythms, jarring sound effects and an abundance of skewed, lunging guitar riffs. “In the past, we were hesitant to go too far out on a limb because we were like, ‘Oh, people like the stuff we’re doing,’ ” reveals guitarist Mark Heylmun. “This time we said, ‘Fuck that. We’re gonna do our own thing and explore everything we know we’re capable of.’ ” Suicide Silence isn’t a complete numetal makeover, however. There are still recognizable past elements of the band’s sound. Heylmun and second guitarist Chris Garza fill the angriest passages with snarling seven-string riffs, ravenous muted chugs and braying artificial harmonics. But the blinding speed and pure dissonance of their past efforts have seemingly been swapped out in favor of atmosphere and improvisation. The results are sometimes melancholy and occasionally explosive, but always unexpected. “Instead of coming into the practice space with pre-written riffs, we literally went into the room and jammed for 45 minute to an hour at a time. We played at the same time and came up with some amazing stuff, then we pulled it all apart

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“IN THE PAST, WE WERE HESITANT TO GO TOO FAR OUT ON A LIMB BECAUSE WE WERE LIKE, ‘OH, PEOPLE LIKE THE STUFF WE’RE DOING,’ THIS TIME WE SAID, ‘F*CK THAT.’ ”

—M A R K H E Y L M U N

and reassembled the best parts into full songs.” All nine tracks on Suicide Silence feature layered guitars, textural, undistorted passages, abrupt rhythm shifts and previously absent melodic vocals. And while the guitars on the band’s past few albums were recorded with a click track that kept the rhythms tight, this time Heylmun and Garza played from the gut, allowing tempos to speed up and slow down along with the intensity of the songs. Suicide Silence tracked the album during seven weeks with nu-metal architect Ross Robinson at his home studio in Venice Beach, California. The producer encouraged the guitarists to record their parts together live from top to bottom. “That’s why there’s so much pick scrape, finger noise and whammy bar stuff,” Heylmun said. “It’s really spontaneous and genuine. We were so in the moment, headbanging, rocking out and having a good time. We never wanted it to end.”—Jon Wiederhorn

Building on a 12-year solo career that has seen the release of eight previous genre-twisting guitar instrumental albums, Telecaster master John 5 has once again ventured out onto the ledge by stitching together scorching country licks, unholy tapping arpeggios and hyper-heavy rock riffs for his upcoming ninth album, due out in March 2017. Titled Season of the Witch, the album was self-produced as all of his earlier records were, but this time around the approach to sharing the music with his fans was more unconventional. “This one was a little bit unorthodox,” explains John 5. “I started releasing singles and videos earlier in 2016 because the music business has changed so much. Everybody seems to be watching music now on YouTube.” The videos reflect the mad shredder’s predilection for all things macabre and features the guitarist and his band, the Creatures [bassist Ian Ross and drummer Rodger Carter] in tributes to Frankenstein, the Wolfman, Planet of the Apes, a hellish reimagining of Hee Haw and enough cleavage to make you go blind. “I try to challenge myself and make it entertaining for myself like something I would want to see and hear,” says the guitarist. “I’m always looking to be inspired. I try to push myself and so all the songs are crazy and a lot of fun.” John 5 has been sharing that cheerful insanity onstage by touring in support of Season of the Witch—the first time the guitarist has ever toured in support of a solo album. “Originally I thought that people wouldn’t want to hear this instrumental stuff live, but I was so wrong and people really enjoy it. It’s kind of like an instrumental Alice Cooper show. It’s been such a privilege to play for people and I’m psyched about it.” —Steven Rosen

S U I C I D E S I L E N C E : D E A N K A R R ; J O H N 5 : M A U R E E N VA N M O R T I S

SUICIDE SILENCE

The virtuoso puts a macabre spin on his upcoming shredfest, Season of the Witch.


OfficialDeanGuitars

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JONNY LANG

(from left) Jason Hook, Ivan Moody, Chris Kael, Zoltan Bathory and Jeremy Spencer

FIVE FINGER DEATH PUNCH The American metalheads look to broaden their sound as they complete the follow-up to Got Your Six. Five Finger Death Punch have been on the road almost nonstop since the release of 2015’s Got Your Six. But when guitarist Jason Hook calls into Guitar World from Syracuse, New York, on a tour stop during their current co-headlining jaunt with Shinedown, he reports that the band’s follow-up effort, and seventh full-length overall, is, surprisingly, “almost done.” According to Hook, the new album is “the first one we’ve recorded at the same time we’ve been touring. All through the summer we’d track with [producer] Kevin Churko at

“IT WOULD BE VERY EASY FOR US TO JUST REPEAT THE STYLE OF THE LAST RECORD, BUT WE’RE THE KIND OF BAND THAT ALWAYS LIKES TO PUSH IT A LITTLE BIT.”

—J A S O N H O O K

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his studio in Las Vegas during the week, and then we’d hop on a plane and go play shows on the weekend. So it’s been pretty grueling.” As for how the new material is shaping up, Hook says “It would be very easy for us to just repeat the style of the last record, but we’re the kind of band that always likes to push it a little bit. So there are a couple of things we tried that are a little different for us. We did some more stuff with acoustic guitars, and we also experimented with certain grooves that are like hip-hop grooves, or almost a heavy-metal swing.” Though Hook says there is no album title yet, he can report on several song titles: “There’s one that’s a play on words called ‘Sham Pain.’ ” He laughs. “It’s about the music business being painful…and a sham. That one has kind of a hip-hop bounce to it. It’s nasty. And then there’s another song called ‘I Don’t Look for Trouble, Trouble Looks for Me,’ which is really aggressive. We might see that one as being one of the singles.” In general, Hook continues, the new record is trademark FFDP, but with a twist. “Got Your Six was a concise record as far as everything being uptempo and to-the-point. On this new record we have some of that, but we also allowed ourselves to step outside the box. Death Punch fans certainly won’t be disappointed.” —Richard Bienstock

Jonny Lang was a 15-year-old blues guitarist and singing prodigy when he burst onto the national scene in 1997. He’s moved through different phases over the last 20 years, including various rock-inspired repertoire, gospel and vocal-based soul. On his last studio album, 2013’s Fight for His Soul, Lang settled into an assured sound that combined elements of everything he’s done. On his next album, still untitled and due out sometime this spring, Lang continues settling into himself while also harking back to his early days. “My idea going into recording was for more of the songs to be riff-based—to have the guitar be a bit more of a centerpiece than it was on my last couple of records, and I think we’ve done that,” says Lang. “The guitar is always in there with me, but it’s more central again on these songs.” Lang’s gear on the upcoming album includes a Telecaster, a Gibson 335 and Gibson Les Paul, all clean and direct—mostly into a vintage five-watt National 1210 amp. “My buddy Matt who engineered the album brought in this amp and I couldn’t believe how this little thing with an eightinch speaker had the most insane, wonderful sound,” says Lang. “I tried it for one track and just kept playing through it and switching guitars for variety. The sound dictates where you go with your playing and that amp really spoke to me.” Lang says that his love for the guitar has also deepened after touring as part of the Experience Hendrix show almost every year since 2008; he will return to the road with them this February. He has played with Buddy Guy, Eric Johnson, Robby Krieger, Zakk Wylde, Steve Vai and others on these tours, all of whom have deeply inspired him, as has digging deep into the church of Jimi. “You think you know Hendrix songs and then you really learn them and discover complexities,” says he guitarist. “He’s uncopiable, so the lesson is: be yourself.” —Alan Paul

F I V E F I N G E R D E AT H P U N C H & J O N N Y L A N G : P H OTO S C O U R T E S Y O F T H E A R T I S T S

The blues guitarist will let the riffs do the talking on his upcoming release.


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(from left) Micayla Grace, Jennifer Clavin and Jessie Clavin

PR EV I EW THE YEA R IN MU SIC

MARTY FRIEDMAN The shredder recruits diverse guest stars to lend a hand on his blazing follow-up to Inferno.

BLEACHED BLEACHED: JEREMY DANGER (MAKEUP: LULU DANGER USING MAC COSMETICS); MARTY FRIEDMAN: STEPHANIE CABRAL

The sisters Clavin get ready to unleash more infectious punk-pop with new EP. It’s easy to get sucked into the vortex of sunshine and good times when you’re a twentysomething rock musician living in Los Angeles, in flux between work, sleep and hard partying. And Jessie Clavin, lead guitarist for the pop-punk group Bleached, remembers those glorious days of 2013 with a large degree of affection. Having just released their first fulllength record Ride Your Heart, Clavin and her sister Jennifer, who sings and plays rhythm guitar for the band, had achieved a high point that most musicians would envy. Laced with pretty surf-guitar riffs, gothkissed vocals and a renegade girl spirit, Ride Your Heart achieved critical acclaim, and landed the Clavins bigger and better gigs. But for Jessie, the first inklings of self doubt started creeping in—not only in terms of her skills as a guitarist, but in her ability to continually create music that excited the band’s burgeoning fan base. “I was in my twenties, living on my own and making my money through music,” Jessie recalls. “There’s this pressure that happens!” It would take a perfect storm of harsh events—which included Jessie getting kicked out of a group house and Jennifer breaking up with a long-term boyfriend—before the San Bernardino native ditched her inner critic. Hitting bottom emotionally proved to

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be more inspirational than destructive, and a short while later, the Clavins and bassist Micayla Grace headed to Joshua Tree National Park for the sole purpose of crafting their next record. Days later, the threesome emerged with the beginnings of “Keep On Keepin’ On,” the first track on their 2016 record, Welcome the Worms, a fuller, louder and layered record loaded with the kind of memorable riffs and wailing solos that Jessie’s rock idols—Joan Jett, Minor Threat and T Rex among them—would love. As 2017 begins, Jessie is excited for the release of Bleached’s forthcoming EP (due later this year on Dead Oceans). And as she prepares to go out on the road again, the guitarist is spending most of her time feeding her sunburst Epiphone Les Paul through her Music Man 210, accompanied by a short list of pedals including an Electro-Harmonix Memory Man, a splitter pedal (to play through two amps simultaneously) and a Fulltone Plimsoul that doubles her Les Paul’s sonic reach. “The Plimsoul is a boost with a little bit of sustain—and it has a tone level so you can make it sound more muscled,” she says. It’s a powerful combination that juxtaposes nicely with sister Jennifer’s rig. “Our guitars work well together because she loves really cheap Japanese guitars, and I play a Les Paul,” says Jessie. “And when I play a Les Paul, it feels really natural to come up with cool, rocking, shredding solos.” —Marisa Torrieri

Since leaving Megadeth and moving to Tokyo at the turn of the millennium, guitarist Marty Friedman has immersed himself fully in Japanese music and culture. But he returned to the American music world in a big way in 2014 with the searing instrumental album Inferno. In the wake of the success of that record, which reintroduced his technically dazzling, exotic-scale–tinged take on shred guitar to U.S. fans, he’s currently putting the finishing touches on a follow-up. As for the sound of the new effort? “It’s like Inferno on steroids,” Friedman reports, then laughs. “As if Inferno wasn’t steroid-ed out enough!” Friedman recorded the still-untitled album in the U.S. and Tokyo, with mixing to be done in Sweden. Like Inferno, the new record features a slew of guests from various corners of the metal world, including an “insane” collaboration with Deafheaven’s Shiv Mehra; a return performance from Shining saxophonist (and Inferno guest) Jørgen Munkeby on a “heavy, intense piece of music, only this time with full-on singing,” Friedman says; and Black Veil Brides guitarist Jinxx, who contributes some violin playing to the record. “When I heard he played violin I went off to the races, because I knew it would be a chance for me to have a really cool counterpoint in my music,” Friedman says of working with Jinxx. “And his violin takes center stage in one song that we wrote together. It’s really dark, and fans of his will be really surprised. Fans of mine will be really surprised, too.” In fact, when it comes to the new album itself, “the word in general is surprised,” says Friedman, who will also be unveiling a new Jackson signature guitar model in 2017. “Nobody’s going to be let down, that’s for sure. It’s a monster.” —Richard Bienstock


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WANT TO BECOME A BETTER GUITARIST BY THE END OF THE YEAR?

We’ve got you covered! With this comprehensive month-by-month lesson program, you’ll learn all sorts of new tips, tricks and techniques in your quest to become a more skilled player by this time next year. B Y

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

M A R T I N

G O U L D I N G


A C E F R E H L E Y: R I C H A R D C R E A M E R / M I C H A E L O C H S A R C H I V E S/ G E T T Y I M A G E S

T

JANUARY HINKING ABOUT DEDICATING

2017 to becoming a better player? Well, you’ve come to the right place. In the following pages, we’ll be working through a series of routines dedicated to a different technique for each month of the year.With so many areas to work on and practice, this is a great way to organize your time, develop your technique and boost your vocabulary of ideas. Following this month-by-month approach will allow you the time to submerge yourself in the study of a wide range of techniques, with each routine based around key exercises to help you develop strength, stamina, timing and accuracy, along with concepts, licks and top tips on effective practicing. The program is divided into three main areas—firstly, developing fundamental fretboard skills based around some of the most commonly used modes of the major scale, including Ionian, Dorian, Mixolydian and Aeolian, with each tonality associated with a certain intervallic theme to develop technical ability and visualization. Secondly, working through a vocabulary of stylistic techniques including bluesbased hammer-ons and pull-offs, classic rock bending repetition licks, double-stops and countryinspired hybrid picking concepts. Thirdly, another main area will see us working on techniques associated with the modern rock style, including legato, twohanded tapping, alternate picking and sweeping. There’s something here for everyone, with the routines as useful to experienced players who want to maintain their technique as they are to students in the earlier stages who are looking to develop their abilities across a broad range of styles. By the time you’ve worked through each technique, you’ll be able to pick your favorite examples from each month and form your own customized routines.

January

January FIGURE 1.1 1.1 G major scale/Ionian mode FIGURE FIGURE 1.1 G G major scale/Ionian mode 1 1

  

6 6

0 G 3 3 3 4 3 5 4 5 5 3 5 3

             2 3 5 3 2                        2 4 5 3 5 2 3 5 3 2 5 3 5 4 2          5 3  235245 24535 5 4 2 5 4 2 5 3 2 5 4 2 3 2 2 3 5 2 4 5 5 3 2 5 3 2 3 2 2 4 1 2 4 1 3 4

Gmaj7 arpeggio     4 3

2 2

3 2 3 2

3 4 5 4 2 5 5 4 3 2 5 3 2 1 4 3 4 3 2 1 2 1 4 3 4 3 2 1

10 10

 3

1 3 4 1 3 1 2 4

 

Gmaj7 arpeggio2 4 1 2 4 1 3 4

3

3 1 4 2 1 5 4 3 2 2 1

                     2  4 3 1 4 2 1 4 2 1

diatonic thirds

4 5 4 4 5 2 5 4 5 2

2 1 2 3 4 3 4 1

2 2 3 2 5 3 2 3 5 2 3 2 5 3 3 5 2 1 4 2 1 4 2 1

4 2 5 4 5 2 4 5 4 2 5 4 5 5

2 1 2 3 4 3 4 1

2 1 4 2 1 4 2 1

4 3 1 4 3 1 4 3

4 3 1 4 3 1 4 3

       2 3  2                          3  5 3 2 3 5 2 3 5  3                    2 5 4 5 5 4 5 2 4 2 3 5 3 5 3 5 3  5 4 5 2 4 2 2 5 4 5 5 4 5 2 4 2 5 3 5 2 3 5 4 5 2 4 2 5  3 5 3 5 2 3 1 4 3 2 4 4 2 1

2 4 1 2 4 4 2 3

4 1 3 4 1 3 4 1

3 4 1 2 4 1 2 5 4

1 4 3 2 4 4 2 1

2 4 1 2 4 4 2 3

4 1 3 4 1 3 4 1

3 4 1 2 4 1 2 4

FIGURE 1.2 horizontal thirds FIGURE 1.2 1.2 horizontal thirds FIGURE

  

7 8 7 8

8 10 8 10

10 12 10 12

12 13 12 13

14 15 14 15

15 17 15 17

17 19 17 19

19 20 19 20

2 1 2 1

2 1 2 1

2 1 2 1

2 1 2 1

2 1 2 1

2 1 2 1

2 1 2 1

2 1 2 1

February

FIGURE 1.3 Chuck Berry-style lick FIGURE 1.3 FIGURE 1.3 Chuck Berry-style lick

  

3

00 3

              5 7 8 7 5              7 8As7 you 5 8 increase               5slowly. 7 5 7 5 the4tempo    inthe  com J A N U A R Y ing weeks, try8 reinterpreting as 7 5 7the 5 rhythms 4 7 5 4 7 5 16th notes, four notes per beat, 7 5with 4 the 8foot  7 7 5

0 Am 5

 14  12  10  8  7    13  15 14 15  13 12 13  12 10 12  10 810  8 7 8 87  13  15 15  13 13  12 12  10 10 8 8 8 9 7   9  2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 2  2 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 2  2 1 2  2 1 2  2 1 2  2 1 2  2 1 2 23 1

February FIGURE 2.1 A Dorian mode FIGURE Am 2.1 A Dorian mode 1 1

2 1 3 1 4 3 1 4

1 3 4 1 3 1 2diatonic 4 2 thirds 1 3 1 4 3 1 4

5 5 7 8 5 4 5 7 5 5 7 8 4 5 7 5 4 5 7 7 5 7 5 4 5 7 5 7 8 7 BY getting5 in 7 guitar playing LET’S BEGIN 5 5 1 7 3 8 4 1 3 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 3 4

tapping only at the beginning of every four1 3 4 3 1 4 3 1 4 2 1 4 2 1 3 1 8 4 7 3 note group. When alternate picking, you’ll shape and establishing a foundational prac1 3 4 1 3 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 3 4 1 3 4 3 1 4 3 1 4 2 1 4 2 1 3 1 4 3 Am7 arpeggio diatonic fourths find it helps to accent the downstrokes that tice routine for the new year. First up is an diatonic fourths fall on the downbeats (where the foot taps). exercise in arpeggio the key of G major, designed to 6 Am7 5 Once you memorize this example, start help 6 you develop a visualization 5 8 8of5the major 5 5 5 4 5 7 practicing it along with a metronome scale and major arpeggio in 5 8 8 “position 5 5 seven 7 7 5 1,” 4 5 7 4 5 and 7 find 5 5 4 5 7 7 7 5 7 5 7 base can as the using the 5 7 (relative to the CAGED 7 5 5 7 be 4 defined 5 7 5 8“E-shape” 8 your 5 7 tempo, 8 4 which 7 7 5 7 5 7 fastest speed you can play something while system), as well as learn how to play third 5 5 1 8 4 3 1 3 1 1 4 1 4 1 1 3 1 3 8 4 1 1 7 3 3 8 4 4 2 2 4 4 1 1 2 2 4 4 still maintaining a feeling of full control. Reintervals melodically, all in a single, efficient 1 4 3 1 3 1 1 4 1 4 1 1 3 1 3 4 1 1 3 3 4 4 2 2 4 4 1 1 2 2 4 4 peat the example continuously for five minexercise, which we can then repeat continutes every day, and be sure to stop and shake uously once memorized (see FIGURE 1.1). 10 5 7 5 We 10begin5by ascending 7 8 5 and descending 7 5 8 the 7 G 5 out your hands and arms for a moment any 5 7 5 4 5 7 7 5 4 7 5 feel 4 the onset of muscle tension or major scale 5 (G7 A B8C5D E Fs),7using 5 alternate 8 7 5 time 7 you 5 4 7 5 4 4 5picking, 7 before switching in7 bar5 4 fatigue. 7 5 After 4 a week, 7 you’ll 5 7 improve(down-up) 7 5 4 7 5 4 notice 8 7 5 7 5 7as your timing ments in your stamina, as well 6 to a more economy-based technique that 8 7 5 1 2 1 3 3 4 1 1 3 3 1 1 4 3 3 1 2 1 4 4 2 2 1 1 4 4 2 2 1 4 3 3 and accuracy. At this point, increase the metcombines sweep picking with hammer-ons 1 2 1 3 3 4 1 1 3 3 1 1 4 3 3 1 2 1 4 4 2 2 1 1 4 4 2 2 1 4 3 3 ronome speed and find your new base tempo and pull-offs to play a two-octave Gmaj7 arfor the next week of practice. peggio (G B D Fs). In bar 8, we switch back to FIGURE 1.2 demonstrates how we can aralternate picking as we ascend and descend range our thirds horizontally as double-stops, the scale again, this time in third intervals. ascending the fretboard on the B and high E The entire example is written as eighth strings. For a good example of thirds in use, notes, so you’ll want to tap your foot on each listen to the intro melody to Van Morrison’s downbeat (every two notes) when practicing

   

 

 

 

 

               

                                     

guitarworld.com

65


FIGURE 1.2 horizontal thirds

classic 1967 hit, “Brown Eyed Girl.” FIGURE 1.3 presents a thirdsbased melodic lick in the style of rock and roll legend Chuck Berry. This time our double-stop framework is played as descending single notes with legato finger slides employed. Set up your amp with a clean, bright tone, just on the edge of break up, and add plenty of reverb. Play the example using your bridge pickup for an authentic, “twangy” rock and roll tone.

FOR THE MONTH of March, we’ll move on to look at another commonly used mode, Mixolydian. Built from the fifth degree of the

66

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

2 1

2 1

2 1

2 1

2 1

 14 



13 15

15 13



12

2 A 2 1U FEBR U A2 R2 Y1

2 1

13 12

2



10

  

0

8 7 12 10 10 8 8

2 1 2

2 1 2

8 7 9

 212

2 1 3

February 1



0 Am 5 5 5 5 7 5

 

              5 7 8 7 5              5 7 8

  5 8

7

5 7

5 7

 5

5 8

1 4 3 1 3 1 1 4

10

4 5 7

5

8 5

5 7 8

4 5 7

1 3 4 1 3 1 2 4

Am7 arpeggio

6

FOR FEBRUARY, we’ll work

MARCH

2 2 1 1

14 15 17 19 15 17 19 20

FIGURE 2.1 FIGURE 2.1 A Dorian mode

FEBRUARY through a practice routine based around the A Dorian mode (A B C D E Fs G), which is the second mode of the G major scale. This means that it shares the same key signature and seven notes as its parent G major scale, except now everything is oriented around an A root, which is heard as the tonal center. This gives us the formula: 1 (A), 2 (B), f3 (C), 4 (D), 5 (E), 6 (Fs) and f7 (G). Following a similar structure to our January lesson plan, we’ll start off with a 12-bar combination exercise, which, after strumming an Am barre chord for reference, has us playing the A Dorian mode and an Am7 arpeggio, before ascending and descending through the scale using fourth intervals (see FIGURE 2.1). Playing fourths through a scale like this helps develop good control over barring and finger rolling techniques. Concentrate on note separation as you play through bars 8–14, breaking the example down into two-beat phrases at first. FIGURE 2.2 demonstrates how we can arrange our fourths horizontally as double-stops, ascending the B and high E strings, and FIGURE 2.3 presents a lick based around the use of fourths in the style of Jimi Hendrix. Work through the examples slowly, beat by beat, and focus on timing and accuracy when performing the finger slides.



