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#STORYBOARD

10

FEET FIRST

SHOWER ME WITH ROSES

PERSPECTIVE

Production editor Ciara’s sandals living life on the edge in Belize. For more on her big adventure in Central America, see p. 102.

Pretty much every single flower in all the land showed up to congratulate EIC

An over-the-photographer’s-shoulder view of Winnie Harlow in action on-set for our “It’s About Us” shoot on p. 74.

Vanessa on her new gig.

JUST BROWS-ING

ME, YOU, MIU MIU

DRIVING MS. CARLI

For the story of how this picture came to be (e.g., why Cara didn’t give associate beauty ed Victoria the silly-faces memo), see p. 94.

We snapped this months ago at Paris Fashion Week and kept it as inspo for when we prepped our trend report (p. 38).

Shout-out to our special projects editor’s husband, Tim, for this snap of her with their sweet ride. (For more: p. 100.)

RED ALERT

DAZZLING TRIO

BEAR WITH

We all wore the same shade of Bite Beauty lipstick (Mistletoe, FYI), and this is what happened: Our teeth looked really white.

EIC Vanessa, health & beauty editor Katherine and event host Jessi Cruickshank shining bright at the Mirror Ball gala.

Between shots, our polyamorous gummybear models (go to p. 61 for this to make any sense) read the latest issues. ■

Get a behind-the-scenes look at each issue as it happens by following us on Instagram @ELLECanada.

TEXT, SARAH LAING; PHOTOGRAPHY, ELLE CANADA STAFF. OPPOSITE PAGE: TEXT, SARAH LAING; STYLING, ELAINE JYLL REGIO; PHOTOGRAPHY, NELSON SIMONEAU (W. HARLOW)

@ E L L E C A N A D A


INSIDER

BEHIND THE SCENES

BRIGHT STAR

1

2

BTS on our February cover.

3

4

Whenever we hear PartyNextDoor’s “Break From Toronto,” the ELLE Canada team is reminded of our day on-set with Winnie Harlow. Not only was the tune on repeat (at her request) but the fact that it shouts out “the ’Sauga” multiple times felt so appropriate for a Canadian-themed shoot starring a model who still keeps a base in that GTA burb. And while the clothes were all homegrown, the vision was to bypass the usual suspects for the newer, younger, definitely cooler roster of talent that We the North have to offer. ■

5

1. Viscose top and pants, Kaelen ($919 and $787, kaelennyc.com). 2. Leather and wood boots, Brother Vellies ($694, brothervellies.com). 3. Sterling-silver ring, Danielle Lee Jewellery ($380, danielleleejewellery.com). 4. Rhodiumplated-sterling-silver necklace, Lauren Klassen ($1,500, laurenklassen.com). 5. Resin and polyurethane lacquer bracelet and ring, Ribeyron ($945 and $392, at Soop Soop, soopsoop.ca).

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COVER STORIES Everything you need to know about what you’ll be wearing come spring. 61 SEX SPECIAL The results from our reader survey are in! 73 FASHION The hot new Canadian designers to know now. 80 FASHION What Winnie Harlow means when she says “I’m not a role model.” By Vanessa Craft & Sarah Laing 94 BEAUTY Sure, Cara Delevingne is the face of a groundbreaking new mascara, but it’s the polymer that’s the real star. By Victoria DiPlacido

74

Winnie Harlow fronts an all-Canadian cast of fashion’s next big things.

TREND REPORT

STYLE & FASHION 24

FEBRUARY 2017

30 32 34

36

SHOPPING Statement tees get an update; tote-ally awesome XL bags; lingerie because February 14. STYLE SCOOP What’s cool, cutting edge and important. STYLE Fashion icon Linda Rodin on how she got to be one. STYLE Sometimes it’s all about dressing for the job you want... not the one you (don’t) have. STYLE An intellectual deep dive into what this season’s runways mean for you as a feminist. By Anya Georgijevic

PHOTOGRAPHY, NELSON SIMONEAU (W. HARLOW), IMAXTREE (BACKSTAGE) & GEOFFREY ROSS (MACARONS)

38


90

You can’t eat these macarons...but you can do your nails with them.

FEATURES 51

54

58

68

70

100 102

RADAR A couple of movies you’ve got to see pre-Oscars; a cocktail to chase away the winter blues. CELEBRITY Canada’s next big export, Charlotte Le Bon. By Sarah Laing LIFE Haunted by the ghosts of literary crushes past. By Heather O’Neill RELATIONSHIP How to love across language barriers. By Lauren Collins CAREER Four cool fashion jobs that will make you super-jealous. By Lisa Guimond TRAVEL A couple’s getaway to wine country. By Carli Whitwell ESCAPE Beaches and zip lines and skeletal remains, oh my! By Ciara Rickard

BEAUTY & WELLNESS 90

BEAUTY BUZZ

92

HAUL OF FAME

96

Products to bring out your sappy side. BODY Aunt Flo just came to town... and she’s got some cool new stuff for you to try.

38

Neon, stripes and all the other mega-trends you need the 411 on

EVERY MONTH 10

#STORYBOARD

11

BEHIND THE SCENES

14

EDITOR’S NOTE

18

GUEST LIST

19

JET SET

20

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

35

ELLE ONLINE

104

HOROSCOPE

105

SHOPPING GUIDE

106

#FASHIONPLAY

ON THE COVER Winnie Harlow is wearing a hoodie by CG Chris Gelinas, a bra by Mary Young, pants by Mikhael Kale, a choker by Laurie Fleming, a necklace by Alynne Lavigne, a necklace by Arielle de Pinto and an earring by Anne-Marie Chagnon. Photographer Nelson Simoneau Styling Corey Ng Art direction Brittany Eccles Contributing stylist Elaine Jyll Regio Hair Justin German (P1M.ca/Bang Salon) Makeup Simone Otis (P1M.ca/Charlotte Tilbury) Manicure Nargis Khan (P1M.ca/Tips Nail Bar) Styling assistant Hankyul Oh Digital technician Mori Arany Photographer’s assistant Spencer Robertson


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

WHAT DOES POWER MEAN TO YOU? When I was 10, I had a dream one night about my future adult life: I lived in New York in a cavernous exposed-brick loft apartment with a white grand piano and an equally grand chandelier. I dressed in hot-pink power suits and pointy-toed stilettos. I never came home until after dark, and I’d unwind standing at my floor-to-ceiling windows looking out over the twinkling city lights. When I woke up, I felt on top of the world and described the scene to my father, who, concerned, asked why I’d been working so late at night and why I lived alone. Had I even eaten dinner? (Oh, dads.) He didn’t get it. In my dream, I felt happy. Fulfilled. And I probably had a Pizza Pocket in a rhinestonebedazzled microwave waiting for me. (Yes, my impression of power was highly influenced by Jem and the Holograms and Janet Jackson’s Control video, but I was a child of the ’80s. I can’t be held responsible for that.) The point is: I felt in command of my life. This season, designers like Jacquemus, Marni and Balenciaga are exploring what dressing powerfully means—and it looks a lot like my childhood reverie: strong, commanding

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2017

shoulders, bags to be carried across the hip so hands are free and unburdened, silhouettes injected with volume to unapologetically take up space. If our Spring/Summer 2017 Trend Report doesn’t inspire you to embrace living large, then our cover star, Winnie Harlow, certainly will. Her confidence is infectious. When we met, I connected with her instantly. She’s someone I wish I had been friends with in middle school, when all I wanted to do was hide everything different about me and just blend in with everyone else. She refuses to be put into any box and isn’t afraid to say so. In my new role at ELLE Canada, I’m thinking a lot about the power we have as women and the power we still need to fight for. So many of us were taught to fit in. Stay quiet. Don’t make a scene. But not in the pages of this magazine. I promise that, through freespirited and intelligent conversation, we will continue to inform, challenge and excite. Our stories on fashion, beauty, culture, career, love and life will help you to take control—because we’re all in this together. My childhood vision has matured. Now, I wear a lot of black. More importantly, I’m never alone. I’m surrounded by strong, insightful women who want to be brave, speak up, take risks and live large. I’m so happy to have you join us.

Vanessa Craft Editor-in-Chief

Follow me on Twitter and Instagram @vanessacraft. What do you want to see more of in the magazine? Tell us at editors@ELLECanada.com or #TellELLECanada.

PHOTOGRAPHY, MAX ABADIAN (V. CRAFT); HAIR, JUSTIN GERMAN (PANTENE); MAKEUP, STÉPHANE CÔTÉ (M.A.C COSMETICS); V. CRAFT IS WEARING A BLAZER AND BRACELETS BY CHANEL

FEBRUARY


ELLECANADA.COM

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Vanessa Craft ART DIRECTOR Brittany Eccles FASHION MARKET EDITOR Elaine Jyll Regio SENIOR FASHION & MARKET EDITOR Anthony Mitropoulos ASSOCIATE EDITOR Liz Guber

FEATURES CULTURE EDITOR Sarah Laing SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR Carli Whitwell

HEALTH & BEAUTY HEALTH & BEAUTY EDITOR Katherine ASSOCIATE BEAUTY EDITOR Victoria

Flemming DiPlacido

ART

ELLECANADA

@ELLECANADA

ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR Elena Viltovskaia (on ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR Brian Fleming DESIGNER Danielle Campbell

leave)

ELLECANADA

COPY COPY EDITOR Marjorie Dunham-Landry PRODUCTION EDITOR Ciara Rickard PROOFREADER Jane Fielding ASSISTANTS Erika David, Maryjane Peters, Michelle Skelsey, Kiera Spronk INTERN Patricia Karounos CONTRIBUTORS Barbara Baumel, Lauren Collins, Lisa Guimond, Georgia Nicols, Linda Rodin, Geoffrey Ross, Marcin Tyszka MULTI-PLATFORM EDITIONS CONTENT DIRECTOR, MULTI-PLATFORM EDITIONS, BOOKS & SPECIAL ISSUES Jessica Ross CREATIVE DIRECTOR, DIGITAL EDITIONS Chris Bond IPAD SPECIALIST/DESIGNER Andrew Tran

Download the ELLE Canada app for iPad on the App Store. Digital editions are also available on Molto, Zinio, Kobo, Press Reader and Google Play. HEARST MAGAZINES INTERNATIONAL PRESIDENT & CEO Duncan Edwards SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT, CFO & GENERAL MANAGER Simon Horne SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT, DIRECTOR OF LICENSING & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Guatam Ranji SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT, INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Jeannette Chang SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT, EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Kim St. Clair Bodden EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, EDITORIAL Astrid Bertoncini EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR, INTERNATIONAL BRANDING Peter Yates

LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE CHAIRMAN & CEO Denis Olivennes ELLE FRANCE & INTERNATIONAL CEO Constance Benque ELLE INTERNATIONAL MEDIA LICENSES CEO François Coruzzi SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT/ELLE INTERNATIONAL DIRECTOR Valéria Bessolo Llopiz SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT/DIRECTOR OF INTERNATIONAL MEDIA LICENSES, DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT & SYNDICATION Mickael Berret ELLE INTERNATIONAL PRODUCTIONS Charlotte Deffe, Virginie Dolata DEPUTY SYNDICATION TEAM MANAGER Thérèse Genevois SYNDICATION COORDINATOR Johanna Jegou COPYRIGHTS MANAGER & DIGITAL SYNDICATION Séverine Laporte

International Ad Sales House: Lagardère Global Advertising, 10, rue Thierry le Luron, 92300 Levallois-Perret, France CEO Claudio Piovesana claudio.piovesana@lagardere-active.com ellearoundtheworld.com ELLE® and ELLE Canada® are used under licence from the trademark owner, Hachette Filipacchi Presse. Registered user: TVA Group – Hearst Publications Inc., 1010, rue de Sérigny, 4th Floor, Longueuil, Quebec J4K 5G7. Contents copyright © 2017 by TVA Group – Hearst Publications Inc. ELLE Canada is published 12 times per year except for occasional combined, expanded or premium issues. May not be reprinted without written permission. Single copy price: $4.50+tax. Full subscription prices: Canada, 1 year, $24+tax; U.S., 1 year, $48 (regular); other foreign countries, 1 year, $146.90 (regular). For subscription inquiries, call 905-946-8319. All reproduction requests must be made to COPIBEC (paper) 1-800-717-2022 or CEDROM-SNi (electronic) 1-800-563-5665. We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund of the Department of Canadian Heritage. Printing: Transcontinental Printing G.P., 2049 20th St. E., Owen Sound, Ontario N4K 5R2. Distributed by Coast to Coast Newsstand Services Ltd. Publications Mail Agreement 41557548. Return undeliverable addresses to ELLE Canada, Subscription Department, 25 Sheppard Ave. W., Suite 100, Toronto, Ontario M2N 6S7. ISSN 1496-5186

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VICE-PRESIDENT & GROUP PUBLISHER Lucie Dumas GROUP PUBLISHER, TORONTO Sandra E. Martin ADVERTISING SALES, TORONTO 416-227-8248 KEY ACCOUNT DIRECTORS, NATIONAL ADVERTISING SALES David Garby, Andrea McBride, Akta Sharma SENIOR DIRECTOR, MEDIA SOLUTIONS, TRANSACTIONAL Jerome Leys ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Kieran Darcy SALES COORDINATOR Jill Alexander NATIONAL ACCOUNT MANAGERS Jillian Dann-Macerollo (on leave), Cathy Ellis, Gary Forshaw, Joanne Landry, Delainie Marin, Vanessa Watson DIGITAL SALES REPRESENTATIVES, NATIONAL SALES Crystal Falls (on leave), Tony Vigario, Joanna Woodman SALES ASSOCIATE Patricia Mixemong RESEARCH ANALYST Eva Chau

ADVERTISING SALES, MONTREAL 514-598-2880 (VENTESPUBLICITAIRES@TVA.CA) SENIOR DIRECTOR, MEDIA SOLUTIONS, TRANSACTIONAL Patricia Heckmann SALES DIRECTOR, MAGAZINES AND OOH Anne Scheffer SENIOR DIRECTORS, MEDIA SOLUTIONS Karl Berthome, Caroline Gagnon COORDINATORS Mélina Delorme (on leave), Ingrid Martinez, Marie-Laurence Miron, Maria Perrotti NATIONAL SALES REPRESENTATIVES Stéphanie Mercier, Sophie Rémillard LOCAL SALES REPRESENTATIVES Vickie Bouthillier, Stéphanie Cusson, Brigitte Fortier, Francine Lanthier, Kathy Marquis, Natalia Tavares ADVERTISING SALES, INTERNATIONAL & U.S. LAGARDÈRE GLOBAL ADVERTISING (LGA) INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR

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DIGITAL PRE-PRESS SERVICES DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Johanne Perron TEAM LEAD Luc Gauvin PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Linda Desjardins

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ELLE CANADA IS PUBLISHED BY TVA GROUP – HEARST PUBLICATIONS INC. SENIOR MANAGEMENT, MEDIA GROUP & TVA GROUP INC. PRESIDENT & CEO, MEDIA GROUP & TVA GROUP INC. Julie Tremblay VICE-PRESIDENT & DIRECTOR OF FINANCES Denis Rozon PRESIDENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES Jean-François Reid EXECUTIVE VICE-PRESIDENT OF ADVERTISING Donald Lizotte VICE-PRESIDENT OF COMMUNICATIONS Véronique Mercier

c a n a d a

One easy way to reach us: firstname. lastname@ tva.ca


GUEST LIST JESSICA WOOD SEXUALITY & RELATIONSHIPS RESEARCHER

A N YA GEORGIJEVIC WRITER

The gig This Brampton-born Ph.D. candidate lent us her sexpertise to help decode your survey responses (p. 61). “It’s great to see so many people eager to express their desires and experiences.”

The gig Toronto fashion guru Georgijevic makes sense of this season’s boldest styles and trends in “Power Ranger” (p. 36). Style blunder “High-heeled sneakers are my ultimate regret. I had them in the early 2000s, and I’ll never recover from the embarrassment. When wedge sneakers came around a few years ago, I just couldn’t go there.”

Relationship rules “Make time together as a couple, and ensure that your relationship is strong. Otherwise, the rest can easily fall apart!”

The gig This Québécois ELLE Canada veteran shot cover girl Winnie Harlow. Early days “When I was 15, I saw a modelling contest in a magazine, and I had a friend who I thought could win. I changed her look and took some pictures of her—she won second place and got signed with an agency in Paris. It was my first shoot.”

COREY NG STYLIST The gig Dressing our cover model, Winnie Harlow, was a breeze for Toronto-based Ng. “I asked her to put a tulle gown over a hoodie, and she did it without hesitation.” Career high “My first NYFW: Being in that environment and seeing all the editors and stylists I admire was a pinch-me moment.”

HEATHER

O’NEILL

WRITER

The gig Montreal native O’Neill explores how her childhood literary loves influenced her future taste in men (p. 58).

