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Booth 7.H20 (Hall 7)


theibcdaily

13.09.2011

TV is robust but must look to second screen Conference Analysis By Ann-Marie Corvin TV advertising is more robust than ever according to global ad chief Mainardo de Nardis, but commercial players must use new platforms and devices to get brand messages out there and to drive viewers back to the primary screen. The OMD Worldwide CEO told IBC delegates at Monday’s keynote, The Challenges for Adver tiser Funded Broadcasting, that TV was still the primary driver with global ad spend rising by 10.6% to $503 billion last year. He added that tele-

vision accounted for a 41% share of total advertising so far in 2011. However, as fellow panellist and media commentator Steve Hewlett pointed out, TV has not grown in quantum terms since 2006 and it was questionable as to whether it would ever increase in real terms again. De Nardis admitted TV was becoming “more vulnerable” and the industry needed to scope out more cross-screen opportunities. “The launch of the iPad and other connected devices has led to the rise of social TV and this has changed the way we enjoy the TV experience. TV is moving outside the box. We’ve gone from the

4K remains emergent Conference Analysis By George Jarrett

Rob Hummel: “The important thing now is not to get hung up on Ks”

One of the main sub plots of an IBC dominated by spectrum greed has been the promise of image richness with 4K, but the subject first came to IBC in 1998 in a master class given by Rob Hummel, now president of Group 47. Looking back at what he saw then, and rating what he sees now, Hummel said: “We were trying to show why it is so important to start in 4K. The important thing now is not to get hung up on Ks.

Thunderbolt support for Io XT AJA Video Systems By Carolyn Giardina Io XT, AJA’s f irst Thunderboltenabled professional video I/O device, has been unveiled at IBC. In addition to a range of supported capture and playback formats, Io XT is designed to unify disparate formats

via its 10-bit hardware up/down/cross conversion capability. “ Wi t h I o X T, T h u n d e r b o l t enabled storage and a new MacB o o k P r o yo u c a n a c h i eve unparalleled performance, including HD uncompressed,” said Nick Rashby, president, AJA Video Systems. “AJA Io XT is a powerhouse I/O device for professional post-

New STB is Android-based EchoStar By Ian McMurray Take Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) and marry it with a 1,500 DMIPS (Dhrystone millions of instructions per second) processor purpose-built for TV applications, and you have the basis of the newly-announced HDX-200 IP set-top box from EchoStar. “Basing the HDX-200 on the Android operating system enables it to take advantage of the huge development effort that is creating an enormous infrastructure of applications and capabilities,” said Gary Stephenson, product manager, IPTV at

EchoStar, “while the powerful processor ensures a fluid, fast user interface experience. “Android also provides enormous flexibility to service providers in terms of the degree to which the settop box is locked down. It can be a ‘walled garden’ on the one hand, or it can be – to the degree the provider wishes – configurable by the user,” Stephenson added. 1.F76

HDX-200 TV-centric silicon

‘when’ and ‘where’ viewers consume content to a new era of ‘how’.” OMD research showed that 27% of active viewers follow TV shows on Facebook, while 5% blog about their favourite shows. It was up to commercial TV players, he argued, “to turn potentially competitive platforms into an added value investment”. Programming will be integrated more closely, he predicted, to exploit second screen opportunities. “Take a cooker y show you mi ght be watching on your iPad. You can pull up the menu, click on the ingredients and devise a shopping list to order from an online grocer.” However, as TV races to exploit multiplatform opportunities Nick Thexton, senior VP of NDS’ advertising solutions division warned that archaic ad measurement systems were getting worse as channel fragmentation continued. Thexton also said that while mature markets were agonising over the impact of digital,

“it could be the new BRIC countries that could become the ad leaders. In 2011 the Indian ad market was worth $5.3 billion (a 21.6% growth) while the Chinese market was worth $28.1 billion (a 20.4%) growth. “India has reached a real turning point with mobile technology with 500 million mobile phone owners – 40% of which have smart phones,” Thexton said.

“It is all about image quality. Film at 4K is 2048 line pairs of actual resolving power and people make the mistake of counting photo sites. They get 4096 and claim it’s 4K, when it is impossible for some cameras to come close to resolving what film does. That’s what separates the men from the boys.” SMPTE President Peter Lude joined the discussion. “4K is already on the surface in cinema, and it is heading that way for the consumer,” he said. “There are no standards for producing 3D in 4K. How quickly that happens depends on market acceptance. There is a debate right now that asks, should we do 3D in higher frame rates, should we do 3D in 4K, or should we do both?”