7 8 10 12 8 10 12 13

FIGURE 1.3 Chuck Berry-style lick

8 7 5

1 2 4 1 3 4 1 3

 7 5

7

4

4 3 1 4 3 1 4 2

7 5 4

4

5

7

7

8 5

diatonic fourths

8

5

1 4 1 1 3 1 3 4

1 2 1 3 3 4 1 1

7

5 8

7

7

5

3 3 1 1 4 3 3 1

FIGURE 2.2 FIGURE 2.2 horizontal fourths

8 7

1 4 2 1 3 1 4 3

5

4

7

7

8

5

5

7

1 1 3 3 4 4 2 2

4

7 4

5

4 7

7

5

5

4

4

2 1 4 4 2 2 1 1

7

7

5

5

7

7

4 4 1 1 2 2 4 4

       5 7  5                      5

7 5

       

5

7 5

5

5

4 8

7

7

4 4 2 2 1 4 3 3

 

             10 8

5

FIGURE FIGURE2.32.3 Jimi Hendrix-style lick

   10 8 87 109 87 55 5   5 7 7 5 FIGURE 2.2 horizontal fourths FIGURE 2.3 Jimi Hendrix-style lick 5 7 7     5   Hendrix-style     lick    FIGURE512.271 horizontal fourths FIGURE1 10 2.3 Jimi 8 12 1 10 1 1 14 2 15 1 17 1 1 8 1 2 2 2 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1   8 12 8 81  10 81   51    1 10 1 1 13 1 15 1 17 1 1  1  1  1   5512.2771 horizontal  1  10 FIGURE fourths FIGURE 2.38 Jimi lick5    7 9 Hendrix-style 7 5 8 10 12 14 15 17 10   5 7 7 5 10 12 13 15 17 8 8 10 8  5  5 7 5 7  5 March   553.177 D88Mixolydian    10  10 12 mode 14 15 17 10 8 7 9 7 5 7 5 7  5 FIGURE 5 7 8 10 12 13 15 17 10 8 8 10 8 5  1  1 1 72  92 72 1 3 51 3 51 73 51 73 51    11D7 11 11 11   11 21 11 11 M A  1 1H1  1 1 1 5 7 17  5 1   R C    1 5 7 7 10  110 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1  12 1 114212 210 2 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 5 1   10 12 13 1  1 1 1  1 13 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 12 10 1 1  110 March 11 9 11 12 12 11 9 1 1 mode 1 1 1  1 1 2  2 2 1 3 1 3 1 3 12 1 10 3 91 10 9210 12 FIGURE 113.1 FIGURE 3.111 D11Mixolydian 1 9 10 12 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1  1 1 1 1 March 12 12 10 9  10D7 D 10 12 Mixolydian mode FIGURE 3.1                             4 2 1 124 1 March 10 10 12 14 12 10 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 3 4 1 3 4 1 2 4 2 1 4 3 1 4 3 1 4 2 1 D7 10 FIGURE 3.1 D Mixolydian      mode    9 11 12 10 12 13 10diatonic  14sixths  10 13 12 10 12 11 9        1  D7 arpeggio 11 10 12 12  10 9 10 12  D7    10 6   1012 9 10 1210   9 11 12 1012 13      13 121012 11 912 10 91210 912 12 1 11 10 10 12 14 12 10  10 13 9 10 1312 10 12 10 9 10 12  11 109 10 10 10 12 13 13 12 10 11 9 11 12 12 10 9 12 11 9 11 12   912 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 3 4 1 3 4 1 29 4 10 2 1 12 4 3 1 12 4 11 3 9 1 9 4 2 10 1 4 2121 12 4 10 12 12 10 10 10 12 10 9 10 12  12 12 9 diatonic sixths 9 10 12 12 10 9 D7 arpeggio 12 9 10 12 12 10 9  10 2 12 10  10 D72 arpeggio 4 1 2 4 1011 24 41 21 33 41 14 3 14 110diatonic 2 21 1244 sixths 22 11 44 32 11 4 34 31 41 24 11 41 2 31 1234 6 1 4 1 3 2 1 4  2114 101 132 4 101 132 410 111 3 4 1 3 4 1diatonic D7 arpeggio  2 4 sixths 2 1 4 3 19 4 3 111 4 122 1410 2 1124 6 10 12 12 10 9 10                     10  9 12   10101413 1510 121314101011 12 1012 9 1310 1212  109 12 10 9 1211 912101012 12 10 12 6 11 1013 10 12 10 9 10 12 9 10 10 12 12 13 13 10 1212 9 9 11 12 11 9 12 12 2 10 12119 2 91 4 2 9 10 12 2 1 4 1 3 11 1 4 1 4 1 11 2 3 1 4 1 10 4 11 3 1 12 4121 10 1 3 3 12 1 104 2 991 10 12 10 12 12 10 9 10 12 12 910 109 12 9 12 12 9 9 10 12 21 41 24 1011 33 1232 11 1444  1541 14 1441 12 1233 31 1014 21 1042 11 3124 32 11 14 42 11 34 43 1 12 44 11 12 1234 3 10 10 2 13 1  4 1  3 2 10 1 4 1 124 1 102 3 1 4 1 132 91124 2 101 4 122 1 114 3 91 41 1 3 3 10  9  11 10 12 12 14  15 14 12 12 10 11 12 10sliding-sixths horizontal FIGURE 3.2 13     10 13   sixths  12  10     FIGURE  9 123.3   10 12 9 11 12lick9 10 12 910 12  10  9  11 10 12 12 14  15 14 12 12 10 11   10 912  12 1310 12 9141014  13 10 12 10 8 10 13 12 12 10 9 1 41011 2 12 1 12 3 14 3 1 154  45 1 7 4 1 3 12 3 1 11 2 4 9 1 3 3 10 1 1 12 4 9 1 2 4 1 2 12 4  11 12 14 16 5 7 9 11  10 1211 1011  41291 12113  12  13 10 1312 149 10  1 4 2 1 3 3 1 4  4 1 4 1 3 3 1 2 4 1 3 3 1 1 4 1 3 4 1 2 4 1 2 12 4 sixths lick FIGURE FIGURE  1 4 3.22 1horizontal 4 1 3 3.33 1sliding-sixths 3 3 1 4  4 1 4 1 3 3 1 2 1 4 1 3 4  1 2 4 12 4   horizontal sixths sliding-sixths lick FIGURE10 3.2 12 FIGURE2 3.3 14 15 52 72 82 10 14 14 2 2 2 2 2 2 10 1 2  2 12 3 2  2 13  1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1  11  103.3 sliding-sixths   12 12 12  13lick133 132   142 143 14 horizontal sixths FIGURE 3.2 12 FIGURE 5 7 9 11  11 10 10 12 14 14 16 15 5 7 8 11 10 April 5 7 9   11   10  11 10 11  12 12 12  13 13 13  14 14 14 10 12 12 14 14 16 15 5 7 8 11 10 E Aeolian mode FIGURE 4.1 12 14 16 52 72 92 11   11Em   102  112 1 112  122 3 122  132 3 132  142 3 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 315214 2123 2 2 3    2  2  2 2  2     2  2  1122 14 1 2 2 2 12    1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 12 13 15 15 13 12  April  12 5 5

7 7

8 8

10 10

12 14 15 17 12 13 15 17

8 8

8 8 8 8

0 000

8 8


10

major scale, this mode corresponds with the fifth chord in a major key, which, when harmonized as a fournote diatonic seventh chord, is a dominant seven, spelled 1, 3, 5 f7. In our parent key of G, this gives us the D Mixolydian mode (D E Fs G A B C), with the formula: 1 (D), 2 (E), 3 (Fs), 4 (G), 5 (A), 6 (B) and f7 (C), along with its associated D dominant seven chord, commonly abbreviated to D7. Again, starting with a barre chord form and following our now familiar scale-arpeggio-interval exercise routine, we’ll ascend and descend the D Mixolydian mode using alternate picking before switching to our economy-based legato technique for the D7 arpeggio (D Fs A C) (see FIGURE 3.1). In bar 7, we resume alternate picking as we ascend and descend through the scale, this time in sixth intervals. This becomes a great exercise in string skipping, and you’ll need good accuracy with both your picking and fretting to play the pattern cleanly, so start by breaking this part of the exercise down into short, four-note sections, then work on playing the entire example from beginning to end in one smooth, uninterrupted flow of notes. FIGURE 3.2 presents our D Mixolydian sixths reconfigured to ascend the G and high E strings. This horizontal arrangement can frequently be heard in jazz, blues, soul and rock styles, including the classic intro to “Red House” by Jimi Hendrix, as well as a trademark feature in the playing of Stax Records session guitarist Steve Cropper on the tracks “Soul Man” by Sam and Dave (1967), and “(Sittin’ on) The Dock of the Bay,” which he co-wrote with Otis Reading (1968). FIGURE 3.3 demonstrates how we can turn our horizontal sixths into another Chuck Berry–style lick with the addition of some legato finger slides.

APRIL FOR APRIL, WE’LL base our

monthly routine around the natural minor scale, also known as the Aeolian mode, which is built from the sixth degree of the major scale and corresponds with the sixth chord in

 151124141102123

    10  12  14  15  14  12  10          12 10  9    12 13 10 12 10 13 12 10  11 19 4 211 1 12 3 3 1 4  4 1 4 1 3 12 3 1 211 4 19 3 3 1 1 412 1 3 4 19 2 4 1 2 4 12 10 9 12 10  12 10 9 10

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FIGURE 3.2 FIGURE 3.2 horizontal sixths 1 4 2 1 3 3 1 4

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12

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FIGURE113.212horizontal 14 16 sixths 5 7

April

8

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11

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12

14

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 10 

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    10  12  13  14 14  10 2   11 2 1 11 2   12 2 3 12 2   13 2 3 13 2   14 2 3  12

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00

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Em

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FIGURE 4.1 FIGURE 4.1 E Aeolian mode 12

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   15 14 12 15 14 

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11 11 12 12 14 14 15 12 12 14 14 14 15 14 15 15

11 11 12 12 14 11 11 12 12 14 14 12 12 14 14 14

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               12 14 12   12            12 14 12 12

12 12 14 12 12 13 13 11 11 12 12 14 14 12 12 14

12 12 13 13 15 15 12 12 13 13 15 15 14 14

15 15 13 13

3 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 3 1 2 4 1 2 4 1

15 15 13 13 12 12

15 15 13 13 12 12 14 13 13 12 12 14 12 14 14 12

3 1 4 2 1 4 2 1 3 1 4 2 1 4 2 1

4 2 1 3 2 1 3 1 4 2 1 3 2 1 3 1

                               

12 12 14 12 11 14 12 11 14 12 11 14 12 11 14 14 1 4 2 1 4 2 1 4 1 4 2 1 4 2 1 4

12 12 11 11 14 12 11 11 12 14 12 14 14 12 15 15

14 14 12 12 15 14 12 12 14 12 15 14 15 15 14 12

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15 15 14 14 12 12 15 14 14 12 12 15 14 15 15 14

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                           19 20    19 20 20 17 17 20 20 15 15 20 20 20

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May May

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FIGURE A FIGURE 5.1 5.1 A minor minor pentatonic pentatonic scale, scale, box box 1 1 Am

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5 5 5 5 5 7 a major key,557which is a minor seven5chord. 5 In 7 7 5 7 7 7 5 7 our parent key of G, this gives us the E Aeo7 5 7 5 8 5 Fs G A B C5 5D), 8 with the formula: lian mode (E

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4 4

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5 5 8 5 8 5 7 5 (D). Notice how this features the 7 minor 5 mode 7 7 5 5 7 5 darker and more melancholic flat-sixth 7 5 8de8 gree, which distinguishes it from the Dorian

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FIGURE 4.2 FIGURE 4.2 horizontal sequence, sequence, in in the the style style of of Yngwie Yngwie Malmsteen Malmsteen FIGURE 4.2 horizontal

14

four-note four-note sequences sequences

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   17 

FIGURE 4.2 horizontal sequence, in the style of Yngwie Malmsteen FIGURE horizontal sequence, sequence, in in the the style style of of Yngwie Yngwie Malmsteen Malmsteen FIGURE 4.2 4.2 horizontal

            19  20 17 20 15 20 19 20                     19 19 20 20 17 17 20 20 15 15 20 20 19 20 20 19    4 1 3 44 1 2 1 4 1 2 M 4  4A 1Y 3 4 3 4 1 4 1 4 3 4 15 12 14 15 17 14 15 17 19 15 17 19 20 17 19 20 15 15 12 12 14 14 15 15 17 17 14 14 15 15 17 17 19 19 15 15 17 17 19 19 20 20 17 17 19 19 20 20

ing off as usual, with a related barre chord for reference, we’ll follow our familiar scale-arpeggio-interval pattern exercise format before ascending and descending the Aeolian mode in four-note sequences, using alternate picking again, as presented in FIGURE 4.1. Work through the entire exercise slowly, bar by bar, and again, once you have it memorized, establish your base tempo and strive to gradually increase it as your technique improves. Our applied lick for April is an example in the style of Swedish neo-classical guitar virtuoso Yngwie Malmsteen and is based on fournote sequences, this time played up the high E string using position shifts (see FIGURE 4.2). Leading with the pinkie (4) and starting on the f3 note, G, the idea ascends as a stream of unbroken 16th notes with a slide shift at the end of each beat. Bar 2 features another hallmark of Yngwie’s style, a classically influenced pedal tone phrase that resolves to the E root note with some wide, decorative finger vibrato.

MAY FOR OUR MAY routine, we’ll

3 3

44

 44

11

22

11

44

11

22

 44

44

May FIGURE 5.1 May FIGURE 5.1 A minor pentatonic scale, box 1 Am A minor pentatonic scale, box 1 FIGURE FIGURE 5.1 5.1 A minor pentatonic scale, box 1

   

        5 5 7   5 8 555 777 55 77 55

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5 5 5 5 7 5 5 7 5 7 5 7 7 7 5 5

 5  55    1

7 7 7

5 8 5 1 8 4 1 3 1 3 1 3 11

8 8 8

5 5 5

  8 5 5 8 8

3 3 3

1 11

3 33

44

11

33

11

33

5

8 8 8

5 5 5

  8 5 5 8 8

1 11

3 33

1 11

3 33

11

11

33

44

 

3 33

1 11

5

8 8 8

5 5 5

  8 5 5 8 8

1 11

3 33

1 11

3 33

3 33

1 11

3 33

5

8 8 8

5 5 5

 8

1 11

3 33

1 11

3 33

8 8 8

5 5 5

  8 55 8 8

5

8 8 8

5 5 5

 8

 5 5 5

8 8 8

5 5 5

3 3 3

1 11

3 33

1 11

3 33

1 11

3 33

1 11

3 33

1 11

1 1

 

 

8 8

 

 

5 5 7 7 5 5 7 5 5 7 7 5 5 7 5 7 5 7 7 5 7 5 7 5 5 7 7 5 5 7 7 7 1 1

3 3

1 1

33

11

33

11

33

11

33

11

33

11

44

11

    

1 11

33

11

44

33

 

5 7 5 5 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 8 1 3 1 3 1 8 4 11

33

11

1

5 5 5

8 8 8

1 11

11

8 8 8

11

33

11

 8 8

5 5

8 8 8

5 5 5

2 22

1 11

3 33

1 11

 

 

7 7 7 2 2 2

44

11



33

11

44



11



5 8 5 8 5 8 5 8 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 8 10 10

10 10 12 12 10 10 13 10 10 12 12 10 10 13 12 12 15 15 12 12 15 12 12 15 15 12 12 15 13 13 15 15

1 3 3 1 1 33 11 33 11 33 11 33 11 33 11 33 11 33 1

3 1 1 3 3 11 22 11 33 11 22 11 33 11 33 11 33 11 3

 

 

17 17

33

11

15 15 17 17 15 15 17 15 15 17 17 15 15 17 17 17 20 20 17 17 20 17 17 20 20 17 17 20 17 17 20 20

11

4 4

  8

 5

 

1 1

3 33

FIGURE 5.2c FIGURE 5.2C playing horizontally horizontally through through the the five five minor minor pentatonic pentatonic boxes boxes FIGURE 5.2c playing



33

 

7 7 7

    8 

5 5 5 7 5 5 7 7 5 8 5 7 5 8 8 8 5 5

33

     5 8 5 5 8 5 8 10 8 8 10 8

1 1 1

44

 

3 33

8 8

FIGURE 5.2b playing vertically through the scale in box 1 FIGURE 5.2b playing vertically vertically through through the the scale scale in in box box 1 1 FIGURE 5.2B FIGURE 5.2b playing

 5  55    1

11

5 8 5 5 5 8 5 8 5 7 5 8 5 8 8 5 7 7

FIGURE 5.2a A minor pentatonic repetition lick 1 FIGURE 5.2A A minor pentatonic repetition repetition lick lick 1 1 FIGURE 5.2a A minor pentatonic FIGURE 5.2a

1 1

44

 5 8 5 8 5 8 1 11

33

33

33

11

33

11

33

11

33

11

33

11

FIGURE Eddie Van Van Halen-style Halen-style lick lick FIGURE 5.3a 5.3a Eddie

5 5

33

11

33

11

11

20 20



20 20

33

2 20 0

FIGURE lick 3: 3: Paul Paul Gilbert-style Gilbert-style FIGURE 5.3b 5.3b lick

5 5

   5     5  5 5 8 5 5 8 5 8 5  5 8 5 8 5 5 8 5 8 5 8     5 8 5 8 5 5 8 5 88 8 5 88 present  some 8 5 5 7 5 5 8 8 8 8 5 8 5 7 5 8 8 5 and down the neck 88through 88the five different more pentatonic-based repe-  7 7     positions. Although the fretting hand should tition lick ideas, which, once developed, can   be slightly angled, there should still be space be applied both vertically and horizontally

  

68

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

1 1

  

work through a series of examples based around the minor pentatonic scale, intervallically spelled: 1 f3 4 5 f7, with an emphasis on the use of legato phrasing. In FIGURE 5.1, we’ll start off by strumming an Am barre chord before ascending and descending the corresponding A minor pentatonic scale using hammer-ons and pull-offs. Aim for a smooth, even execution, with all notes having equal duration and volume, and with the pull-offs clean and free of any leftover notes ringing. To suppress unwanted string noise, the index finger (1) should be positioned to mute the adjacent lower string with its tip, while laying flat across the higher treble strings. FIGURES 5.2a–c demonstrate how we can take a basic pentatonic phrase and generate licks from it by applying the idea both vertically through the scale (in a single position), as well as horizontally up

May

4 4

17 17

1 33 11 33 11 33 11 33 11 33 11 33 1 3 3 11 33 11 of between the underside the neck and the cup of the hand. Check, too, that there is plenty of space between the individual digits; the fingers FIGURE lick 4: 4: Paul Paul Gilbert-style Gilbert-style FIGURE 5.3c 5.3c lick should bunch together only when the final bent note is played and the push vibrato technique5 5 5 8 5 5 8 8 5 is applied. 88 55 7 55 88 8 5 7 5 7 7 The next three examples, FIGURES 5.3a–c,



 

  3 3

33

1 1

22

3 11 333

   11

33

33

11

22

3 11 333

11

33 11 22 11 33 11 33 11 33 11 22 11 33 1 1 3 3 1 1 in in the same way. FIGURE 5.3a is a phrase the style of Eddie Van Halen and incorporates June June a useful fret-hand tapping technique that he FIGURE lick 1 1 FIGURE 6.1 6.1 lick calls “hammering on from nowhere” when 11 11 11 11 1 1 descending12 (specifically, all the eighth-fret 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 15 FIGURES 15 15 15 5.3c15 15 notes), and 5.3b and are in15 15 15 15 spired by Paul Gilbert’s style.

  

          



33

11

lick lick 2   2           12 12 15 12 12 12 15 12 12 12 15 15 12 12 12 15 15 12 12 12 15 15 12 12

FIGURE FIGURE 6.2 6.21 1

11

11

11

11


UNIQUE NATURAL CHANNEL ONE CONTROL: MASTER VOLUME

COMPACT YET POWERFUL

CUSTOM 10” SPEAKERS - 101dB SENSITIVITY

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15 17 15 15 17 15 17 20 17 17 20 17 17 horizontally five boxes FIGURE 5.2c playing 17 17 through 20 20 20 horizontally through the the20 five minor minor pentatonic pentatonic boxes

               55 88 55         1 3  1  883 55 188 553 88 188 10103 8810110 8831010 188 10103 1101012123 10101131310103 121210101 131312123 1515121215151212151512121515 5 8 5 5 8 5 8 10 8 8 10 8 10 112 10 3 13110 12 3 10113 12 3 15112 15 3 12115 12 3 151 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 8 8 10 10   Eddie Van Halen-style lick lick 3: Paul Gilbert-style FIGURE 5.3a FIGURE 5.3b FIGURE 5.3a FIGURE 5.3B Halen-style lick lick 3: Paul FIGURE FIGURE 5.3b     115.3A 33 11 Eddie 33 11 3Van 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 2 1 3 1 2 1 3 1 3 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 2 1 3  1 2 1 3 1Gilbert-style 3 11 33 11 33 1 1 33 5 5 5 5 J U N E               5 8 5 8 5 5 8 5 8 5 8 5 5 8 8 5 8 5 5 8 8 5  1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 12 1 3 1 28 15 3 1 8 3 1 3 8153 1 83    7 5 5 17  5 8 5 8 5 5 8 5 8 5 8 5 5 8 8 5 8 5 5 8 8 5     17 15 17 17 15 15 178 15 15 17 178 15 151 17 817 17 20 20 8 17 2017 17 20 20 17 17 207 17 17 20 20 7 20 FOR THEMONTH  of June, we’ll 15       17 17 20   20 20 20 20 continue 15 17 15 our pentatonic 15 17 15 theme 17 20 17 17 20 17 17   17 17 20 20 20 20 2 0 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 3 1 2 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 2 1 3 1 3 1 

20

FIGURE 5.2c playing horizontally through the five minor pentatonic boxes

  

  

and turn our attention to a routine based around a collection of classic string-bending repetition licks 1made 3 famous 1 3 by 1 just 3 about 1 3 every 1 3 1 guitar player from the Fifties rock and roll era through the classic and Eddie Van Halen-style lick FIGURE 5.3a modern hard rock and heavy metal from the Sixties 5 and Seventies5to 5 8 5 day,8with 5 notable 5 8 5 play8 5 the present 8 8 8 8 ers including Chuck Berry, Alvin Lee, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Ace Frehley 1 3 1 3 and 1 3 Angus 1 3 1 Young 3 1 3 1(see 3 1 3 FIGURES 6.1–6.6). These kinds of stock licks form an important part lick 4: Paul FIGURE of 5.3c the authentic rockGilbert-style lead guitar vocabulary and provide a great foun5 upon which 5 dation8 and 5 springboard 5 8 8 5 5 8 7 7 to build other, more unique licks. In all of these examples, try experimenting with3 the finishing-note 3 3 3 3 speed 1 2 and 1 3 width, 1 3 as 1 this 2 1will 3 1 vibrato help define the nuance of the style lick 2 in. Start by setting FIGURE you6.2 are playing 1 1 1 your amp 12 up 15 with 12 a moderately 12 15 12 12 15 15 try applying15 overdriven tone and a fast and shallow vibrato to the held bends for a soulful blues-rock sound (think 3 Angus Young). 3 In con3 try1 dialing 3 1 in a modern hightrast, gain tonelick and 3 using a slower, wider FIGURE 6.3 1 which will give 1 vibrato, you a more1 hard-rock/metal sound (think Ed12 12 12 12 14 14Zakk Wylde). 12 14 14 die14Van Halen and Also, when performing these licks, the fret hand should be for3 3 ward 3 angled, 1 1 and 1 with space between the individual digits until the final bend is played, at which time the fingers will bunch together in support of the bending finger. At this point, the thumb will move up and over the top of the neck, acting like a hook, or clamp, and forming a pivot with the first finger just above the knuckle. The string bending motion will come from a rotation of the wrist and forearm against this pivot, with the fingers remaining rigid as the wrist moves.