Dating dud “A guy I once dated would invite his ex-girl-

friend along every time! He didn’t want her to feel left out.” ■

18

TEXT, MICHELLE SKELSEY; PHOTOGRAPHY, JULIA C. VONA (H. O’NEILL)

NELSON SIMONEAU PHOTOGRAPHER


JET SET

MAKE IT UP TO YOU If you were one of the lucky VIPs who made it to our event at the Twist Gallery on Queen West in Toronto, you got a master class in day-to-night holiday glam, courtesy of our health & beauty editor Katherine, makeup artist Sabrina Rinaldi and the Revlon “Eyes, Cheeks & Lips” palette.

HOT TICKET TEXT, SARAH LAING; PHOTOGRAPHY, JAMES YIGITOZ/PRCPTN

This month, our events were all about primping, pampering and partying.

FRENCH TWIST Two of our favourite things are France and skincare, so naturally we were on hand to fete the opening of the new spalike Caudalie store at Sherway Gardens in Toronto. While some guests got mini facials, health & beauty editor Katherine chatted with others over cheese and wine. Parfait, non? ■

19


LETTERS “every shade delivers knockout care.”

@best_pr Need this Marc Jacobs blouse!!!

WORD UP Rita Remark, global lead educator want care without sacrificing colour? Rita recommends ”treat, love & color,“

Your tweets, Instas, emails and more.

@czm8 Just got my issue yesterday...cover is heaven

our one-step system for stronger, brighter nails. @julymua Really beautiful @ELLECanada

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NATURAL ANTHEM I admired the article about Alicia Keys [“Let’s Get Acquainted,” ELLE Celebrity, January 2017]. I’m a mixed girl and I used to put my hair in a bun to hide my head of curls. I also made my mom buy me every latest product just because I thought I needed it. Alicia Keys has begun to wear no makeup and she embraces her natural hair, so I am too. She stated that she feels like she’s at a very powerful moment in her life—I can happily say that I am too. I’m no longer going to try to fit in when I was born to stand out. Thank you, Alicia! Shi-Tashes States, Toronto

LOVE AND MARRIAGE I’ve been reading ELLE Canada since I moved to Canada in February 2016. It is great for my English, and it’s my best friend when I decide I deserve a moment of relaxation. I really enjoyed reading “Honeymoon Hangover” [ELLE Relationship, December 2016]. I moved here to live with my Canadian husband, and I could relate to many of the issues in the article. I knew living together would be very different from our longdistance relationship because back then, every time we met was like a honeymoon! Reading the stories made me think that we’re doing great. Monica Davila, Winnipeg

TWEETS @EsteeLalonde @ELLECanada Soooooo cool! Thanks so much for having me! I had a blast @JaimeMaser Big congrats @vanessacraft on the EIC title @ELLECanada! @helderdiego @ELLECanada @vanessacraft OMG!! Such great news. Congrats, Vanessa!! @LipStainsSM Some afternoons just require a little extra TLC @ELLECanada. #mondaymotivation

After reading “Honeymoon Hangover,” I realized that social media and makeup have a lot in common: Both can be used for creative expression or to mask insecurities and present a glossed-over face to the world. As the article suggests, one might feel pressured to present an engagement happily on social media to mask underlying insecurities. However, where makeup gives people the self-confidence they need to face the world, social media gives people a facade behind which to hide. Thanks for a thought-provoking article! Tovi Ander, email Send us your letters via email at ELLELetters@ELLECanada.com or snail mail at ELLE Canada, 25 Sheppard Ave. W., Suite 100, Toronto, Ont., M2N 6S7. Include your name and address. Letters may be edited.

America’s nail salon expert. Since 1981.

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ELLECANADA.COM

PHOTOGRAPHY, MAX ABADIAN

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Clothes don’t send a message—said no one ever. Let’s hail one of fashion’s basic instruments of self-expression: the slogan tee. It’s a cotton canvas for wise words, bons mots and clever quips.


STYLE 1

2

4

3

5

JUST SAYING These cool crewnecks get the word out. 1. Cotton and elastane, H&M ($15, hm.com). 2. Polyester, cotton and rayon, Arima Designs ($40, at etsy.com). 3. Cotton, Mango ($40, mango.com). 4. Cotton and modal, Zoe Karssen ($86, zoekarssen.com). 5. Polyester and elastane, Boohoo ($27, boohoo.com). 6. Cotton, Maison KitsunĂŠ ($115, shop.kitsune.fr). 7. Cotton, Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh ($370, at farfetch.com). 8. Supima cotton, Mother ($145, motherdenim.com).

7

8

STYLING, ELAINE JYLL REGIO

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ELLECANADA.COM


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STYLE

1

2

SUPERSIZE ME

Slouchy or structured, the carryall goes XXL this season.

LOEWE

3

4

6

7

1. Faux leather, Sole Society ($88, solesociety.com). 2. Leather, Clava ($218, at shoebuy.com). 3. Leather, Vionnet ($3,581, vionnet.com). 4. Leather, Zara ($199, zara.com). 5. Calf leather, Valextra ($6,269, at farfetch.com). 6. Nubuck leather, Whistles ($225, at John Lewis, johnlewis.com). 7. Canvas and leather, Marni ($1,719, at modaoperandi.com).

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ELLECANADA.COM

STYLING, ELAINE JYLL REGIO; PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (RUNWAY)

5


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STYLE 1 4

2

DEMICUP Half-cup bras add oomph to your cleavage, thanks to their upturned pitch, and are suited to small- and medium-cup sizes.

3

DRESS YOU UP IN MY LOVE 7

EXTRA SUPPORT 6

Underwire and a full cup are key, but these embellished sets prove that you don’t have to sacrifice beauty for function. Not sure if you need to size up? Consult an expert.

10

9

8

BODYSUIT 11

12

A sheer, embroidered bodysuit is a guaranteed showstopper. For the daring: Treat the onepiece as a top and layer under a blazer.

1. Stretch-lace bra and briefs, L’Agent by Agent Provocateur ($108 and $66, lagentbyap.com). 2. Nylon and spandex bra and briefs, Victoria’s Secret ($72 and $33, victoriassecret.com). 3. Silk, nylon and rayon bra and briefs, Gilda & Pearl ($229 and $135, at farfetch.com). 4. Lace and microfibre bra and thong, La Vie en Rose ($50 and $25, lavieenrose.com). 5. Polyester, spandex and nylon bra and thong, Ashley Graham for Addition Elle ($70 and $30, additionelle.com). 6. Nylon and spandex bra and briefs, WonderBra ($47 and $24, at Hudson’s Bay, thebay.com). 7. Tulle and jacquard-satin bra and briefs, Simone Pérèle ($139 and $79, simone-perele.com). 8. Nylon, polyester and elastane bra and briefs, Elomi ($88 and $43, elomilingerie.com). 9. Polyamide, polyester, elastane and cotton ($99, at cosabella.com). 10. Stretch-lace, Eres ($1,005, eresparis.com). 11. Polyester, Sally Boutique ($52, at boohoo.com). 12. Stretch-lace, Huit ($129, huit.com).

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STYLING, ELAINE JYLL REGIO

5


15

SLIP A slip plays many roles: luxe sleepwear, slinky base layer and answer to slightlytoo-sheer skirts or sweaters. Above all, it will add a vintage touch to your look.

13

14

16

Build the base of your wardrobe with these essential takes on lingerie.

SOFT CUP

18

Meet athleisure’s underwear equivalent. It’s underwire-free (#win) and perfect for pairing with slouchy tees. This style is best left to smaller cup sizes.

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LACE BRA No one will see your lacy set (or will they?), but its confidenceboosting powers rival a new pair of shoes. Just avoid too-tight tops.

23 24 22

13. Polyester, Topshop ($71, topshop.com). 14. Modal-knit and lace, Journelle ($98.41, journelle.com). 15. Nylon and elastane, Freya ($58, freyalingerie.com). 16. Lace and chiffon, Coco de Mer ($408, coco-de-mer.com). 17. Silk and polyamide bralette and briefs, Araks ($133 and $86, at modaoperandi.com). 18. Polyamide and elastane bra and briefs, Mango ($34.95 and $19.95, mango.com). 19. Polyester and spandex bralette and briefs, Naked Princess ($74 and $48, nakedprincess.com). 20. Silk bra and thong, Fleur du Mal ($195 and $89, at farfetch.com). 21. Polyamide and Lycra bra and thong, Beyond Love ($78 and $32, at blushlingerie.com). 22. Nylon and Lycra bralette and briefs, Only Hearts ($77 and $69, onlyhearts.com). 23. Lace bra, thong and belt, Coco de Mer ($295, $177 and $228, coco-de-mer.com). 24. Polyamide and elastane bra and briefs, H&M ($25 and $13, hm.com).

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STYLE NEW-L ABEL LOVE

WHAT’S COOL, CUTTING EDGE AND IMPORTANT IN FASHION

I LOVE THE RELAXED FEEL OF COTTON POPLIN. IT’S CRISP BY NATURE, AND YOU CAN CREATE A LOT OF VOLUME THAT DOESN’T LOOK TOO GIRLIE; IT HAS A CERTAIN SLEEKNESS. I LOVE THIS CASUAL LUXURY. – Designer Derek Lam on his spring/ summer collection (from $1,000, at Holt Renfrew, holtrenfrew.com)

C O M F O RT I N

Model turned shoe designer Mari Giudicelli creates glossy lizardskin mules and block-heel sandals that are as ineffably cool as she is. Since launching her eponymous line in 2015, the breakout designer has amassed an impressive roster of stockists, including Vancouver’s One of a Few shop and Toronto’s Fawn and Ewanika boutiques. The spring/summer collection, produced in Giudicelli’s native Brazil, introduces quirky new details like satin bows and suede ties. Here’s to shoes you can—stylishly— chase a streetcar in. (From $520, marigiudicelli.com)

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TEXT, LIZ GUBER; PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (RUNWAY & BACKSTAGE)

Designer Rejina Pyo, who cut her teeth at Roksanda prior to launching her own line, has crafted the kind of label that speaks to today’s fashion attitude: individual, intelligently minimal and experimental. The spring/summer collection is full of compelling details: subdued ruffles, mismatched buttons and unusual textiles— think silver fringe and hole-y denim. This won’t be the last time you read Pyo’s name. (From $326, rejinapyo.com)


U P D AT E D

Customization is the best thing to happen to denim since the Canadian tuxedo. We’re loving Brit label M.i.h Jeans’ new online personalization service that lets you add a final touch to the brand’s denim. From embroidery and ’70s patches to step hems and tassels, the options change with seasonal trends. There’s also a bespoke route for jeans you already own. Just upload an image of your dream denim to the site, mail in those vintage Wranglers and await the transformation. (Embellishments from $25, mih-jeans.com/denimgirlsproject)

JEAN-IUS

1. Ripped medium wash, $108

2. Distressed light wash, $118

Three new takes on denim.

Denim jacket, M.i.h Jeans ($470, mih-jeans.com)

WAISTED

The story of Alexia Elkaim’s new denim label Miaou (pronounced “meow,” in case you were wondering) is a bit like the plot of The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants. “I wanted to make a pair of jeans that fit all of my friends,” says Elkaim. The L.A. native struck gold with her first design, Brigitte, when the high-rise, tight-fitting jeans with grommet and rope embellishments were spotted on Bella Hadid. Next up? Elkaim is expanding the range to include a pair of Wall Street-meets-Clueless pinstriped pants that feature her nowsignature grommets. And so a brand is born. (From $301, miaouxx.com)

3. Antique wash, $108

CREAT ED Yves Saint Laurent once said he wished he had invented blue jeans. But it’s reinvention that keeps denim crave-worthy. To that end, the new Levi’s 501 Skinny jeans offer an update on the iconic style, combining the classic high-rise fit with a slim leg that’s thoroughly modern. (From $108, levi.ca)

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STYLE

ST YLE GUIDE here’s an old image I love of my mother riding a bicycle. She’s young and smiling, and she’s wearing a simple cream turtleneck and a pair of inky denim dungarees. It’s a slice of an old 16 mm home movie, so the colours have a hazy, bluish filter. There’s no sound, but I know my father was the one behind the lens. He was the family photographer. A doctor by day, he was a Gregory Peck-type character. I can’t ever remember him not being smartly dressed under a trilby hat. All the men wore hats in the ’50s. He was passionately in love with my mother, and my earliest memories involve them piling my sister, my brother and me into the car on weekends and heading to the beach, a half-hour drive from our postwar home in the tightly knit community of Roslyn, Long Island. We didn’t have a lot of money, but appearance was always important to my parents: Our hair was always brushed, our shoes were always polished. My mother, Beatrice, a.k.a. Billie, was incredibly stylish and obsessively collected objects of beauty. She had an antiques shop, she was an interior decorator, she was a sculptress. She had wonderful taste, as did my grandmother and my aunt, so I think it was just by osmosis that I grew up with an appreciation for beautiful things and a keen eye for clothing. Style was always present in our house. The Warholian-style wallpaper (before his famous flower paintings) in our modest kitchen—bold and flowered in black and bright blue—wasn’t like anything in the homes of my childhood school friends. But it was

32

unique and, like the impeccably tailored clothes I’d see my mother wearing, understated in a way that felt independent, confident and always special. She made the trends of the day totally her own. I lived at home until I was 18, going back and forth into New York City on the train, jumping off at Penn Station and exploring the immediate area around 34th Street, not wanting to stray too far. And then I made the move to Manhattan. I studied liberal arts at NYU, heading home on weekends. My roommate and I shared an apartment on the Upper West Side. The bathroom was royal purple, while the rest was painted a beautiful lavender. It was a funny first apartment. I remember the pride I felt for my olive-green vintage dresser, with its white marble top and beautiful mirror, and my big, roomy bed. It was just charming. When I moved to Italy a year later to follow a boyfriend, I felt liberated and open to anything, like most 20-year-olds at the close of the ’60s. Looking back on that time, stepping out of the blissful suburban bubble where I had grown up, I suppose my thoughts and views on the world were radically changing. What wasn’t radically changing was my personal style: simple, straightforward and clean. Aside from a brief hippie moment of long, centre-parted hair and dangly earrings and ponchos (we all wanted to look like folk singer Joan Baez) and a fun stage where I channelled ’30s Parisians, I was essentially a shirt-and-jeans girl. What other people were doing, culturally and sartorially, was always interesting to

PHOTOGRAPHY, GETTY IMAGES

t

Never one for following trends, beauty-brand founder Linda Rodin reflects on a lifetime of staying true to her instincts.


me. I would adopt bits and pieces but remained true to my rather simple style, although my inherited and hopeless need to surround myself with things of unique beauty was an affliction I continued to fully embrace. By 1979, I was back in New York and opened Linda Hopp, a clothing store that was the first of its kind in SoHo. I was designing clothes, and I was buying Calvin Klein and Todd Oldham early on, before both designers were propelled into fashion’s super league. I had hats and bags—it was an original “concept” store, albeit short-lived. For a time, people would come by to uncover new and different pieces, experimenting and playing dress-up, until the homogenized power uniform of ’80s Manhattan set in. I left the exaggerated shoulder pads and gratuitous excess to New York’s movers and shakers and channelled my own brand of maximalism into the downtown apartment in the funky pre-war building I moved into 35 years ago (and still remain in today). When I say “funky,” what I really mean is a bit shabby, but in this city’s rental market, once you find a place, it’s wise to never leave. And I love my one-bedroom apartment with windows on three sides. I’ve made it totally mine, surrounding myself with pieces that give me joy. I collect anything and everything: vases, shells, bowls, glasses—whatever strikes my fancy. I don’t have anything that’s contemporary. I don’t look to interiors

I don’t own an evening gown and I never have. Nor have I ever dyed my hair. It was never an issue when I started turning grey at 35. That didn’t bother me at all. It never has. I guess you could say it’s become my signature—that and the glasses. Everyone says, “Oh, you wear the greatest glasses.” Well, I can’t see! They are, admittedly, a nice, quirky addition and a super-easy way to add flair to my look. I also collect vintage jewellery, but I only wear a few personal pieces designed by Soraya Silchenstedt. She made long chain necklaces for me and my sister about seven years ago. Mine has a small round diamond charm and a heart on it, and my sister’s just has the tiny heart. When she passed away, I buried her in my necklace and now I wear hers. I’ve never taken it off. On my wrist I have her name, Christine, tattooed in turquoise. I was 62 and didn’t have to think twice. My first and only other tattoo (which I got at 60) says “Nick”—my nephew who was serving in Iraq. I needed him close. (He’s back home and safe now.) I operate on instinct—I’ve got a lifetime of experience to draw on. I don’t shop by label. If something looks good on me, I’m on board. And I keep some pieces forever. I still have a denim shirt that’s 30 years old and a denim jacket that I’ve had forever. I’m fortunate in that I’ve kept the same silhouette so I can still wear the same jeans—I’m a real denim fanatic. I wear vintage Levi’s 501s almost every

I FIND IT HYSTERICAL THAT A 68-YEAR-OLD, SOMEONE WHO’S WRINKLY AND WORN, HAS BEEN NOTICED BY THE FASHION SET AND THEY HAVE DECIDED TO EMBRACE ME. magazines or shop according to the hottest designer or store. I’m a loner, and I love what I love. If I see a beautiful dish from the ’70s or a faded mirror from 1930, I’ll get it. It’s eclectic, a hodgepodge, things I like to wake up and see. My choices are mine alone to make. I never did meet the right guy and settle down, and now I live with the love of my life, my miniature poodle, Winky. He weighs nine kilograms, he’s silver, he’s got really long legs and he’s much smarter than I could ever be! As someone said: “Poodles aren’t dogs; they’re people.” I love to have friends over, a few at a time, for a glass of wine and a chat. I’m not a big entertainer. No dinner parties. No space for that. I travel, but I always love to come home to my turquoise velvet sofa and my gorgeous plants and flowers. I’m a true homebody. I find it hysterical that a 68-year-old, someone who’s wrinkly and worn, has been noticed by the fashion set and they have decided to embrace me. It’s wonderful to be called a “style icon.” First came the Karen Walker sunglasses campaign, then a lookbook for The Row. It’s flattering to think they find my style “cool.” I don’t have a lot of dresses. I don’t like frilly things. I like being tailored; it suits my physique. While I’d happily saunter around my living room in floor-length ’30s bias dresses,

day. I have lovely designer jeans as well. I’ve got a pair from Chloé, but it doesn’t matter where they came from or who designed them—I just love denim in any shape or form. I’m waiting for my Ellery jeans to arrive from Australia. I love Ellery and got her wonderful flare pants while visiting Sydney. Style does not have to rely on money or resources. For me, it’s about personal taste and a sense of oneself. And I don’t think that just because you get older you have to dress older, or younger, or anything. I was never a provocative dresser anyway. I did wear hot pants and miniskirts when I was 18. I guess we all did. But since then, I’ve always been pretty covered up; that’s just the way I feel most comfortable. It has to feel right for me in order to look right. And now when I look at footage of my mother, it strikes me how similar my tastes have become to hers. That simple turtleneck, those great dungarees—there was a simplicity about the way she dressed that allowed her personality to shine through. That and the slick of raspberry lipstick that frames that beaming smile. It’s a shade I’ve recreated today in my own beauty line, Rodin Olio Lusso. It still feels modern, even 60 years on. I called it Billie on the Bike. ■

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STYLE

PERFECT FIT How an international organization is helping women find their dream jobs—one outfit at a time.