Andy Maltz, AMPAS science and technology council director suggested, “4K becomes important on the acquisition side when you have 4K and 8K displays – not just in the home but in cinema. If all you are putting into the archive is HD at less than 2K, what are you going to put on 4K and 8K displays?” Brian Lenz, new technology director at BSkyB looked at the coming two years. “4K will not be for launching, but for a lot more exploration. It is not the next 3D in that time frame, but I think we will go to 4K in the long-term.” BBC R&D leaf engineer Justin Mitchell warned: “In order to have 4K you need to have higher frame rates, otherwise you just get motion blur when anything moves.”

production, and with its Thunderbolt ‘daisy-chaining’ connectivity, it maximises what Thunderbolt has to offer. “It really delivers on the promise of Thunderbolt with its simplicity,” Rashby added. “This will be the first of many Thunderbolt-enabled products from [AJA].” Earlier this year, the new I/O device was previewed as a technology demonstration under the codename Phaser. Io XT availability is

Mainardo de Nardis: TV was becoming “more vulnerable”

By Fergal Ringrose MultiDyne Video & Fibre Optic Systems is introducing a new line of 3G/HD/SDI/ASI -to- optical fibre converters that facilitate the automatic conversion and transport of SDI, HD-SDI, and 3Gbps SDI signals over distances up to 10 km using readily-available, fibre optic cable. The high quality HD-3000-II p r o d u c t s l eve r a g e n ew O L E D technology and a menu-driven systems for control and conf iguration, to create cutting edge

In brief World-first ear receiver

Io XT: ‘a powerhouse’

Phonak is presenting invisity, claimed to be the world’s smallest in-ear RF receiver and also the first ever wireless one of its kind. Invisity’s miniature earpiece sits invisibly inside the ear canal and weighs just 1.5g, making it very suitable for presenters and performers who require clear audio prompts. It offers total freedom of movement and is ergonomically designed for daylong wearer comfort. Two different invisity earpieces are available to suit users who require either one or more programmable frequencies. When one is required, invisity Flex is the best choice, with a single frequency and two volume settings (max. 108dB); and for extended use, the four-frequency invisity 4channel – which features the same two volume settings and maximum dB – allows quick and easy flick between preprogrammed frequencies via remote control. The invisity Programming Unit allows the user to reprogram invisity frequencies and the invisity remote control. Invisity can be used with a Phonak transmitter such as a TX-300V or inspiro, and one transmitter can be used with an unlimited number of receivers. 8.E95

Lenses from widest to closest Abakus has designed an Ultra High Definition Wide Angle Lens suitable for use with NHK’s Super Hi-Vision camera. The PL-mount lens covers 180° and, according to Abakus’ MD Dr Ken Pollitt, has “very controlled distortion for such a wide angle. It is ten times better than the standard B4mount lens.” It is said to be perfect for all-encompassing stadium shots and will be available in December for about £15,000. Its new XL Borescope, with PL mount, is suitable for movie model work. It can focus as close as the front glass. It will come with five lenses (10, 14, 20, 28 and 40mm), and options of 90° and 45° bends. Usefully, for such a long lens, the focus and iris controls are at the back. It will become available in March and cost at least £40,000. 11.G29

Zoom, zoom, zoom planned for the last quarter of the year with a list price of $1,495. 7.F11

Ideal image processing MultiDyne

3

products that are ideal for image processing and display of single and multiple signals from adjacent and remote locations for broadcast, professional video and government applications. Consisting of six new modules, the new HD-3000-II family provides customers with a choice of LC, ST, FC or SC connectors, depending on the converter model selected. MultiDyne’s HD-3000-II converters are compliant with all SMPTE specif ications and are housed in a rugged enclousure that stands up to daily production, both in the studio and in the field. 2.A54

Fujinon is showing a prototype of its new HA19x7.4 lens, the first ENG lens with three zoom elements, which enables it to be more than 5cm shorter than Fujinon’s previous 22x7.3. It also offers increased optical quality thanks to two aspheric lenses in the front elements. Ideal for drama production, it will be available late this year, and will also come in a mini box studio version. 11.C20

Vectorscope monitor Marshall has a new auto-stereoscopic 7-inch 3D monitor that allows users to view stereoscopic pictures without glasses. The 1600x600 pixel OR-70-3D can input separate or combined right and left images, and show waveform and/or vectorscope for both eyes. There is an optional remote for flicking between 3D and either eye view, and to select different markers or show a check box mode to see if the two eyes are aligned. It will be available next month for about $7,000. 11.D20