11







 

3 1 2 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 2 1 3 1 3 1

June

33 11 33 June

11

3

1

3

3 3 11 FIGURE 6.1 lick lick11 FIGURE 6.1 1 1 1 FIGURE lick 3: Paul1Gilbert-style Gilbert-style FIGURE 5.3b 5.3b112lick 12Paul 12 13: 1 12

                                     1512 15 12515 12 1512 515 5    55 88557 58855 55 8855 7 58855    1588 55 1555 88 51588 55 88 5155 55 88 15 88 55         88 5 88 88 5 88    77 77         8 5 5 8 8 5 8 5 5 8 8 5     3 731 2 1 33 1 3 731 2 1 33 1  3 1     3 3 3 3  3 1 11 332 111 33 311 331 11333 111 332 11 133 131 331 33 11 22 11 33 11 33 11 33 11 22 11 33 11 33 11 FIGURE 6.2113 33 1lick 2             3 1 2lick 1 32 1 3 1 3 1 2 1 3 1 3 1 June FIGURE  6.2 J U15 N E June 12lick 15 12Paul 12 15 12  12 12  12 15 121          4: Gilbert-style lick FIGURE 5.3c FIGURE 6.1   15 Gilbert-style15 15 6.1 lick 1 15  FIGURE 5.3c lick 4: Paul FIGURE June 15  156.16.112lick151 12 FIGURE  155 12 15 1215 512 15 12 15 1212151212 15 12  12   FIGURE       5   5 12 12 12 12           1288 55 7731255 88 12 88 55123 77 55 88   3  1515 31515 1515 1515 1515  3     153 115 33 115 15 3 15 3   3 13 3 1     FIGURE 3 3 3 3 1 lick 3 6.3 3 3 3 3 3 1  6.333 lick FIGURE 3 11 223 11 33 11 33 11 22 11 33 11       1 12 12 12 12               lick 2 FIGURE 6.2  FIGURE 14 6.2 FIGURE 12 12  214 14  14 14 12 14 14 12 12 14 14        14 12 12 6.2 1212lick     12 12 14 14 12 15 12 12 14 14 12 15 12 12 14 14 12 15 12 12 14 14   15  15 12 15 1215 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15     15 15 15 15 15         15 12     12 15 123  3 3 3 15 3 1 1 115  3 3 3 3  3 1 1 1  FIGURE 5.3c 3 FIGURE 1 3 5.3c 1 3lick 4: 1 Paul 3 Gilbert-style FIGURE Eddie Van Van Halen-style lick 5 FIGURE 5.3a 5.3a Eddie 5Halen-style lick 8 5 5 8 8 5 5 8 5 5 73:5Paul Gilbert-style 75 FIGURE 5.3b 8 lick 5 5 8 8 5 5 8

  

11 33 11 33 Gilbert-style

  

1 33 4:1Paul

  

33 lick

  



1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3

11 33 11 FIGURE 5.3C

1

  

  

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 1

1

3

3 3

3 33

1 1

3

1 1

1

1 1

1

1

1

1

1 1

1 1

3 3

 

1 1

1 1

 

1 1

1 1

1 1

1 1

1

1 1

3

1

1 1

1

3 3

3 3

 1    1    1    1    1   12 12 12 1 1 12  12 12 12 14 14 12 12 14 14 12 12 14 14 12 1414      14     1412 12 14 14 12 14 14 12 14 14 12 14 14  12 14 14 12 14 14  

JULY FOR JULY, WE’LL work through

a routine based around another component of the rock guitar style— double-stops. Double-stops have

70

1

1

3

FIGURE 6.3 lick 3 FIGURE FIGURE 6.3 6.31 lick 3

3 3

3 13

1 1

1

3 FIGURE 6.4 FIGURE 6.4 4 lick 4 FIGURE 6.4 lick



 12  12

1 1

1 1

1

33

1 1

11

3 3

   12

   12

   12

33

33

33

11

11

12 15 12 15 12 14 14

12 15 12 15 12

  12   12   12   12 12 12 12 12 1 1

11

12 12

14 14

33

3 3

11

 14 14 1 1

33

2 2

14 14

33

11 11

15 15 12 12 14 12 12 14

22

33

33

12 12

14 14

33

11

33

12 12

33

  12  12

15 15 12 12 14 12 12 14

33

11

11

33

  12  12

1 1

12 12

11

12 12

14 14

  12  12

July July

11

12 15 12 15 12 14 14

11

FIGURE 6.6 FIGURE 6.6 FIGURE 6.6 lick lick 6 6

1

3 3

FIGURE 6.5 FIGURE 6.5 5 lick 5 FIGURE 6.5 lick

1

3 3

15 12 15 12 14 14

14 14

2 2



1

11

14 14

 

11

15 15 12 12 14 12 12 14

15 15 12 12

33

33

11

15 15

  12  12 33

 

 

15 15

11

FIGURE FIGURE 7.1 7.1 A minor pentatonic A minor pentatonic double-stops double-stops

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017



 

5 5 5 5

7 7 8 8

5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7

5 5 5 5

7 7 7 7

5 5 5 5

8 8 7 7

5 8 10 15 12 5 8 10 12 12 15 12 15 13 5 13 15 5 8 8 10 10 13 15 13 13 15 13 14 12 14 12

14 12 14 12 14 12 12 15 12 10 7 14 12 12 14 14 15 15 12 12 15 12 10 7 15 8 15 12 12 10 10 8

 


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been a well-used device among lead guitarists since the birth of rock and roll in the late Fifties, with pioneering players like Chuck Berry becoming famous for employing them to harmonize his melodies and fatten up solos and fills. The technique was later used to great effect by Jimi Hendrix, who was well known for incorporating double-stops into his signature R&B-based chord-playing style to create motion within chords and countermelodies to his vocals within his accompaniments. In the following routine, we’ll concentrate on using double-stops that occur within the minor pentatonic scale, using mostly fourth intervals. FIGURE 7.1 presents the A minor pentatonic scale, arranged in fourths and thirds as double-stops. Initially ascending through box 1 in fifth position, the idea then continues up the B and high E strings, before descending across the strings through a higher box pattern and returning along the low E and A strings. This is a great warm-up exercise which, once memorized, can be repeated continuously for a couple of minutes to develop your fretboard shape visualisation. FIGURE 7.2 presents an applied double-stops–based lick inspired by Hendrix’s rhythm and fill playing style. Beats one, three and four feature double-stops played with gracenote hammer-ons to the lower note of the double-stop. For this idea, dial up a warm clean sound on the verge of overdrive and add a little reverb. FIGURE 7.3 presents a lick in the style of Angus Young that features three-note rhythmic phrasing groupings played through the bar as even eighth notes. Use downstrokes exclusively and tap your foot on each beat. FIGURES 7.4 and 7.5 present two more Berry-style licks, both in the key of A and featuring the use of hammer-ons from the minor third, C, to the major third, Cs, which creates a tastefully bluesy sound. The lick in FIGURE 7.5 also features—during beats three and four of bar 1—a double-stop with the f3 note, C, played on the high E string’s eighth fret together with the sixth, Fs, played at the seventh fret on the B string, with the lower note bent up a half step to the f7, G. To ensure that the high E string stays still while the B string is bent, angle your

72

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

3

3

3

  

3

3 1 FIGURE 6.6 lick 61 3 3 1 lick 1 FIGURE 6.6 61 112 12 15 12 FIGURE 6.6 lick 6

1 1

1

1

1

1

1

1

      12    12    12     14  12  14 12 12 15 12 14 12 12 15 12 14 12 12 15 12 15    12 15 12 14 12 12 15 12 14 12 12 15 12 14 12 12 15 12 15    14 12  12   143 153 12 143 12 153 12 143J12U L153 Y12 14 312 153 12 15  1 2 2 3 1  3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 July 1

2

2

3

3

3

3

1

1

FIGURE 7.1 3 A minor 3 3 3double-stops 3 FIGURE 7.1 pentatonic July 1 2 2 3 1 5 8 10 FIGURE 7.1 A minor pentatonic double-stops July 5 8 5 8 10 

     

  

5 7 5 double-stops 7 5 8 10 FIGURE 7.1 A minor 5 7 pentatonic 5 7 5 8 5 8 10 5 5 5 1 5 1 5 1 5

7 8 7 3 8 4 7 3 8

5 5 5 1 5 1 5

7 7 7 3 7 3 7

5 5 5 1 5 1

7 7 73 73

5 5 5 1

1 1 3 1 3 1 1 4 1 3 1 3 1 FIGURE 7.2 Jimi Hendrix-style 1 3 1 3 1 let 11 34 let let 3 1 3 1 FIGURE 7.2 FIGURE 7.2 Jimi1 Hendrix-style

     

8 8

8 10 8

5 5 5 5 5

7

1 1 1 1 1 1

5 1/4 5 7 5 5 7 5 7

3  7 

5 5 5 5 5

5 1/4 5 5 5 7 5 7

7 ring 5 6 P.M.7 let 7 7 7 ring 5 7 5 6 P.M.7 7 7 7 5 1 1 73 51 62 3 73 1 1 3 1 7 3

5 5 5 5

1 1 1 1

5 5 5 5

1 1 1 1

3 3 3 3

1 1 1 1 1 1

7 7 7 7 73 3 3



 5  51 62 6

6 let 5 P.M. ring 5 6 6 7

3

7

51

1 2 3 3 3 1 3 1 2 3 3 3 1 3

15 15 15 15 15 15

12 13 12 13 12 13

1 2 1 2 1 2

4 4 4 4 4 4

2 1 2 1 2

1 2 1 1 2 1

5 1/4 5 7 5 5 7 51 3 1 7 1 1 1 1

  

7 7 7 7 7

3 3

3

15 14 15 14 15 1 14 4

13 12 13 12 13 12 2

14 14 14 14 14 3 14 3

6 6

14 15 14 15 3 14 4 15

1 1

12 12 12 12 1 12 1 12

15 15 15 4 15 4 15 1 15 4

3 1 4 2 3 1 3 3 1 3 1 Angus 4 1 FIGURE 7.3 4 2 3 1 3 1 3 1 7.3 3 1 Angus 1/44 1 FIGURE 7.3 FIGURE

     

5 5 5 5 5 1 1

1/4 1

7 7 7 7 7 7

5 1/4 5 7 5 5 7 5 7

1

1/4 1

5 1 5 1/4 7 5 5 7 5 5 7

12 12 12 1 12 1 12 1 12

10 10 10 1 10 1 10 1 10

7 8 7 1 8 2 7 1 8

1

1

1

   

4 1 1 2 lick Young-style 4

4 1/4 1 1 2 lick 1/4 Young-style

5 1/4 5 7 5 5 7 5 1 7 3 1 1 1 1 17

5 5 5 5 5

5 1/4 5 7 5 5 7 5 7

3 1/4

1/4

3 1/4

5 5 1/4 5 7 5 5 7 5 7

7 7 7 7 7

5 5 5 5 5

1/4

7 7 7 7 7 7

5 1/4 5 5 5 5

  

5 5 1/4 5 7 5 5 7 5 7

FIGURE 7.5 Chuck Berry-style lick 1 1/2 1/2 let FIGURE 7.5 Chuck Berry-style lick ring  5 5 5 5 5 8 8 1 1/2 1/2 let  5 7.5 FIGURE 7.5 FIGURE Chuck Berry-style 5 5 5 5 7 7 8 lick 7 5

let ring  let 5 ring 5 6 9 7 5 ring 5 5 5 7 15 5 8 1/281/2 9let  let 5 5 5 5 5 5 7 7 ring 8 7 5 7 ring  5 6 7 9 9 7 5 5 5 5 5 5 8 8

     5 5 5 5 5 7   1 3 73 3 3  11 3 3 3 23

6

12 12 12 12 12 1 12 1

1

1/4 1/4 1/4 FIGURE 57.3 5 Angus 5Young-style 5 5 lick 5

51 1/4 1 1 1 1 3 1 3 1/41 4 1 1/4 7 5 1 7 15 1

P.M. ring 5 6

7

3

12 13 12 13 12 13

   5   51 

5 8 5 511 84 5 3 1 3 1 3 1/41 8 4

3 FIGURE 7.4 Chuck Berry-style lick 3 let let 3 FIGURE 7.4 Chuck Berry-style lick ring  P.M. P.M. ring  5 Chuck let let lick FIGURE5 7.4 FIGURE 7.4 Berry-style 5 5 7 5 7

     

1 1 1 1 1 1

3 4 3 lick 4 3 let lick

8 8 10 5 7 5 55 5 7 9 7 5 7 7 73 511 3 511 3 75 7

1 3 1 2 3 2 10 4 51 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1/4 1 2 3 2 1/4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1/4 1 2 3 2 1/4 4 1 51 5 1 1 5 1 5 1

7

5 8 10 5 8 10

ring  ring  ring  ring  8let 8 letHendrix-style let licklet 7.2 8ring 10 Jimi 8 8 8 ring97 ring ring  5 5 8let 8 7 let let let 5 7 5 5 5 8ring 10 8 8 8 10 ring ring   5 7 5 5 7 9 7 5 7 ring

FIGURE

7

7 8 7 4

3

1

1 3 1 1

3

3

 

7

 92

8 7 5 75 3 9 7 53 5 6 1 2 3 1 73 1 2 3 13 1 3

2 1 2 3 3 3 2 1 2 3 3

2 3 2

  

1 3 12 13 1 1 3 12 1 1

AUGUST August

FIGURE 8.1 August FIGURE 8.1 Albert Lee-style banjo roll study Albert Lee-style banjo roll study FIGURE 8.1let ring

let ringm  a m  m  a m  a m  m letlet ring ringm  a m  m  a m  a m  m    m0  3a m0  m0  3a m0  3a 0m  0m  m0  1a m0  m0  1a m0  1a 0m  0m  45 53 5 53 53 5 23 31 3 31 31 3   4 5 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 2 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0  let ring m  a m  m  a m  a m  m  m  a m  m  a m  a m  m letlet ring ring  m0  1a m0  m0  1a m0  1a 0m  0m let ringm0  1a m0  m0  1a m0  1a 0m  0m  0 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 3 3 1 3 3 1 3 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  0 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 

FIGURE 8.2 banjo roll in G a a roll in G FIGURE 8.2a banjo FIGURE 8.2 m a 3 m 0

m a 3 m 1

  3 3  0 1     

m a 3 m 2

3 2

 

  

m a m 3 m 2 3 a m 3

2 3

 

3

3

 3a m  m 3a m  a3 m   a 3m 0 2m 3 3a m3 0 a3 3m 0 0 3 0

3

0

2 3

3

0

3

0

m a m 3 m 2 3 a m 3

2 3

3

3

 3a m  3m  a 3m 0 3m 0 3 0

3

0

a m a 3m 0

a m a 3 m 1

a m a 3 m 2

3 3 3 0 1 2

  

m open-string   FIGURE 8.3b    country  lick  2 2 0 m  m m m  22      2 0 3 1 2 2 0    4 2 0 2  3 1 2 2 4 2 0 2 0 2 1 0 2     2 0 2 3 4 0    4 2 0 4 2 0 33 44 2 0 33 44 2     2 1 0 2  3 4 0  

FIGURE 8.3a open-string country lick 1 open-string country lick 1m FIGURE 8.3a m m

FIGURE 8.3b open-string country lick 2


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 0a a a 0  0  0 a a1m 0m m 0ma m  a m0m 1a mm0 a m0m  1aa mm0  ma1 ma0m ma ma0m  1 1 3 31 3 31 3 1 3 3 3 3 31 3 3 3  00 22 0m03 22 13m m230 22 m20 322 3a m3 00 223a 3m 00 2m22 30 3a m322 033a3 03m330 m20 3333a 0m3 330 3a 3m0 033 3m 03m0 m1333 m230   0 1 2 23 30 3023 30 30 23 30 30 0 1 2        8.2banjo roll in G FIGURE FIGURE a banjo a a roll in G a a a FIGURE 8.2 8.3A FIGURE 8.3B open-string country open-string 1 m aFIGURE 2 FIGURE 8.3a m country a m  alick m m  a 8.3b m m a m  a m  m lick am am am am am am m 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 32 m 3    m m mopen-string m country lick 1m open-string country FIGURE 8.3a FIGURE 8.3b m m m m lick m a m a m m a m a m m a m a m             m 300 311 322  22 33 3 m33 0 3 33 0m22 33 3 33 0 3 33m2 0 0 223 3313 233 0 3 33 0 3 300 311 2322           44 22 00 4 2 0 3 4 2 00 3 4 022  0  2 0 0 3 1 2 220 00 2 01 0 3 4 2220      4 2 0 3 4 2 0 3 4    2 1 0 2  3 4 0   FIGURE 8.3a open-string country lick 1 FIGURE 8.3b open-string country lick 2 m open-string country lick 1m 2 FIGURE 8.4a 8.3a FIGURE 8.3b  scale, m m G FIGURE FIGURE 8.4bopen-string open-string Mixolydian C  open-string   country  scale,lick  major  m 2 8.4B 0   m m G m FIGURE 8.4A FIGURE      FIGURE 8.4a FIGURE 8.4b open-string scale, Mixolydian open-string scale, C major 3 1 2    m  m a  m a  a  m a  m   2 0  m  m  m  m2     44 22m 00 m4 2a 0 3m a4 2 a00 3 3m4 00a22 6 m33     88 377 551 826220m0 00 2 m010m 3 4 m22220   0 2 0 5 7 25 1 00   4 2 0 2     8 6 0 7 3 4 0    3 0 7 3 00 7 33 04 77 0 53 34 6      7 5 0 8 7 3 7 0  0 3 7 8 7 3   3 7 FIGURE 8.4a open-string scale, G Mixolydian FIGURE 8.4b open-string scale, C major September FIGURE 8.4amopen-string FIGURE 8.4b  open-string scale, G Mixolydian scale, C major m a m a a m a m m m m  m         string September string set middle FIGURE 9.1am low FIGURE 9.1b  0 3 8 7 5 0 a  m a  a0  3 m a  8 6 m0string  m0set m  m   6m   lowm string    9.1a     set middle 0 3 8 7 5 FIGURE FIGURE 9.1b 7 5 0set 0  8 6  7 0    0 3 0 7 3 007 0 55 3 6         3 0 7 3 0 7 3 7 S E P T E MB E4R5 7 4 5 77 54 57 70 884 7750 733     33 5 7 7 3 5 7 3 5 7 3 5 7    4 5 7 4 5 7 4 5 7 4 5 7  3 5 7 3 5 7 September   3 35 7 3 35 7 3 3 3 3 3 3 September 1 2 low 4 string 1 2 4set 1 2 middle 4 1 2 string 4 FIGURE 9.1a 9.1A FIGURE 9.1B set FIGURE FIGURE 9.1b 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 FIGURE 9.1a FIGURE 9.1b 1 2 4set 4  1 2string 4  set 1 2 low4 string  1 2 middle 3  highstring set  FIGURE 4 combined  4 5 7  FIGURE  9.2  9.1c  all three sets 5 7      FIGURE 9.2 set  all three combined FIGURE     4 5  7 sets 4 5 7  9.1c   high5 3string    53 75 8 7 37 558 757 73 85 5 77 338 55 77     4 5 7 4 5 7 45 75 875 47 85 57  5 7 8 5 4 5 7    53 735 875 7 38 5 73 835 577 8 3   5 37 8  3 4 5 73 3 4 54 7 3 5 7 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2    1 32 4 1 32 4 3 3    3 5 7 3 4 5 73 3 3  31 5 27 4 1 2 4   3 3 3 3 3 5 7 6 6 6 1 3 high 4 1 string 3 4 FIGURE 9.2 all three sets combined set FIGURE 9.1c 3 3 3 3 FIGURE 9.1c 9.1C 1 3 high 4  1 string 3 4 set FIGURE 9.2  FIGURE  6all threesets6 combined   6 5 7 8 5   5 7 8 FIGURE 9.2 5 7 8    55 77 88 5 7 8 55 77 88 5 7 8       4 5 7 55 77 88 5 7 8 5      4 5 7      3 5 7 33 55 77 4 5 7 4 5 7    3 5 76 3 3 3 3 6 6 FIGURE 8.2 in G 1a m m banjo a mroll m m m1 m m a m

fret hand and move from a rotation of the wrist and forearm, similar to the motion of turning a key in a lock, and with the fingers remaining rigid.

AUGUST FOR THIS MONTH’S routine,

we’re going to focus on the hybrid picking (pick-and fingers) technique, with an emphasis on openstring ideas commonly featured in country guitar lead playing. We’ll start by working through two banjo roll patterns, presented in FIGURES 8.1 and 8.2, the first of which is in the style of great English country player Albert Lee and is reminiscent of the pattern he used in the main theme to his famous showpiece “Country Boy.” Start off slowly at first and concentrate on getting an even velocity and volume among the notes picked with downstrokes by the plectrum and those plucked with the bare middle and ring fingers (indicated by the traditional Spanish abbreviations m and a, respectively). For an authentic country tone, use your guitar’s bridge pickup with your amp set up with a fairly bright, “hot” clean tone (slightly overdriven), and, ideally, with a short slap-back delay, or at least some spring reverb. FIGURES 8.3a and 8.3b are two country-style licks that incorporate the use of pull-offs to open strings and are based around an A dominant-seven tonality and played using pick strokes alternating with notes plucked by the middle finger (m). If we arrange the notes in ascending order as a scale formula, we get the A Mixolydian mode (spelled: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, f7), with the addition of the bluesy f3, which usually precedes the target major third degree. Within this formula, we can also see both the A major and A minor pentatonic scales. FIGURE 8.4a and 8.4b present the ascending G Mixolydian mode (G A B C D E F) and descending C major scale (C D E F G A B) arranged with ringing open strings and played using hybrid picking. At first, these ideas may seem confusing, as the open strings are often higher in pitch

74

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

1 33 4 1 33 4 1 3 4 1 3 4

3

3

than the lower fretted notes, so start out slowly and work through the examples beat by beat until you memorize the figures, then try playing them faster.

