Page 62

frankel review brothers Sadler’s Wells and Nureyev, and Galileo himself has sired eight stakes winners, including Group and Grade 1 scorers The United States, Rhododendron and Hydrangea from mares by Pivotal. Frankel has another stakes winner out of a Nureyev line mare in Goldrush, a threeyear-old who has won all three of her starts, including the Carlingford Stakes and Cooley Stakes, and looks like one to keep on the right side of in 2018. She is out of five-time Group and Grade 1 winner Alexander Goldrun, who is by Nureyev’s grandson Gold Away, and her second dam is by Darshaan. Overall, if not a game-changer, Nureyev appears to be a net positive for Frankel appearing in five of his stakes winners from 28 starters. It would have been hard for Frankel to have made a better start, and given that he was even more formidable at four than he was at three, it’s likely that further significant

Frankel’s offspring already includes stakes winners from 5f to a 1m4f, and it’s hard to say that there is a “typical” Frankel runner successes lie in wait for members of his first crop next year. With regard to his second crop, only 34 of 107 foals have so far faced the starter, three of them having won Group events. Of course, while his strike-rate to date sets a pace that has been set by very few sires, that comment would also apply to the quality of mares that has visited him, and as much

as a pedigree trend it strikes that many of the best Frankels are out of extremely good racemares. Still, just as a truly outstanding sire will often overcome modest opportunities, no amount of quality mares can make a bad one. Thinking on this, and thinking about the opinions expressed regarding Frankel not stamping his first yearlings, we wonder if in fact this is a key to his success. Frankel himself possessed considerable pace – there is no doubt that in his 2,000 Guineas (G1) mode he could have won good sprints – but he also stayed well enough to take a Champion Stakes (G1) over 1m2f on soft ground. Frankel’s offspring already includes stakes winners from 5f to 1m4f, and it’s hard to say that there is a “typical” Frankel runner. It might well be that Frankel is a very strong influence for class than aptitude, and that trait may serve him particularly well when he’s covering books of elite runners.

Watching the Frankel runners develop and reveal their abilities has been a highlight of the last two seasons: we’re looking forward to the future

62

www.internationalthoroughbred.net

Profile for Thoroughbred Publishing

ITB_Dec2017  

Stallion Review 2017, including Frankel, Mickley Stud, a wealth of stallion statistics and an interview with Elite Racing Club, owner-breede...

ITB_Dec2017  

Stallion Review 2017, including Frankel, Mickley Stud, a wealth of stallion statistics and an interview with Elite Racing Club, owner-breede...