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ELLECANADA.COM

PHOTOGRAPHY, PHILIPP JELENSKA/TRUNK ARCHIVE

v

ictoria Beckham has her pencil skirts and silk blouses. Hillary Clinton has her pantsuits. And Serena Cripps has her peach-and-black suit. The Vancouver resident received the jacket and skirt from the international non-profit organization Dress for Success, which provides clothing for women who are looking for work. Clients like Cripps spend an hour with a stylist in one of the organization’s cozy boutiques. Some liken it to shopping your best friend’s closet, but the experience is more than an afternoon of playing dress-up: It’s the first step in helping disadvantaged women feel visible again. “When the volunteer put the suit together, it was like, four months to find work in Canada. To help, Dress for ‘There you are,’” recalls Cripps, who spent years living Success provides interview counselling and mentorship. in shelters and struggled with addiction. “After being Melissa, a victim of domestic violence who requested treated like a statistic and a number...I didn’t see my hu- that her last name not be used, credits the interview rolemanity anymore. With those outfits, I felt that I had playing she did at the Ottawa chapter with helping her get a job in non-profit housing. “This HR professional somewhere to start.” There are more than 1.5 million Canadian women in I worked with was an absolute angel,” she says. “Her similar predicaments, living below the low-income cut- questions were bang on; they were perfect for my [actual] off. “Every story is different, but most of the women interview.” Of course, she adds, the black suit she took who land here have either lost a job or been out of the home with her after visiting the Dress for Success boutique certainly helped her confidence. “There workforce [to raise families],” says Jennifer was no question; once it went on, we were like, Halinda, executive director at Dress for Success ‘Yeah, this is the one.’” Vancouver. (There are 11 chapters across Cripps, meanwhile, has enrolled in a peerCanada; most women are referred through support-worker program. Once she graduates, social services.) “Or they are underemployed— Head to so they are working, but they’re not necessarily ELLECanada.com she hopes to open her own non-profit organization geared toward helping women with addicusing their skill sets and making the money they for more inspiring stories from women tion and mental illness. As for what she’ll wear deserve to be making.” who have benefited on her first day, we’re thinking something peach Wardrobe is just a part of the equation. from Dress for CARLI WHITWELL and black would be perfect. According to a Workopolis study, it takes about Success.


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Your 2017 shopping game plan: no more buying clothes you’ll never wear. #DreamCloset

2. Winter is grey and dull, but your coat shouldn’t be. We’ve rounded up the best toppers of the season.

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3. Pare down your skincare routine this year with our curated list of products.

COLLAGE, DANIELLE CAMPBELL; PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (RUNWAY) & GETTY IMAGES (FLOWERS)

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BALENCIAGA

MARNI

JIL SANDER

HERMÈS

STYLE

Grace Jones

POWER

STELLA MCCARTNEY

CÉLINE

How to wear the new season’s large-and-in-charge looks. BY ANYA GEORGIJEVIC

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RAG & BONE

ISABEL MARANT

BURBERRY PRORSUM

MARQUES’ ALMEIDA

Working Girl


STELLA MCCARTNEY

T H O U G H T YO U H A D F A S H I O N ’ S R U L E S O F proportion nailed? Well, this season is about to throw you a curve—a really voluminous one, complete with silhouettes that challenge the natural lines of the body. On runways from New York to Paris, power is the watchword. Follow the thread back and there’s a nod to the 1980s power shoulder à la Melanie Griffith as Tess in Working Girl or Grace Jones on the cover of her album Nightclubbing. Look to the present and you’ll see Hillary Clinton and her army of pantsuits stitched into this latest version of authoritative dressing. Last fall, Demna Gvasalia, fashion’s newest enfant terrible, debuted his take on Cristóbal Balenciaga’s legendary sculptural shapes. He opened the show with a houndstooth skirtsuit equipped with shoulder pads and padded hips, imposing the hourglass shape. This season, he showed oversized blazers and trench coats, with the emphasis on the breadth of shoulders. A similar silhouette showed up at Jil Sander. Designer Rodolfo Paglialunga borrowed equally from the ’40s and the ’80s for a look that would certainly have appealed to Griffith’s Tess as she battled Wall Street’s male contingent to shatter the glass ceiling in corporate finance.

shirt/blazer hybrid is another ingenious semi-formal piece, paired beautifully with paper-bag-waist culottes. Burberry, Ellery and Marques’ Almeida gave their poufy sleeves extra oomph (bordering on pirate chic), best worn with slimmer pants or shorts. In some instances, the button-up featured a dropped hemline, transforming it into a shirtdress. But in the case of Rag & Bone and Hermès, it was layered over pants or leggings, keeping that utilitarian office look—perhaps a more chill take on the power suit. The most surprising twist of the season? Adding a tool-belt-like bag (yes, a fanny pack!) and holster as a statement of convenience and independence. (Plus, they look majorly badass.) For two centuries, women’s mobility has been somewhat hindered by the handbag. While backpacks certainly serve their purpose, the design itself is too cumbersome for all occasions. When Carrie Bradshaw donned a monogrammed Gucci belt bag in Sex and the City, it was greeted with enthusiasm, only to be lost in the sea of It bags that followed. Still, it was bound to make a comeback. The new crop of fanny packs takes a more sophisticated appearance, working well with both formal and sporty ensembles. For Jil Sander, the waist pouch that looks like a miniature bucket bag fits with Paglialunga’s interpretation of the workforce wardrobes of powerful women. Marni’s Consuelo Castiglioni, who, like Paglialunga and Philo, focused on the pantsuit this season, took the idea of a waist bag to the extreme, with large poacher-pocket bags mounted on each hip in a more practical version of Gvasalia’s padding. The Marni woman has never shied away from so-called man-repelling pieces, and there is perhaps no stronger message than creating literal volume around oneself. On a less monumental scale, Stella McCartney’s casual brown faux-leather belt pouches pair seamlessly with a leisurely spring wardrobe, be it an oversized pyjamalike ensemble or a pair of jeans. For a nighttime option, Barbara Bui’s shiny leather fanny packs will go splendidly with a little black dress—or any fancy frock, for that matter—like an ultra-modern wallet on a chain. Interestingly, it’s the female designers appropriating a stereotypically masculine gadget who concocted most of these tool bags. A shift in fashion silhouettes isn’t going to solve gender inequality in the workplace. But it does take confidence to pull off these looks, whether worn in a full look as seen at Marni or opting for one dramatic garment at a time. And perhaps that’s the key: The power in these shapes emanates at least in part from the wearer, as she dons her armour and heads into battle. ■

IMAXTREE (RUNWAY)

RANGER Phoebe Philo kept her signature Céline minimalism intact while playing with her version of a zoot suit: baggy high-waisted trousers and an oversized wide-lapel blazer. But she also provided a less formal take on the look by pairing her crisp-white boxy tailored jackets with leather culottes and printed maxiskirts—her suggestion on how to wear the jacket of the season outside an office environment. Despite being intimidating at first (as it’s meant to be), the shoulder-emphasizing jacket is as versatile as that boyfriend blazer you’ve been wearing for the past decade and can easily vibe with a pair of jeans for those I-justthrew-this-on days. But the suit jacket is not the only authoritative garment that underwent deconstruction this season. The buttonup dress shirt, a staple in every woman’s closet and a universal symbol of professionalism, also took on new shapes. Isabel Marant gave the crisp collarless button-up the same exaggerated shoulder of the power blazer du jour, with billowing rolled-up sleeves. She paired it with shiny highwaisted black pants for a slightly sinister look, but the pillowy shirt can easily be worn with breezy culottes, palazzo pants or a miniskirt on warmer days. Stella McCartney’s

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2017 TREND REPORT S/S

38

FENDI

PORTS 1961

MULBERRY

GUCCI

Graphic, oversized and running in every direction, spring’s high-contrast stripes defy the rules.

PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (ALL RUNWAY IMAGES) & GETTY IMAGES (ALL BACKGROUND IMAGES)

TRUE STRIPES

NINA RICCI

PROENZA SCHOULER

WE DECODED THE KEY RUNWAY LOOKS OF THE SEASON. CONSIDER YOURSELF INFORMED.


MONSE

VETEMENTS

JACQUEMUS

Designers tinkered with the button-down until it was almost unrecognizable. Collars shifted at Monse while sleeves ballooned at Jacquemus, taking the silhouette into unexplored territory.

OFF-WHITE C/O VIRGIL ABLOH

SACAI

ALEXANDER WANG

JIL SANDER

SHIRT, INTERRUPTED

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2017 TREND REPORT S/S

40

BARBARA BUI

SIES MARJAN

BALENCIAGA

ALEXANDER WANG

DELPOZO

The runway’s straight-from-1992 highlighter hues were as hard to miss as Kendall Jenner’s brief Instagram hiatus. A dialed-up palette of orange and pink gave sporty looks the competitive edge, while Day-Glo green emerged as spring’s unexpected hero shade. Some squinting may be required.

CHANEL

NEON BRIGHTS


VERSACE

FENDI

ROBERTO CAVALLI

MSGM

SPECTACUL AR

STELLA MCCARTNEY

MARNI CHRISTIAN DIOR

JASON WU

3.1 PHILLIP LIM VALENTINO

GUCCI

CÉLINE

Designers had their eyes on coloured lenses, embellished frames and retro shapes.

PRADA

ERDEM

GIVENCHY

OFF-WHITE C/O VIRGIL ABLOH

JASON WU

DRIES VAN NOTEN

The kitten heel came back with a roar as sandals, mules and slingbacks took the low road this season.

CÉLINE

MEOW MIX

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PRADA

MARC JACOBS

2017 TREND REPORT S/S

SIDE PIECE 42

Designers treated earrings as sisters, not twins. Mix—don’t match—accordingly.

J.W. ANDERSON

MARNI

JEREMY SCOTT

ERDEM

RODARTE

Whether an embellishment or the main event, fluttering, pastel-hued plumage was the answer to hems, sleeves and necklines this season. The take-away? Feathers are the new fringe.


ROKSANDA

PROENZA SCHOULER NO. 21

SALLY LAPOINTE

PRADA

MARQUES’ ALMEIDA

The runway’s love affair with exposed shoulders continued, but asymmetrical cut-outs gave the trend an update.

VETEMENTS

MONSE

JONATHAN SIMKHAI

TIBI

JASON WU

FEMME FEATHERS

CUT IT OUT 43


SHOULDER SEASON Designers put major emphasis on the power shoulder. With a strong but feminine touch, they came rounded, ruffled and embellished, saying “Make room!”

44

MARC JACOBS

RODARTE

SAINT LAURENT

BARBARA BUI

JIL SANDER

DOLCE & GABBANA

2017 TREND REPORT S/S


BAND OF OUTSIDERS

KENZO

OFF-WHITE C/O VIRGIL ABLOH

MARNI

ROBES FOR THE WIN The runways championed comfortable-cool toppers— terry cloth and slouchy pockets included.

JONATHAN SIMKHAI

LACOSTE

ALEXANDER WANG

DKNY

JIL SANDER

NO. 21

WAISTED With fanny packs (both big and small) doing double duty as belts, the hands-off approach has never looked more now.

45


FENDI

CHLOÉ

2017 TREND REPORT S/S

46

TORY BURCH

THOM BROWNE

DOLCE & GABBANA

LOEWE

The groundbreaking thing about this season’s florals is the variety, from painterly, romantic bouquets at Dolce & Gabbana and Fendi to graphic, downright-groovy florets at Michael Kors and Chloé.

FLORA ARRA


The new way to layer is bold, unexpected and high impact.

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TKTKTKKTKTKT

OVER THE TOP

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI

KENZO

SIES MARJAN

PRADA

LOUIS VUITTON

2017 TREND REPORT S/S


The season’s aquanaut-worthy gear was impossible to ignore. Designers made a splash—but this was no backyard pool party. Surf-ready separates at Stella McCartney and half-worn scuba suits at Maison Margiela were edgy and athletic in equal measure.

ISABEL MARANT MAX MARA

ALEXANDER WANG

MAISON MARGIELA

STELLA MCCARTNEY

MUGLER

SCUBA STYLE

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A R T & M U S I C B O O K S ,

TEXT, SARAH LAING

T R A C K I N G

T H E

B E S T

I N

M O V I E S ,

SHOT

If you watch only one of the big Oscar hopefuls this year, make it the Mrs. Kennedy biopic, Jackie. (Could you not feel Natalie Portman’s emoting here through this mag’s closed cover?) More of an indie niche type? We’ve got your cool-points-scoring frontrunner on the next page.

RADA

SCREEN

51


RADAR

READ

DARK PL ACE

HOME CREEPY HOME What would you do to live in a state-of-the-art minimalist-modern temple of technology and clean lines... for almost nothing? Would you sign a contract with pretty intense rules? (Rule #1: You can’t bring your own stuff when you move in.) Would you agree to let the house’s software monitor your every move and bodily function for the purposes of research? Would you ignore the fact that there had been three suspicious deaths there in two years? If you answered yes, sign on the dotted line for JP Delaney’s The Girl Before, a gripping one-sitting read. We won’t even ask for first and last months’ rent.

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Iranian-born actress Narges Rashidi on why her Oscarcontending film is more than just a horror flick.

FOOD

JU S T A S P O O N F U L

Move over, camomile tea: There’s a new before-bed brew in town. After finding success with her Canadian-cream-based ghee, Lee Dares of the eponymous Lee’s Provisions has another small-batch marvel on its way to market: Chaga-Prash. It’s a mignon jar of Ayurvedic goodness—honey, spices, rose petals—that works anywhere you’d put a traditional jam. Dares recommends it dissolved in hot water, just before bed. Think bone broth meets hot cocoa.

TEXT, SARAH LAING; PHOTOGRAPHY, ANNA WENDT (N. RASHIDI), GEOFFREY ROSS (CHAGA-PRASH), RYAN SZULC (COCKTAIL), IMAXTREE (RUNWAY), GETTY IMAGES (H. KLUM, H. MIRREN & S. WILLIAMS) AND ISTOCK (RASPBERRIES, COIN & HORSESHOES); COCKTAIL STYLED BY NANCY MIDWICKI; PROP STYLING BY MADELEINE JOHARI

r

emember this come Oscar-pool time: The Iranian film Under the Shadow is a front-runner for the Best Foreign Language Film award, and the fact that it has already been selected by the United Kingdom as its entry for that category is largely due to a critically lauded performance by one woman: Narges Rashidi. Rashidi plays a woman beset by evil spirits, the haunting going down during the Iran-Iraq war, and while, yes, that sounds like a horror movie, the 36-year-old hopes you don’t dismiss it. “It works on so many levels and is written so smartly that it would be a shame to just call it a horror film,” she pleads over the PROFILE phone from a cab in New York. She’s visiting from Berlin and doing rounds for the film’s limited theatrical release. (Netflix bought the streaming rights for it; it should drop there this winter.) The actress—who’s kind of a big deal on the indie scene in Europe—was born in Iran and lived there as a child during the war in which this film is set. “My parents protected me, so I didn’t really see all of the horrors,” she says. “I do remember waking up in my mother’s lap and hearing noises, and she would say ‘Oh, it’s just some bombs; go to sleep.’” Rashidi later moved to Germany and says she worked so hard on building a new life for herself that she buried a lot of who she’d been in Iran. “I totally forgot where I came from. Doing this movie was cathartic. I got to dig so much deeper into that time.” If you’re wondering how to pronounce her name, it’s a soft “g” and the emphasis is on the last syllable. “It means ‘daffodil,’” she says after patiently coaching us through a few bungled “Nargeez? Nargas? Narjays?” “I was born on WHAT WE’RE TALKING ABOUT THIS MONTH IN ARTS & CULTURE the first day of spring, and I was supposed to be called something even harder to pronounce!” she says. “But my mother’s father came to her in a dream—he’d passed away—and told her that my name had to be Narges.” Like we said: a name not to forget.