SEPTEMBER FOR SEPTEMBER, WE’LL focus on a

routine based around the “half-roll” legato technique. Fast and fluid, this style was highly popular among flashy lead players that entered the spotlight in the late Seventies and early Eighties, such as Eddie Van Halen, Randy Rhoads, George Lynch and Warren DeMartini, and is based around the principle that only the first note played on each string is picked, with all subsequent notes sounded using hammer-ons. FIGURES 9.1a–c present

6

6

6

a half-roll practice routine played in the key of G major and based around the box-1, threenotes-per-string shape. It consists of three exercises, covering the low, middle and high two-string pairs, or sets. The bottom two and middle two strings are fretted with fingers 1, 2 and 4 (index, middle, pinkie), and the top two strings are fretted with fingers 1, 3 and 4 (index, ring, pinkie). Set up the fret hand squarely and dropped with the thumb pressing against the middle of the back of the neck and with plenty of space from the underside of the neck to the cup of the hand. Position the first finger so that its tip is set to mute the next lower string while also resting flat over the higher treble strings, to eliminate any unwanted string noise. FIGURE 9.2 demonstrates how we can connect the individual string sets together to form a long, fluid six-string run. Play the


final note staccato to allow time to prepare for the repeat, and practice continuously for five minutes, pausing only to shake out any tension as it may arise. Try practicing three-notes-per-string runs with other scale and mode positions and patterns you know, using this same approach and technique. FIGURES 9.3a–c present a range of options for transforming our legato exercises into musical phrases with the addition of an “exit,” or finishing note, which is typically a bent or unbent note adorned with some decorative finger vibrato. In each case, the finishing note resolves the run on a chord tone relative to the tonality of A Dorian. We are therefore perceiving the starting note in each case, G, as the f7, relative to an A root. Once you’ve played the final note, visualize the box-1 A minor pentatonic scale and continue improvising using ideas drawn from your existing rock lead vocabulary. FIGURE 9.4 offers a two-string legato exercise in A Dorian, starting from the fifth degree, E. After ascending the fretboard horizontally through each consecutive position, the run finishes an octave higher with a bend from the f7 (G) to the root note (A), with vibrato added.

OCTOBER FOR THIS MONTH, we’ll work

through a routine based around the two-handed tapping technique. FIGURE 10.1a is an exercise in the style of Eddie Van Halen, who dazzled the world with his brilliant application of tapping in his showpiece “Eruption” on Van Halen’s 1978 self-titled debut album. Although Eddie and many of the early modern rock players utilized their index finger for tapping, I would advise holding the pick conventionally—between the thumb and index finger—and using your middle finger to tap instead. This way, you’ll be able to integrate the technique seamlessly with others that require the use of the pick, such as alternate picking or sweep picking. FIGURE 10.1b presents another single-string pattern, this one in the style of the great Randy Rhoads,



FIGURE 9.3a lick 1 FIGURE 9.3a FIGURE 9.3A FIGURE 9.3a lick lick 1 1



P.M. P.M. P.M.

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017







 5

    888  5   8 1 3338  11   1  3 7   77   3337  5 5 5

1 1 1

 4 5 7 5 5 4 5 7 4 5 7 4 4 5 7 5 7  3 5 7 5 7 3 4 5 7 4 5 7 4 5 7 4 5 7  33 55 77     333 555 777 33 55 77  3 3 3 3 3 3 5 37  33 33 33 33 33 33 4 335 7 4 5 7 4 5 7 FIGURE 93.b lick 25 7 5 7 3 3 FIGURE3 9.3B FIGURE 93.b 5 7 lick FIGURE lick 22     3  93.b 3 3 3  3 3 3 5  4 5 7 4 5 7 5 5 4 5 7 4 FIGURE lick 2 4 5 7 4 5 5 7 7 4 4 5 5 7 7 3 93.b 3 5 7 4 3 5 7 4 5 7 5 7 4 5 7 4 5 7  33 55 77     33 555 777 33 55 77  3 3 3 3 3 3 3 5 1  33 33 33 33 33 4 335 7 4 335 7 11 4 5 7 4 5 7 lick 3 53 7 3 5 7 FIGURE FIGURE3 9.3c 3 9.3C 5 7 lick FIGURE 9.3c lick 3  FIGURE   3   9.3c  3  3  3  3  3 3 1  3   4 5 7 4 5 7  5  lick 3 4 5 7 4 5 7 4 5 FIGURE 4 5 5 7 7 4 5 7 4 4 5 5 7 7  5 3 9.3c 3 5 7 4 4 4 5 5 7 7 3 5 7 4 4 5 5 7 7 4 5 5 7 7  5 7  3 5 7   3 5 7 3 5 7       33 55 77 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 15   33 3 335 7 4 335 7 3 335 7 4 335 7 4 335 7 4 335 7 4111 335222 4744  11  3 9.4 5 7 moving through the scale horizontally FIGURE FIGURE 9.4 through the scale horizontally FIGURE moving FIGURE 9.4 9.4 3  3 3  through 3  moving  3 81 1032 412 1  3 the3 scale horizontally 5 7 8  7 8 10  10 12 14 7  555 777 888 55 77 88 777 888 10 7 8 8 10 10 8 10 12 8 8 10 10 12 12 10 12 13 10 10 12 12 14 14 10 8 10 12 10 12 13 10 8 10 12 10 12 13 FIGURE 9.4 moving through the scale horizontally            5 7 8 7 8 10 8 10 12 10 12 14  51 33373 84 1 3333 4 71 33382 104 1 3332 4 81 103332 124 1 3332 4 101 123 134 1 2 4 1 1 3 3 44 11 33 44 11 22 44 11 22 44 11 22 44 11 22 44 11 33 44 11 2 2 4 4         12 14 15  14 15 17  15 17 19 17  12 13 153 12 17 14 20 15 12 14 14 15 15 13 143 15 15 17 17 15 17 15 17 17319 19 17 19 20 17 3 15 3 19 3 17 12 15 17 15 17 19 17 19 20 20 12 13 131 15 153 4 1 13 13 15 17 15 17 19 17 19 20 20 3 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 3 4 1 2 4         3 15 12 14 3 15 13 15 3 17 14 15 3 17 15 17 3 19 15 17 3 19 17 19 3 20 17 12 13 20 1 3 3 32 4 1 333 4 1 332 4 1 332 4 1 332 4 1 332 4 1 33 4 1  1 2 4 1 3 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 3 33 1 2 4 1 3 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 3 44 11 FIGURE 9.3a lick 1

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October October

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extending legato phrases with pick-hand taps

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FIGURE 10.2b 10.2B developing the the “hammer-on “hammer-on from from nowhere” nowhere” FIGURE 10.2b developing FIGURE developing the “hammer-on from nowhere” FIGURE 10.2b

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FIGURE 10.2c Steve Steve Vai-style Vai-style lick lick FIGURE 10.2c 10.2C FIGURE FIGURE 10.2c Steve Vai-style lick

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a high-gain tone. When picking, move from the wrist and with the arm relaxed, and swing the pick evenly over the string, aiming for the tip. Accent each beat on the downstroke and reinforce the rhythmic feel by tapping your foot. FIGURE 11.1 presents a lick in the style of Yngwie Malmsteen, which features one of the virtuoso guitarist’s trademark single-string runs in bar 1. Isolate the pattern by repeating the first beat until memorized, then continue down the scale, position by position. For this particular pattern, keep the index finger planted. In bar 2, there’s a run that descends across the strings diagonally in f5s, and with

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FIGURE 10.3a Greg Greg Howe-style Howe-style tapped tapped scales scales FIGURE 10.3a 10.3A FIGURE FIGURE 10.3a Greg Howe-style tapped scales

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

444

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

through a routine in A minor that focuses on the alternate picking technique, and with an emphasis on six-note patterns. As you would for all modern rock lead-playing techniques, set your amp up with

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FOR NOVEMBER, WE’LL work

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NOVEMBER

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extending legato legato phrases phrases with with pick-hand pick-hand taps taps FIGURE 10.2a FIGURE extending FIGURE 10.2a 10.2A extending legato phrases with pick-hand taps FIGURE 10.2a



another highly innovative lead player who came to prominence in the early Eighties. Practice repeating the example slowly at first before gradually increasing the tempo, and don’t forget to tap your foot on each beat. Our next three examples demonstrate how we can use pick-hand tapping to extend our three-noteper-string legato patterns and are common in the lead playing styles of guitarists such as Steve Vai and Reb Beach (Winger/Whitesnake). Based around the A Dorian mode, FIGURE 10.2a ascends our familiar two-string legato pattern with the first note of each string being picked, followed by a tap at the 10th fret. This is followed by a succession of pull-offs, before hammering-on back up the scale using fret-hand legato articulation. FIGURE 10.2b incorporates the use of hammer-ons “from-nowhere” (fret-hand taps) to descend to the B string. At first, hammer firmly and from a good height above the string with the pinkie to develop strength and accuracy. FIGURE 10.2c develops this idea by extending it across three strings in bar 1, before repeating the idea to form a full six-string run starting from the D string in bar 2. FIGURE 10.3a presents a scalar run in position-5 of A Dorian (relative to the three-notes-per-string, seven-position system), and FIGURE 10.3b demonstrates an Am7 arpeggio (A C E G) in position 4 (based around the “Am shape” relative to the CAGED system). Both examples are performed using a combination of hammer-ons from nowhere and pick-hand taps. An approach favored by players that rose to prominence in the late Eighties, such as Greg Howe and Richie Kotzen, this technique, once developed, offers you a way to play fast, fluid, scale- and arpeggio-based lines with a saxophone- or synthesizer-like tone.

15 15 15

 

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the Gs note signaling a change in tonality from A natural minor (A B C D E F G) to A harmonic minor (A B C D E F Gs). Be sure to apply Yngwie’s characteristic wide, bold finger vibrato by pulling the resolving root note on the D-string downwards (in toward your palm). FIGURE 11.2 is a lick in the style of Vinnie Moore, featuring his signature “backward-ascending” single-string pattern in beats three and four of bar 1. In bar 2, there are two descending four-string scale runs, which utilize both “outside-the-strings” and “inside-thestrings” alternate picking techniques, the latter being considerably more challenging to


perform. Start off slowly and practice each two-beat phrase separately before assembling the whole idea. Our next lick, FIGURE 11.3, is in the style of Paul Gilbert. Starting from the A root note on the B string in A natural minor position 3 (relative to the 7-position system), the run features one of the guitarist’s favorite outside-the-strings patterns in beats one and two, before a fourth-finger shift leading into beat three turns the idea around, to descend using insidethe-strings picking. FIGURE 11.4 demonstrates our final alternate picking challenge, this one in the style of Dream Theater’s John Petrucci. This example, inspired by a passage in the Dream Theater song “Metropolis,” featured on the band’s classic 1992 album Images and Words, is a great example of how advanced players, when building runs, will often target the interlocking two-string symmetrical fingering pairs found within the three-notes-per-string patterns. Again, work through two beats at a time until memorized before finding your base tempo and repeating continuously for five minutes.

DECEMBER IN OUR FINAL practice routine,

for the month of December, we’ll bolster our neo-classical metal lead-playing chops with a selection of exercises designed to help develop the sweep picking, or sweeping, technique. This exciting technique gained popularity as a result of Yngwie Malmsteen’s groundbreaking debut album Rising Force, which was released in 1984. From the impact of Yngwie’s fast, melodic style, which demonstrated a new level in technical and artistic virtuosity, neo-classical rock was born and steadily developed throughout the rest of the decade with a succession of virtuosos, including Vinnie Moore, Tony MacAlpine, Paul Gilbert, Jason Becker and Marty Friedman, all renowned for their use of the sweeping technique. FIGURES 12.1 and 12.2 present two Yngwie-style patterns. The first is based around a descending cascade of A minor triad (A C E)

NOVEMBER November November

November FIGURE 11.1 FIGURE 11.1 November YngwieMalmsteen-style Malmsteen-stylerun run FIGURE 11.1 Yngwie Yngwie FIGURE 11.1 Malmsteen-style run run FIGURE 11.1 Yngwie Malmsteen-style

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

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22 22

FIGURE FIGURE 11.2 11.2 FIGURE 11.2 Vinnie VinnieMoore-style Moore-stylerun run FIGURE run FIGURE 11.2 11.2 Vinnie Vinnie Moore-style Moore-style run

                        5 7 8 10  88 77 1010 88 77 1212 1010 88 1212 1010 88  44 55 77 555 666 888 555 666 888 555 777 888 10 10 10 8 8 7 7 10 10 8 8 7 7 12 12 10 10 8 8 12 12 10 10 8 8  44 55 77 5 6 8 5 6 8     6 6 6 6 11 22 446 11 22 44 11 22 446 11 33 44 44 22 116 44 22 11 44 22 116 44 22 11  66 66 66 6 44 22 116 44 2 2 1 1  11 22 44 11 22 44 11 22  44 11 33  4444 22  11 44 22 11   13 131212 10101313 12121010                      13 12 12 10 10 12 10 13 1210 10 99 10 99 77 13  13 12 12 10 10 12 10 9 12 1210 10 99 10 9 7 10 10 99 77 10 8 7  12 10 9 12 10 9 10 9 7 10 9 7 10 8 7  10 8 7 5 12 10 9 10 9 7 10 8 7 10 8 7  5 10 8 7 10 8 7 5  5 66 66 66 66 10 8 7  44 33 11 44 33 11 44 22 11 44 22 11 44 33 11 44 33 11 44 22 11 44 22 11 11 66 66 66 66   4 11 4 3 3 1 1 4 4 33 11 44 22 11 44 22 11 44 33 11 44 33 11 44 22 11 44 22 11 FIGURE PaulGilbert-style Gilbert-stylerun run FIGURE 11.3 11.3 Paul FIGURE 11.3 FIGURE11.3  Paul  Gilbert-style    run                 Paul Gilbert-style run FIGURE 11.3 10          1212 1313 1515 1313 1212 1515 1313 1212 1515 1313 1212    10  1212 1313 10 1313 1212 1010 1212 1313 1010  1010 13 15 13 12 14 10 13 12 10 12 13 10 10 12 14 12 12 10 10 10 12 13  10 12 13 13 12 10 12 13 12 13 15 13 12 15 15 13 13 12 12 15 15 13 13 12 12 14 12 10 14 12 10     6 6 6 6 11 33 44 6 11 44 33 11 33 44 6 11 33 44 44 22 11 6 44 22 11 44 22 11 6 44 22 11 66 66 66 6  11 33 44  11 44 33 11 33 44 11 33 44 44 22 11 44 22 11 44 22 11 6 44 22 11   10           14 14 12 12 10 14 14 14 14

14 14

12 12

10 10

44 44

22 22

6 11 6 44 6 11 6 44

FIGURE FIGURE 11.4 11.4 FIGURE 11.4 FIGURE FIGURE 11.4 11.4

12 12 12 12

10 10 10 10

14 14 14 14

12 12 12 12

22 22

11 11

44 44

22 22

John JohnPetrucci-style Petrucci-stylerun run

10 10 10 10

14 14 14 14

6 11 6 44 6 11 6 44

12 12 12 12

10 10 10 10

22 22

11 11

 12 12 12 12 22 22

  John  Petrucci-style     run                 John Petrucci-style run                          12 14  12 14 14 15 15 14 15 15 17 17 14 14 15 15 13 15 17 14 14 15 15 17 17 12 12 14 14 15 15 12 14 15 14 14 15 15 17 17 14 15 17   1212 1313 1515 1212 12 14 15 14 15 17 13 15 17 12 14 12 14 14 15 15 13 15 17 14 14 15 15 17 17 12 12 14 14 15 15 14 15 15 17 17   12 12 13 13 15 1566 13 15 1766 66 66 11 1 1

22 2 2

44 6 44 6

11 11

33 33

44 44

11 11

22 22

44 6 44 6

11 11

22 22

44 44

11 11

33 33

44 6 44 6

11 11

33 33

            12

14

15

1

3

4

December 80

 

20 20 17 17 19 19 20 20 19 19 17 17 19 19 15 15 17 17 19 19 17 17 15 15 17 17 13 13 15 15 17 17 15 15 13 13 15 15 12 12 13 13 15 15 13 13 12 12 20 20 17 17 19 19 20 20 19 19 17 17 19 19 15 15 17 17 19 19 17 17 15 15 17 17 13 13 15 15 17 17 15 15 13 13 15 15 12 12 13 13 15 15 13 13 12 12

12

14

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2

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6

14

15

17

1

2

4



12

13

12 14

8

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17

1

3

4

6

FIGURE 12.1 Yngwie Malmsteen-style run 17

14

8

9

5

5

44 44

11 11

1/2

16

 5

5

33 33

44 6 44 6

11 11

22 2 2



0

1

44 4 4

2


LIVE IN CONCERT 2017! ic DVD Music Gone IDPuAYbl, JAN. 20! AVAILABLE FR

FEATURES

SEVEN

NEVER-BEFORE-SEEN PERFORMANCES!

16-17 Feb – Clearwater, FL – Capitol Theatre 18 Feb – Fort Lauderdale, FL – Parker Playhouse 19 Feb – Orlando, FL – The Plaza Live 21-22 Feb – Newberry, SC – Newberry Opera House 23 Feb – Durham, NC – Carolina Theatre of Durham 24 Feb – Charlotte, NC – McGlohand Theatre 25 Feb – Lancaster, PA – Lancaster Roots & Blues Festival 26 Feb – Pittsburgh, PA – Byham Theatre 28 Feb – Burlington, VT – Flynn Theatre 1 Mar – Troy, NY – Troy Savings Bank Music Hall 2 Mar – Englewood, NJ – Bergen Perfomring Arts Center 3 Mar – Newton, NJ – Newton Theatre 4 Mar – Tarrytown, NY – Tarrytown Music Hall 5 Mar – Northampton, MA – Academy of Music 7-8 Mar – Alexandria, VA - The Birchmere 9 Mar – Richmond, VA – Carpenter Theatre 10 Mar – Rocky Mount, VA – Harvester Performance Center 11 Mar – Greenville, TN – Niswonger Performing Arts Center 12 Mar – The Cave at Cumberland Caverns – McMinnville, TN

Music Gone Public is a collection of “choice performances" from Tommy’s previous PBS airings plus seven never before seen performances and collaborations. It features Tommy himself telling the stories behind the songs. The program combines performances for PBS over the last decade from previous features such as Center Stage, Tommy Emmanuel & Friends - Live from The Balboa Theatre, and Live and Solo from Pensacola, Florida.

TOMMYEMMANUEL.COM

CGPSOUNDS.COM


82

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

  14 14  14

  15 15  15

  12 12 12  12

  14 14 14  14

  16 16 16  16

  14 14  14

  15 15  15

  17 17  17

  14 14 14  14

  16 16 16  16

D E C E M B E R16

12 14 15 6 14 15 17 6 12 14 16 14 1 3 4 6 1 2 4 1 2 4 6 1 12 14 15 14 15 17 1 3 4 6 1 2 4 1 2 4 6 1 December 1 3 46 1 2 4 1 2 46 1 December 1 3 4Yngwie 1 Malmsteen-style 2 4 1 2 4 1 FIGURE 12.1 run FIGURE 12.1 6 6 December

FIGURE 1 12.1 4 1 Malmsteen-style 2 4 1 run  3 Yngwie December  2 Yngwie Malmsteen-style run FIGURE 17 12.1   12 12 8 run   December Yngwie Malmsteen-style FIGURE 12.1  12 13  8 10 17 12

3

4

  17 12 13  10 12 8    17 12 13 1414 12 8 10 9 9 8 5   13 10 5   44 11 22  1433 44 11 22 911 44 11 11  44 41 11 2 2 7 3 43 4 4 1101 72 2  1 1 1344 101 1 1 1 1 7 2 99 101 134 10 112 12  131 44 411  331 44 2 77 443  66 4 77 10 10 7  13 10  10 3 6 9 41 74 10 7 1310 12 13 3 4 6 7 9  10 12 13 4 1 7 4 10 7 4 7 10 13 10 13 14 13 Malmsteen-style 10 run 9 FIGURE 17 12.1 12Yngwie 8 14 12 9

    

1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 16

16 1/2 16 16 16

17

3 3 3

4 4 4

8 1 5 3  4 88 55  55 5 8 5 5

4

   