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theibcdaily

In brief

13.09.2011

Taking the pulse of the industry Conference Analysis

Syper update At IBC this year, TeamCast has announced a new software version for its DVB-S/S2 demodulator, called Syper, enabling it to support SNMP and web browser control. The newly released S110 software is already available and provides the capability to control the demodulator either by SNMP or an embedded web browser. This new release allows the introduction of Syper in an automatic control environment thanks to SNMP. Remote monitoring and control through SNMP and HTTP is now available without any additional cost. 2.B51

New BNC connectors Making its European debut at IBC is a range of Brilliance High Definition BNC connectors from Belden. Designed for use with Belden Brilliance Coax cables, the new connectors are said to deliver the exceptional performance and reliability required by the professional broadcast and professional audio/video markets. The connectors also provide better than -20dB return loss performance through 4.5GHz, exceeding the SMPTE specification requirements. The new range comprises one-piece BNC compression connectors with an optional patented locking feature; optimised three-piece BNC crimp connectors; and connector tools for both one-piece and three-piece connectors. Belden’s HD Brilliance one-piece BNC compression connector design eliminates the pin, collar and connector as separate components, thereby – according to the company – providing faster, easier installation. In tests, Belden said that installation took about half the time to secure the one-piece connector design versus traditional three-piece connectors. In addition, the one-piece connectors are said to provide excellent holding strength and weather resistance. 1.C21

TotalGuide for CE Technologies designed to enhance the digital consumer entertainment experience in Europe are being exhibited by Rovi Corporation. Innovations on display include MainConcept SDK version 9, which enables developers to take advantage of the latest codec and networkstreaming technologies for the creation of new entertainment products. Rovi is also highlighting TotalCode – a new line of encoding solutions designed to help post facilities, broadcasters, cable operators and digital storefront operators to streamline product and delivery – and its Entertainment Store technology for deployment of OTT video services. TotalGuide for CE, meanwhile, unifies search, discovery and recommendations to provide consumers with one destination where they can access content seamlessly from broadband and broadcast services. The company is also collaborating with a number of other technology providers on demos at the Rovi booth, which include DivX Plus Streaming ported to a Broadcom platform, and a deployment of TotalGuide and ANT Galio Platform. 5.A31

“When you plan a conference six months out, you have a degree of nervousness that the themes will still be relevant. So I am really pleased that our international group of advisors on the conference committee have absolutely hit the bull’s eye this year.” So said Michael Lumley who chairs the conference committee, reflecting on the resounding success of this year. At a time of dramatic change, the debates have focused on the key issues – creative, commercial and technical – that are driving the transformation. Lumley pointed to the strands looking at connected television

and social media. Joanna Shields of Facebook gave the convention keynote, emphasising that she came not to conquer but to be friends with broadcasters. “What was satisfying was the queue of people wanting to talk to her at the end of the session,” Lumley revealed. “They all wanted to talk serious business with her. As she moved on from the keynote to her next session, she was followed by a crowd of broadcasters who all wanted to engage with her, to drive forward the dialogue with social media. “That is the real benef it of IBC, a benef it which I think is unique,” he continued. “The IBC Conference is set up as a place to

do business, a place for real networking. It is very much a qualitative measure, but I rate the conference programme with an ‘index of interactivity’ – the groupings of people at the end of each session engaging with the speakers and with each other. “On that basis, the 2011 conference has been hugely successful, session after session.” Has the IBC Conference moved away from its roots as a place to discuss technology in favour of business? “As conference chair I certainly wanted to build sessions that attract policy makers and strategists,” Lumley replied. “But equally impor tant – and still

hugely relevant to a strong core audience in R&D as well as operations – is the technology stream. “IBC is still seen as the place to reveal the latest research, because we provide the time and the structure to discuss ideas in detail.” With the IBC2011 Conference nearing its conclusion, what will be the hot topics for 2012? “Once the dust settles we will start our crystal ball gazing for 2012,” Lumley explained. “I have no idea what the hot topics will be: everything is moving so fast at the moment that any predictions made today could be turned on their head by next September. “What is certain is that IBC will deliver world class speakers on the most relevant topics, in a professional atmosphere which promotes interaction and debate.”