RECIPE 6 raspberries 11/2 oz. (45 mL) Bacardi Maestro de Ron rum 1/2 oz. (15 mL) lemon juice 1 oz. (30 mL) elderflower liqueur 1/4 oz. (7.5 mL) crème de cassis 1 mint leaf

SEIZE THE DAY ...with this clutched-fist amulet based on a Brazilian symbol believed to bring on the lucky breaks. ($74, Erica Weiner, ericaweiner.com)

FUN FACT

M E E T TH E M I X O L O G I ST

GET LUCKY Minds out of the gutter, people: We’re not gettin’ lucky with this cocktail in a wink-nudge kind of way. Nope! This Valentine’s Day, we’re raising a glass to making your own good fortune...with a little Dutch courage, if necessary. Whether that’s hitting the d-floor on Daft Punk night with wild abandon, making your “Barbara from Stranger Things” appreciation blog public, revelling in spending February 14 alone or watching the Gilmore Girls revival for the 43rd time, this crushed-ice creation pairs perfectly with crushing it, whatever that may be to you.

ALBERTA FERRETTI

Be your berry best and look plum delightful in this season’s sweetest hue.

COCKTAIL SPOTLIGHT

NINA RICCI

ON THE RUNWAY

LUCK BE A BIRDIE

MARC JACOBS

This Placido-Flamingoand-Barbie-had-a-lovechild pink drink is from the mind of Vancouverborn Mike Shum. The Canadian champ of the Bacardi Legacy cocktail competition made this drink for a regular who wanted a classic Bramble (gin, lemon, crème de cassis) but with a rum twist: “Our band for the evening was playing ‘Get Lucky’ at the time, so when she asked what the drink was called, that was the first thing that came to mind!”

Crushed ice melts more quickly than cubed (something about surface area?), so drink up!

Crush berries in the bottom of a shaker; add rum, lemon juice and elderflower liqueur. Pour the crème de cassis into a cocktail glass, fill with crushed ice and strain the rest of the liquid into the glass. Garnish with a mint leaf.

We’re heading into the Chinese-zodiac year of the rooster! It’s an auspicious año, given that the cockerel is the brightest, most fun sign in the 12-animal pantheon. For extra luck, wear lots of yellow and brown.

THE CHARMS THESE FAMOUS FOLKS WON’T WALK UNDER A LADDER WITHOUT. 1. Heidi Klum: her baby teeth—in a bag. 2. Helen Mirren: a pair of $39 Perspex heels. 3. Serena Williams: the same socks for every match in a tournament.

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Embroidered net blouse (Marc Jacobs) and 18-karatgold and diamond earrings (Charlotte Chesnais)

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C HARLOTTE THE GOOD THIS FRENCH-CANADIAN ACTRESS IS SET FOR THE GLOBAL BIG TIME. By Sarah Laing Photography by Marcin Tyszka Styling by Barbara Baumel

Just before she started filming The Promise, Charlotte Le Bon sent an email to her two co-stars. “I wrote to Oscar [Isaac] and Christian [Bale],” recalls Le Bon, miming out the action of typing as she sits in a Toronto hotel lobby. “I just said that I was super-intimidated by them both but I couldn’t wait to start. I promised that when I met them, I’d pretend everything was all right and it was fine, but I just wanted them to know that that feeling was there.” (BTW, Isaac wrote back right away saying he felt the same; Bale never replied.) We’re catching up with the French-Canadian actress the day after that film’s premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival, and her relief at the romantic epic’s positive reception is obvious. “We had a standing ovation. There were a lot of Armenians in the room, and it was really moving to have them come up to us afterwards with tears in their eyes, thanking us for our work. That’s exactly why I want to do my job.”

In the film, to be released early this year, Le Bon plays Ana, a cosmopolitan Armenian woman who returns home to what is now modern-day Turkey (then the Ottoman Empire) on the eve of the outbreak of the First World War—and the start of the genocide of much of that country’s Armenian population by the Ottoman authorities. (It’s worth noting that Turkey still officially denies this ever occurred.) Ana also finds herself in the middle of a love triangle, torn between an American journalist (Bale) and an Armenian medical student (Isaac). “I think she really doesn’t know [who to choose],” says Le Bon. “Love is a weird and complex feeling: Sometimes you choose passion; sometimes you choose comfort. I think it’s a modern approach to a love story because although it’s not completely politically correct to say she’s in love with two men, it happens in real life.” That complicated romantic situation isn’t the only true-to-life parallel the 30-year-old noticed while h

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CELEBRITY filming the Terry George-directed epic, which centres much of its action on a group of Armenians (and Ana) trying to escape through the mountains. Two summers ago, Le Bon and her boyfriend were on the Greek island of Lesbos, which, along with being an idyllic vacation spot, is also the site of a large refugee camp filled with migrants from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan fleeing conflict. “I just remember seeing hundreds and hundreds of people walking in the street in the heat,” recalls Le Bon. “You really don’t know what to do. We bought water bottles and we were trying to give what we could. You’re trying to choose—maybe give to this one because she’s older, this one has a baby. You feel completely helpless.” Fast-forward to shooting The Promise in Spain about a year later: “Seeing those hundreds and hundreds of extras going down the mountain, I was like, ‘Fuck—this is exactly what I saw [in Greece].’ It’s awful to see that 100 years later, nothing’s really changed. Humans are worse than rats! We don’t learn.”

she calls “all this stuff,” gesturing to the elaborately embroidered dress she’s wearing for a day of television interviews, her heavily-made-up face and her carefully coiffed hair. “This is not my favourite thing, you know?” she says. “I wear no makeup in real life, and I wear jeans and sneakers.” Even when it’s for a role, Le Bon finds the beauty routine tiresome. “Sometimes I’m like, ‘Ugh! I just want to do everything without makeup. Can I do that?’ I mean, Christian and Oscar arrived in jeans without makeup. It’s freaking unfair!” But Le Bon insists she’s not letting down the Canadian side by throwing any tantrums or being difficult. (Although she does half-jokingly threaten to “start a revolution” when it comes to these gender-based double standards.) “The thing people say is that I’m unusually nice,” she says of being unashamedly Canadian. “I’ve been living in France for seven years now, and it’s actually true that we are so nice. Even when I come back now, I’m surprised by how easy and relaxed and cool it is

“SOMETIMES I’M LIKE, ‘UGH! I JUST WANT TO DO EVERYTHING WITHOUT MAKEUP. CAN I DO THAT?’ I MEAN, CHRISTIAN AND OSCAR ARRIVED IN JEANS WITHOUT MAKEUP. IT’S FREAKING UNFAIR!” At another point in our conversation, Le Bon complains about her eyes (“They’re too big, especially on a movie screen”), but seeing her use them to persuade, to impart passionate caring, you get a sense of why this Montreal-born performer is already a big deal in her adopted home of France—and why Hollywood has come calling. Le Bon is basically the definition of French-girl cool, down to an endearing overlapping front tooth that seems impossibly chic. (She’s probably pictured beside the word “gamine” in the dictionary.) She started as a model, served briefly as a weather girl on French TV and then got her big acting break in the 2014 biopic Yves Saint Laurent, which was quickly followed by a role in the Golden Globenominated The Hundred-Foot Journey and a star turn opposite Joseph Gordon-Levitt in 2015’s The Walk. And while Le Bon loves acting, she says she feels most like herself when she’s drawing. (And it’s no hobby; she opened her first solo show in Paris this summer.) “The thing with acting is that it goes through so many filters that in the end you can’t control anything, but with art the delivery is so pure because it’s you, it’s just you.” She says being an actress is work—not so much “what happens between ‘Action’ and ‘Cut’” but what

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socially. I’m used to the Parisian attitude now, so it’s almost weird!” Oh, and if you’re wondering how Le Bon eventually fared on-set with those “intimidating” co-stars—well, she and Isaac ended up hanging out all the time (when he wasn’t jetting off to promote Star Wars: The Force Awakens, that is), and she basically became a one-woman fan club for Bale. “I think I laughed at every single one of his jokes for four months,” says Le Bon of her on-set “best pal.” She does note, however, that Bale was very much about doing his own thing. “He’s very present, very professional—but when it’s over, he just disappears like Houdini. Poof!” Bale even pulled a disappearing act on the last day of filming. When the final shot had wrapped, Le Bon went to find him so she could give him a drawing she’d done for him...and he’d already bailed. (Bale-d?) “I asked everyone where Christian was, and they were like, ‘He’s already on a plane! He’s gone!’ and I was like, ‘Shit!’ But, really, it was fine.” And then it’s Le Bon’s turn to go, gracefully picking up her skirts as she rises from the table, straight from our chat to a flight bound for Paris. ■


Glossy-velvet dress, red bra, leather belt and leather pumps (Nina Ricci), tights (Falke), gold- and palladiumplated-brass ring (Louis Vuitton) and 18-karatgold and diamond earrings (Charlotte Chesnais). For details, see Shopping Guide. Makeup, Sandrine Cano-Bock; hair, Alessandra Rebecchi; styling assistant, Tiphaine Menon


LIFE

ON THE SAME PAGE

Heather O’Neill finds that no man measures up to her literary heroes.

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COLLAGE, DANIELLE CAMPBELL

g

rowing up, I lived in a tiny apartment with my father. He was a janitor. He watched television every night with the volume turned up, pronounced words funny and wore a toque inside because it was cold. I loved him and I loved my life, but I wanted to explore different places; books were my escape. I spent all my time with my head in medieval castles and Edwardian manors. I used to consider the characters my best friends. I was insanely in love with Anne Shirley. I imagined myself with Catherine from Wuthering Heights, our hair whipping around wildly in the wind and getting tangled up with each other’s. But I had no interest in the dashing Heathcliff—until I turned 14 and male characters began to seem more and more intriguing to me. My favourites were dashing and conflicted and unpredictable—characters whose inner philosophies led them to strange actions, frivolous fools who would whisper sweet nothings into Anna Karenina’s ear. I had a definite crush on the impulsive George from A Room With a View. I liked his absurdity and playfulness. I thought about him a lot while sitting on the stoop of my building, eating peanut-butter-andjelly sandwiches. I fantasized about having conversations with him about the statue of the lion in the park. I visualized him riding by my building on a 10-speed bicycle, his hands off the handlebars, blowing me a kiss. I figured he was the type who always gets hit by cars. I imagined drawing a picture of a question mark on his cast and us both smiling at that. Then there was the fun-loving Mercutio from Romeo and Juliet. We would slowly fall in love and speak crazy monologues to each other while out drinking behind the bowling alley. He would definitely be a theatre kid. And he would be a great date to bring to junior prom: the life of the party, wearing a baby-blue tuxedo, dancing on his knees while firing finger pistols into the air. In high school, this was the type of boy I fell in love with. The funny, outspoken class clown. I admired all his flights of fancy—until the teachers tired of his shenanigans and he was expelled. As I moved into college, my tastes in life continued to echo my fascinations on the page. Of all the men surrounding Isabel Archer in The

Portrait of a Lady, I liked her sickly cousin Ralph the most. He had been dying his whole life. Since being sick was his full-time occupation, he could only lie on a daybed and have enchanting and astute and generous views of the world. In college, I found my own Ralph: an artist who was stoned every day. He lay in bed letting the earth slowly turn with him, occasionally commenting on the nature of things. He managed to compose some exquisite poems. Still, there turned out to be only so much a girl could take of a bedridden lover. I knew it was wrong to be attracted to Raskolnikov in Crime and Punishment. I thought that it was the residual effect of having had a little too much feeling for the Big Bad Wolf and that I’d simply found a version in an Edwardian suit and button-up boots. I loved Raskolnikov in his threadbare clothes, reading books in an attic, coming up with clever, if morally corrupt, theses. I imagined he would write a controversial paper for my ethics class at McGill and he would always argue the obviously wrong side on the debate team. After I graduated, in my 20s, I dated a misanthrope who was intent on making my life a living hell. All he did was criticize me. He was jealous of my happiness and free-spiritedness and was intent on crushing it. I blame him on Raskolnikov. As a writer, I think that, in some ways, I was searching for a muse—someone I could spin into a character on the page who would match the brilliant eccentricities of these men. And, of course, it wasn’t as if the relationships were all completely bad. Each had its moments. I think I was looking for men who were problematic and edgy not only because I liked drama but because I liked to be challenged, especially intellectually. And, to be fair, I would say that they were all free thinkers who found new ways to demand that the world be more beautiful—although today I am glad that I’ve closed the book on my story with each one of them. ■

Heather O’Neill’s third novel, The Lonely Hearts Hotel, is out this month. She’s also the author of Lullabies for Little Criminals and The Girl Who Was Saturday Night.

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SPECIAL

LET’S TALK ABOUT

TEXT, CARLI WHITWELL; PHOTOGRAPHY, GEOFFREY ROSS

BABY!

Over 2,000 readers answered the really, really personal questions in our second Sex and Relationship Survey. Here’s (almost) everything you told us about what goes on in your bedrooms. Nearly all of the respondents were women (we did not include data from male respondents) from across Canada between the ages of 18 and 80. Most (85%) identified as heterosexual, while 15% identified as lesbian, bisexual or other sexual orientations.

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SPECIAL THE BIG NO

The female orgasm is much more elusive than pop culture would have us believe. To wit: While two-thirds of ELLE Canada readers who answered our survey say they orgasm “most or all of the time” during sex, 56% admitted to having faked it in bed. (That figure was as high as 60% in the 18 to 24 demographic.) Herein lies the (literal) rub: Once you start faking orgasms, it can be hard to break the cycle. If you stop, your partner will wonder why things aren’t working for you like they used to. Pretending—often done to make your partner feel better—also puts your needs second. “I was so close and he was trying so hard—I didn’t want him to feel bad,” said one respondent. Another felt the same way: “He’d put in a lot of effort to satisfy me, and I didn’t want to hurt his feelings.” This sentiment is echoed in research. In a 2016 study by Ryerson and St. Thomas universities, most of the women said they faked it simply to end bad sex. Other respondents to our survey said their partners are mostly able to get them off, but sometimes, if the women MIND know they just aren’t going to get there, they OVER pretend to climax. M AT T E R The sexual revolution in the ’60s may Connecting with your vagina sounds like have contributed to these bedroom behavthe premise of an SNL iours. “It became a feminist goal to say ‘We skit, but hear us out. have the right to have an orgasm,’” says Elke Practising mindfulness Reissing, director of the Human Sexuality (quieting the mind Research Laboratory at the University of and putting your full Ottawa. “Then it became this orgasm imattention on the present perative: A woman has to have an orgasm, moment—including because if she doesn’t, it means her male lover physical sensations) during sex can leave [if she’s in a heterosexual relationship] is not you better satisfied. a good lover and she is not a sexually liber“Think ‘Where does ated woman who’s seeking her own sexual it feel right? Where pleasure. There’s an obligation to provide on my body do I feel that orgasm to her partner and maybe even, sexual?’” says Reissing, in a sort of self-delusional way, fake it.” who advises looking Remember: Every woman achieves orgasm beyond the typical differently. What works for someone else buttons to push: Try might not work for you. For example, many exploring the back of the knee or another women cannot orgasm through penis-inunusual place. vagina intercourse without additional stimulation to the clitoris. “As soon as we set up these artificial standards that to be sexual you have to be a certain way, as opposed to deciding what works for you, that creates problems for women,” says Sandra Byers, chair of the psychology department at the University of New Brunswick.

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TEXT, CARLI WHITWELL; PHOTOGRAPHY, GEOFFREY ROSS

Why so many women still feel compelled to fake it.


68%

O F R E A D E R S I N T H E AT L A N T I C P R O V I N C E S S AY T H E Y O R G A S M D U R I N G S E X M O S T OR ALL OF THE TIME.

GET BU SY Our survey found that 77% of you think you should be having more sex. (This figure is highest in the 35 to 49 age category.) As with faking it, what’s implicit in this belief is that something is lacking in you—or your relationship—if you’re maybe not in the mood after working 10 hours, going to the gym, making dinner and doing the laundry. That’s not to discount the importance of sex. Research published in 2015 from the University of Toronto Mississauga found that the more sex you have, the happier you are. (However, happiness doesn’t further increase with frequency beyond once a week.) Byers recommends focusing on quality, not quantity. Don’t make sex something you’re crossing off your Tuesday-night to-do list. Focus on the whole experience, not just the finale. And remember: “Normal” is simply what works for you.