  17 17 17  17

5 5 5

    5

5 55 5

51

0

5

0 0 0 0

4 4 4

1  11 1

2

1

1 1 1

2 2 2 22

2  4 1 2   1 4 14  1 2  14  14   14  3 6 9 12 4 1 2 43 4 1 2 73 4 1 2 10 3 4 1 2 13 3 3 14  4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 3 4 12.2 1 2 Yngwie 3 4 Malmsteen-style 1 2 3 4 1run2 3 4 1 2 3 3 FIGURE FIGURE 4 12.2 1 3 1 2 3 FIGURE 12.2 2 2 3 3 4 4 1 1 2 23 3 3 3    12 2 28Yngwie 8 3 54 4 1 1run  4 4 Malmsteen-style Yngwie Malmsteen-style run FIGURE4 12.2  1 3  1 82   10 7  run 5 77 44 6  6 44 10 FIGURE 12.2 10 8  8 10 8 5 5  5 5  Yngwie  7 9  9 77   Malmsteen-style 5 5 5 7 4 109 Malmsteen-style 10 8  8 5  5 run 6  7 6 4 10 7  9 10 9 7  12.2 FIGURE  12  12  12 8Yngwie     8 1010 9910108 8  5 5 5 55 5 5 5 7  4 6 6 77 6 6 4 10 7 9 9 10  9 9 7   10      12 38 109 103 8 8 35 5 5 35 5 7 43 6 7 63 4 10 73 910 93 7      44 3311 22 911 3322 11 44 3311 11 511 3311 11 44 1133 22 733 2233 11 44 1133 22 1033 2233 11   12.3 4 3 1position-3 2 1 3 2 (C-shape) 1 4 3 1 sweep 1 1 3arpeggio 1 1 4 31 2 3 32 1 4 31 2 3 32 1 etude FIGURE 4 1 position-3 2 1 2 (C-shape) 1 4 1 1sweep 1 arpeggio 1 1 4 etude 1 2 3 2 1 4 1 2 3 2 1 FIGURE 12.3 3 3G 3 3 3 3 3 G 3 Am F E FIGURE 12.3 position-3 (C-shape) sweep arpeggio etude FIGURE 12.3 4 1 2 1 2 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 2 3 2 1 4 1 G2 3 2 1 Am G F E            position-3 (C-shape) etude FIGURE 12.3 Am F arpeggio  6 55 88G10 (C-shape) 77 8 sweep   77 8 8 12 10 5 8 E 7 4 10 G G 10 8 12 6 5 8 sweep FIGURE Am position-3 G10 F  arpeggio E etude   5 6 5 810     7 4 5  7 8 7   12.3 9 10 81210 5 6 5 8 7 4 5 4 8 7     7 10 9 10 9 7 6 7 9 Am G F E G   7 5 4 5 65 8 7 4 5 6 7 8 7 65 8 10 7 8 7 9 8 12 10 7 8 9 10     12 12 8 10   10          9 56  10 8 7 10 8 7 56 5 4 7  8 7 10   8     12101039 10 38 12 10 37 87 9 39 10  87 735 635 8 7 43 54 6 63 7 87 735 6 53 8 10 37 87 9 39 10  8 4 33 51 2 31 4 4 31 2 71 310 3 4 84 3 5 1 23 1 4 4 31 2 4 1 37 4  3 4   121244 103322 911 22 3311 44 44 3311 22 711 3310 93 4  4 7 4  33 1 23 1 4 4 31 2 1 6 33 74  84 7 33 1 2 31 4 4 31 2 1 393 10  10 8  43 2 1 23 1 4 43 1 2 31 3  4 43 3 1 32 1 4 43 1 2 13 3 4  43 3 1 23 1 4 43 1 2 31 3 4 FIGURE 12.4 4 2 1Jason 2 1 4Becker-style 4 1 2 1 3 run 4 4 3 1 2 1 4 4 1 2 1 3 44 3 1 2 1 4 4 1 2 1 3 4 3 3run 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 FIGUREAm 12.4 3 Jason3 Becker-style 4 2 Jason 1 2  1Becker-style 4 4 1 2 1 3run 4 4 3 1 2 1 4 4 1 2 1 3 4  4 3 12 1 4 4 1 2 1 3 4  FIGURE 12.4    Am FIGURE 12.4 8 5   5 run  8 FIGURE 12.4 Jason5Becker-style  8 17 12 13  8 12 8  12  55 10 8 12 8 10 10 8 17  8Becker-style 5 5  5 5  run 12 8 10    AmAm FIGURE 12.4 5Jason 5  55 5   10 99 10  10 99 10 8 12 8 1099 10 8 17 12 12 13 14 14 Am 7 5 5 5 8 5 5 5 5 5  12 8 108 12 8  10 108 1712 13 14 14 5 8 5 5 12 8 10 10 12     3 7 7 12 15  7 10    5 5 9 9 9  3 7 75 5 5 8 55 5 5 5 12 108 9 10 12 7 12 109 10 8 12 108 9 10 8 17 1213 1414 14 15   3 7 12 7 12 15 5 5 5 10 10 10 10 13 103 143 3 310 3 3 3 3  37 3 3 3  3 3117 33744 744 511 3311 11 44 3311 11 511 3311 11 44 3311 22 911 1033221212447 12711 123344 1022 911 3322 11 44 3311 22 911 2233 11 44 3311 22 1433 143333151544  13 4 4 13 1 1 43 1 1 13 1 1FIGURE 43 1 12.5 2 13 2 Tony 4 13 4 MacAlpine-style 2 13 2 1 43 1 run 2 13 2 1 43 1 2 33 3 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 FIGURE 4 1 2 12.5 1 2 4 Tony 1 4 2MacAlpine-style 1 2 1 4 1 2 run 1 2 1 4 1 2 3 3 4 Am 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3T 3 3 3  1 4 4 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1FIGURE  1FIGURE 4 1 12.5 2 1Am 2 Tony 4  1 4 MacAlpine-style 2 1 2 1 4 1T run 2 1 2 1 4 1 2 3 3 4  8 10 12 17 12.5 Am TonyMacAlpine-style run12 10 8   10 8 10 12 17 T 12 10 8 10   9MacAlpine-style   Tony FIGURE FIGURE 12.5 9 10 8 10 12T 17run  Am     12.5  12 10 8 10 9  10 10   9 108 10 12 17T12 10 8 10    Am 12 7 12 10 12   910  10 9 10 12     1 2 7 12    7 1210109 10 8 10 12 17 12 10 8 109 1010 12   12   7 1112 44 22 911 22 11 22 44 44 22 11 22 911 2212 44 1211    71 124 102 1 2 1 2 4 4 2 1 2 1 102 124  112  1 1 4 2 1 2 1 2 4 4 2 1 2 1 2 4

    1

1

1 1

2

              

inversions, which then ascend in bar 2 through a succession of F diminished-seven arpeggio (F Gs B D) inversions. Based on a 16th-note rhythm, this example outlines a V-I (“five to one”) perfect cadence in the key of A minor, with the Fdim7 arpeggios superimposed over an E root note, producing a dominant E7f9 (E Gs B D F) sound. FIGURE 12.2 is again based on the interplay between Amin and Fdim7 arpeggios, however this time played in six-note patterns. When sweeping, push or pull the pick through the strings in a single motion, similar to the action of dragging a stick through park railings. To keep the technique clean, release each note from the string with the fret hand as the next one is played. On the first-inversion minor form, which incorporates the use of a barre, carefully roll the first finger across the strings along with the pick to achieve note separation and avoid any ringing, which would make it sound like you’re simply strumming a chord. FIGURE 12.3 presents an exercise based around the position-3 triad forms (the “C shape,” relative to the CAGED system). Be aware that every note is picked, in particular the notes on the high E string, which move from one arpeggio to the next via a fourth-finger shift. Accent this shift and tap your foot on the beat (every three notes). As you ascend through the strings in one single motion, rest the “heel,” or wrist/ thumb-pad, area of your picking hand on the strings in front of the bridge to mute the unplayed strings and prevent them from ringing and producing unwanted string noise. FIGURE 12.4 is a lick in the style of Jason Becker and is based around a succession of triad inversions that we can visualize around the position-1 (Em shape), position-3 (Cm shape) and position-4 (Am shape) A minor chord shapes (again, derived from the CAGED system). Viewing them as inversions, the position-1 form starts on the f3 (first inversion), the position 2 form begins from the 5 (second inversion) and the position-4 form starts from the root (root position). On the threestring pattern on beats three and four of bar 1, and beats one and two of bar 3, concentrate on pushing

  12 12  12

1

through the downstroke sweep in one single motion and apply some light palm-muting. Our final example, FIGURE 12.5, is in the style of the very talented Tony MacAlpine. The idea is based around the position-3 triad (second inversion, starting from the fifth degree), and after ascending with a sweep stroke, incorporates a three-notes-per-string

4

2

1

2

1

2

4

4

2

1

2 1

2

4

scale roll, using hammer-ons and a pick-hand tap. After pulling off back to the first finger on the high E string, the remaining descending notes are all performed using hammer-ons from nowhere. This technique is also used by players like Greg Howe and Richie Kotzen and provides a fast and fluid tone similar to that of a keyboard.


FE B RUARY 2017

the gear in review

85

MARSHALL C o de 5 0 a nd C o de 2 5 c o m b o s

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EARTHQUAKER DEVICES Ava l a nc h e Ru n p e da l

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ERNIE BALL Ex p re s s i o n O ve rdr i ve a nd A m b i e nt D e l ay p e da l s

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PRA AUDIO SYSTEMS W i C fo r G u i t a r wi re l e s s s ys te m

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BREEDLOVE USA Co n ce r t M o o n L ig h t aco u s t i c

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CRAZY TUBE CIRCUITS T i m e p e da l

Distortion Decoder

GUITAR WORLD

GOLD AWARD P

ER

FORMA

NC

MARSHALL CODE50 AND CODE25 E

By Chris Gill

MANY COMPANIES BRAG about being the first

to introduce a new type of product, but Marshall is the kind of company that prefers to do things better. For example, Marshall may not have been the first British amp company (Vox, Watkins, Selmer and several others came before them), nor were they the first company to introduce a piggyback amp head/speaker cabinet configuration (Standel and Fender beat them there), yet Marshall is the first company that most guitarists think of when it comes to British amps and high-power stack amps. While digital modeling amps have been on the market for about two decades now, Marshall took their

sweet time developing their first digital modeling amps, called the Code Series. This was a wise move, as not only has the technology improved dramatically over recent years, but Marshall also developed a product with a set of features and ease of use that are sure to please both tech heads and traditionalists alike. We took a look at Marshall’s first two Code Series products, the Code50 and Code25 combos. FEATURES With the exception of the speaker size,

wattage and slightly different front panel control configurations, the Marshall Code50 and Code25 are otherwise identical. The Code50 is a 50-watt combo with

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For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2017

CHEAT SHEET LIST PRICES $285 (Code25), $375 (Code50) MANUFACTURER Marshall Amplification, marshallamps.com

Code25

a single custom 12-inch speaker, while the Code25 is a 25-watt combo with a single custom 10-inch speaker. The Code50 also has separate Preset and Edit control knobs, while both of these functions are accessed via the Preset knob on the Code25. Both models provide four power amp models, 14 preamp models, eight speaker models and 24 effects (up to five effects can be used simultaneously), and store 100 presets. Standard front panel controls include Volume, Gain, Master, Bass, Middle and Treble EQ. PreFX (stomp box), Amp (preamp), Modulation, Delay, Reverb, Power Amp and Cab buttons make it easy to quickly select models and edit presets to create or modify sounds. The front panel also provides a mini USB jack (for playing music or downloading updates), a dedicated MP3 player mini jack input, a mini headphone output and a single 1/4-inch instrument input. The preamp and power amp models are comprised mostly of Marshall’s most popular tones, including JTM45, Bluesbreaker, Plexi, JCM800, Silver Jubilee, DSL and JVM models. American clean and overdrive models and an acoustic simulator provide just the right amount of tonal contrast and variety. The cabinet models are based on various types and configurations of Celestion 12-inch speakers. The effects provide a solid “meat and potatoes” selection of essential processing such as overdrive, compression, pitch shifting, chorus, phaser, flanger, tremolo, auto wah, and various reverbs and delays. A tuner, tap tempo function and Bluetooth connectivity (for the free Marshall Gateway app) are easily accessible by holding down two-button combinations.

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PERFORMANCE While both the Code50 and

Code25 are very easy to use and program via the front panel controls alone, I highly recommend using the Marshall Gateway for even greater ease of use (such as being able to edit the power amp’s presence and resonance controls simultaneously instead of toggling between the two settings). The app also provides a playback section where you can access music on your iOS or Android device and loop sections you want to learn or practice over. The Gateway app will also let you load sounds into any Marshall Code amp (like one owned by a friend or at a studio) without overwriting that amp’s internal presets, so you can take your sounds anywhere you go. Whereas most digital modeling amps try to be everything to everybody, Marshall’s Code amps mainly focus on their greatest strength— genuine Marshall tones. Right off the bat you get a great collection of classic and modern tones that will satisfy Marshall connoisseurs. The distortion delivers that desirable Marshall crunch, and the EQ nails the characteristic Marshall treble sparkle, midrange growl and bass thump. The American clean and overdrive tones provide enough variety to satisfy most players’ needs, and the effects cover all the essentials extremely well. The Code50 is the best choice for gigging (until Marshall introduces the head version), while the Code25 is better for studio recording and jamming at home. Both are great choices if you love Marshall tones but also desire the convenience, versatility and power of a modern digital modeling amp.

The 14 preamp models include Marshall’s greatest classics, modern favorites, American clean and overdrive and acoustic simulation. Effects consist of all the essentials like compression, overdrive, modulation, reverb and delay, and up to five effects can be used at once. The free Marshall Gateway app allows users to control all functions with an iOS or Android device via Bluetooth. With its 12-inch speaker and 50-watt output, the Code50 is ideal for gigging, while the Code25, with its 10-inch speaker and 25-watt output is ideal for the studio.

THE BOTTOM LINE Providing a history of Marshall’s greatest amps, a full selection of essential effects, awesome speaker cab models and powerful app-based operation, Marshall’s new Code Series amps offer an incredible bargain looking for a Marshall for the modern age.


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For exhibition and sponsorship opportunities contact Graham Kirk: graham.kirk@aes.org


SOUNDCHECK

For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2017

GUITAR WORLD

PLATINUM AWARD EX

CELLEN

CE

Peak Performer EARTHQUAKER DEVICES AVALANCHE RUN By Chris Gill

FEW EFFECTS INSPIRE creativity as much as reverb and delay ( just ask the Edge, who pretty much built U2’s catalog on those effects). But EarthQuaker Devices Avalanche Run pedal is so ingeniously laid out that it’s more of an instrument unto itself than a usual reverb/delay pedal. While it offers the stellar sound quality and processing power of a pro DSP unit, its operation—particularly in live performances—is stomp box simple. FEATURES The Avalanche Run provides delay and reverb effects in true stereo thanks to its stereo input and output jacks. The delay time ranges from zero milliseconds to two seconds, and the reverb is essentially a lush, hall-style effect. When both are engaged at once, the delay effect comes before reverb in the signal path. Controls for the delay are located on the top row and consist of time (zero to 2,000 ms), repeats (zero to infinite), tone and mix. Reverb controls are on the bottom row and consist of decay and mix. Also on the bottom row are controls for the expression pedal jack assignment knob and the delay ratio switch, which selects delay subdivisions when using the tap tempo footswitch. A mini toggle switch selects normal (delay and reverb), reverse (reverb and reverse delay) and swell (volume swell) modes. PERFORMANCE To get the most out of the Avalanche Run

pedal, I highly recommend connecting an expression pedal to the expression pedal jack. This allows users to manually control one of the following six functions with an expression pedal: reverb decay, reverb mix, delay time, delay repeats, delay mix, or toggling between forward and reverse delay. While you can use the Avalanche Run as a straightforward delay/reverb pedal, several “hidden” functions give players added creative control. For example, when holding down the tap tempo footswitch in normal or swell mode, the delay will go into self-oscillation for trippy dub effects, or in reverse mode it will flip the delay effect to normal (forward) as long as the tap tempo switch is held down. The pedal can also be set up so the delay effect trails off

CHEAT SHEET

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STREET PRICE $295 MANUFACTURER EarthQuaker Devices, earthquakerdevices. com

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRU R A RY 2017

with natural decay in five different trail length settings. The sound quality is as clean, noise-free and pristine as a professional high-end digital processor, but the overall tone is fat, rich, lush and musical. The Avalanche Run will give your guitar tone a professional-quality sheen, but more importantly it seems to pull creative inspiration out of the ether.

An expression pedal jack allows players to manually control any of six different reverb or delay settings.

Holding down the tap tempo engages delay selfoscillation (normal or swell mode) or flips the reverse mode to normal.

THE BOTTOM LINE Much more than the sum of its built-in delay and reverb effects, the EarthQuaker Avalanche Run is a creatively inspiring instrument that generates mind-boggling effects in live performance.


SOUNDCHECK

GUITAR WORLD

PLATINUM AWARD EX

CELLENCE

Kill Switch

ERNIE BALL EXPRESSION OVERDRIVE AND AMBIENT DELAY By Ch ris G ill

THE EXPRESSION PEDAL is a woefully underused tool in the effects market. Sure, we’ve had our wah pedals for a good long run, and the Whammy pedal proved that pitch shifting and an expression pedal made a really cool pair, but beyond that the expression pedal is mostly offered only as a costly alternative option for more adventurous sonic explorers on a handful of products in the stomp box realm. With the introduction of their new Expression Overdrive and Ambient Delay effect pedals, Ernie Ball is boldly proclaiming, “Why not give expression a chance?” by making the expression pedal an integrated feature of their stomp box designs.

FEATURES The Ernie Ball Expression Overdrive and Ambient Delay would both be impressive overdrive and reverb/delay effects even if they were housed in the usual square box with a footswitch format, but the addition of a built-in expres-

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sion pedal control elevates these pedals to a new level. Both are housed in solidly crafted metal enclosures with gold (Expression Overdrive) and rose gold (Ambient Delay) plating. Both pedals are powered by a nine-volt adapter (not included), or you can use your own standard center-negative barrel plug power source. The pedals have a textured nonslip pad on the top of the foot treadle, and the control knobs and mono 1/4-inch input and output jacks are all located on the pedal’s front-facing surface. The Expression Overdrive’s controls consist of Drive, Tone (a treble roll-off function) and Boost (providing up to 6dB of boost). The Ambient Delay’s controls consist of Reverb (the level of a plate reverb effect), Feedback (number of repeats from one to many) and Time (from 50ms to one second). The Ambient Delay also features a 1/4-inch jack for connecting an optional on/off footswitch for controlling

a tap tempo function. On the delay, the expression pedal controls the mix between the wet and dry settings, functioning sort of as an on/off switch but with the ability to also mix in how much of the effect that is desired. PERFORMANCE Even without the

expression pedal feature, the Expression Overdrive and Ambient Delay would be worth the price of admission as both are solid, useful tools with the kind of overdrive and delay/reverb effects that players rely upon as building blocks for their tones rather than occasional exotic touches of “spice.” The Expression Overdrive also stands out from most other overdrive effects in the way that the guitar’s dry signal always remains present and the overdrive textures are blended in at varying levels of intensity depending upon how far the toe is pressed down. The Ambient Delay’s expression pedal provides bone-dry effect


For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2017

Fender

ACOUSTIC SFX HANDRUBBED WALNUT STAIN LIMITED EDITION

CHEAT SHEET free sound at the heel down position, and similarly it blends in an increasing level of delay and reverb simultaneously as the toe is depressed down on top of the dry signal. Although the Expression Overdrive always includes the guitar’s “dry” tone in the mix (technically the tone isn’t dry as the pedal’s tone control setting is always active and remains constantly in the signal path), it’s not to be confused with a traditional clean boost as the “dry” tone remains consistent while the treadle pedal mixes in an additional layer of gain grit and volume boost that increase the further the player depresses his or her toe. The Ambient Delay’s heel down “bypass” setting matches the sound of plugging the guitar straight into the amp. I would have liked the option to control different parameters with the expression pedal, but most players will be perfectly content with the usefulness of the bypass/effect mix sweep function of both products.

LIST PRICE $203.99 (each) MANUFACTURER Ernie Ball, ernieball.com Both pedals feature built-in expression pedal controls that do away with the standard click switch, and enable users to blend effect levels from dry to fully processed. The Expression Overdrive provides up to 6dB of boost, while the Ambient Delay combines delay (up to one second) and plate reverb.

THE BOTTOM LINE After using the Expression Overdrive and Ambient Delay and experiencing their expressive potential, you’ll never want to go back to the click of a footswitch again.

The Fender Acoustic SFX Hand-Rubbed Walnut Stain is a limited edition acoustic amplifier featuring a hand-rubbed walnutstain finish that highlights the wood grain, making every unit unique. The Acoustic SFX amplifier sets a new standard for studio-quality acoustic-electric guitar sound, providing a fuller, more natural tone for a rich acoustic experience. The amp features Stereo Field Expansion (SFX) technology, which creates a lush, room-filling sound. STREET PRICE $899.99 fender.com

Morley

CLIFF BURTON TRIBUTE POWER FUZZ WAH LIMITED EDITION Morley, in collaboration with Ray Burton (Cliff Burton’s father), has released a limited edition chrome version of their Cliff Burton Tribute Power Fuzz Wah. The pedal is housed in a mirror finished chrome cold rolled steel chassis, equipped with dual LED indication and quick clip battery door. The wah and fuzz can be used individually or together. The pedal features separate wah level control, fuzz level and intensity as well as a modern/ vintage switch to select between two types of fuzz. This Chrome version is limited to 500 pedals worldwide. STREET PRICE $250 morleypedals.com

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Golden Age of Wireless

GUITAR WORLD

GOLD AWARD P

ER

FORMA

NC

For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2017

PRA AUDIO SYSTEMS WIC FOR GUITAR E

By Ch ris G ill

THERE ARE A LOT of good reasons for using a wireless system these days, but guitarists still have found a lot of reasons why they won’t use one. Common complaints are that they cost too much, are too difficult to set up, use up batteries too quickly, and don’t sound as good as using a cable. The PRA Audio Systems WiC for Guitar is one wireless system that kills all of these complaints for good.

ideal channel. Up to four WiC systems can be used at once, each with their own separate channels and with a maximum range of 500 feet. The transmitter and receiver both feature built-in rechargeable batteries that provide more than 20 hours of full charge. The USB charger recharges the batteries in a few hours—usually an overnight connection is more than adequate.

FEATURES The PRA Audio Systems WiC

tion and rechargeable battery features make the WiC for Guitar system stand out from the competition, its most impressive feature is its stellar sound quality. The Standard tone profile (the other option is ELF, or extended low frequency) is ideal for guitar, featuring a slight roll off of bass frequencies that are similar to what a good live sound or recording engineer would do to a guitar’s tone to

for Guitar is a complete wireless system package consisting of the WiC transmitter, WiC receiver, a transmitter holster, separate short audio cables for connection to the guitar/transmitter and receiver/amp, a dual USB charger and USB charging cables. The system uses 2.4GHz wireless technology and instantly and automatically selects the

CHEAT SHEET

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STREET PRICE $299.95 MANUFACTURER PRA Audio Systems, praaudio.com

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRU R A RY 2017

PERFORMANCE While the instant connec-

The transmitter and receiver automatically match channels when the system is turned on, and up to four systems can be used on the same stage.

make it more prominent in the mix. The system doesn’t just sound as good as a cable; it actually sounds better. The treble is clearer and has more presence, the midrange has enhanced definition and the bass sounds big and full. You actually hear more of your guitar’s natural tone and dynamic nuances. I tried the WiC in a variety of environments, and it performed equally efficiently and reliably in each, whether it was a straight, unblocked path to the stage or from the second floor of a house to an amp set up in the basement. The sound quality remained consistent whether the guitar/transmitter was 20 or 200 feet away from the amp/receiver, which makes the system great for home recording applications when you want to isolate an amp in an entirely different room and not hassle with long cables.

The batteries for the transmitter and receiver are rechargeable via USB and provide up to 20 hours of full power.

THE BOTTOM LINE The incredibly affordable PRA Audio Systems WiC for Guitar is the perfect wireless system for guitarists who want an easy to use system that makes no compromises in sound quality.


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For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld. com/Feb2017

SOUNDCHECK

GUITAR WORLD

PLATINUM AWARD EX

CELLENCE

Over The Moon

Buzz Bin

BREEDLOVE USA CONCERT MOON LIGHT SITKA SPRUCE-MAHOGANY By Paul Ria rio I RECENTLY VISITED the Breedlove fac-

tory in Bend, Oregon, and from what I witnessed, I can tell you this: 2017 promises to be a big year for Breedlove. The company is creating some groundbreaking innovations in their sound profiling technology, and these developments will be implemented into their new Big Sound guitars. One of the new Big Sound guitars is the stunning Breedlove USA Concert Moon Light Sitka Spruce-Mahogany. Combining Breedlove’s sound profiling tech and one of the thinnest finishes in their line, the Concert Moon delivers pristine note projection, enhanced acoustic response and a full-bodied sound in an incredibly easy-to-play guitar. FEATURES The USA Concert Moon Light is unbelievably lightweight at just over three and a half pounds, and sports a razor-thin satin finish that makes the guitar feel smooth and lively. The guitar’s inviting concert body hugs the waist and feels comfortably snug. It also plays effortlessly with low action, and features a 1 3/4-inch nut width, 20-frets, and a mahogany neck with an ebony fingerboard. Breedlove is a green company and salvages its Alaskan Sitka spruce for its top from fallen trees in the Tongass National Forest, while its Honduran mahogany used in its back, sides and neck are responsibly harvested from Guatemala. The Moon Light is built using Breedlove’s sound profiling technology that targets optimal resonance frequencies on their tops and backs, resulting in thinner tops, thicker backs and a smaller soundhole, all of which in turn produce its surprisingly full and robust voice. The guitar also features an optional LR Baggs EAS VC under saddle pickup that’s surreptitiously tucked away underneath the soundhole.