Orders for Magic AlphaNova Gamers boost TV ARPU One 5600K and 3200K lights, but the colour matching works with the By David Fox €1,145 bi-colour (2800K to 6900K) ANova Two. Rotolight’s new AlphaNova series of It takes the ambient light colour energy-efficient flood lights has a and level “and transmits that via Wi-Fi unique colour matching ability that to the light, which accurately replicates will allow users to set its colour via that colour of sampled light”, said an iPhone and match the colour Rotolight’s International Sales Director, temperature seen by the phone’s Rod Aaron Gammons. It also allows camera. This would be useful where instant recall of previous settings. DoPs need to match the light on a The 38W lights are claimed to be the equivalent of 1kW Tungsten. They output no heat, run from a V-Lock camera battery for two days on full power, and can be linked together to form one large array. Although not available Gammons with the AlphaNovas until the end of the year, Rotolight took orders character shot in a greenscreen for 100 units in the f irst three studio to the light on location. days of IBC, with the potential of The Magic Eye app also provides another 1,000 in the pipeline, said remote control over all three ANova the manufacturer. variants, including the €999 ANova 11.G73

Rotolight

T-1 is pure and uncompressed Band Pro By David Fox The clean lines of the new Weisscam T-1 HD camera are built around three concepts: “Pure, fast and uncompressed. The idea is to simplify down to what you need,” said Seth Emmons, Weisscam marketing manager at the stand of its distributor, Band Pro, yesterday. The new camera has one button (on, off and record) and a touch screen for record speed (1-350fps), shutter (exposure), ISO and colour temperature. It has a 2/3-inch sensor, B-mount lens, and records uncompressed 12-bit or 10-bit HD internally to 4GB memory (for short high-speed sequences) or via a 4x3Gbps HD-SDI connection that also carries power and comms to T-Rec, its recorder, which uses 1-4TB T-Pak solid-state packs.

Weiss designed the compact, uncompressed T-1 for his own use

There will also be a 4K S35-sensor version taking PL-mount lenses, which will be otherwise the same, except that users can crop to 2K and then go to 700fps. The T-1 will be available early next year and probably cost €30,000-€35,000. 11.F40

Playcast By Heather McLean Next generation Cloud-based gaming provider for cable and IPTV operators Playcast has suggested that TV operators faced with the challenge of increasing average revenue per user (ARPU) should use a subscription gaming model. “The biggest challenge for operators today is gaining ARPU,” claimed Guy de Beer, CEO at Playcast. He said rolling out new boxes and services is a very complex method of raising more ARPU in this competitive, saturated market. “This is to the point where video for operators, whether they are cable or telco, is a very sticky service but not necessarily a profitable one in itself,” de Beer said. “Getting actual margins out of video is increasingly difficult. There are few services that get meaningful ARPU and that also reach a high penetration of users. “Operators have had gaming applications for a decade now, but they’re not the sort of games that users want to play,” said de Beer. “Video games mean big money; the UK market for video games alone is $2 billion per year, while the game Cal l of Dut y Bl ack Ops made around $1 billion in just under a week when it was released last November, making it the fastestselling media product ever. That dwarfs what Avatar did.” Gamers spend a fortune on their passion, de Beer pointed out, and operators can use Playcast’s service to take a slice of that revenue. He claimed that the average gamer will buy 12 games per year, at a cost of £35 per game, amounting to £420. “With our Cloud-based service, combining our software with our licensing agreements from gaming publishers, we take that £420 down to £5 per month on a subscription basis via the TV provider,” de Beer said. “That’s something that even hard core gamers will consider, and for those more casual gamers who

can’t afford to buy many games per year or all the kit, we bring the price per entertainment hour from $5 per hour, down to just a few cents, like Pay TV. Our product has genuine ARPU and wide attraction,” he concluded. 3.A15n

EDITORIAL Editorial Director Fergal Ringrose Managing Editors David Davies, Melanie Dayasena-Lowe Production Editor Simon Croft Reporters Kate Bulkley, Michael Burns, Ann-Marie Corvin, Chris Forrester, David Fox, Carolyn Giardina, Dick Hobbs, George Jarrett, Heather McLean, Ian McMurray, Anne Morris, Adrian Pennington, Paul Watson Photographers James Cumpsty, Richard Ecclestone, Chris Taylor Web Videographer Tim Frost IBC Chief Executive Officer Michael Crimp

SALES Sales Director Steve Connolly Tel: +44 (0)20 7354 6000 Email: steve.connolly@intentmedia.co.uk Deputy Advertisement Manager Ben Ewles Tel: +44 (0)20 7354 6000 Email: ben.ewles@intentmedia.co.uk US Sales Michael Mitchell Tel: +1 (631) 673 3199 Email: mjmitchell@broadcast-media.tv

ART & PRODUCTION Production Manager Stephen Miller Page Design Avant Garde (Croydon) Ltd At the Show Paul Aarons, Dawn Boultwood, Hazel Croft Publisher Joe Hosken Managing Director Stuart Dinsey Printed by Partnion 00 31 (0)61 362 4321 Published on behalf of the IBC Partnership by

Intent Media London, 1st Floor, Suncourt House, 18-26 Essex Road, London, N1 8LN, England © The International Broadcasting Convention 2011. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means without prior permission of the copyright owners.