THE TOP

5

R E A S O N S YO U ’ R E N O T H AV I N G S E X 1. Not enough energy (45%). 2. Don’t like the way you look naked (14%). 3. Aren’t sexually excited by your partner (9%). 4. On medications that have dampened your libido (9%). 5. Would rather binge-watch your favourite show (4%). h

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SPECIAL YO U R TO P

2

DEAL BREAKERS Body odour and personal grooming. According to 65% of readers, penis size is NBD. “Not too big or too small—average is good,” said one respondent, who clearly lives by the Goldilocks golden rule.

& TEC H N O LO GY

TINDER TRUTHS

YOU WANT LOVE, ACTUALLY Tinder et al. might not be the harbingers of the dating apocalypse that everyone thought—63% of those surveyed who use dating apps are looking for romantic partners. However, only 7% have actually met a long-term partner on an app, and more than half say that they prefer to meet people off-line. Using traditional dating sites, such as match.com, to find romantic partners is most popular in the 24-plus crowd. MOST OF YOU ARE MULTI-TASKERS Four out of five app users

say they message at least two people at a time. We’re all for having options, but juggling too many dates can be detrimental to forging a real connection, says Robin Milhausen, associate professor of family relations and human sexuality at the University of Guelph. “We are such a culture of instant gratification,” she says. “If you don’t get a reply back from somebody right away, you just move on to the next person. That forces us to make rapid decisions about relationships when taking a little more time to reflect and make conscious choices is probably a good idea. Sadly, you can miss out on a great person if you don’t text them back within two minutes.” IN OTHER GOOD NEWS Tinder just got a lot more inclusive: As of

November, its Canadian, U.S. and U.K. apps allow users to choose from 37 genders—from transgender to neutrois—or create their own.

YO U R TA KE “ D ATI N G A P P S A R E E A SY A ND USE F UL IF I ’ M E X P L I C I TLY L O O K I N G F O R SOM E ONE T O D ATE . O R G A N I C R E L ATI O N S H I PS A R E NICE T OO — I J U S T D O N ’ T H AV E TH E PATIE NCE .”

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20% of respondents have sent a sexually explicit Snapchat.

16% have used a webcam for Web sex.

19% have had sex with someone over Skype or another type of video chat.

54% have sent nude or scantily clad photos to their partners. That number climbs to 78.1% for 18- to 24-year-olds. 24% have filmed themselves having sex.

48% sext a few times a year, 27% once or twice a month, 10% several times a week and 2% on the daily. You’re mostly sexting to spice up your current relationship (29%), but some of you also do it to tease someone sexually (19%) or to get candid about your sexual desires (17%).

TEXT, CARLI WHITWELL & KATHERINE FLEMMING (“SERVE AND PROTECT”); PHOTOGRAPHY, GEOFFREY ROSS

How you really feel about dating apps.


GET SO ME

For one in five of you, this was a casual hookup. The rest of you were with your live-in love or a committed partner.

THE LAST TIME YOU HOOKED UP: A SNAPSHOT

54%

Two-thirds of you said your last sexual encounter had happened within the past week, and about the same number reported that it all went down in 30 minutes or less. That’s including foreplay: One-third spent just one to five minutes warming up, and about half of you spent from six to 20 minutes.

27% of you cuddled for one to five minutes; another 27% snuggled for more than 20 minutes.

SERVE AND PROTECT

The IUD might be your best birth-control bet. Chances are you’ve heard of the IUD and maybe even have one. Of the survey respondents, 7% said they use an intrauterine device. These T-shaped forms of contraception are inserted into the uterus and have a failure rate of less than 1%. IUDs are available in two versions. The first, a hormone-free copper IUD (copper creates a toxic environment for sperm), costs about $100. One potential drawback, though, is heavier, crampier periods. The alternative—a progestin-releasing IUD—is best for those who suffer from heavy flow and severe cramping because it thins the uterine lining, but the downside is it can cause acne. (This one will run you about $400.) Once inserted, your IUD can last from three to 10 years. Insertion, which is done by a doctor, can be painful—an IUD goes about five centimetres deeper than your average pap smear—so some doctors recommend you take an ibuprofen before your appointment. On the plus side, it takes less than 10 minutes to insert, and any post-insertion cramping will likely subside before you leave your doctor’s office. And FYI: The removal feels like a tiny pinch that is over by the time you’re back into your skinny jeans.

gave oral sex the last time you had sex and 43% received it; 5% had anal sex.

When it comes to sexual positions, you change it up: 21% used one position during your last encounter, 37% used two, 28% used three and 14% used four or more.

91%

described your last time between the sheets as either very pleasurable or somewhat pleasurable. But the rest of you said it was not very, or not at all, fun.

YO U R FAV E

4

METHODS OF CONTR ACEPTION 1. Male condom (30%). 2. Contraceptive pill (20%). 3. Withdrawal (11%). (In fact, 59% of you have relied on the withdrawal method at least once.) 4. Sterilization: tubes tied, vasectomy, etc. (9%).

29%

OF R E SPONDE NTS L OST TH E IR VIR GINITY BE TWE E N TH E A GE S OF 18 A ND 20.

S TAY S A F E Forty-five percent of you told us that sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are your biggest fear. But only 34% of you always ask a new partner to disclose his or her STI status and 43% always use a condom with a new partner. Here’s why using a condom is a good idea: According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis have been climbing steadily since the ’90s. Younger generations are more likely to be infected with an STI, but cases in middle-aged people are also on the rise. Lelo has designed a new latex condom that has an interlocking hexagonal pattern that makes it stronger—but it’s also thinner. A win-win. Lelo Hex condoms ($19.90 for 12, lelo.com) h

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42%

OF WOM E N M A STUR BATE ONCE OR M OR E A WE E K. 61% H AVE FINISH E D TH E M SE LVE S OFF WH E N TH E IR PA RTNE R DIDN’T—A ND H A L F OF TH E SE WOM E N DID IT ON TH E SLY.

H AVE Y OU EVER ?

23% have had a three-way.

19% of women who identify as heterosexual have had sex with another woman.

6% have engaged in swinging.

58% have engaged in sexual spanking.

PL AYTIME

32% have engaged in BDSM.

All the buzz on next-gen sex toys.

1. Handmade from 100% natural rose quartz crystal, Chakrubs The Original Heart crystal dildo ($241.13, chakrubs. com) is meant to heal the body as well as stimulate it. 2. Trojan has developed a mini version of the classic wand clitoris stimulator. Trojan Power Wand Vibrations Massager ($25, at amazon.ca and Walmart, walmart.ca). 3. The Jimmyjane Ascend 4 ($120, jimmyjane.com) allows you to keep your options open—the two ends vibrate at very different frequencies. (Think concentrated, super-intense pulses versus a bigger, deeper buzz.) 4. This game changer is meant to mimic oral sex. Its silicone head fits neatly over the clitoris, creating a slight vacuum and pulsing the air around the hood. Satisfyer Pro 2 ($120, at castlemegastore.com). 5. Sex-toy brand Crave polled customers about their favourite vibration patterns and put all 12 options into one magical silicone toy. Crave Flex ($120, lovecrave.com).

VIEW IN G PLE ASUR E S

37% have engaged in roleplaying.

55% have had sex in public.

52% have had anal sex.

Almost 90% of respondents said they do not negatively judge people who watch porn. In fact, 21% watch it one to three times a month, 23% tune in a few times a year and almost one-third of you have watched it at some point (but don’t currently). It’s also worth noting that more than half of those who do watch porn said it gives them inspo in bed. These are largely solo missions: Half of you said you never watch porn with a partner. One-third of you said you check it out with your boo a few times a year, but that figure climbs as high as 42% for married women. Spark = alive and well.

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TEXT BY CARLI WHITWELL; PHOTOGRAPHY, GEOFFREY ROSS (CANDY)

Sex toys are now a $15-billion industry (thanks in part to Christian Grey and that Sex and the City ep when Charlotte gets addicted to the “Rabbit”). About 60% of respondents said they use them in the sack—although numbers skewed higher in respondents aged 35 to 49 and in the Prairies and Atlantic provinces. Vibrators and dildos are your faves.


POLYAMORY 101 One plus one doesn’t equal two. Polyamory, in a word (or two), is consensual non-monogamy. This means that you and your partner have agreed to have sexual or emotional relationships (or both) with other people. The key word here, friends, is “agreed.” It’s not like adultery, where one spouse is obviously in the dark. Polyamory is also different from having an open relationship (some polyamorous threesomes or foursomes are exclusive to each other) or polygamy (a typically faith-based relationship in which you have more than one spouse). HOW CAN I TRY IT? If you’re in a relationship, you have to make sure you’re both on board with the idea (e.g., you don’t secretly want to break up with your spouse and are using this as a way out). Then make some ground rules. “Some people may say ‘It’s okay for you to meet someone, but before you actually get physical, I need to meet them,’” says Zoe Duff, director of the Canadian Polyamory Advocacy Association. “Set up boundaries depending on where your comfort levels are.” Some couples even have written agreements; apps like Poly Life can help organize these. ■

Y OU R TA K E “ I H AVE TW O PA RTNE R S, A ND E VE N TH OUGH I’M M A R R IED TO ONE OF TH E M, I DON’T CONSIDER E ITH E R OF TH E M M O RE IM PORTA NT TH A N TH E OTH E R .”

6%

OF RESPONDENTS WHO ARE I N R E L AT I O N S H I P S I D E N T I F Y T H E I R S A S P O LYA M O R O U S . O F T H O S E , 74% H AV E O N E O R T W O R O M A N T I C PA R T N E R S A N D 18% H AV E THREE OR MORE.

Wait, there’s more! For the complete results of our Sex and Relationship Survey, head to ELLECanada.com.

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RELATIONSHIP

LANGUAGE OF LOVE

S T E P AWAY F R O M T H E K E Y B OA R D . In the end, it really doesn’t matter whether you reply now or three days later, “like” or “heart” the post or tag or DM someone. You won’t seem like a loser if the time stamp is 6:57 a.m. Using full stops does not suggest you are bad in bed. Just bang out the first thing that comes to mind. Turn off spell-check. Throw in some Xs. The person on the receiving end of your message, whoever it is, isn’t going to be swayed by your choice of adverb. I’m telling you: Short of using an eggplant emoji, you cannot screw this up. What makes me so sure that how you say it is more important than what you say? Why am I an evangelist for getting hyper-articulate women to loosen up? Alors, it was the experience of falling in love with someone with whom I didn’t share a native language. Eventually having to learn this convinced me that if love’s gonna happen, it’s gonna happen, whether you can blow his mind with a perfectly crafted text message or not. I met Olivier at a party. Technically, I was a crasher, if by crasher you mean someone who was not invited by, or even known to, the host. I was 30. I had arrived in London exactly 24 days earlier, having led a happyish but stagnating life in New York. Taking pity on a newcomer, a friend of a friend had invited me to tag along with her for the night. The theme of the party was wine and cheese. I had gotten my first passport when I was 19. I couldn’t have pronounced fourme d’Ambert if Gérard Depardieu had been plopping great gloopy wedges of it into my mouth himself. For some reason—I still don’t know exactly why—I made a beeline for Olivier. I think I thought he somehow looked “European,” activating my adult-gap-year fantasy of becoming a sort of romantic locavore. (It was either the strong nose and the hooded eyes or the shirt he was

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wearing—which, I regret to report, had “Let’s rock” spelled out in boulders—that gave off a continental air.) I was in a bold mood. I introduced myself and asked him where he was from. “France,” he said. “A village about an hour outside Bordeaux.” “I’m from Wilmington!” I said, as though he would obviously be on a first-name basis with a random beach town in North Carolina. Crazily enough, he was: He’d once travelled there, while studying in California, for a classmate’s wedding. Other than that, Olivier and I had absolutely zero in common. I was American. He was French. I was a writer. He had a Ph.D. in math. If I’d been pressed to claim a hobby, I might have said, not very ambitiously, reading. He was obsessed with aviation and had a pilot’s licence. He traced aerobatic moves in the air as we talked for longer than one might have thought. I remember that the conversation, for some reason, turned to drugs, and I was impressed: Imagine knowing how to say “pothead” in a second language. Eventually, Olivier announced that he was tired and had to go. He took my email address and sent me a message containing nothing but “hello” in the subject line. A fairly unpromising start in this era of slaved-over Instagram captions and Tinder profiles written by committee. As bicultural correspondents go, we weren’t exactly Anaïs Nin and Henry Miller. Nin, a novelist fluent in three languages, received countless letters from writer Miller that described their intense feelings as so: “We’re in Seville and then in Fez and then in Capri and then in Havana,” he wrote. “We’re journeying constantly, but there is always a machine and books, and your body is always close to me and the look in your eyes never changes. People are saying we will be miserable, we will regret, but we are happy, we are laughing always, we are singing. We are talking Spanish

PHOTOGRAPHY, GETTY IMAGES

Saying the right things isn’t as important as you think. BY LAUREN COLLINS


and French and Arabic and Turkish. We are admitted everywhere and they strew our path with flowers.” They saw their affair as an opportunity, their differences as a superpower rather than a handicap. On our first date, we were admitted to a pub, where our path was not strewn with flowers but cigarette butts, and then to a Chinese restaurant. I loved his sharp mind and his understated sense of humour. He was emotionally elegant in a way that struck me as very French. But I had no idea what life with someone from another culture, and another language, would entail. A lifelong monoglot, my main takeaway from high-school Spanish was the word sacapuntas (pencil sharpener)—I was ignorant of the risks and rewards of loving someone across a language barrier. Olivier was a skilled English speaker, but we couldn’t finish each other’s sentences. We were lucky, actually, if we got the gist of the first halves of them. As we got to know each other, I experienced this as a sort of liberation, a free pass from the expectation of being clever and well informed and always having something to say. When the time came for me to meet Olivier’s French-speaking family, I didn’t have to sing for my supper, or even speak for it; I could just be. The gaps in our communication seemed like proof of the primal authenticity of our connection: Imagine being loved by someone to whom you couldn’t properly speak. Eventually, lust in translation gave way to love in translation. Olivier and I, like all couples, went from googlieeyed idealism to the nitty-gritty everyday. Amid the chaos, it was often hard to read each other’s signals. Olivier told me that always speaking to me in English felt like “touching [me] with gloves.” In addition, when trying to say that I’d accepted delivery of a gift his mother had sent to our apartment, I told her that I’d given birth to a coffee machine. A professional communicator, I was tongue-tied in my personal life. I finally faced up to it: I had to learn French. I’d tried before. A year or so into our relationship, I enrolled in an evening class at the Institut français du Royaume-Uni in South Kensington. There were maybe 10 of us: me, a South African who was dating a Frenchman, a Korean who was dating a Frenchman, a Turk who was dating a Frenchman, a Swede who was married to a Frenchman and so forth. Intellectual curiosity is dead. Or at least, I can attest, it’s a non-starter when it comes to adult language learning. The only people desperate enough to spend their Thursday nights conjugating third-group verbs were the wives and girlfriends of an assorted bunch of Gallic men who, judging from the collective evidence, couldn’t be understood until you understood their language. With each of us mangling the language in our own unique way, I quit somewhere between “Je m’appelle” (“My name is”) and “J’ai dans mon sac” (“I have in my bag”). In our parents’ day, most people ended up with people who were very much like them. Even marrying outside of

one’s religious denomination was enough to raise eyebrows: My maternal grandmother was known to comment on the fact that four of her five Protestant daughters had married Catholics. Today, 11.2 percent of Canadian marriages and common-law relationships include a foreign-born spouse. We pick and mix across increasingly meaningless gender, race, religious and cultural barriers with relative ease. We have babies with incredible skin tones and improbable names. The interestingness of our lives, for the most part, makes up for their occasional lack of context. Six months into our marriage, we were living in Switzerland’s francophone Geneva, where Olivier’s job had moved, and my lack of French bothered me in a way that earlier it hadn’t. I signed up for another class and got serious: flash cards, notebooks, listening to the radio at top volume every single morning until I, at long last, understood, one glorious morning, what the presenter was talking about: un nid d’oiseau chanteur (a nest of songbirds). After the nest of songbirds test, my confidence rose. One night, I heard Olivier talking on the phone to his brother, and it was as if someone had turned up the volume on the previously muffled soundtrack to my life. “Elle n’est pas très mobile,” he was saying (“She’s not very mobile”). Four years after that night at the party, I was hearing Olivier’s real voice for the first time. Even more miraculously, I soon discovered mine. One night, I found myself sparring with Olivier over his refusal to take more than a week of holidays a year. “C’est idiot!” I barked (“It’s silly!”), willing to sound like one myself if it meant getting through on an emotional level. I felt like a different person in French— more credible, somehow, its formal locutions and regimented syllables buttressing my arguments. I also felt, by virtue of having bothered, like a properly loving wife. We live in Paris now and have been married for three years. I’m fluent in French, which is to say that I speak it well enough to know how many mistakes I’m constantly making. I’m 36. I doubt my French will ever catch up to Olivier’s English. Our daughter is set to overtake me at approximately two and a half years old. The other day I looked up hanneton, a word I saw in an article, and the dictionary came back, confusingly, with “cockchafer.” Still, not having the language for all those years made me realize that words aren’t the tools of seduction I once thought they were. It made me learn to love, as a transitive verb, rather than simply trying to articulate my love, the common noun, all the time. And having it now makes me realize that if being able to communicate doesn’t bring us together, then it keeps us together, trying to tune into each other’s needs and desires through all the static. We translate inside languages as much as we do between them. It doesn’t matter what your birth certificate says, or how you say fourme d’Ambert; at some point, every couple has to put cleverness aside and learn how to talk. ■

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CAREER

SARAH LEWITINN MUSIC DIRECTOR, ARITZIA

The night Kanye West’s The Life of Pablo hit the Internet, while you were memorizing the lyrics to “Fade” and refreshing your Twitter to see the latest on the T.Swift debacle over that line in “Famous,” Sarah Lewitinn was busy too—editing out all the profanity from the album. “I was up until 4 a.m. so I could add it to the stores ASAP,” says the New Yorker, who curates the eclectic (think everything from Chvrches to Drake) playlist for all of the North American Aritzia and Wilfred stores. Lewitinn started out as a teenage music critic and later ran a record label. She has been DJing for over a decade and compares building the ultimate song list for the Canadian retailer to programming the best radio station ever. “I’m not making a playlist for the most popular girl in school but rather for the cool girl the popular girl secretly wants to be like.” That’s music to our ears.