CHEAT SHEET

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STREET PRICE $1,499; $1,599 with LR Baggs pickup MANUFACTURER Breedlove, breedlovemusic.com

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRU R A RY 2017

GUITAR WORLD

PLATINUM AWARD EX

PERFORMANCE The most noticeable thing about the USA Concert Moon Light is how much volume the guitar projects from its body. The guitar rings out with powerful harmonics and intense detail, producing rich and complex lows, a sweet midrange, and crisp and clear highs. The Moon Light nails those coveted acoustic tones with balanced complexity whether you lightly fingerpick or strum hard. The LR Baggs pickup is a perfect plug-and-play option that doesn’t interfere with the Moon Light’s voice. Of course, the Moon Light’s near perfect setup makes it a real pleasure to play, but its lightweight that rests comfortably on your knee will make you forget that you’ve been playing it for hours.

THE BOTTOM LINE The Breedlove USA Concert Moon Light Sitka-Mahogany is an impressive acoustic with a huge voice that responds with focused depth and bloom across the entire frequency range.

CELLENCE

Crazy Tube Circuits Time

There are many delay pedals that simulate tape echo, but I always love finding the unusually cool ones that offer just a little more of a twist on this popular effect. One of my latest finds is the Crazy Tube Circuits Time, which replicates the sound of tape and magnetic drum echoes along with built-in modulation and the ability to manipulate infinite feedback and oscillation when holding down the tap footswitch. Time comes in a compact, gold housing with two footswitches for bypass and tap tempo, with four controls for more (wet/dry mix), tail (number of repeats), m/sec (delay time from 130ms to one second) mood (tone) and a three-way mini toggle (switches the tap tempo between quarter, dotted eighths and triplets). The pedal has a secondary function for adjusting the chorus/vibrato modulation by holding down the tap switch An internal switch can be set for true bypass, or a high quality buffered bypass mode that allows for delay repeats to trail when switching it off. The pedal’s delay sound is organically smooth with lo-fi repeats that trail off into darkness but can easily be brightened up by increasing the mood control. It definitely has a warmer tone than most other echoes and as you crank up the more control to get some Edge-like repeats, it adds lush ambient space to your guitar sound. The vibrato chorus effect has a glossy warble but can get angular by pushing it to extremes. But the most fun I had was holding down the tap switch for over a second and listening as the echoes began to swirl and oscillate into an infinite chaos of repeats and then finally releasing the switch to return to my original setting. —Paul Riario

STREET PRICE $235 MANUFACTURER Crazy Tube Circuits, crazytubecircuits.com


COLUMNS

HOLCOMB-MANIA by Mark Holcomb of Periphery

SHIFTING POSITIONS

Exploring 12/8 meter and “Prayer Position” HELLO EVERYONE, and welcome back

to Holcomb Mania! It’s great to be back in the pages of Guitar World as a columnist. Over the next several months, I’ll be demonstrating many of the techniques that my band mates in Periphery and I employ in the formulation of our music, using some examples from our latest album, Periphery III: Select Difficulty, to illustrate. For this first column, I’d like to focus on the song “Prayer Position,” the album’s sixth single. A few months ago, I put out a request on the band’s website to see which songs our fans would most like to see broken down in these columns. There were a lot of requests for “Prayer Position,” so here we go! “Prayer Position” is played in “drop-A” tuning, which is the same as drop-B tuning (low to high, B A D G B E), but with all six strings additionally tuned down one whole step (low to high, A G C F A D). In this case, I find it easier to think of everything in a “transposing” manner, as if the fifth through first strings were tuned normally and the sixth string was tuned to B. This makes navigation through the riffs and chords much easier to understand. One of my favorite things about this tuning is that an octave is sounded when fretting what would normally be a root-fifth power chord shape on the bottom strings. “Prayer Position” is unique because it is one of the very few Periphery songs that is played with a triplet feel, best represented here in 12/8 meter. One of the beautiful things about 12/8 is that the alignment of three evenly spaced eighth notes per beat allows for all kinds of rhythmic ambiguity when putting riffs and patterns together. FIGURE 1 illustrates the song’s opening phrase, which is constructed from a variety of techniques that are at the heart of many of our songs—lots of pull-offs, hammer-ons, open strings, position shifts and a high degree of fretboard mobility. In bar 1, on beat one, I attain a power-chord vibe by playing the notes of a B5 power chord individually, followed by rhythmic accentuation of the open sixth string. The aforementioned two-note octave shapes,

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

Drop-B tuning, down one whole step (low to high, A G C F A D). All music sounds one shole step lower than written. FIG. 1 1 FIGURE Bm G D Bm 1

 4

7

 

4

4 0

2

C

0

3 0 0 0 0 1

G

D



3 3 7 1 1 5

  9    60  9 3

 2

2

0

C#

      2

1

C#(¨9)

2

6 0

0 4

2

1/2

2 4

Gm 0

2

0 0 0

0

3

0 4

0

N.C.

P.M.

P.M.

2 2 2

played on the bottom two strings, follow at the beginning of bar 2; on the upbeat of beat three, I begin a long single-note riff that includes several ringing open strings. In bar 5, I shift from two-note octaves to a root-major third voicing on the bottom two strings, and the five-bar riff culminates with two beats of single notes. At this point, the first two bars repeat, and bar 8 begins like bar 3, but I add a twist starting on the upbeat of beat two through beat three. At the end of bar 9 and into bar 10, I move from a three-note

0 2

 1

2 2 2

2 0

5

10 3 3 8 1 1 6



0 0 2 5 5

 2

P.M.

10 9 2 2 2 0 0 8 7 0

N.C.

0

3 1

F5

P.M.

Bm

0 4

5 3

10 10 8 8

(Bm)

1/2

3

0

N.C. P.M.

5 2

2

4 0 2

4

4 0

4

4 0

0 2

(Bm)

0 0 0

0

7 5

2 5

2

4 5

1



0 0 4 5 5

6 0

FIG. 2 2 FIGURE

3 3 1

7

Em

3 0

C

3

1/2

0

4 5

7

3

3 0

8 5 5 6 6 3 3

7 6 5 4 3 3 5 4 0 3 2 1 1

6

7

7

(C)

P.M.

8

 6  6  0 0

Bm

F D

10 9 8 6 6 0

(B)

7 5

5 3

B

10

7



B

7

10 5 5 8 0 0 3 3

E

0



10 10 8 8

0 0 0 0

Bm

10 5 8 0 0 3

3

0

2 2

1

0 2 3 3 1

P.M.

3 3 3

4 4 4

5 5 5 4 4

4 5 4 3

3

 

F5 power chord to a similarly voiced B major chord, and the phrase ends with unexpected sliding octaves. For the verse section, illustrated in FIGURE 2, we decided to take a more “caveman” approach and simplify matters a little bit. This phrase is simpler inasmuch as it’s mostly comprised of single notes and two-note figures, with stronger accents on the downbeats throughout. But it is still intentionally deceptive, rhythmically, so work through each bar slowly and carefully.

Mark Holcomb plays guitar in Periphery, whose latest album, Periphery III: Select Difficulty, is out now.


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COLUMNS

For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2017

STRING THEORY

By Jimmy Brown

DARK MAGIC

FIGURE FIG. 1 1 soloing over an E minor jazz-blues progression Em9

Melodic tactics for a minor jazz-blues progression

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

E7#9

7fr

2134

 5

  

4 6 4

Am7



7

C13



4

9 5 7

13

16

7 12

12

5 4

5 7

15 16

6 7

5

4 7

5

5 4

8

4 6 7

4 5 7

4

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B7#5 7 6 5

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1 234

7

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4

6

9

7

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 

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5

3

3

3

3

15 16 13 12

14 12

3

  16

14 15 17

14

3

C#m7¨5 17 16 15 14

17

16

14 17

13 14

9

8 7

3

4 7

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4 5 7

7 8 10 8 7

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11

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3

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7 10

3

14

11

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10

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15 17

15

14

16 14 16 18

14 11 12

13 10

15 17 19

continuing the ascent. This Steve Morse– inspired alternate picking move is effective for mustering energy and building momentum in a climbing triplet run. Another noteworthy tactic employed throughout the solo is the use, over Em9, of the major seven, Ds, which I often use to “tonicize” the temporary E minor tonal center in a classical kind of way. The Ds note harmonically clashes with the

3

 13

12 10

17 14 15

B7#5

15 17 18 17 15

16 15 13 12

(Ending) Em11 9

15 14 13

3

17 14 15 16

C13 17

12 10

B7#5

B7#5 12 11

6 5

Em9

12 14 15 14 12

14 15 17 14 15 17

7 5

B7#5

B7#5

8

C#m7¨5

3

8fr

1324

7

Em9

Em9 11

2 333

Em9

5 4

C13 4fr

Em9

 B7#5

Em9 16 16 14

2134

4

C#m7¨5 5fr

Am7

3

23

B7#5

E7#9

12

19

6 5

5 7 8

(2nd Chorus) Em9

 3    =   

6 7 4

Am7

6fr

1 234

Medium-Fast Swing Em9 1

AS PROMISED LAST MONTH, I now

present an original melodic solo, played over a minor jazz-blues progression in the key of E minor (see FIGURE 1). It’s two choruses long (24 bars total), is played over a medium-fast swing-eighths groove and demonstrates what I think are some pretty cool, musically effective things to play over this rather dark, intriguing set of chord changes. For reference, I’ve included chord names above the notes, as well as the voicings and fingerings I used for the accompanying rhythm guitar part heard in the online video demo. The tempo is 200 beats per minute, which is fairly brisk and lively and not too laid back…ideal for playing swing eighth notes. It’s also slow enough that I can manage to shred a little on some alternate-picked eighth-note triplets, (see bars 12 and 14–16). Notice throughout the solo how I target chord tones (namely, the root, third, fifth, seventh or ninth), mostly on the downbeats, but sometimes a half a beat early, such as the Fs, the ninth of Em9 (E G B D Fs) at the end of bar 2, which is tied over into bar 3, and, at the end of bar 4, the E note, which is the fifth of bar 5’s Am7 (A C E G). Near the end of the second triplet burst, on the downbeat of bar 16, I land on the fourth of E7s9, A, then approach the third, Gs, from a half step below (G), so I’m hitting that golden chord tone a beat late. This run is a prime example of how one’s technical abilities and inabilities, or limitations, often steer and determine note choice when attempting to play quickly. In this instance, I gravitated toward these particular notes because they offered an easy “opening,” or “path,” for alternate picking fast eighth-note triplets, which can be very challenging and difficult, depending on how the pick strokes fall when crossing strings. (Ah, the bane of an alternate picker’s existence!) Sometimes, when shredding, the desired rhythmic effect—in this case, “machine-gun” triplets—and melodic contour trump a “perfect” note choice. Notice also in bar 16 how I rev up my picking motor across beats two and three by repeating the same three notes on the A string before crossing to the D string and

B7#5

5fr

11 10

8

7 !

7

14 12

11

  9 !

chord’s native minor seventh, D natural, which lives within the E Dorian mode (E Fs G A B Cs D), but it can melodically work well in context. Finally, note that the Csm7f5 chord (bars 8 and 20) is effectively acknowledged by playing either its arpeggio (Cs E G B) or notes from Cs Locrian (Cs D E Fs G A B), which is the seventh mode of the D major scale (D E Fs G A B Cs).

To download instructional guitar DVDs by Jimmy Brown— as individual chapters or complete discs—visit guitarworldlessons.com or download the official Guitar World Lessons app in iTunes.

LESSONS


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COLUMNS

ECLECTICITY

by Alex Skolnick

ROAD MAPS

Melodic phrasing tips, part 2 LAST MONTH, WE took steps toward developing a deeper understanding of blues and how it informs both jazz and rock. By practicing playing over standard blues changes with single-octave patterns, used as miniature “road maps,” we were able to incorporate the more colorful chord tones into melodic phrases and expand beyond the basic pentatonic shapes we all learn early on. This month, we’ll begin with descending versions of such patterns. Previously, I had mentioned some famous examples of the “minor third into major third” melody. One of them was a great TV show theme I grew up hearing: Quincy Jones’ “Theme from Sanford & Son.” The first bar of FIGURE 1 is a major pentatonicbased lick in the key of C that’s similar to this melody. It’s entirely descending, except for the ascending minor-to-major third (Ef to E). The remainder of FIGURE 1 moves the lick through the I, IV and V chords of a basic blues in C—C7, F7 and G7, respectively. The intent here is to form a road map in order to establish a familiarity with the colorful notes, absorbing them as a source of vocabulary in practice, but not to force yourself to play them in live situations. They can also be blended with more standard minor pentatonic licks, as demonstrated in FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3 is a blues vamp incorporating dominant seventh chords. Whereas the last lesson featured a slow “Red House”–style blues, this one is more of a mid-tempo swinging “Now’s The Time”/“Everyday I Have the Blues”–style groove. This figure features a “quick IV,” with a move to the IV chord, F7, in bar 2, followed by a return to the I chord, C7, in bars 3 and 4. FIGURE 4 is an improvised solo played over these changes. The first lick is straight out of our previous lesson, an all-ascending pattern with the minor third into the major third. This is followed by the reverse, which follows the changes, just as described in FIGURE 1. The next few licks are in fact the ascending pattern with a few extra notes added, before reverting back to today’s descending pattern. A brief critique of my own playing in the video example: The first 12-bar chorus feels rather forced. Normally, I would make it less obvious that these patterns are lurking behind my improvisations, but the purpose here

100

For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2017

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

 3    =   

FIG. 1 1 Triplet feel FIGURE

C7

 

10 8

F7

10

8

8

9

10 !

 10 10 !

9

C7

10

F7

Rhy. Fig. 1

 

9 8 8

9 8 8

C7+5 C7

8

9 9 8

9 8

8

8

FIGURE FIG. 4 4

9

8

8 10

9

10

8

C7

11

8

8 9

810

8 9

10



8 8

  10 8

8

 



8

8

8

8

11

8

11 10 8

    10

8

11 12

12

   8 8

10

1/2

10 8 10

10

8

 88  7 8 

8 8 7 8

C13 8 7 8

10



8

10

 8 C7

10

10

C7

G7

C7

10 10 8 10

8

 ! 12

3

8



12

F7

 

  8 8

0

8



9 10

1/4

F7

 10 

9 10

10 8

10 8

10 8

8

C7 10

3

8 10

9 8 8

  10 10 9 9 10 10 

10 9 8

8 11 8 11 10 8 10

C7

8

G7

10

10 12

9 8

end Rhy. Fig. 1

F7 10 8

 10 9  8 8

10 9 8

 10 8 8 9

  

 

11 12

10 !

C7

 

1/2

8 10

1/2

F7 8

 

C7

8 10    

F7

9 10

7 8

1

10

3

G7

8

9

F9

FIG. 5 5 FIGURE

G7

810

4

9

8 10

8

G7

12 10

FIG. 2 2 FIGURE

10 !

9 8 8 F7  8 

9 8



C7 10 8



9

10



10

 10 !

C7

 8 

F7

    10   C7 7  10 8

 10  9 10 

10 9 10

C7

8

  

8

G7

w/Rhy. Fig. 1

1

 3

8

8 7 8 

8 7 8

9 10

C7

FIG. 3 3 Triplet Feel    = FIGURE 1

F7

10 8

10

8

9

9 10

10 8



10

3

1

810

8

810

 C7 8 8 3

10

10

8

810

3

1

13

8

810

3

8

3

 

3

is to demonstrate the examples. Fortunately, the second time around (See FIGURE 5) it lightens up a bit, as I begin to break away from the rigidity of sticking closely to one type of pattern, with a few minor pentatonic licks thrown in to add flavor. Finally, in the third chorus (shown only in the video), things begin to feel more natural. The patterns are still in the background as guides,

but the playing is more open, allowing whatever comes to mind to happen. By gaining a better understanding of standard blues changes beyond the simplified rock vamps many of us learn early on—tools that can be both highly useful and severely limiting—we can strengthen our foundations as guitarists, no matter what styles we choose to play.

Alex Skolnick is a world-renowned guitarist, composer/arranger, author and teacher, best known for his role in the world of metal as original lead guitarist for Testament, and also for his brilliantly innovative and creative jazz-based playing with the Alex Skolnick Trio, whose latest release is AST Live Unbound.


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by Dale Turner

THUMBS UP

Richie Havens’ thumb fretting madness AMONG OTHER HONORS, soulful, folky

groove-meister Richie Havens (1941–2013) holds the distinction of being the first musician to grace the stage of Woodstock: 1969’s legendary “Peace and Music” festival that featured rock icons like Hendrix, Santana, Grateful Dead and the Who. Havens was originally slated to perform as the fifth act, but Woodstock’s location was so remote (a 600-acre field in the Catskills region of New York), with its lone roadway jammed (400,000-plus people attended!), that many musicians were running late. Havens stepped up to the plate, opened the show and performed for nearly three hours, encouraged to ad lib until other scheduled entertainers arrived. When his “stretching” prompted an improvised variation on the spiritual “Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child,” soon dubbed “Freedom,” a legend—and timeless musical anthem—was born. (Following his 2013 passing, Havens’ ashes were spread across Woodstock’s festival site.) Let’s examine the hallmarks of Havens’ signature sound: intense rhythmic strumming of chords in open D tuning (low to high: D A D Fs A D) and thumb fretting of as many as six strings! FIGURE 1 is “in the style” of Havens’ “The Key,” one of his final compositions (2008’s Nobody Left to Crown). We’ll use this passage to ease into Havens’ unbelievable thumb-fretting demands, using the thumb to cover strings 4–6 (bars 1 and 2), while open strings ring throughout (in Havens’ open tuning, this produces colorful chords like Bm7, E9sus4 and D/G). The final chord, Efmaj7, will give you a taste of crazy thumb things to come, as Havens covers strings 2–6 with his long, versatile appendage, allowing only the highest string to ring open. It’s worth noting that Havens was not only a towering musical giant, he also stood 6’6” tall and had huge hands! He also, in virtually every case, involved all six guitar strings when playing chords, using his thumb to barre—squeezing the neck with a clamping grip to fret multiple strings with one finger—anywhere from three to six strings at a time. For us mere

102

For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2017

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

All examples are played in open-D tuning (low to high: D A D F# A D).

FIGURE FIG. 1 1

 = downstroke

D

Bm7

0  0  0

let ring

  

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

0

A

7fr

TTTTTT

Bm

9 8 X 9 9 9

FIGURE FIG. 4 4

D5 Bm

9 9 8 8 X 0 9 0 9 0 9

0 0 0 2 2 2

0 0 X X X

D/G 0 0 0 2 2 2

2

0 0 0 X 5 X 5 X 5

9 8 X 9 9

5fr

0 0 0 5 5 5

0 0 0 5 5 5 5

0 0 0 5 5 5

0 0 0 5 5 5

0

 

0 0 0 X X X

D5

0 1 1 1 1 1

 

9 9 9 9 8 8 X 0 9 0 9 0

7 7 X 7 7 7

7 7 7 7 X 0 7 0 7 0 5

5 5 X 5 5

5 5 5 5 X 0 5 0 5 0

4 4 X 4 4

0 0 0 2 2

2 0 2 0

0

5fr

A9sus4

7

4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4

Bsus2   9 9  97  97 X X  99  99

34 111

E9sus4 D E9sus4 D

TT 1 2 3

F#7

4 4 X 4 4

FIG. 55 FIGURE

             0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 2 2 0 0 0 2 2 2 0 2 0 0 X X 2 2 0 0 0 2 2 2 0 2 0 0 7 7

E9sus4 D

TTT 2 3 3

6fr

D

 7 7 7   4 4 4  2 2 2  2 2 2  2 2 2

5fr TTT 2 2 2

6fr

TT 3 4 1

D5 Gmaj7 D5

alt. fing.

A9sus4

alt. fing.

5fr

TTTTT 2

A

Am

alt. fing.

*T *fret

2 2

E¨maj7

5fr

TT 2 3 1

5fr TT 1 3 4

A7

6fr

 and w/thumb (throughout)

alt. fing.

TTT 2 3 3

0 0 9 9 9

etc.

alt. fing.

TTTTT 2

etc.  9 9 9   9

*T *fret

Asus2

0 0 9 9 9

6fr

TT 1 1 1

let ring

0 0 9 9 9 9

Amaj7

alt. fing. 7fr

  

E9sus4

0  0 0 0

*T *T *All fretting performed by the thumb.

FIG. 2 2 FIGURE

FIGURE FIG. 33

0 0 0 9 9 9

0 0 9 9 0 9

 = upstroke

7

mortals, most of these voicings will be unplayable. To ease your pain, FIGURE 2 presents the actual chord fingerings Havens employs for grips like A, Amaj7, A7 and Am (notice he never uses his index finger), with alternative fingerings provided, so you can replicate his songs more comfortably. These are put to use in FIGURE 3, a passage inspired by the aforementioned “Freedom,” which closed Havens’ Woodstock appearance. Keep your picking hand grooving in steady 16th notes, striking the strings when indicated, and strum harder each time you see an

      A

5 5 5 X 7 7

5 5 5 X 7 7

7 7 7 X 7 7

7 7 7 X 7 7

7 7 7 X 7 7 7

7 7 7 X 7 7

9 9 7 X 9 9

0



COLUMNS

ACOUSTIC NATION

4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4

4 4 X 4 4

0 0 0 0 0 0

4 4 4 4 X 4 4

Bm D        

9 9 7 X 9 9

9 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 X X X 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

9 9 8 X 9 9

0 0 0 0 0 0

and w/thumb (throughout)

0 0 0 0 0 0

Dm7 Em/D5 Gm6/D5 Dadd2

0 0 3 3 3 0 0 0

2 2 1 0 0 0

2 2 1 0 0 0

2 0 0 0 0 0

accent (>). Amazingly, there are even more tendon-traumatizing chord shapes in the Havens arsenal, among them the Asus2 and A9sus4 stretches shown in FIGURE 4 (again with mortal-friendly alternative fingerings). Be sure to shift these up and down the neck so that you can experience easier or more demanding stretches. We’ll close this overview of Havens’ approach with FIGURE 5, which contains moves inspired by “Handsome Johnny” (from 1967’s Mixed Bag), which Havens used to open Woodstock.

To download Dale Turner’s Secrets of the Great Acoustic Songwriters DVD—as individual chapters or the complete disc—visit guitarworldlessons.com or download the official Guitar World Lessons app in iTunes.