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theibcdaily

13.09.2011

Cyprus Broadcasting goes HD with DSNG and OB Megahertz/KIT digital By David Fox Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation is going HD with a new DSNG vehicle and 12-camera 12m OB truck with expanding sides from Megahertz/KIT digital. The €700,000 four-wheel drive Sprinter DSNG van will have a triax camera and a wireless camera, but f ive VTRs, all different Sony and Panasonic formats, to provide recording and playback for other broadcasters.

“ We a r e b u y i n g t h i s t r u c k because Cyprus will take over the EU Presidency in the second half of 2012, and will offer broadcast facilities for all broadcasters visiting us,” explained Chrysanthos Hadjioannou, CyBC’s director technical services. CyBC is also buying robotic cameras for the conference centre, HMI lights, camera stabilisation and various MCR equipment, which will go out to tender, but given the lead times it had to buy the trucks first. Reliability was the key aspect for Project Engineer Yioula Kyria-

cou. “Everything is fully redundant,” with dual paths for RF, plus external power, a generator and an uninterruptible power supply. “That is not on everything, but it can keep us on air.” It has dual Ericsson encoders, upconverters and Xicom 400W amplifiers, feeding an Advent 1.8m Ku-band dish – bigger than usual for Europe, but it has to cover Eutelsat, Hellas Sat II and other satellites representing Europe and North Africa. The uplink can handle HD and SD, in MPEG-2 and MPEG-4, and in 4:2:0 and 4:2:2. “It is a particu-

Litepanels By David Fox Litepanels has three new lights at IBC: Croma, an on-camera bicolour LED; Sola 4, the latest in its Sola Fresnel range; and Hilio, a high output fixture. Croma is a variable colour 9W lamp, from daylight (5600K) to tungsten (3200K). It runs on six AA batteries, giving at least 90 minutes’ usage, as well as mains or a DV adapter plate to take Sony, Canon or Panasonic DV battery packs. It will be available in November at a cost of about €500.

DTS, Digital Rapids By Carolyn Giardina

Glowing example: Russell with (clockwise from top left) the Sola 4, Hilio and Croma

650W HMI. It will have manual or remote DMX dimming and weigh 5.9kg. 11.D61

Horus uses IBC for A-D networking Merging Technologies By Paul Watson Merging Technologies has launched Horus, its new 24-mic pre A-D/D-A interface, which also provides analogue/AES/MADI interconnectiv-

ity. Horus comes in two models: 192kHz, which is standard, and a premium model, which can be inserted into two 192kHz boards, depending on the user’s needs. It can be deployed as a standalone 24 analogue mic/line I/O, and audio can be converted into a MADI or AES

IBC video interviews now online The IBC e-daily online site is showing more than 30 video IBC2011 interviews. Carrying a mix of conference speakers and chairs, and from-the-floor exhibitor stand interviews, the e-daily web section presents snapshots of products and conference content taken live from the show. See today’s video interviews at http://www.tvbeurope.com/ibc-videos, or see them on our YouTube channel at TVBEuropeMagazine.

Vantastic: Kyriacou, Burgess and Hadjioannou in CyBC’s new DSNG vehicle

Support for UltraViolet

LED light choice extended The 5600K Sola 4 has a 4-inch Fresnel lens that is fully focusable from 70° flood to 10° spot. “It’s the world’s smallest fully dimmable LED Fresnel, outputting the equivalent of about 250W from a 30W lamp,” said Stuart Russell, Litepanels’ marketing manager. It will cost about €1,200 and will also be available in November. The 125W Hilio has an array of 72 1W LEDs, and throws its 5600K light over a distance of about 7m – longer than other LED f ixtures, without over driving the LEDs (which drastically shortens their life and causes overheating) – and is claimed to be the equivalent of a

larly flexible, well-specified production/uplink vehicle,” said Steve Burgess, technical director, Megahertz/KIT digital. “It’s got everything you’d ever want on a truck.” “The challenge was to build a system that could do a lot, but keep it simple to use,” added Kyriacou. The €3.3 million OB truck will use 12 Grass Valley LDK 4000 cameras, a Ross vision mixer, Evertz router and glue, a Studer Vista 9 audio console and EVS XT3 servers. The talkback system is currently being decided on. 11.F20