INSIDE JOBS Four fashion-industry gigs you never knew existed...and will instantly want. BY LISA GUIMOND

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THREE SONGS LEWITINN HAS ON

1. “Secrets” by The Weeknd. 2. “Cranes in the Sky” by Solange. 3. “I Followed You Home” by Eliot Sumner.

ROTATION RN

DANIELLE MIKA NAGEL DIRECTOR OF MINDFUL PERFORMANCE, LULULEMON

As far as corporate mantras go, Lululemon’s is pretty chill: “When life works, work works.” It’s not surprising, then, that the Canadian label, which was at the forefront of the athleisure revolution, created the role of mindfulness manager in 2015 to help its employees focus their minds and supercharge their careers. Now director of mindful performance, Danielle Mika Nagel and her team of meditation teachers lead sessions for everyone from store staff to the executive team (including twice-daily classes at the company’s Vancouver head office). Mika Nagel also creates customized programs and yoga podcasts for internal use and for the world-class athletes with whom the brand works. But her guidance as a certified teacher goes beyond sun salutations. “The outcome of practising yoga and meditation is present-moment awareness,” she explains. “When we’re present, we embrace life and begin to look at challenges as opportunities for growth.” LIVE IN THE NOW “Start mono-tasking rather than multi-tasking,” she says. “Whether you are having a conversation, driving your car or helping your kids with homework, stay fully present with that one activity.”

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“MODEL EMPLOYEES” & “CAREER LESSONS” TEXT, CARLI WHITWELL; PHOTOGRAPHY, TRUNK ARCHIVE (MODEL), GEOFFREY ROSS (STARS) & GETTY IMAGES (J. CUMMING, H. GATES & K. MOSS)

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T R A C E Y PA N E K HISTORIAN, LEVI STRAUSS & CO.

Tracey Panek is not your typical archivist. This history buff traded in books for blue jeans in 2014, when she took a job as Levi’s on-staff historian, responsible for the cataloguing of the company’s archives in San Fran. She also travels the globe looking for vintage pieces to add to the collection. Recently—and thanks to the auction-house gods—she acquired Albert Einstein’s denim jacket, which dates back to the 1930s. “Making discoveries [like that] is definitely the most exciting part of my job,” she says. When she’s not snapping up rare garments, she’s collaborating with designers to research historical designs and details that often inform the direction of new collections or the re-releases of throwback styles—and she gets to do it all in jeans. “Let’s just say that my work uniform consists of the denim tuxedo,” she says. WHAT’S OLD IS NEW AGAIN

Levi’s has just updated its iconic 501s. For more info, turn to Style

Scoop on page 30.

DIY

R O M N E Y J A C O B D I R E C T O R O F M I N D S E T, NORTH AMERICA, WGSN

Can’t find the job of your dreams? Everlane, a fashion brand whose philosophy involves revealing the true cost of every item it produces, has an open posting titled “Name your job,” where you’re encouraged to pitch a role that would be valuable to the brand. Its best advice? “Be convincing.”

MODEL EMPLOYEES E V E RY D AY T HE Y’ R E HUS T LI N G . JULIA CUMMING This Hedi Slimane muse also fronts the indie band Sunflower Bean.

HAILEY GATES When not on the catwalk, she hosts States of Undress, a Viceland docuseries about global fashion.

KATE MOSS The supe just opened her eponymous modelling agency.

You probably haven’t even decided what you’ll have for lunch today, but New York-based trend forecaster Romney Jacob knows what you’re going to want to buy in 10 years. Despite her “straight out of The Hunger Games” title, she uses her powers only for good: to help fashion brands learn what will sell for them in the years to come. “We help companies connect the dots and navigate the future of what their consumers are going to be interested in and when it’s going to hit for their business,” says Jacob, who started her career in fashion journalism. “Only after spending years in editorial roles did I discover that my strongest drive came from tracking the emergence of trends—not just talking about what is the new black but analyzing why it’s the new black.” How does she do this? Instead of relying purely on statistical data (though that still plays a role), she organizes “trend treks”: bespoke itineraries that allow execs to tour specific regions and markets where they’re interested in doing business. Recently, she says, she took a team to four cities across Europe to live life like Millennials. Taking 10 selfies a day was optional, of course. WHAT SHE HAS LEARNED “Be open to finding your niche in this industry. When I started my career in fashion, I only knew about two paths: being a designer or working for a magazine. Learn about all of the different avenues you can take in fashion, and be honest about which ones truly excite you each day.”

C A R E E R L E S S O N S W E ’ V E L E A R N E D F R O M T H R E E O F O U R FAV E FA S H I O N F L I C K S The Devil Wears Prada: Sometimes you have to work with difficult people. Deal with it. Also: Assistants don’t get to shop the fashion closet. Zoolander: Having a “look” can take you a long way. See Ferrari, Magnum, Le Tigre and Blue Steel. Funny Face: The 1950s musical starring Audrey Hepburn as an NYC bookstore clerk who (reluctantly) goes to Paris to model proves that leaving your comfort zone can be a good thing. ■

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STRESS TEST #7226

Go undercover in an unstable country. Break a major story. Start a movement for social change. Have people say it went viral because you’re pretty. Prove them wrong. Do it again.

STRESS TESTED FOR WOMEN


Metallicized polyester-blend jacket (Greta Constantine), rhodium-platedmetal earrings (Biko) and leather and metal choker (Fecal Matter)

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IT’S ABOUT US

RISING STAR WINNIE HARLOW IN DESIGNS FROM AN EXCITING LINEUP OF CANADIAN FASHION TALENT.

Photography by Nelson Simoneau Styling by Corey Ng Art direction by Brittany Eccles Text by Vanessa Craft & Sarah Laing


Polyester blouse and cotton and elastane skirt (Beaufille), lambskin and metal choker (Emily Kowalik), PVC, pewter and bronze-platedmetal earrings (Anne-Marie Chagnon) and leather boots (John Fluevog)


Neoprene hoodie (Mikhael Kale), cottondenim trousers (S.P. Badu) and syntheticmaterial sneakers (Call It Spring)

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Cotton, silk and polyamide dress (Sid Neigum), bamboo and elastane bra (Mary Young), cotton, polyamide and elastane skirt (House of Nonie) and synthetic-material sneakers (Call It Spring)


Faille dress (Kaelen) and sterling-silver necklace laced in dress (Dolorous)

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IF YOU’RE GOING TO SHOOT A PERFECTLY OFTHE-MOMENT CANADIAN DESIGNER EDITORIAL, THERE’S ONLY ONE MODEL FOR THE JOB RIGHT NOW: WINNIE HARLOW. There are the obvious reasons—she’s from Toronto, for starters. She’s got strong industry relationships, most notably with rising star Mikhael Kale, who made her a custom piece to wear to this year’s Canadian Arts & Fashion Awards, for which she was a judge. There’s also the way she relates to this country’s style DNA, describing DSquared2, for example, as designers who “embody everything within me. [Their aesthetic is] crazy but still classy.” And then there are the more abstract dots to connect between Harlow and the Canadian fashion biz: the way her unconventional career (which started when Tyra Banks discovered her on Instagram) mirrors the off-the-established-maps direction in which Canada’s fashion industry is heading (RIP, Toronto Fashion Week); their shared David and Goliath struggle to make a mark in an industry that favours the established and easily digestible; and,

yes, there’s also the way that Harlow, who has recently relocated to London, and many Canadian designers feel that sustainable success lies outside our country’s borders. Or, you know, we could just go with the fact that Harlow is totally a model of the moment who shows these clothes to their best advantage. Bonus: She’s a great storyteller. Which brings us to the part where we’re all on lunch break for this shoot and she tells us a story about that time she did shots with Prince Harry. (Unfortunately, what is discussed on-set over chicken and quinoa stays on-set.) Now, if this anecdote surprises you, then you’re probably familiar with Winnie Harlow in her “role model” incarnation, a designation she says she never asked for, FYI. (More on that later.) You probably watched the cycle of America’s Next Top Model that introduced the world to the girl with vitiligo from the GTA and on which she won the highest number of public votes. You may have seen her TEDxTalk, “My Story Is Painted on My Body,” which she gave in 2014 under her given name, Chantelle Brown-Young, and which has had over 500,000 views. And if you’ve seen her in Beyoncé’s Freedom video, there’s a good chance you also remember when Drake namechecked her in a song on If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late. h


Cotton and silk jacket (House of Nonie), silk top and skirt (Tanya Taylor), lambskin choker (Emily Kowalik), brass and sterling-silver necklace (Anastassia Sel) and leather sandals (Aldo)

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But if the Prince Harry story feels like an “Oh, Winnie” moment, then either (a) you read the Daily Mail (safe space here) and so will have seen her “stepping out” on the regular, sometimes with rumoured (and maybe ex?) BF Lewis Hamilton, (b) you’re one of her 1.5 million Insta followers or (c) you spent a day with her, like we did, chatting about everything you’d expect any other 22-year-old would be into: boys, hair, funny things her relatives’ kids say. And that’s the fascinating thing about Harlow: She’s not exactly distancing herself from the physical difference that initially brought her fame (and campaigns for Desigual, Sprite and Swarovski), but she is trying to move beyond it. On-set, we got the sense that Harlow was there to be a model—working hard to get it right, giving as much on the 12th shot as she gave on the first, not complaining about things

Today my girls are coming over and we’re going to make American Thanksgiving dinner.” Are you a good cook? “I make a good oxtail stew, but I don’t cook too often so I don’t know what else I could make.” You just need one showpiece dish and then you can pretend. “Right? The mantrap!” [Laughs] Okay, we need to focus on this interview. Have you ever made any fashion faux pas? “My

sense of fashion has developed a lot. Even working with my new management for the past year has changed it. I still have my ’hood style—I still like to wear my gold chains and my grills. I’m surprised I don’t still have a gold nameplate from back in the day.” Speaking of back in the day, I know when I was growing up, I wasted a lot of time trying to fit in and not be different from everyone else. Was that your experience? “Like any other kid, I was

I FEEL LIKE I AM AN INSPIRATION. THAT’S THE WORD I PRE running over schedule—but she wasn’t there to be a spokeswoman for vitiligo. In fact, the only time that she was anything but relaxed was when someone asked her an offhand question about the condition. Harlow answered it briefly—the Coles Notes version of an explanation she has clearly given 1,000 times before—but it obviously broke her flow in front of the camera. Shortly after that, she asked her cousin (who’d come with her, along with an assistant) to change the music playing on the studio’s sound system. “Something I can dance to,” she requested from behind the camera, swishing the black Sid Neigum dress around her.

Later that same week, our editor-in-chief, Vanessa Craft, got on the phone with Harlow to keep the conversation going (they really bonded over that chicken and quinoa at lunch, okay?) and had a chat about career, labels and the fact that she’s just getting started. What have you been up to since the shoot? “I’m taking my time being home [in Mississauga].

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trying so hard to fit in that school made no sense to me. I wasn’t attending class; I was trying to hang out in the caf with the cool kids. I was always trying to be cool. In the end, the viceprincipal told my mom it would be best for me to go to an alternative school where I was only there when I had class and then I left. That helped me to focus on my studies and not on everyone else and what they were doing.” Did you grow up feeling comfortable in your own skin? “As a child, I really hated it. I think, regard-

less of my skin condition, my mom is very conservative with dressing—like, when she’s helping me do laundry and she sees a thong, she’s like, ‘What is this dental floss in your laundry basket?’ With my skin, I have to avoid direct contact with the sun, so that combined with my mom being conservative meant I grew up wearing stockings under shorts and long sleeves under tank tops. It was kind of embedded in me that I was supposed to be covering up. As I grew up, people would still stare, but, I don’t know, me feeling uncomfortable just disappeared. I’d be walking out with friends and they’d be like, ‘Don’t you


feel everyone staring?’ and I’d be like, ‘No, I actually don’t. I just don’t care.’” Do you ever get tired of having to address all this?

“I’m very sick of talking about my skin.” There’s so much more to you than that. “Precisely. I am literally just a human. I have the same brain as you; there’s a skeleton under my skin just like yours. It’s not that serious.” On-set we talked about how as women of colour become more successful, you often become the only black person in the room. Do you ever feel pressure to perform or speak on behalf of “all your people”?

“I don’t put pressure on myself. People try to put it on me—like I speak for women, for black women. There’s so many other pieces to me. I’m not a vitiligo spokesperson just because I have vitiligo. I don’t perm my hair anymore, but I’m not a natural-hair expert just because it grows out of my head like that.”

I’m hitting the club. “That too! [Laughs] I plan to walk for Victoria’s Secret one day. I’d be so honoured if they would have me. People say I should get into acting because of my big personality, and, honestly, I will say I’m a bit of a crazy person. I walk around my house having a fake argument with a boyfriend who has cheated on me, and I’ll go so far as to have my eyes watering as I’m cussing out this fake boyfriend, just to see if I can pull that emotion.” Do you have a mantra? “I have a couple, but one of my most liked Instagrams is actually a quote I came up with myself. It’s ‘Confidence doesn’t eliminate insecurities, and insecurities don’t mean you’re not confident.’” Did something happen in your life to inspire that?

“This goes back to me not talking about my skin. The picture was me in a bra and underwear, and when I took the photo, I was in the middle

FER. I DON’T BELIEVE THAT I HAVE TO BE A ROLE MODEL. So true. “I’m just living life. And if that inspires you, I’m proud, but I’m not going to put pressure on myself to be the best person in the world and tell everyone I have vitiligo. If you want to know about it, you can do your research. Either way, I’m not in the dictionary under ‘vitiligo.’” Are you comfortable being seen as a role model? “I feel like I am an inspiration. That’s the word I prefer. I don’t believe that I have to be a role model, someone to be emulated. My mom inspires me, and I take great things from her, but there are things from my mom that I would never do. So I don’t have my mother as a role model, but I do have her as a huge inspiration.” Your career has really taken off in the past year. Do you have a proudest moment so far? “When I

signed with my new agency, I had a list; I said these were the things I was trying to accomplish in one year and five years. One thing on my list was [to do] more covers, and I already have five covers.” What’s the biggest goal for you? “As a woman, one day I will have a family and be a sweet little housewife and take my kids to soccer and ballet and piano lessons. But until then...”

of doing my makeup. Everyone was like, ‘Oh, if she’s talking about confidence, she must be talking about her skin,’ but I was actually just saying that we all wear makeup and have insecurities. My contour is an unblended stripe on my face, and no one even saw that!” Do you feel like people project onto you that you have to always be about loving yourself, never changing yourself? “A former friend of mine got

a nose job, and I was the most supportive person of that nose job. I’m not the person that people portray me to be. I love myself the way I am, but people will always message me about other people with vitiligo who cover their skin. ‘Winnie Harlow, you need to tell them that they need to love themselves the way they are and stop covering their skin!’ No! If that’s what makes them comfortable and what makes them happy, let them be. This is just what makes me happy. Right? So that’s why I do it. But that’s not me saying ‘Well, you must never get a nose job, you must not cover your skin, let your pimples shine free.’ [Laughs] Cover all of those fuckers up.”