LESSONS


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end. Nicknamed the Ice Man, the Houston, Texas, ax slinger employed the “chilly” theme for the titles of many of his most celebrated songs, such as “The Freeze,” “Frosty,” “Thaw Out,” “Snow Cone,” “Don’t Lose Your Cool” and “Ice Pick,” and the album titles Ice Pickin’ and Frostbite. I had the great fortune and honor to get to know Albert and perform with him on one very memorable occasion. He was a warm and wonderful man who was well loved by his band and always deeply engaged with his fans. Born Albert Gene Drewery on October 1, 1932, Collins—who died of cancer at the age of 61 on November 24, 1993—was introduced to the guitar by his cousin Lightnin’ Hopkins and taught to play by another cousin, Willow Young, using an unconventional open F minor tuning in conjunction with a capo. An early influence was Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown, who also employed a capo. Albert adopted the same instrument as Gatemouth, a Fender Esquire, with which he cut his early records. He later switched to his signature “maple cap”–necked, natural ash body 1966 Fender Telecaster, equipped with a Gibson humbucking pickup in the neck position, though he utilized the bridge pickup most of the time. FIGURE 1 illustrates a first-position Fm chord. To attain an open tuning that replicates this sound, the sixth, third, second and first strings are raised one half step, and the fifth and fourth strings are raised one and a half steps. For this lesson, I’m using open E minor tuning instead of F minor. The structure of both tunings is the same, but it’s easier and more convenient to get in and out of open E minor tuning. As shown in FIGURE 2, simply raise your A and D strings up a whole step to B and E, respectively. The resulting tuning is, low to high, E B E G B E. With a capo placed at the third fret, strumming across all six open strings sounds a Gm chord (see FIGURE 3). If we fret the third string one fret above the capo with the index finger, a G major chord sounds. (All tab numbers shown here are “true.” Notes tabbed at the third fret are played “open,” and the other

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

1

FIG. 4 4 FIGURE

3

4

3

3

3

5

5

  

13  6 6 6

3 13 13 3

8

6

3

3

1

6

3

6 3

5

3

3

5

3

3

4

5

3

8

3 3 4 3 3 3

3

5

3

3

3

4

3

4

3

3

5

3

5

3

3

5

3 3 6 3

3

8 8

3 5

3 5 3 3

3 53

C7 3

3

5

3

5

3

G7

8 8 6

5

8

7

3

 

8

8

3

5

3

33

3

6

3

5

3

4

6

8

9

3

3

3

 1/2

11 810 8 10 8

3

5 6  5 6 5 3

6

numbers reflect the actual frets). FIGURE 4 illustrates a G7 arpeggio along the lines of Albert’s approach. FIGURES 5 and 6 offer examples of soloing in Albert’s style in the context of a swinging 12-bar blues. FIGURE 5 begins with unison G notes on the top two strings. On beat four of bar 3, I use a reverse rake to quickly descend the third, fourth and fifth strings. Albert always picked with his bare fingers, but this technique can also be

3 6

3

3

3

3

5 6 5 3 5 3

3

5

5

3

5

3

3 6

3

5

5

3

5

3

5

6

5

3

4 4

C7 

3

3

5

3

5

3

5

3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6 3 5 3 (5) 3 (5) 3 (5) 3 (5) 3 (5) 3 (5) 3 5 5

3

3

3

5 6 5 3

3

7 9

G7

6 3 53

3 6 3 5 3

3 6

7

3

5

1

863 3

3

3 3

6

  

3

4 4

3

G7

1

5 5

3

G7

5

8 3 6 3

FIG. 6 6 FIGURE



G7

4

3

3

3

C7 3

G7

G7

3

 

1/2

6

3

6 3 5 3 53

3

00 3 3 3 3 3 3

*All tab numbers are “true.” All notes tabbed at the third fret are played as open strings.

3

3 4

3

5

3

5

3

3

3 53

3

D7 3 53

10

)

 

Gm

3

12

6

 3    =   

D7 3 6 3 53

  3

3 8 8(8

3

1/2

3 5

notes: E B E G B E

G7

1

C7 3

0

 

FIG. 5 5 Triplet Feel FIGURE

6! 6

4



G7

let ring 3

 

3

1

0 0 0 2 2 0

open Em tuning *Capo 3 0 0 0 0 0 0



1

FIG. 3 3 FIGURE

Em



ALBERT COLLINS IS a blues guitar leg-

0

 

1 1 1 3 3 1

FIG. 2 2 FIGURE

 1

Fm



A tribute to Albert Collins

FIG. 1 1 FIGURE



COLUMNS

by Andy Aledort

THE ICE MAN

104

For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2017

IN DEEP

3

9

8 11

3

10 13

44

D7 3

5

3

3

D7 13 12 10

5

3

3

3

3

13 11 8 6

G7 8 6

6

863

7

6



3

achieved with a pick. Notice in both examples the frequent use of open strings and allow them to ring together. Collins phrased his licks in a very distinct manner, and one of his signature techniques is demonstrated in bars 4 and 5 of FIGURE 6, as fast trills are sounded between the fifth of G, D and the sixth, E. Be sure to listen to the live version of “Frosty” from Frozen Alive to experience the full breadth of Albert’s musical inventiveness.

To download instructional guitar DVDs by Andy Aledort— as individual chapters or complete discs—visit guitarworldlessons.com or download the official Guitar World Lessons app in iTunes.

LESSONS


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COLUMNS

THRASH COURSE by Dave Davidson of Revocation

HIT THE BAR

How to use your whammy bar within a riff THIS MONTH, I’d like to demonstrate

Gm(maj7)

1

 8

 

 

9 9 10 10 10 10 11 11

FIG. 3 3 FIGURE 1

w/bar

 



 Dm(maj7)     2  5  3  6  3  6  4 7  5

FIG. 2 2 FIGURE

0

1

9 10 10 11

 

0

5 5

4 5

9 11 13

10 12

9 11 13

0 0

9 9 10 10 9 9 13 13 999999 9 9

10 12

5

0

9 9

8 9

C#sus4 C#

0 0

9

9

16

9

 

7 9 11

8 10

5

 

 

8 10

8 10

5

FIGURE FIG. 4 4

16

2 3 2 4 2 2 2 2 2

9

16

5 7 6 7 5

5

F#m7 9 10 9 11 999999 9

5 7 6 7 5 5555

5 7 6 7 5

2 2 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

9 10 9 11 9

9 10 9 11 9 9999

5 5 6 7 5555555

9

12 11 12 11

2 2 2 4 2

9 10 9 11 9

 Bm7

9

A good example of this type of whammy abuse in a Revocation song can be heard during the guitar solo in “Monolithic Ignorance,” from Great Is Our Sin. FIGURE 4 illustrates the rhythm part, which is performed in 5/4 meter. Each chord is played in the same manner, as I alternate between 16th-note root accents and sustained chords. FIGURE 5 depicts the solo. As with

14

11

11

5 5 6 7 5

5 5 6 7 5 5555

5 5 6 7 5

2 2 2 4 2 2 2 2 2

15 12 12 13 10

12 11

2 2 2 4 2

Dmaj7  

F#m13

 



7 9 11 11

Dmaj9

5 7 6 7 5555555

13 11 11

2 3 2 4 2

10 10 11 11

(B)

Dmaj7

9 10 9 13 9



0

11 11

Dmaj9



Bsus4 B

0 0

0

0

F#m7 

4

 Dm(maj7)     2  5  3  6  3  6  4 7  5

Bm9 2 3 2 4 2

FIG. 5 5 FIGURE

16

6 7

9 11 13 13

10 12

9 10 9 13 9 9999

2 3 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

5 7 9 9

Bm7

 

0

7 7

5

5

F#m13

w/bar

9 10 10 11

7 9 11

5

5

1

Gm(maj7)

  sim.

6 8

6 8

5 7 9

5

  10  11  11  12  10





w/bar

6 8

5 7 9

9 9 10 10 10 10 11 11



N.C.(A)

5

2

Gsus4 G (dive) Asus4 A

(C#) 3

 

(dip)

  

  10  11  11  12  10 w/bar

00 0 0 0 0 10 11 11 12 10

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

FIG. 1 1 FIGURE

some ways in which I like to utilize my guitar’s whammy bar in the music of Revocation. I often use the bar to “color” chord patterns and to give single-note lines different and unusual textures. FIGURE 1 is played in 6/4 meter, and throughout this eight-bar example, a different chord or voicing is played in each bar, with the sound and attack of the chords manipulated with the whammy bar in slightly different ways. All the chords are dissonantsounding minor major-seven chords, starting with two different voicings of Gm(maj7) in bars 1 and 2. I begin with a root-position Gm(maj7), first striking the chord and then adding subtle bar vibrato. In bar 2, I play a third-inversion voicing that places the major seventh, Fs, on the bottom. Here, I “dip” (depress and release) the bar on the downbeat of beat one and then add vibrato. The Dm(maj7) chord in bar 3 is treated in a similar manner, and I change things up in bar 4 by dipping twice before applying vibrato. The first four bars then essentially repeat, but in bar 5 I begin with a dip and vibrato for the initial Gm(maj7) chord. Another cool way to employ your whammy bar is to use it as an alternative means to sound a note or chord, as opposed to picking. For each measure in FIGURE 2, I begin by hammering onto two notes on the D and G strings while dipping the bar. As the notes ring, I add bar vibrato and then pull off to the open strings while “diving” with the bar, followed by another two-note hammer-on and similar treatment to each subsequent chord. Using dipping to attack a note or chord works just as well when kicking off a singlenote riff, as demonstrated in FIGURE 3. Here, I’m simply ascending through the whole-tone scale using hammer-ons only, starting on the sixth string’s fifth fret in bar 1 and then moving up two frets higher in each measure. I dip the bar while hammering onto the first note of each phrase, which creates a distinct “string attack” sound. At the end of each measure, the final note is sustained, with bar vibrato added. This technique gives the line an otherworldly character, especially when using a delay effect.

106

For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2017

 

13 10 13 10

 18 18 ! Bm9

w/bar

18

the accompaniment, I adapt a consistent rhythmic concept here that adheres to each phrase in bars 1–4, beginning with a “hammer-on from nowhere” in conjunction with a whammy bar dip, and additional dips are applied at strategic rhythmic points, moving from downbeat to upbeat accents. Notes are not picked conventionally until bar 5, after which I use the bar strictly for vibrato.

To download Dave Davidson’s Heavy Metal Hybrid Picking DVD—as individual chapters or the complete disc—visit guitarworldlessons.com or download the official Guitar World Lessons app in iTunes.

LESSONS


A L L - N E W

P R O

S E R I E S

S I G N A T U R E

Pro Series Signature Misha Mansoor Juggernaut HT7FM, Ebony Fingerboard, Oceanburst

Pro Series Signature Misha Mansoor Juggernaut HT6, Ebony Fingerboard, Satin Gun Metal Gray

M I S H A

M A N S O O R M I S H A

M A N S O O R

J U G G E R N A U T

H T 6

&

H T 7 F M

VISIT JACKSON TO VIEW ALL COLOR OPTIONS. HEAR MISHA ON

P E R I P H E R Y I I I : S E LE CT D I F F I C U LT Y www.periphery.net ©2017 JCMI. Jackson® and the distinctive headstock designs commonly found on Jackson guitars are registered trademarks of Jackson/Charvel Manufacturing, Inc. (JCMI). All rights reserved.

jacksonguitars.com


TRANSCRIPTIONS

HARDWIRED Metallica

As heard on HARDWIRED… TO SELF-DESTRUCT Words and music by JAMES HETFIELD AND LARS ULRICH • Transcribed by JEFF PERRIN

B5

B¨5

A5

7fr 14

A

E5

6fr

F5/C

5fr

14

F5

14

1

114

14

B5

Gtrs. 1 and 2 (elec. w/dist.) 1 P.M.



  

0

 

0

 

Bass 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

   

0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

B5

   

0 0 0

0 0

0 0 0

B¨5

0 0

A5

P.M.

0

0

0

0

B5

9 7

8 6

7

8 6

6

6

8 6

6

B¨5

7 5

5

0

5

108

   

0

N.C.(E5)

0

0

0

9 7

8 6

0

0

0

0

0

B5 A5

9 0 0 7

0

0 0 0

8 6

0 0 0

9 7

7

8 6

6

8 6

6

8 6

6

0

0

0 0 0

7 5

0

0 0

0

0

 

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

N.C.

7 5



5



GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

P.M.

8 0 0 6

0

0

N.C.(E5)

P.M.

0

0

0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

7 5

5

3

0

 

0

5

6

 

5

3

5

2 0

 0

0 0 0

B5

B¨5

0 0

0 0

   

A5

P.M.

0

0

0

9 7

8 6

8 6

8 6

7 5

0

0

0

7

6

6

6

5

E5



0 0 0

0 0 0

N.C.(E5)

A5

9 7 5

N.C.(E5) P.M.

P.M.

0

0

   

   

0

B5 B¨5

0

B¨5

(play 4 times)

3

6

14

Intro (0:00) Moderately Fast q = 174 N.C.(E5)

G5

8fr

B5

2 0

9 7

7

B¨5

 

8 6

6





“HARDWIRED” WORDS AND MUSIC BY JAMES HETFIELD AND LARS ULRICH COPYRIGHT © 2016 CREEPING DEATH MUSIC (GMR) INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED ALL RIGHTS RESERVED REPRINTED BY PERMISSION OF HAL LEONARD LLC


“ HARDWIRED”

B

(0:27, 1:00)

(w/Double-time feel) N.C.(E5) Rhy. Fig. 1 P.M. 13

     

C

0

0

0

B5

B¨5 N.C.(E5)

A5

P.M.

0

0

9 7

8 6

0

0

0

8 6

0

7 5

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1st and 2nd Verses (0:39, 1:11) N.C.(E5)

0

0

B¨5

N.C.(E5)

B¨5

6

5

3

5

0

9 7

0

0

0

0

0

8 6

0

0

of to

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

   5

5

5

5

 



desperation paranoia

N.C.(E5)

A5

P.M.

0

5

1. In the name 2. On the way

B5

Gtrs. 1 and 2 Rhy. Fig. 2 P.M. 16

0

3

On reprise (at 1:00), substitute Bass Fill 1 last time (see bar 23)

0

A5

(play 4 times)

P.M.

Bass Fig. 1 0

N.C.

P.M.

0

0

0

8 6

0

7 5

0

B¨5

A5

In the name of On the crooked N.C.(E5)

8 6

7 5

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Bass plays first four bars of Bass Fig. 1 simile (see bar 13)

18

P.M.

0

Bass 20

0

0

0

9 7

8 6

N.C.(E5)

P.M.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

B5 B¨5 Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Rhy. Fig. 1 (see bar 13) 0

D

0

B¨5

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 "

0

Bass  5

7 5

5

5 5 5

5

0

5

5 5 5

0

0

0

0

0

B¨5

A5

0

0

0

B¨5

0

0

10 8 8

6

0

In the name On the way N.C.(E5)

0

A5

0

0

F5/C

8 6

6

0

P.M.

0

0

Gone Doom N.C.

0

0

0

0

0

of to

all creation great destroyer

0

0

0

insane

0

0

0

design

Bass Fill 1

Chorus (0:49, 1:22, 2:35) We’re so fucked Shit outta luck A5 B¨5

7 5

0

N.C.(E5)

Gtrs. 1 and 2 24

 

0

B5 B¨5 N.C.(E5) Gtrs. 1 and 2 repeat Rhy. Fig. 2 (see bar 16)

0

22

0

B5

pain

wretched border line

6 6 6

1

  1

0

0

1 1 1

   

5

Hardwired

A5 P.M.

3



5

5 5 5

5

5

3

5

self-destruct G5 F5

0

3 1

3 1

5 3

5 5 5

1

1

3

7 5

5

5

On 3rd Chorus, skip ahead to K (bar 61)

to

0 7 5

6

P.M.

0 0

0 0

guitarworld.com

109


TRANSCRIPTIONS

E

1st time, go back to B (bar 13) 2nd time, proceed to F Interlude (bar 30)

(0:57, 1:29)

N.C.(E5) 28

B5

E5

0

2 0

B5

B¨5

9 7

8 6

P.M.

0

0

0

F

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2 0

G0

0

2 0

Go! Oh

7

6

Interlude (1:32) N.C.

B¨5

Gtr. 2 Rhy. Fig. 3 30

 

 0

7 7

(play 3 times)

5

 6

3 3

 

5

E5

5 5

 5

3

3 3

1

B¨5

Gtr. 1

 

 6

   0

2 0

   0

Bass

 

   6

8 6

7 7

 6

5

(play 3 times)

3 3

8 6

 

5

E5

 

  0

2 0

 

   6

8 6

8 6

8 6

6



 

A5

G5

7 7 5 5

5 3

7 7 5 5

5 3

5 5

3

N.C. Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Rhy. Fig. 3 (see bar 30)

Bass 34 Bass Fig. 2

 

0

0

(play 3 times)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

110

0

0

6

(play 3 times)

  

Bass 0

Bass Fig. 3 5

5

3

5

B¨5

Gtr. 3 (elec. w/dist.) 36

 

0

 

0

0

0

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

0

0

0

0

0

0

   6

3

3

A5 fdbk., w/filter effect

X

GX

6

1

G5

pick scrape

X X

X X

5

5

   3


“ HARDWIRED”

G

Guitar Solo (1:53) N.C.(E5)

Gtr. 3 38 5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

0 0

3

5

5

5

5

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

3

Gtrs. 1 and 2 Rhy. Fig. 4 P.M.

0

Bass

0

0

5

6

5

3

5

0

0

0

3

5

Bass Fig. 4 0

0

0

0

Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Rhy. Fig. 4 (see bar 38) Gtr. 3 40 3 5 5 3 0 5 5 3 0 5 5

3

0

0

5

3

3

 

1/4

12 12

12 12

14

14

14 14

12 12

3

2

1

3

3

2

0

3

14 14

12

12

14

14

2

0

0

0

2

11

3

  

1/4

14

5

3

Bass plays Bass Fig. 4 (see bar 38) 42

0

0

14

14

1

12

14

14

12

15 12

14

12 15 12

12

14

12 15

12

14

12

3

Gtrs. 1 and 2 play first four bars of Rhy. Fig. 3 (see bar 30)

45 12 15 12

H

14

12

12 15 12

14

12

12 15 12

14

 12 15 15

1

15

1

15

1

15

1

15

1

15 15

15

2

 (pick scrape)  12 ! X  !   Bass plays Bass

15

15 12

Bass plays Bass Fig. 2 three times simile (see bar 34)

(2:08)

Fig. 3 (see bar 35)

N.C.

Gtrs. 1 and 2 50

0

7

7

5

6

3

3

5

6

Bass plays Bass Fig. 2 three times simile (see bar 34)

I

 

3rd Verse (2:13) Once upon Once upon Do you feel Do you feel N.C.(E5)

54

a a that it

5

5

3

5

3

0

0

0

1

Bass plays Bass Fig. 3 (see bar 35)

planet burning fear returning hope is fading terminating

Once All Do in

upon

a flame in vain comprehend the end

you

(play 4 times)

P.M.

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

5

6

5

3

5

 

Bass plays Bass Fig. 4 (see bar 38)

guitarworld.com

111


TRANSCRIPTIONS

J

“ HARDWIRED”

(2:23)

Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Rhy. Fig. 3 (see bar 30) Bass (play 3 times) 56

  0

7

7

B¨5

 6

5

A5

Gtrs. 1 and 2 59

3

3

5

 

 6

5

5

 5

3

3

G5

A5

G5

F5

B¨5

5 3

7 5

5 3

3 1

8 6

3

  0

1

7

7

 6

5

 

(play 3 times)

3

Go back to

3

D

5

Chorus (bar 24)

P.M.

8 6

7 5 3

8 6

3

8 6

8 6

8 6

3

8 6

3

Bass 6

5

3

5

3

3

K

1

 

Hardwired

P.M.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 !

B5

Gtrs. 1 and 2

B¨5 N.C.(E5)

P.M.

0

B¨5

0

M

A5

2 0

9 7

0

8 6

0

Gtrs. 1 and 2

B5 B¨5 N.C.(E5)

P.M.

67

0

0

0

0

8 6

7 5

0

0

3

5

6

5

destruct A5

8 6

0

7 5

6 !

5



5

A5

(play 4 times)

3

7 5

7 5

7 5

5



7 5

(end double-time feel)

destruct destruct destruct

-

-

 

7 5

Bass substitutes Bass Fill 1 fourth time (see bar 23)

9 0 0 0 0 7

B¨5 A5

P.M.

8 6

8 0 0 0 0 6

N.C.

N.C.(E5)

P.M.

7 5

0 0 3

5

6

5

3

5

Bass

112

2 0

Self Self Self

N.C.

6



Outro (2:58) N.C.(E5)

 

self B¨5

P.M.

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 (see bar 13)

 

2 0

P.M.

0

6 3

to



0

(2:47)

0

6

E5

N.C.(E5)

64

6

3

(2:43)

61

6

3

N.C.(E5)

L

6

0

0 0 0 0 0

0

0 0 0 0 0

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

0

0

3

5

6

5

3

5

   

P.M.

0 0 0

E5

  

*

*repeat previous beat

  

2 0

*

0 0 0

B5 B¨5

0

2 0

9 7

8 6

 

7

6

 


TRANSCRIPTIONS

CAN’T STOP

Red Hot Chili Peppers As heard on BY THE WAY Words and music by ANTHONY KIEDIS, FLEA, JOHN FRUSCIANTE AND CHAD SMITH • Transcribed by JEFF PERRIN

Cmaj7

G

D

7fr 4321

A

1

Bm

Bm7

5fr T 3211 T = thumb

13331

Cmaj7

7fr T 3111

Em

7fr 13114

7fr

D

T 4321

3421

2341

    

Gtr. 1 4

0

C



5 7

5 7 7 5 7

5 7

5 7

5 7

(grad. increase volume throughout intro)

5 7

  

9 X

X X 7 X 9 9 X 0 0 0 X X X 0 0 0 X X X X X

Verses (0:32, 1:35) 1. Can’t stop Defunkt 2. Sweetheart I’ll get (E5)

7 X

7 X

9 X

C 7fr

3211

8fr

31111

T 321

(0:21)

addicted the pistol is bleeding you into

X 7

7 X

X 7

7 X

7 X X 7 7 X X

   0

X X

Bass (omit bass first four bars on 1st Verse) Bass Fig. 1 p p s p s p * s 7 9 7 9 7 7 7

 

9 X

9

p 9

9 X

7 X 9 9 X X X X X X 7 7 7 X

7 7 7 X X

(C5)

7 X

9 X

X 7

p X

7 X

7 X 9 9 X X X X

X X X 7 7 7

to the shindig that you pay for in the snow cone penetration

7 X

*

*Main riff B performed with strumming. X's in notation reflect fret-hand muting used to keep adjacent strings to melody notes from ringing.

(B5)

7 0 X

Bm7 12fr

211

(play 4 times)

5 7 7 5 7

7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7

8fr

111

(repeat previous bar)

Gtr. 1 Rhy. Fig. 1 7

 

34211

*Play vibrato on repeats only.