stream, then converted back to MADI in 24 analogue outputs. When in Ravenna mode, it can interconnect an entire facility using just a RJ45 connector; it becomes a node on a network, which can be instantly called to be an input or output, or a combination of both. “Horus is an incredibly powerful stagebox and FOH receiver, and is a very powerful tool for the live and events industry,” explained Johan Wadsten, product manager at Merging Technologies. “When you mix it up with our partner products, Pyramix and Ovation, the world opens up – you can do live recording with Pyramix on the Ravenna network, for example.” Wadst en says t he Ravenna organisation has been developed to address the growing need for a more professional, low latency, nodebased audio solution that integrates between products. “Transmission is one thing, but the ability to tell every other device on the network what you are able to do and what feature sets you can bring to a workflow – that’s the really important thing,” Wadsten added. “And the signal-to-noise ratio of the D-A at full scale is 123dB; so much better than anything else out there, and at a competitive price point.” 6.C29

Representing the companies’ first tools to support the Digital Entertainment Content Ecosystem’s emerging UltraViolet, the DTS MediaPlayer is using UltraViolet Common File Format files created with upcoming version 2.0 of the Digital Rapids Transcode Manager automated transcoding software. Additionally, Transcode Manager 2.0 will feature encoding and multiplexing of a range of profiles of the DTS-HD codec, from lossless DTS-HD Master Audio to low bitrate DTS Express. Both products support UltraViolet CFF files, furthering DECE’s goal of developing a digital rights management system that empow-

ers consumers to use multiple content services and device brands interchangeably. “From mobile phones and tablets to PCs and connected TVs, multiscreen viewing and the increasing volume of digital content are driving fundamental shifts in the way media is distributed and consumed,” commented Brick Eksten, president of Digital Rapids. “We’re committed to enabling our customers with systems that provide the flexibility, quality and efficiency needed to capitalise on these shifts. UltraViolet will play a crucial role in unlocking the potential of multi-screen media consumption, and we’re excited to be continuing our successful partnership with DTS by working together in support of the standard.” DTS, 2.B50; Digital Rapids, 7.G41

Dramatic entrance for large sensor camera Ikegami By David Fox Ikegami is planning to enter the large sensor camera market with a broadcast camera designed for lower-cost drama production where shallow depth of field is desired. The HDS-F90 camcorder will use a single 4K 4/3-inch CMOS sensor and take PL-Mount lenses. It will use Ikegami’s GFCAM solidstate recording system, offering I frame only recording at 100Mbps, MPEG-2 (4:2:2). Whether it gets the f inal go ahead depends on visitors response at IBC, but “reaction has been good. There has been an awful lot of interest,” said Mark Capstick, general manager, Ikegami Electroni c s U K . I t wo u l d c o s t a b o u t €25,000 including viewfinder and camera plate, making it very competitive. It is being shown with I kega m i ’s l a t e s t c o l o u r L C D 960x540 viewfinder (available now for €4,400).

Seeing sensor: Mark Capstick with Ikegami’s HDS-F90 camcorder

The new HD Unicam (HDK97A) will be its top-of-the-line 3GSDI 1080/50p HD studio camera. It is a dockable camera, with fibre or triax outputs (wireless and recorder backs likely in future), 16-bit A/D, and three new progressive AIT CCD sensors. It outputs 1080/50p (or 60p) 4:2:2 or 1080/50i (60i) 4:4:4. 11.A31


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Designed for driving HDMI monitors from a single cable connection, Hi5-Fiber converts HD/SD-SDI audio and video over single-mode 1310 nm Fiber optic cable (ST-style Fiber connector) to HDMI. Two channel RCA audio outputs for separate audio monitoring are also available.

Find out about our workflow solutions by visiting us at IBC Stand 7.F11

B e c a u s e

i t

m a t t e r s .