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Cotton coat (Hayley Elsaesser), polyester-blend arm bands (Emily Kowalik), sterling-silver ring (Danielle Lee) and steel and zinc choker (Aldo)


Bamboo, cotton and spandex top and silk, cotton and velvet trousers (Brit Wacher), rhodiumplated-sterling-silver and brass earrings (Alynne Lavigne) and napaleather heels (Zvelle)

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Polyester-blend-tulle gown (Greta Constantine), cotton hoodie (Atelier Wonder), rose-gold-plated-metal earrings (CG Chris Gelinas), rhodiumplated-metal choker and 18-karat-goldplated-metal choker (Biko), gold-platedsterling-silver ring (Alynne Lavigne) and 22-karat-gold and pewter ring (AnneMarie Chagnon)

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Lambskin-leather jacket and viscose, polyamide and elastane top and skirt (Markoo), cotton choker (Hayley Elsaesser), rhodium-plated-sterling-silver and brass earrings (Alynne Lavigne), 18-karat-yellow-gold-plated-sterling-silver three-finger ring (Betty Barbs), copper ring (Malorie Urbanovitch) and patentleather boots (John Fluevog). For details, see Shopping Guide. Contributing stylist, Elaine Jyll Regio; hair, Justin German (P1M.ca/Bang Salon); makeup, Simone Otis (P1M.ca/Charlotte Tilbury); manicure, Nargis Khan (P1M.ca/Tips Nail Bar); digital technician, Mori Arany; photographer’s assistant, Spencer Robertson; styling assistant, Hankyul Oh


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G U I D E

BEAUT Y O U R

N E E D - T O - K N O W

C O U N T E R C U L T U R E

JASON WU TEXT, KATHERINE FLEMMING; PHOTOGRAPHY, GEOFFREY ROSS (PRODUCTS) & IMAXTREE (MODEL)

Guerlain Gommage de Beauté Skin Resurfacing Peel ($73); Burt’s Bees Flavour Crystals Lip Balm in Ripe Raspberry ($4.89); Farmacy Honey Potion Renewing Antioxidant Hydration Mask ($75); Essence Rock n Doll Crazy XXXL Volume Mascara ($5). For details, see Shopping Guide.

E A S Y R I D E R Shelve the bold colours and highintensity hair. This month is all about cosseting your skin in comfort before we break for spring. And lashes—always lashes.


BEAUTY YSL Couture Palette Collector The Street and I 5 Color Ready-to-Wear ($68); YSL Face Palette Collector The Street and I Blush Poudre Effet Bonne Mine Healthy Glow Powder Blush ($59). For details, see Shopping Guide.

RO C KER C H IC

New-face alert: Staz Lindes, a rock guitarist from Los Angeles who is equally famous for her modelling prowess (she has strutted for Jeremy Scott, Sonia Rykiel, Saint Laurent and Moschino), is the latest beauty to join the YSL fam (a minor leap forward from being discovered in...a bowling alley). We caught up with the 24-year-old pillow-lipped brand ambassador—known as @yostazyo by her devoted socialmedia followers—just in time for Yves Saint Laurent’s “The Street and I” makeup collection release.

ON BEAUTY ICONS “I am inspired by my mom, her friends, my babysitter and Gwen Stefani. And all of the women in Cry-Baby.” ON MUSIC “From the Beatles to Nirvana, a lot of musicians I listen to have great style. Music and fashion are both about self-expression. When I’m getting ready to go out, I usually listen to Devo, Hot Chocolate or George McCrae.” ON NAILS “Since I play guitar, I have to keep the nails on my left hand a little shorter. I love wearing yellow or a classic-red nail polish.” ON COCONUT OIL “I do oil pulling in the morning, and I use it as a makeup remover and body moisturizer. I have eczema on my legs, and it’s great for that.” ON BEAUTY PRODS “I use a Caudalie serum and moisturizer on my face and Homeoplasmine [a French antiseptic ointment] for chapped lips. For makeup, I love YSL Mascara Volume Effet Faux Cils Baby Doll Mascara, Kiss & Blush Lips & Cheeks and Couture Kajal 3-1 Eyeliner.”

THIS MONTH’S NEW & NOTEWORTHY MUST-HAVES

d EDITOR’S PICK

d

N AILED IT

As someone who hasn’t done her own nails for longer than I care

to use. (You could still see my cuticles when I’d finished painting—usually, they’re covered for

BALM.COM These bleak days of hiver test both our will to live and our skin’s ability to stay hydrated. And much like how a generous pour of Okanagan Pinot can top up our emotional reservoir, these waxy balms restore and seal in lost moisture. Soapwalla founder Rachel Winard’s The Balm, which she calls a “miracle product,” took hundreds of formula tweaks and three years to fine-tune. The jellylike moisturizer reduces redness and soothes damaged tissue so your skin won’t look like Jon Snow’s when he’s coming back from beyond the Wall. “Infusions of calendula, arnica and St. John’s wort work synergistically to reduce swelling and calm redness,” says Winard.

HEALING BALMS WE’RE HOARDING LIKE FINE WINE Clockwise, from top left: L’Occitane Immortelle Divine Eye Balm ($90); Soapwalla The Balm Concentrated Repair Balm ($78); Neal’s Yard Remedies Wild Rose Beauty Balm ($72); Éminence Organic Skin Care Rosehip & Lemongrass Repair Balm ($88)

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ELLECANADA.COM

days.) The polish is a base coat, colour and top coat all in one. Each kit includes a nail colour that matches the delightful macaron-shaped LED lamp, a nail file, a cuticle stick and enough presoaked pads to remove polish once. Apply two coats, cure for 30 seconds each and forget about your nails for the next week (at least). Le Mini Macaron Gel Manicure Kit ($45 each) VICTORIA DIPLACIDO

TEXT, KATHERINE FLEMMING; PHOTOGRAPHY, GEOFFREY ROSS (PRODUCTS)

to admit, I found this DIY gelmanicure kit surprisingly simple


BEAUTY READ MY LIPS Red lipstick not your bag? Swipe on this burgundy mascara instead. The wand is a hybrid of two different brushes to give both curl and volume without clumping. Marc Jacobs O!mega Lash Volumizing Mascara in Garnet ($33)

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST French designer Azzedine Alaïa’s sophomore fragrance is a floral arrangement with notes of almond and vanilla, meant to conjure up a stroll through the Alhambra gardens in Granada, Spain. Alaïa Eau de Parfum Blanche Spray ($122 for 50 mL)

H A U L O F FA M E

RED IT Whether you’re staying in or going out, indulge in a little romance.

PINK LADY Gently diffuse powders with this fluffy multi-purpose brush. Lise Watier Face and Corsage Brush ($32) LIGHT YEARS 2017 marks the 30th anniversary of Guerlain’s cult illuminating powder that brought light to the face long before strobing was a thing. This limited-edition version contains matte and shimmery pearls for a warm glow. Guerlain Météorites Happy Glow Pearls Light Revealing Pearls of Powder ($89)

GAME PLAN “I wanted to choose a colour that I go to and that any skin tone can wear. It’s like a raspberry: It’s red, it’s pink, but it’s not red and pink all the way—it’s a great in-between. I had to say ‘Can you make it a little more this, a little more that?’ until we got the colour that I fell in love with. I just put it on and was like, ‘This is it, this is the one!’” – Empire actress Taraji P. Henson on her Viva Glam lipstick. All proceeds go to people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS. M.A.C Cosmetics Viva Glam Taraji P. Henson Lipstick ($21)

MILLENNIAL MOMENT A pink nail suddenly feels so right. Rebecca Minkoff, global colour designer for Essie, agrees—she included two shades in her spring collection for the brand. Essie Nail Polish in Backseat Besties ($10). For details, see Shopping Guide.

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TEXT, VICTORIA DIPLACIDO; PHOTOGRAPHY, GEOFFREY ROSS

SLICK MOVES This ingenious body spray takes the messiness out of oil application. (This one is sweet almond.) The scent—Tom Ford’s summery Soleil Blanc, with notes of bergamot, cardamom and ylang-ylang—doesn’t hurt, either. Tom Ford Soleil Blanc Dry Oil Spray ($84)


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Everywhere I go, I’ve got it covered. Maybelline.ca Gigi wears new Dream CushionTM in Classic Ivory. ©2017 Maybelline Canada

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BEAUTY Rimmel London Scandaleyes Reloaded Mascara in Extreme Black ($9). For details, see Shopping Guide.

How do you innovate the most ubiquitous of beauty products? Victoria DiPlacido investigates.

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inner-most corner of the eye. “When the brush is really thick, it’s very hard not to touch the skin,” explains Piggott. “And most of us apply mascara last, so after you have perfected your eye makeup, you end up with dots of mascara [on your eyelids]. It’s really frustrating. The tapered brush allows for more control.” Millennial women—all women, really—expect nothing less from their products. “I think that as young women, we’ve got so much to do and we don’t have a lot of time to sit there and do makeup,” says Delevingne. “So the easier and more effective [products] are, the better.” In 2015, Delevingne chose to leave modelling in pursuit of an acting career, despite astronomical success. She didn’t hold back when explaining her decision, telling the media she found herself deeply unhappy in the industry.

PHOTOGRAPHY, GEOFFREY ROSS (PRODUCT) & GETTY IMAGES (R. ORA, K. MOSS & G. M. JAGGER)

i

f you’ve read any articles about the ideal brow shape in the past five years, you know Cara Delevingne’s dense, expressive pair is it. A quick search on YouTube will find you just under 30,000 tutorials demonstrating how to get the look that Delevingne naturally wakes up with every morning, thanks to genetics and the luck of having been too young to wield a pair of tweezers in the ’90s. “I tend to leave them by themselves,” says the 24-year-old Rimmel London ambassador between bites of sushi in Shoreditch’s Ace Hotel in London. “Occasionally people do like to touch them, but I don’t generally do anything to them. They don’t like to be tamed.” On the day we meet, Delevingne looks her usual blend of casual cool. She’s wearing an army-green lace-up bomber from Unravel Project, black skinny jeans and a pair of Pumas. The brows? They’ve only been given a cursory bit of attention by makeup artist Kirstin Piggott. “It’s all about eyes today,” Piggott says about the artful smoky look she has created on Delevingne in honour of the model turned actress’ latest role as the face of Rimmel London’s Scandaleyes Reloaded Mascara. It’s a strong fit for the outspoken Brit’s first campaign with the brand. In contrast to her live-and-let-live approach to her brows, Delevingne is particular about her lashes. “I’m pretty OCD about my mascara,” she admits, sitting crosslegged on the sofa. “I want to literally get every lash.” Scandaleyes was redesigned with this kind of precision work in mind. Unlike the original wand, the new brush tapers off at the end, allowing it to reach lashes on the


I ask Delevingne if she considers it one of her most scandalous moments. “I don’t know if it was scandalous,” she says, adding that it was “definitely” an adventure. “I tend to go headfirst into things anyway. If you are confident, then other people kind of believe that you are too. It works.” Montse Passolas, vice-president of global marketing for Rimmel London, references this “fearless spirit” as one of the reasons Delevingne is a perfect partner for the brand, calling her “a true inspiration to young women everywhere.” Beyond the brush, the mascara has another major point of difference from the original: an intensely pigmented volumizing formula that wipes off with warm water but won’t smudge during the day. It is, I learn, quite a feat— and not the first time the brand has had a major breakthrough in the mascara category. In 1864, Eugene Rimmel, the entrepreneurial son of a French perfumer who set up shop in Mayfair, invented Water Cosmetique, the world’s first non-toxic mascara. Today, all mascaras are made up of waxes, pigments and oils in various combinations. Why mascara clumps (or doesn’t) depends largely on how the brush and the formulation work together. “What happens is that many of the volumizing formulas contain a lot of wax,” explains Dhavel Patel, vice-president of research and development for Rimmel London. “They tend to dry pretty fast on the lashes, so you don’t get a lot of time to actually shape them.” Different types of waxes have different effects on the formula. Rimmel London uses a proprietary combination of waxes based on the type of mascara they’re looking to develop. “Wax is basically oily material in a solid form that repels water,” says Patel. “So that’s primarily how you build material on the lashes to make them longer and thicker.” Properties of the wax also affect how long wearing the formula is, as well as its creaminess (and thus how many layers you can apply with varying amounts of ease). Use of harder, more rigid waxes will actually curl your lashes as the formula sets. Scandaleyes is able to avoid the clumpiness of most volumizing mascaras by using a gel-

DE C O D I N G TH E LO N DO N LO O K

“British-girl makeup is quite effortless,” says makeup artist Kirstin Piggott, who has also worked with Rimmel London faces Kate Moss and Rita Ora. “The general London girl likes a bit of a rock ’n’ roll thing. It’s funny, my hairdresser friend in New York is like, ‘What is it with you English girls not even wanting to brush your hair?’” For Delevingne, British beauty is more of a mindset than an aesthetic. “I think it’s about being unapologetic and unafraid,” she says. “We are willing to push boundaries and break the rules.”

Rimmel London faces Rita Ora, Kate Moss and Georgia May Jagger

cream formula that features a patented polymer technology the brand is the first to bring to market. The polymer, Patel tells me, is everything. Since I spent my last chemistry class debating the merits of Lindsay Lohan in Mean Girls, he offers this primer: “A polymer is a general term for something made up of many smaller units.” The one Rimmel London developed is multifunctional, which means it’s made up of units that are normally separate. Because the polymer has wax already built into it, not as much of it is needed to increase volume. This allows the brush to comb through the lashes, separating them from one another before the formula dries (ergo, no clumps). It also evenly disperses black pigment through the formula, giving the product its fluid texture and lacquer finish. “The shiny effect is normally not there with mascaras that have a lot of wax,” says Patel. “They are usually matte or grey looking.” In the campaign, Delevingne plays a secret agent tasked with avoiding capture by a crew of suited men in aviators chasing her through St. Pancras station—presumably it’s a sweaty pursuit, but her makeup remains intact. In order for the mascara to be granted long-wearing and smudgeand humidity-proof status, Rimmel London puts the formula through a sauna test, as well as consumer testing in every type of climate. The polymer (it always comes back to the polymer, says Patel) encapsulates the pigments and other materials, repelling most of the moisture and humidity. (Note: Jumping into a pool is beyond the limitations of the mascara. For that, you need to go fully waterproof.) When I ask Delevingne if she’s typically good about removing her makeup at night, she says she tries: “Obviously, I’m not going to lie. There have been occasions when I just have to get to sleep as quickly as possible.” Later that night, there’s a launch party at Kachette, a former railway station, where English rapper Lady Leshurr— there at Delevingne’s request—stands under an imposing brick archway and dedicates a song to exactly those kinds of moments. “This is for the girls who don’t take their makeup off and go right to bed,” she announces to a crowd of beauty editors and influencers before launching into the track “Queen’s Speech 6.” As Delevingne leaves the event, I get another look at her makeup. It appears just as it did when we spoke six hours earlier. Hopefully she’ll take it off before bed, but even if she doesn’t, there’s a good chance it will look fine in the morning. ■

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BODY

PERIOD PEACE The latest intel for a less annoying time of the month. BY KATHERINE FLEMMING

ELLE L OV E S Here lie the most beautifully comfortable period panties in the world. They delicately slip over your distended lower belly with a seamless waistband, and the built-in leakproof pad steps in like an understudy if your OG method starts to give way. Knixwear Lace Leak-Proof

CO LLECTO R S L AN E

THREE GREEN ALTERNATIVES TO CONVENTIONAL PADS AND TAMPONS 1. T H E H O N E S T C O M PA N Y O R G A N I C C O T T O N TA M P O N S

($9.25 for a box of 16, honest. com) Actress Jessica Alba’s wildly popular line of household products has been expanded to include organic tampons, which are free of synthetics, fragrances and deodorants. Cute packaging too. 2. T H E D I VA C U P

($40, diva cup.com) This is as polarizing as Kanye, but the women who swear by it love never having to re-up on supplies. Composed of medicalgrade silicone, the cup warms up and adapts to your shape, creating

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a near-airtight seal that can hold fluid for 12 hours. To achieve that snug fit, the cup must be rotated 360 degrees, which takes patience and practice. The cup is offered in two sizes—for before and after having a baby/turning 30. 3. LUNAPADS

(from $12, luna pads.com) The Vancouver-based company offers a plethora of soft, washable cotton pads, depending on flow and size (from extra-long to thong). The patterns are lively and bright and lift any enviro guilt from using disposable pads.

TEXT, KATHERINE FLEMMING; PHOTOGRAPHY, JACQUES WEYERS (MODEL), GEOFFREY ROSS (PRODUCTS) & ISTOCK (WATER & PARSLEY)

Boyshorts ($36 each, knixwear.ca)


UPGR ADE YOUR F O O D & DR I NK I NTAKE THE DRINK: SWAP COFFEE FOR WATER. “Coffee depletes mag-

nesium in your body. During your period, your uterine muscles are contracted [hi, cramping] and magnesium helps to relax muscles,” says Melissa Ramos, a Toronto-based nutritionist and creator of Sexy Food Therapy, a website and clinic that specializes in digestion and hormonal health. Intervene by upping your liquid intake. “It sounds counterintuitive, but drinking extra water helps flush out excess water,” she says. She suggests drinking two litres of room-temperature H2O a day. “Cold water decreases the hydrochloric acid in your stomach, which can lead to bloating; you can’t digest food properly without adequate levels of stomach acid.”

GREENS MEAN GO De-bloat at lunch or dinner with this blended parsley soup. “Parsley is a diuretic that helps to replenish key minerals while at the same time taking excess water out of your system,” says Toronto nutritionist Melissa Ramos.

