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to many fans there. Next, as the “Gay Games” and “Outgames” are held in other countries, there should be a regional focus on the way in which they market the game to address a specific current act of violence or issue relevant to the homosexual community. Encouraging more coaches and players at all levels to talk about homosexuality and share their stories, may help plant the seed for a generation more accepting of homosexuality. As one of the most controversial industries to advocate gay rights, the sports industry can carry the torch of homosexuality further along the track than any other field could slowly stagger. Sports, with its broad cultural appeal, widespread following, and accessibility to such a diversity of athletes, may be the most powerful medium for normalizing homosexuality in the world today. Certain

Winter 2014

fans and athletes all across the globe have waited for this. Perhaps, one day the public will also be cheering loudly in a consensus of support too. _____________________________________________________ 1 Sarah Holley, “Put me in Coach, I’m Good: Confronting Stereotypes of Female Athletes,” The Yale Herald Online. October 30, 1998, http://www.yaleherald.com/archive/xxvi/10.30.98/opinion/ saraholley.html. 2 Anne Friedman, “When Lesbian Athletes Come Out, We Hardly Notice,” New York Magazine Online, May 2, 2013, http://nymag. com/thecut/2013/05/when-lesbian-athletes-come-out-we-hardlynotice.html. 3 Judy Davidson, “Sporting Homonationalisms: Sexual Exceptionalism, Queer Privilege, and the 21st Century International Lesbian and Gay Sport Movement,” Sociology of Sport Journal 30, no. 1 (March 2013): 57 – 82. 4 Ibid. 5 “Asia’s First Gay Tournament Begins in Nepal,” NDTV Sports, October 12, 2012, http://www.ndtv.com/photos/sports/asia-s-firstgay-sports-tournament-begins-in-nepal-13965/slide/6.

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Winter 2014 Intercultural Management Quarterly  

Intercultural Management Institute

Winter 2014 Intercultural Management Quarterly  

Intercultural Management Institute

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