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In brief Loudness metering for mc2 Lawo is presenting at IBC a string of new products and features, including the V4.14 SW release for mc2 consoles with loudness metering; and the mc266 MK II with extra faders option surface. Lawo is also revealling its sapphire console overbridge for the first time, along with a new version of touchscreen software VisTool, which has been visually and technically upgraded. Also on display is a new sapphire master card that can technically handle the expanded requirements. Based on this master card, a new Nova19 matrix has been displayed with new software release 4.0 which supports all its new modules and contains further feature developments. 10.D57

New products speak volumes Glensound Electronics has introduced several new single unit commentary boxes and HD mobile telephones. The fully digital Glensound Talent Box (with AES I/O option) gives each commentator their own control unit; which Ethernet link allows an engineer to remotely control incoming audio levels, which is a first for a single unit box. Glensound’s CMBus allows multiple Talent Boxes to connect, accommodating up to 30 commentators; and has three talkback circuits and five external source inputs for monitoring. The Coin GT-013 is the world’s first dedicated commentary and intercom unit, which Glensound designed alongside leading commentary system designer RTS/Telex. Glensound provided the commentary interface and RTS/Telex intercom interface. The specification includes a single user commentary system, a high-spec mic input, three-source headphone monitoring and three direct access intercom channels. Each intercom channel is able to be configured for any source on the matrix. Glensound is also showing a range of mobile phones for broadcast, which allow integration of 3.5kHz 2G and 7kH 3G (via Glensound HD Voice) telephone calls into the broadcast chain. 8.E89

Sun shines on MeteoGraphics, the broadcast division of Europe’s largest private weather service MeteoGroup, is presenting new product developments including video integration for WeatherPresenter and MeteoEarth weather visualisation and presentation systems. Videos from correspondents or viewers can now be stored in WeatherPresenter and MeteoEarth and launched by presenters. A Bing Maps plug-in allows the generation of high-resolution maps with the ability to zoom to street level. Global and local weather events can therefore be shared quickly and clearly across the world. MeteoGraphics is showcasing these new functions on its IBC stand today. Images captured by a camera at the stand can be viewed live in MeteoEarth. Further new functions include datadriven wave effects on seas and oceans as well as new interactive items such as symbols indicating areas threatened by forest fires and graphics that contain several weather parameters. 2.C48

13.09.2011

Jünger Audio and Merging Technologies merge technologies Jünger Audio By Heather McLean It was announced at IBC2011 that Jünger Audio and Merging Technologies have signed a technology partnership that will see Jünger Audio’s Level Magic loudness control solution incor porated into Merg in g ’s n ew MX Fix b atchprocessing wrap tool. The combination of Merging’s MXF metadata conformity wrapping, Final Check loudness analysis, Surcode Dolby E decoding and encoding plug-ins with Jünger’s Level Magic provides a powerful allin-one media compliance batch processing wrap tool, say the developers. Jünger Audio has achieved notable success with a range of hardware units offering Level Magic as one of the processes. These incorporate ATSC, ITU and EBU R128

Claude Cellier, Merging Technologies and Peter Poers, Jünger Audio

recommendations on loudness, and have already been adopted by broadcasters such as Discovery Channel, MediaCorp, Canal +, Astro and RTL. The addition of Level Magic to MXFix is the f irst time it has

been offered as part of a suite of software options. Peter Poers, managing director at Jünger Audio, stated: “Here, realtime technology is meeting f ile based technology right in the

middle. We are delighted to be in partnership with Merging Technologies because this one-stop process is popular with some broadcasters, and it is important to have Level Magic as part of the process, integrated into the network and working faster than realtime. Our 20-plus years of expertise in dynamic processing and Merging’s similar experience in software and server development, is an ideal combination.” Commented Claude Cellier, Merging’s CEO: “When we were looking to add control as the next step after our Final Check Loudness analyser, Jünger Audio’s Level Magic was really the obvious choice. Whether content is coming from realtime processes on Jünger’s hardware, or our file-based system, it will produce the same results.” Cellier added: “We each have very different sets of competence, with very little overlap, so we ended up immediately falling in love and have come to this reciprocal arrangement. We could each do what the other does, but to develop it in our own right might take years, so the obvious choice was to merge our respective technologies.” 2.C49

C-Cast sports second screen control TriCaster gets EVS By David Fox Control of the second screen is a hot topic at IBC, and EVS is demonstrating an integrated approach that makes it simpler for broadcasters to select and send content to the cloud and for viewers to access it on their iPad or smartphone. C-Cast (for cloud-cast) augments EVS’ multi-camera OB recording, enabling operators to select key action and put clips on the Cloud, with associated metadata. It is an open system, so broadcasters can put their own web interface on C-Cast. In the initial beta test with Channel 9, Australia, rugby viewers could see player profiles, watch replays, and select different camera angles by clicking on a map of the stadium showing all the camera positions. “It gives the viewer the ability to become a real active player in the broadcast,” said