1 handful fresh parsley 1 tbsp organic unsalted butter 1 tbsp minced garlic 1 large white onion, chopped 3 cups organic chicken stock 1 cup full-fat coconut milk Salt and pepper to taste

T H E N O S H : S K I P P R O C E S S E D F O R O R GA N I C . Hit pause on

your default period snack that’s loaded with unpronounceable ingredients and preservatives and try the acutely addictive Prana Organic Chocolate Bark ($5.49), which contains high percentages of organic cocoa and blood-sugar-stabilizing powerhouses like almonds, cashews and pumpkin seeds. The Canadian brand currently has four flavour offerings, from the sea-salt-infused Carazel to the vegan-friendly No Mylk’n, a dairy-free, crispy-rice-laced milky chocolate made from rice syrup.

Blanch parsley, chop it and then set it aside. In a pan over medium heat, add butter and sauté garlic and onion until they begin to caramelize. In a medium pot, bring stock to a boil and then add the coconut milk, onion and garlic and parsley. Season with salt and pepper and then toss everything into a blender. (We love the Vitamix Ascent A3500 Blender, $799.95, vitamix.ca.)

CLEANUP CREW When you don’t have time for a hot shower but need a fast refresh, try these Good Clean Love Rebalance Moisturizing Wipes ($9 for a box of 10, goodcleanlove.com) instead. They are formulated with a patented technology that replicates natural lubrication without disrupting the growth of good bacteria—a crucial component for healthy vaginal flora. This translates to minimized odour without dryness. The wipes are vegan and free of petroleum, petrochemicals and parabens.

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“The Kicker”

“The Flamingo”

“The Bat”

“The Irish Stepdancer”

“The Doggie Paddler ”

However you sleep, you’re protected. Always Overnight pads have a 75% larger back* for up to 10 hours of protection while you sleep.

*vs. Always Ultra Thin Regular with wings

“The Gecko”

© 2016 Procter & Gamble

“The Jumping Jack”

“The Cliff Hanger”


TEXT, CARLI WHITWELL; PHOTOGRAPHY, GETTY IMAGES (NAPA)

E S C A P E S G R E A T & T A L E S G E T A W A Y

Drinking in the romance of Napa is even easier come winter. The region’s yellow wild-mustard flowers bloom, there are fewer people and the cool nights beg for you to curl up under a blanket, Cab Sauv in hand.

TRAVE

SWEET VA L L E Y

PACKING LIST 1. The Cali sun is strong– even if you’re miles from the beach. Protect thyself. Wool hat, Club Monaco ($129.50, clubmonaco. ca). 2. Between October and April, the nights get chilly. Either plop yourself in front of a fire or bring a cozy duster coat. Cotton-linen coat, Cos ($250, cosstores. com). 3. You’ll need to keep your hands free—for sipping wine, of course. Calf-leather cross-body bag, Meli Melo ($683, melimelo.com).

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TRAVEL The 2017 Lincoln Continental

ON A BREAK

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came to the realization that my husband and I are vacation incompatible when we were on our honeymoon. We were in the crumbling, romantic seaside city of Syracuse in Sicily. I was jonesing for a little loungey beach time, preferably with my new BFFs: cassata (a ricotta sponge cake) and espresso. But Tim had hunted down an archaeology museum, so instead I found myself wandering after him through its dusty corridors for hours. So we divorced. Kidding! But to avoid future tantrums—mine, not his—we devised a plan. Going forward, we’d divide all vacations: 50 percent sightseeing, 50 percent slothing. We tested out the approach on a recent getaway in Napa Valley and San Francisco. A road trip, I reasoned, would ensure that I could hop in the car and hightail it to the nearest beach if Tim pulled the museum sneak attack. It might not come as a surprise that Napa (wine,

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sunshine, spas, swimming) is my thing. There are 501 wineries in the county, and according to our tour guide, David, “There isn’t a bad glass of Cab Sauv.” Challenge accepted, sir. First up: sightseeing. Our Napa time began with a visit to Elizabeth Spencer Winery. This mom-and-pop operation doesn’t grow its own grapes; rather, it sources them from local vineyards. Spencer’s was my kind of tasting: We were served in a tree-lined courtyard. For those who prefer the romance of a wine tour, I’d recommend Davis Estates. It’s the passion project of Mike Davis, a gregarious-cowboy type who made it big in the tech boom and then went into the wine biz—for fun. The

PHOTOGRAPHY, COURTESY FORD CANADA (LINCOLN CONTINENTALS & C. WHITWELL AND T. ROBINSON), ISTOCK (VINEYARDS, SAN FRANCISCO, GRAPES & DRINKS) & GETTY IMAGES (GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE)

Carli Whitwell and her husband attempt to find some common holiday ground.


tour is worth it to see his palatial manor alone; apparently some state senators had stopped by the week before. A blissful Tim took so many photos his iPhone died. Meanwhile, I powered through until I found a comfy hanging chair on the terrace overlooking the valley. Round two: sloth mode. You won’t find any impersonal 500-room hotels in Napa; it is mostly B&Bs or small resorts. We stayed at the ultra-luxe Calistoga Ranch—think summer camp for millionaires—which has just 50 rooms. They call the rooms “lodges,” which is apt because they’re bigger than my condo and feature outdoor fireplaces, outdoor showers and hot tubs. It’s also worth noting that the resort is in a forest, so it smells like you’re inside a cedar-scented candle. We wrapped up our stay with a deep-tissue couples massage in the ranch’s Auberge Spa, after which I nearly cried because I didn’t want to leave. Next up: city sightseeing. Knowing we were headed into his territory, Tim appeased me by letting me drive. I dawdled as much as I could, taking a leisurely, winding route into the city before hitting all the classic tourist stops—Golden Gate Bridge, Fisherman’s Wharf, AT&T Park (the stadium where Kanye proposed to Kim, so obvs a must-stop) and the OG hippie haunt, HaightAshbury. (FYI, Deadheads: 2017 marks the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love, and the city is hosting exhibitions and festivals all year long.) Today’s San Fran is not the Full House iteration you grew up with. It’s now a home base for booming neighbour Silicon Valley, and apartments here cost more than their Manhattan equivalents. The people-watching is just as good as the Big Apple’s: Over truffle fries and a glass of Cab Sauv in the St. Regis hotel, I’m pretty sure we saw at least five app-development deals go down. As the city has evolved, so, too, has the food scene. The region now boasts 49 Michelin-starred restos. We ended our getaway with a meal at the buzzy Twenty Five Lusk, which recently got a thumbs-up from Barack Obama. “Nobody comes here once,” our guide had told us about the city. Turns out not even sedentary vacationers like me can resist it. We’re already planning our next trip. ■

R AIS E YO U R GL AS S

WINE ISN’T THE O N LY T I P P L E O N O F F E R I N N A PA AND SAN FRAN.

BLOODY MARY Each St. Regis hotel carries its own version of the southof-the-border Caesar that was invented by one of its bartenders in 1934.

IRISH COFFEE The Irish-whiskey-spiked java at the landmark Buena Vista Cafe in Fisherman’s Wharf is a tourist rite of passage.

MULBERRY STREET This version of a Negroni, which I tried at Twenty Five Lusk, uses rye instead of the traditional gin.

JOY RIDE Your road trip is only as good as your wheels. Here are my three must-haves. 1. Comfy seats. We test drove the 2017 Lincoln Continental, and I can report that the leather seats were as soft as the marshmallow-like bed in my Napa lodge. They also boast back massagers. 2. A good sound system. The Lincoln’s 10 speakers ensure you can always play Rihanna at full blast, as she should be. 3. A jacked-up dashboard. Among its many tricks, it shows the speed limit of the road you’re on. This is helpful when you’re pulling a Jack Kerouac and have no idea where you are or how fast you should be going.

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ESCAPE

Clockwise, from above: The beach at Turtle Inn; the view from the writer’s cottage at Turtle Inn; the writer’s luxe cabana and terrace at Blancaneaux Lodge; a hut on the beach in Placencia

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COPPOLA CABANA

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t’s 11 a.m. on the beach, and my friend has just suggested we open a bottle of rosé. “It’s not even noon yet!” I protest. “And?” she says. Good point. The bottle is almost BY CIARA RICKARD gone by lunchtime. I feel justified in taking on this level of indulgence because we’re on holiday in Belize. We’re winding down from the previous few days’ adrenalin highs (I’m pleased to report we were completely sober for zip-lining and waterfall rappelling) in the most picturesque setting: white sand, blue sea and sky and a smattering of palm trees leaning over the water’s edge just so. The tiny Central American country appeals to visitors on two fronts: adventure in its wild and verdant interior and relaxation on its Caribbean coastline. Our bases for the week—a jungle idyll and a beachy haven—are both owned by one Francis Ford Coppola (who, by the way, has three other high-end properties, in Guatemala, Argentina and Italy), and they are duly luxurious in a laid-back, rustic way. Blancaneaux Lodge is a secluded oasis surrounded by mountains and lush vegetation in Cayo, near the western border of the country. Peppered with waterfalls, caves and Mayan ruins, this region is truly an explorer’s playground. And when we were done exploring for the day, our cabana’s private terrace and infinity plunge pool would lure us back. Turtle Inn, on the coast and farther south, was the perfect chaser after a few days inland. The resort’s 25 luxe thatched cottages are on, or just back from, the beach, and it’s a 20-minute walk (or a quick cab ride) from Placencia, a seaside village of colourful clapboard buildings, fairy-light-bestrewed patios and laid-back beach bars. The sea view from the veranda of my cottage will be forever imprinted on my mind.

Life in the lap of rustic luxury in Belize.


PHOTOGRAPHY, CIARA RICKARD (CABANA AT BLANCANEAUX LODGE), SUNITHA SHIVAKUMAR (WATERFALL RAPPELLING & ZIP-LINING), COURTESY THE FAMILY COPPOLA (PLACENCIA, TURTLE INN & BLANCANEAUX LODGE) & COURTESY BELIZE TOURISM BOARD (CAVE OF THE CRYSTAL SEPULCHRE & XUNANTUNICH)

BLANCANEAUX LODGE IN THE AREA CAVE OF THE CRYSTAL SEPULCHRE This is a fascinating five-kilometre-long underground river and cave system where the Mayans performed ritual sacrifice around 700 to 900 AD. They believed that caves were the portal to the underworld and therefore a direct line to the gods, so that’s where they went to make offerings: bloodletting, the severing of limbs or digits and, when times were really rough, death. We entered through a small opening deep in the jungle and then waded through waist-high water, our headlamps spotlighting the stunning rock formations surrounding us. (Very Indiana Jones.) After about an hour, we reached “the Cathedral,” a surreal cavernous space that reminded me of Fraggle Rock (minus the singing puppets). Enormous stalactites and stalagmites cast eerie shadows on the walls while we took in the in-situ remnants of its dark past: hundreds of Mayan pots, the phalangeal bones of severed fingers and the calcified skeletons of 14 victims, including the “Crystal Maiden,” whose bones sparkle from centuries of calcite buildup. The practicals: While you only spend about three hours in the cave, a visit here takes the better part of a day—it’s about an hour’s bumpy drive in (the tour operator will pick you up) and a 45-minute walk to the cave opening. XUNANTUNICH Once we had learned how to pronounce the name of this Mayan city (shoonahn-too-nitch), we gave our calves a workout and scaled two of its major temples for vertiginous views and the de rigueur feet-hanging-over-the-edge photo op. Further ruins are still being unearthed at the site; in fact, archaeologists discovered the tomb of a high-ranking individual last summer. Around 10,000 people lived in Xunantunich at the height of its power, but it was abandoned by around

1000 AD. Today its buildings carry the echoes of Mayan life, but howler monkeys, iguanas, tarantulas and other wildlife have since moved in. The practicals: This is one of the smaller Mayan sites, so you can cover it in a couple of hours. You don’t need a guide (especially if you rent your own wheels), but it does add to the experience, and you can book one through the hotel.

TURTLE INN IN THE AREA BOCAWINA RAINFOREST ADVENTURES “Not that many people die doing this,” joked our guide Wilson as he attached my harness to the zip line. His nonchalance actually did calm my nerves, and after one turn flying through the canopy 50 metres off the ground, I was hooked. We followed this adrenalin high with another: rappelling down a 35-metre-high waterfall. Looking up at the crashing water was one of the best views of the whole trip. The practicals: This day trip is an hour’s drive from Turtle Inn, and transfers are included in the tour price. THE BEACH AT TURTLE INN Placencia is known for having the best beaches in the country: white sand, the calm turquoise sea and enough palm trees to hang the odd hammock. Our first day here was a super-chill cycle of reading on chaise longues, swimming in the bathwater-warm sea and refuelling at the Laughing Fish beach bar. A wobbly attempt at stand-up paddleboarding was the extent of the day’s exertions. The practicals: The resort also has sailboats, snorkel gear, kayaks and water bicycles, and helpful beach staff are on hand to get you started. Scuba diving is also on offer, and you can do your training there if you aren’t already certified. ■

Clockwise, from top left: The main temple at Xunantunich; the writer on two of her adventures (waterfall rappelling and zip-lining); the entrance to the Cave of the Crystal Sepulchre


HOROSCOPE N I C O L S

AQUARIUS

PISCES

ARIES

(JAN. 20 – FEB. 18) This is your birthday month, which means it’s time to rejuvenate yourself. As if by magic, important people and favourable circumstances will present themselves to you. Consider this a gift from the universe. You will be not only gracious and charming but also direct and forthright because both Venus and Mars will influence your communication style.

(FEB. 19 – MARC H 20) This is the perfect month to make plans for the rest of the year. It’s your powerful time of harvest, and people are proud of you. They admire your accomplishments. It’s easier for you to get a loan or mortgage right now because you have the support of others, so dream big! Shop for beautiful things for yourself and your loved ones, and treat yourself to something sexy.

(MARC H 21 – APRIL 19) This is a powerful month for Aries. For starters, it’s a great time to shop for wardrobe goodies. In fact, with your ruler Mars in your sign, you are pumped and ready for action! Enjoy increased popularity. Schmooze with friends, and be active in clubs and groups. Venus is in your sign, so younger people in particular want to talk to you.

TAURUS (APRIL 20 – MAY 20) This is the only month of the year when the Sun is at the top of your chart, shining a spotlight on you—and the spotlight is flattering. (This is why bosses, parents and VIPs are impressed with you, even if you don’t do anything special.) Since you have this advantage, use it! Make your pitch. State your case. Advance your agenda.

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G E O R G I A

GEMINI

(MAY 21 – JUNE 20) You don’t do boring, which is why you crave variety and stimulation. This month, let’s add travel to that list because you want the thrill of seeing new places and meeting new faces. Some of you will use this same planetary influence to take a course or go back to school. Meanwhile, friendships are warm and, perhaps, competitive.

CANCER

(JUNE 21 – JULY 22) With fiery Mars and fair Venus at the top of your chart, you make a great impression on important people this month. Mars arouses your ambition, and Venus makes you unusually charming and diplomatic. A romance with a boss might begin. This is a good time to discuss inheritances, shared property and how the wealth of others affects you.

LEO

VIRGO

LIBRA

(JULY 23 – AUG. 22) This is the one month of the year when you need more sleep. This might be due to your ambitious travel plans. However, many of you are also exploring opportunities in publishing, the media, medicine and the law. A new romance with someone different, perhaps from another country or a different culture, is likely. (What a fun way to learn a new language.)

(AUG. 23 – SEPT. 22) You have never been one to sit around getting dusty; you like to be efficient, organized and productive. This is why you will love February. Your primary motivation this month is to be better organized and more on top of your game. You even want to improve your health as well. Meanwhile, your sex drive is amped. You want it all!

(SEPT. 23 – OCT. 22) This is the most playful month of the year for Librans, which is why you should accept invitations to parties and enjoy a variety of social diversions. Buy something pretty to wear, and enjoy the arts, movies, theatre, sports events, vacations and playful times with children. (Librans like to dress well.) Be patient with partners because Mars is opposite your sign.

SCORPIO

SAGITTARIUS

CAPRICORN

(OCT. 23 – NOV. 21) Home, family and your private life are your top priorities now. Feel free to grab every chance to cocoon at home because you will love it. (Stock up on your favourite munchies.) Nevertheless, when you sally forth into the world, you will actually be a fireball at work, delegating tasks and cajoling others to achieve your objectives. See what a little rest can do?

(NOV. 22 – DEC. 21) This is a busy, fast-paced month. Grab the baton and run! Short trips, mucho errands, conversations with others, increased reading and writing, plus social invitations (including sports) all combine to give you a jam-packed schedule. Romance is also promising. Can you handle this? Of course you can. In fact, you are ready to play!

(DEC. 22 – JAN. 19) It’s appropriate that your focus is on cash flow and assets because you have big plans to renovate or redecorate. In fact, many of you are not only entertaining at home but also exploring the possibility of a change of residence. Face it: You’re downsizing and streamlining your life. (How cool that people think highly of you now.) ■

ELLECANADA.COM

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ILLUSTRATIONS, EMILIE SIMPSON

BY


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TEXT, LIZ GUBER

TIED

If fringe took first place at Marco de Vincenzo’s spring/summer show, then bows, like the eight making their way up these satin rainbow boots, happily claimed second.



Elle Canada – February 2017