Bass

D

12fr

B

    

5 7

C

8fr

(q = 92)

Gtr. 1 (elec. w/clean tone) *

Em

5fr

Intro (0:00) Moderately q = 89 N.C.(E5)

  

C

7fr

X X 7

7 X 7 7 7

(D5)

s

s

7

5

8

7 X

9 9 X X

8 8 8

8 8 X

top he says punk the feeling smart she’s leading gender a of

I’m gonna win that you stay me to ozone generation

big for

7 X

9 X

X 0 X

X 0 X

X 0 X

7 X

X X

9 X

9

X 0 X

p 7

p 9

s

p X

s

p 7

s

p 9

Chop This So The

0

9 X

5

5

X

0

p 7

0

s

5

*s = slap w/thumb; p = pop w/finger

a life want In time I the great (2.) Music The birth of every (B5) (1.) Choose not

9

7 X

9 X

7 s

7

114

p 9

p 9

X 7 s

7

X 7

X 7 s

of imitation to be your best communicator other nation

7 X

p 9

7

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

X X

s

7

9 X

s

7

friend

Distant Eastside Use two Worth your (C5)

9

X 7

X 7

p X

s

7

X 7

cousin love is sticks weight the

7 X

9 X

p 10

p 10

8 s

8

X 8 s

8

to living to make gold of

X 8

X 8 s 10

the reservation on the West it in the nature meditation

end Rhy. Fig. 1

7 X

p 10

End

s 10

9 X

9

p 10

s

X 8

7

7 X X 8

X X

 

end Bass Fig. 1 s

5

 

“CAN’T STOP” WORDS AND MUSIC BY ANTHONY KIEDIS, FLEA, JOHN FRUSCIANTE AND CHAD SMITH © 2002 MOEBETOBLAME MUSIC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED USED BY PERMISSION REPRINTED BY PERMISSION OF HAL LEONARD LLC


“CAN ’T STOP”

Knocked White (Ah This Can’t

*

out but boy you better come heat is screaming in the jungle Ah chapter’s going to be a close stop the spirits when they need

(B5) Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Rhy. Fig. 1 (see bar 7) Bass p p s p s p s 11

 

7

9

7

Don’t die Complete

you know the motion

one you

Smoke rings I Mop tops are

know happy

p 7

p

the truth is you if

some do stumble Ah) gonna blow one you’re feed you when they

(D5) p 9

7

9

7

to

p X

7

s

s

7

5

p 9

s

s

7

5

p 7

p 9

p X

5

s

5

*Gtr. 2 is elec. w/clean tone

1.

1.

write your message on the pavement on a spaceship perservering (Ah)

Go All

(B5) 13

s

p 9

p 9

s

7

s

7

2.

Go J.

p 9

s

9

p X

9

7

s

7

Come Birds

X 7

Bass

s

9 X

p 9

X 7

p 9

17

X 7

X

   

9

9

9

9

9

9

7 8 9

9

s 9

p X

s

s

7

8

7

Chorus (1:14, 2:16) world I love The tears G D * 3 3 4 5 3

9 X

  

3 3 4 5

5 7 7 7 5

X X X

3

I

drop

12

9

10

7 8 9

7 8 9

s

   

8

8

strong blow

 7 8 9

7 8 9

7

8

7 8 9

7 8 9

7 8 9

7 8 9

     10 10 7 7 

7

with fifty the meaning

12

to

p 10

be

p 10

belly into

 7 8 9

7 8 9

dancers bebop

The The

7 8 9

7 8 9

X X

part

of

s

   

s

p

s

8

8

8

X

8

the

Bm 5 7 7 7 5

5 7 7 7 5

5 7 7 7 5

X X X

*Composite arrangement: Two guitars arranged for one part

 10

wave meant steering

X X

7

s

7

D

7 X

p 10

back that

Cmaj7

Gtrs. 1 and 2 15 7 X

p 10

8

for any answers is in the tree top (Ah)

(B5)

bright I wonder what the hands for everything but

(C5) Substitute Bass Fill 1 on 2nd Verse (see below)

s

X

ask the dust Butterfly

Burn so Use my

12

12

X X X

   7 7 7 9

9

12

7 7 9 7

X X X

9

12

12

wave Cmaj7

8

8

8

Can’t stop

7 8 9 10

7 8 9 10

7 8 9 10

7 8 9 10

10

10

10

X X X

12

10

12

Bass Fill 1 (2:03)

  

(C5) s

8

p

p

10

10

s

8

s

X

p 9

s

X

p 7

7

7 5

guitarworld.com

115


TRANSCRIPTIONS

19

Ever G

wonder D

if

it’s

X X X

7 7 7 5

7 7 7 5

7 7 7 5

7 7 7 5

X X

12 9 10 12

12

12

12

12

   3 3 3 4 5

10

3 3 4 5 3

all Bm

   7 7 7 9

X X

9

7 7 9 7

you Cmaj7

for

12

7 8 9 10

X X X

9

12

The world I love The trains I G D

7 8 9 10

10

7 8 9 10

10

7 8 9 10

10

   3 3 3 4 5

X X X

14 14 12

10

3 3 4 5

7 7 7 5

7 7 7 5

7 7 7 5

9 10 12

12

12

X X X

3

10

hop to be

7 7 7 5

X X X X

12

1st time, go back to C 2nd Verse (see bar 7)

22

part Bm

   7 7 7 9

9

E 25

of the wave Cmaj7 7 7 9

7 8 9 10

X X

12 12

9

Bridge (2:37) Wait a Em Rhy. Fig. 2

7 8 9 9

9

7

7

F

Come and G

7 8 9 10

7 8 9 10

3 3 4 5

10

7

7 8 9 9

10

X X

9

 14

5 7 7 7

9

9 7

7

7 8 9 9

8 8 9

5 7 7 7

5 7 7 7

12

12

I

5 7 7 7

10

X X

7 7 7 5

7 7 7 5

7 7 7 5

9

10 12

12

12

lose Bm

5 7 7 7

7 7 9

7 7 9

9 9 9 7

7

ever 5 7 7 7

7 7 7

10 10

time Bm7

7 7 7 5

10 7 7 9 7

 

10 7 7 9

7 8 9

  

0 7 8 9 10

 10  !

to Cmaj7

8

9

Just like you Cmaj7

Bm7

7 7 7

knew Bm end Rhy. Fig. 2

when it’s

C 8 9 10

D

12 10

8 9 10

10

8

8 9 10

5 7 7 7

How ’bout you Bm7

C

7 7 7 9

7 7 7 9

end Bass Fig. 2 7

7 7 7 9

9 9 7

7 7 7 9

7

8 9 10 10

D

12 10

8 9 10 10

10 8

 

8 9 10 10

5

 

7 7 7

6

(2:58)

more Ten reasons more Far shocking Em C Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Rhy. Fig. 2 simile (see bar 25)

Gtr. 3 (elec. w/clean tone and chorus effect*) let ring throughout 33 ** 12 12 12 12 13 13 12 12 12 12 12

 

why than

13 14

Bass plays Bass Fig. 2 simile (see bar 25) *Chorus effect rate and depth controls set to produce vibrato-style effect. **Don’t play first note second time through.

116

3

10

me D

tell 3 3 4 5

Win or

10

7 8 9 9

12

more shocking than anything D C 7 8 9 8

X X

passin’ out D 7 8 9 8

   3

 12

Em

Far 29

10

stop

minute I’m

9

7

10

7 8 9 8

Bass Fig. 2

7 8 9 10

Can’t

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

12

I anything

13 14

need D

10

10

10 11

now knew

somebody ever I Bm

10

11

12

12 12

11

12 12

11

12


“CAN ’T STOP”

1.

just

Bm7

35

5

5

7

5

7

7

5

7

7

like 5

7

you 7

7

Cmaj7

7

D

7

7

8

7

8

9

7

7

5

8

9

9

 

7

7

Bass substitutes Bass Fill 2 (see below) 2.

Right

on

cue

Bm7

Gtr. 3 37

Cmaj7

5

7

5

Gtrs. 1 and 2

5

7

7

7 7 7 9

5

7

7 7 7 9

Bass 9

7

G

9

5

7

7

7

7

10 7 7 9

0 0 10

9 7

7

8

7 9

Gtr. 1 (w/dist.) 39 15 x

!

1

15

x

(B5)

 15 !

15

x

x

12

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 simile (see bar 7)

8 9 10

8 9 10

8 9 10

8 9 10

8 9 10

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

10

I’m gonna win big

15 !

15

1

(Ah

Defunkt

12 !

15

that you

pay Ah you better come Ah

for to

Can’t stop addicted to the shindig (E5)

15 !

Distant (C5)

12 14

12

 oh

This

Don’t oh (D5)

17

cousin to

the reservation

12

11

14

that you stay Ah) the truth is some Ah)

punk the feeling die

17

0

of imitation 15

1

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 simile (see bar 7)

Knocked out but boy (Ah (E5) Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Rhy. Fig. 1 simile (see bar 7)

Gtr. 3 (w/dist.) 1 47 15

12

 the pistol

x

12 12 12 12 12 12

Chose not a life (B5)

8 9 10 0 7 8 0

(3:29)

1

9

10

Bass substitutes Bass Fill 3 (see below)

Chop top he says (D5) 15

12

8

9

8 9 10

(C5)

 12 !

7

8

8 9 10

8

(D5)

7

8 9 10

H 1

7

9

8 9 10

12

7

8

(3:19)

N.C.(E5)

44

7

you know

for do

1

!

15 !

15

15

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 simile (see bar 7)

Bass Fill 2 (3:06) (Cmaj7)

 

12

10

10 8

Bass Fill 3 (3:26) (C5)

(D) 5

7

5

6

 

10 8

X

10

7

9

7

5

7

5

8

guitarworld.com

117


TRANSCRIPTIONS

(Oh

49

I

(Oh (B5)

“CAN ’T STOP”

In

time I

want

Go

write your message

12 !

(4:00)

(E5)

Eastside oh) Burn so oh) (C5)

to be your best friend Ah on the pavement Ah

generator

(D5)

Gtrs. 1 and 2 51 7

(B5)

7 X

9

X 7

X 7

X 1

X X

7 X

Can’t stop the gods

9

9 7

7

X 0 X

7

Feel (C5)

from engineering

7

J

(4:10)

(E5)

Gtr. 1 55

7 X

Bass s

7 X

9 X

p 7

p 9

X 7 s

Gtr. 1 59

X X X

118

9 X

9 X 0

7 X

0

7 X

p 9

7 X

s

s

X

X X

9 X

9

p 7

s

p 9

s

X

two maybe X 7 7

7

7

s

p 9

s 9

p 9

X

X 7 X

X 7 X

p 7

s

s

7

5

three of these

X X

9 X X 7

9 X X 7

9 X X 7

p 9

s X

p 7

7

Can’t

stop

the spirits

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

X 7 X

even

s X

I wonder what the wave

but don’t

7 X

X 0 X

9 X

need

7 X

7 X

X 0 X

the West

0

9 X X 8

X 7 X

X 0 X

s

s

7

8

when they need you

meant

 

1

9 X X 8

9

X X

9 X X 8

X X 8

her

X 9

9

0

0

9 X 0

9 X 0

9 X 0

1

9

9 X X 8

1

9 X X 8

9 X X 8

9 X X

This life

is

more

than ordinary

7 X

9 X

X 0

X 0

X 0

7 X

X X

9

9

X 0 X

X 0 X

p 7

p 9

s

s

p 7

s

p 9

s

p X

s

X

5

7 X X 8

9 X X 8

p 10

p 10

7

7 X X 8 s

9

X

life

X

9 X 0

X 0 X

7

the Pleiades

7 X X 8

7 X X 8

7 X X 8

7 X X 8

7 X X 8

7 X X 8

s X

p 10

s X

p s p 10 10 10

s

8

This

0

interfering

Comin’ from a space to teach you of (C5)

8

End

intimidate

for any

1

(D5)

7 X

bright

Sweet talk

no

9

the dictionary

9 X

p 9

9 X X 8

8

0

7

N.C.

7 X

X 9

X X

7

in

Your image

Can I get 57

X 7

7

0

(B5)

X 7

9 X

on

1

53 7 X

is living

 12 !

12

Kick start the golden

love

7 X X 8

7 X X 8

8

is more

than just a read-through


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TRANSCRIPTIONS

SLEEPING DOGS Zakk Wylde

As heard on BOOK OF SHADOWS II Words and music by ZAKK WYLDE • Transcribed by JEFF PERRIN

Gm

F

Cm

3fr 3 3   

    

134111

43121

Intro (0:00)

134211

Moderately q = 81 w/Swing 16ths feel     =     Gm Rhy. Fig. 1

Gtr. 1 (acous.)

3

3

5

3

5

3

5

3 3 3 5

3

3

3

3

3

3

  

3 3 3

6

3

6

5

3 4 3 5

3 4 3 5

3 4 3

4 3 3

6

3 3 3

5

Gtr. 2 (elec. w/clean tone and medium-fast tremolo effect) Rhy. Fill 1

0

 

0

3 3 3

4 3 5

Bass Bass Fig. 1

  

3

3

3

3

3

3

Gm Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fill 1 (see bar 1) Gtr. 1 3 3 3 3 5

3

5

3 3 3 5 5 3





let ring throughout

1

13421



A

3

5 3

3

3

6

3

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

3 5 5

5 3

3

3 3 5 5 3

3 3 5 5 3

3 3 3

6

3 3

6

5

3 4 3 5

3 4 3 5

3 4 6

3 4 3 3

3 3 3

5

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 (see bar 1)

B

(0:13, 1:15)

Gm Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 1 twice (see bar 1) Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fill 1 twice (see bar 1)

Gtr. 3 (elec. w/overdriven tone) Riff A 5 5

  7 7 7 5

5

  5 5 !

 3 3

1/2

7

7

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 (see bar 1)

Gm



Gtr. 3

7

7 !

7

5

5

3

3

3

end Riff A

 3

5 5

5 5

  5 !

(let ring into next bar)

1/4

5 5

3

Bass 3

120

3

3

3

3

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

3

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

“SLEEPING DOGS” WORDS AND MUSIC BY ZAKK WYLDE COPYRIGHT (C) 2016 BELLBOTTOMS AND BEER MUSIC ALL RIGHTS ADMINISTERED BY REACH MUSIC PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED USED BY PERMISSION REPRINTED BY PERMISSION OF HAL LEONARD LLC


“SLEEPING DOGS”

C

Verses (0:25, 1:27) You 1. 2. Isn’t

Gm

9

couldn’t justice

find

that

your you

3 5 5 3

3 3 5 5 3

Gtr. 1

3 3 3 5 3

5 3

3

3 5 5

5 3

5 3

peace hope

3 3 3

6

3

6

3 4 3 5

5

3 4 3 5

4 3

4 3 3

6

3 3 3

5

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 twice simile (see bar 1)

Gm

11

that you

within the bitterness that Believe in the story 3 3 3 5

3

3

3

3

For the For the

Gm

Gtr. 1 13

3 3 3 5

3

3

5 3

5 3

3 4 5 5 3

dogs dogs

sleeping sleeping

5 3

3

3

3 4 5 5 3

burns sell

5 3

3 3 3 5 5 3

3

3

3 3

6

that that

3

6

3 4 3 5

5

3 4 3 5

3 4 3 5

4 3 3

6

lie lie

F

4 3 5

5

3 3 3

Forever They’re alive

3 1

3 1

1 1 2 3 3 1

1

1

1

2 3 3 1

2 3 3 1

1

1

2 3 3

X X

1

2 3 3 1

1

1

1

X X

Bass 3

3

3

3

to 15

6

D

17

4 3 3

6

6

3

return and

E¨ 4 3 5

3

5

6

4 3 5

4 3 5

6

6

3

well

Forever Alive

3 4

3 4

4 3 3

6

6

6

5

3

3

3 4 5 5 3

Bass Fig. 2 3

3

3

   

3 4

3

3 4

3

3 4

3

3

3 4 5 5 3

3 4 5 5 3

3

3

5

6

6

6

Chorus (0:49, 1:51, 3:38) but not forgotten Gone Gm Cm Gtr. 3 plays Fill 1 on 3rd Chorus (see below) Rhy. Fig. 2

to

6

6

3 3

6

6

return well

and

5

6

4 3 5

3 4 3

4 3 5

6

6

6

3 3 3 5 3

3

3

3

3

  

3 3

3

3 3 5 5

3

3 3 5 3 3

3

3 3 3 5 3 3

5

3

3 3 3 5 3 3

X X

5

5

1

1

1 1 2 3 3 1

1

1

1

   

X X

5

6

You cut me down F

3 3 3

4 3 3

6

just

1 1 2 3 3 1

1 1 2 3 3 1

1

1

X X

6

to watch me

1 1 2 3 3 1

1 1 2 3 3 1

1 1 2 3 3 1

X X X X

1

1

1

Fill 1 (3:38) Gtr. 4

(Gm) (F)   17 15 17  ! 17 17 17 ! ! (Cm)

guitarworld.com

121


TRANSCRIPTIONS bleed E¨

20

4 3 5 6

5 6

6

6

6

  

3 4

3 4

3 4

3 3

5 6

6

6

6

6

2 3 3 1

1 1 2 3 3 1

2 3 3 1

1

1 1 2 3 3 1

1 1 2 3 3 1

 1

1

1

5

6

gave you the last word F

23

E

3 4 3 5

Gone Cm 4 3 5

3 3 3

6

6

3

3

3 4 5 5 3

3

3

3

and that’s the

but not forgotten

  

Gm 3 4

3 4

3 4

3

3

3

last

3

3 4 5 5 3

3 4 5 5 3

3

3

3

thing

1 1 2 3 3 1

1

1 1 2 3 3 1

1 1 2 3 3 1

1

1 1 2 3 3 1

X X

5 3

3

3

3

 

3 3

5

4 4 4 3 3 3 3 5 5 5

6

6

4 4 4 3 3 3 3 5 5 5

5

6

6

6

6

6

6 6

3 3 5 3 3

X

5 3

3

3

me

6

5 6

4 3 5 6

6

6

6

 

3 3 5

3

3 5

3

5 3

*

6 6

*Note in parenthesis played on 2nd and 3rd Choruses only.

(2:18)

Gm E¨ Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 1 twice (see bar 1) Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fill 1 twice (see bar 1) Gtr. 3 1/4 26 5

  7 7 5 7

  5 5 !

 3 3

5

Gm



1/2

7

7 !

7

7

5

5

3

5 5

5 5

Guitar Solo (2:29) Cm Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 2 twice (see bar 17)

Gtr. 4 (elec. w/dist., phaser and wah) 1

30 5



5 5

3

3

5

5

5

5

Gtr. 4

Gm

3 ! w/bar

F

  3 3 !

1

  5 !

Gtr. 3

1/4

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 twice (see bar 1)

F

3 3 5 3 3

3 5

5

end Bass Fig. 2

 6

6

4 4 3 3 5 5 6

3 3

3 5

1st time, go back to B (see bar 5) 2nd time, continue to E (see bar 26) 3rd time, skip ahead to G Outro (see bar 53)

end Rhy. Fig. 2

5 6

1

5 3

3 3 3 5

you’ll take from

1 1 2 3 3 1

3 3 3

I

5

6

5

  2

3

2

2

2

3

3

5

Bass plays Bass Fig. 2 twice simile (see bar 17)

E¨ 33 3

1

 5

Cm

w/bar

1

6 !

6

5

X

 5 !

5

5

5

Cm

w/bar

3



1/2

5

1

5

3

 3

3

37

Gm 1

5

 3

1

6 5 5



6

6

3

5

15 15

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

3 5

3

3

122

F

6

3 5 3

  2

2

2

3

3

3

3

Gm

 5

1/2

5

5

5

5

5


“SLEEPING DOGS”

F 40

5



5

3

1

3

4

5

10

10

6

10 10

8

6

3

10 11 13

10 10 13 13

10

6 8 10 10 10 10 8 6

(trem. pick)

10 8 6 10 8 6

1

43 13

8

6

10 10 10 8 7

1

7 7 7



10 8 7 10

13 13

13

let ring

 /13 13 0

13

13

13

3

13

13

13

   13 13 w/bar

13

13

X X

13

10

 F

 14 !

Gtr. 1

1 1 2 3 3 1

1 1 2 3 3 1

1

1

 1 1 2 3 3 1

Bass 1

14

15 15 17

49

18 18

1/2



14 15 14 12

1 1 2 3 3 1

3

1 1 2 3 3 1

1 1 2 3 3 1

1 1 2 3 3 1

3

1 1 2 3 3 1

1 1 2 X 3 X 3 1

1

1

3

1

1

1

18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18

18 18 18

3 4 3 5 6

3 4 3 5 6

3 4 3 5 6

6

6

6

3 4 3 5 6

3 4 3 5 6

  18 18  18 18

3 4 3 5 6

6

6

1

18

15

3 4 3 5 6

1

1 1 2 3 3 1

1

18

 15

3

3

3 3 3 5 5 3

3 3 3 5 5 3

3

3

3

3 3 3

1

12

0 0 0 0 0 0

6

3 4 3 5 6

4 4 3 3 3 3 3 5 5 3

6

6

1

15

18

1/2

18

18 18

1 1 2 3 3 1

  

 1

1 1 2 3 3 1

3

1 1 2 3 3 1

3

1 1 2 3 3 1

18 15

17

3

15

3

1 1 2 3 3 1

1

1 1 2 3 3 1

3

1 1 2 3 3 1

1 1 2 3 3 1

1

3 3 3 5 5 3

3 3 3 5 5 3

3 3 3 5 5 3

3 3 3 5 5 3

3 3 3 5 5 3

3

3

3

3 3 3 5 5 3

15

18 15

18

18

3

18

15

18 17 15 17 15

3

3

3

17

17

17

15

3

(repeat previous bar)

 3

1

6

3 3 3 5 5 3

1

*2nd string “caught” under ring finger.

1 1 2 3 3 1

Cm

3

F * 1

  15

2

Gtr. 4 46

X X

3

1

13

13

X

1

X X

  ( 13)

1

w/bar

8

Cm

  X 12

1

F

  ( 13) 13 13

let ring

11 10

3

6

Gm

8

9

E¨ 41

11 10

1

 1

3

3

3

3

3

3

guitarworld.com

123


TRANSCRIPTIONS

“SLEEPING DOGS”

51

17

15

17

17

17

3

52

15

17

3

3 4 3 5 6

3 4 3 5 6

6

6

6

15 17

15

17

15

17

3

3 4 3 5 6

15

15

17

15

3

3 4 3 5 6

17

17

3

3 4 3 5 6

15

3 4 3 5 6

17

15

3

3 4 3 5 6

6

6

15

6

3

3 4 3 5 6

3 4 3 5 6

6

6

6

6

Go back to

18

18 15 18 15

3 4 3 5 6

3 4 3 5 6

3 4 3 5 6

6

6

6

3 4 3 5 6

15

18 15

3 4 3 5 6

18 15

18 15

3 4 3 5 6

18

15

17 15

17 15

17 15

6

Outro (4:04)

6

6

Last thing you’ll take from me E¨

 

6

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

E¨ 3 3 3 5 3

3 3 3 5 3

3

3

X X

3

Gtr. 2 3 3 3

0

X X

6

6

Last

thing

3

3 4 3 5

5

Slower

3 4 3 5

you’ll

take

3 4 3

3 4 3 5

6

from me Gm

0 3 3 3 5 5 3

0

0



 



(repeat previous two bars)

Gm

3

6

Gm

Bass

Gtr. 1 57

X X

3 3 3



2.

3 4 3 5 6

Last thing you’ll take from me

53



4 3 5

Bass 3

124

3

3

3

3

3

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017

3

3

6

6

6

Chorus (see bar 17)

17 15 17 17

17 15

3 4 3 5 6

1.

Gm E¨ Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 1 twice (see bar 1) Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fill 1 twice (see bar 1) Gtr. 3 plays Riff A (see bar 5)

D

9

3 4 3 5 6

6

6

(2.) me

 

3

3 4 3 5 6

1

18

15

17

3 4 3 5 6

9

G

15

17

6

6

6

6

6

3 !


the

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125


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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2017


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130

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Guitar World - February 2017