Parting the clouds over viewer retention

Nicolas Bourdon, EVS marketing & communications director (right). As 70% of iPad users already watch TV with it on their knees, Bourdon suggested that “for broadcasters to keep their attention, they have to have the ability to provide extra content, instead of losing them to other internet sites”. Operators can create fully synchronised multi-camera links to

content on an XT server that is available to viewers within two minutes, and the viewer’s device could also display news around the event and provide a quick link to social media, to discuss the event as it happens. “Basically we are creating an environment where you have more choice in terms of content and additional information and interaction with other people through Facebook or Twitter,” said Sébastien Verlaine (left), EVS marketing manager, EMEA. It will be released in October and is part of EVS’ Sport 360 concept, giving broadcasters the tools to enhance live production with everything from ultra slow motion to enhanced metadata. Bourdon says that C-Cast will play a big part in the Olympics, where he expects OBS and rights holders to have about 600 EVS servers in operation, and where making content quickly and easily available online will be particularly important. 8.B90

Compact converters go anywhere Atomos By Carolyn Giardina Pocket sized, battery-powered Connect converters have been unveiled at the stand of Atomos. In addition, the company – maker of the Ninja and Samurai portable field recorder, monitor and playback/playout devices – has reported during IBC that Samurai will support the Avid DNxHD codec. The new compact Connect converters connect HD-SDI to HDMI (Connect S2H) or HD-SDI to

HDMI (Connect H2S). They remove pulldown where necessary, and include an inbuilt test pattern and audio tone generation. Available next quarter for €249, the converter offers a dual battery – one internal and one external – system, which incorporates Atomos’ patentpending Continuous Power system. The company reported that Connect offers up to 32 hours continuous operation from one external battery, and the ability to swap batteries on-the-fly thanks to an internal power cell. AC power options are also available.

“With Connect, we’ve designed two products that are not only outstanding format converters, but they remove pulldown, supply test patterns and audio tones, and have multiple power options including dual battery, which means you’ll never be without a working product, whatever happens. These really are the ultimate tools for video production and infrastructure.” said Jeromy Young, CEO and cofounder of Atomos. The Avid DNxHD codec will be available late this year, priced at €99 for any Samurai user.

Apple support NewTek By Carolyn Giardina New TriCaster software provides the ability for HD TriCaster systems from NewTek to work directly with video and audio from any Apple AirPlay-enabled device or application. With wireless support f o r t wo s i m u l t a n e o u s A i r P l ay s o u r c e s , d ev i c e s s u c h a s a n iPad, iPod, iPhone and Mac can serve as direct inputs to the Tri Caster system. In addition to support for Apple AirPlay apps, the new TriCaster Rev. 3 software update is aimed at offers a more har monised user workflow across the product line, refinements to the multi-view monitor capabilities, enhanced audio functions, and support for all NewTek control surfaces. “ We c o n s t a n t ly r e f i n e a n d improve the TriCaster user experience. And with this new update we make it even easier and more intuitive for live video producers to deliver top-notch programming,” s a i d A n d r ew C r o s s , N ew Te k C TO. “ N ow, w i t h s u p p o r t f o r Apple AirPlay included with all of our HD systems, anyone with an iOS device can wirelessly transmit m e d i a d i r e c t ly t o a Tr i C a s t e r input. Our approach ensures that we work with all applications that support Apple AirPlay protocols, so that content from any new app is immediately accessible to TriCaster.” 7.K11


we’re there

That’s a bold statement, but a true one. As one of the world’s largest broadcast and professional solutions suppliers, Grass Valley™ has over 3,000 active ‘broadcast’ customers, and tens of thousands of professional users generating content using Grass Valley tools. For more than 50 years, Grass Valley has been, and continues to be, at the forefront of on-air innovation, creating some of the most accomplished products and services available. When you’re watching news, sports, or entertainment programming, whether on a TV, the web, or a mobile phone, you’re watching Grass Valley at work.

Visit us at IBC Stand 1.D11 For more information, please visit: www.grassvalley.com


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In brief Flashlink multiplexer provides building block Nevion has introduced the Flashlink module – a building block in the company’s optical network video services solution. This multiplexer, installed at each node of an optical ring or other network configuration, is capable of adding, dropping or passing signals that move flexibly through the network. Nevion is also introducing single-channel, H.264 contribution-quality, 4:2:2 and 4:2:0, 8- and 10-bit codecs with ASI and IP network interfaces. The company has also announced enhancements to VideoIPath, the video services management platform that was introduced at NAB 2011. VideoIPath now includes an MVPN control infrastructure, a network topology modelling capability, and an application for equipment inventory management. 8.B70

DVD-N: the business case On the company’s IBC stand, Edgeware is discussing the business case for a distributed video delivery network and its effect on both CAPEX and OPEX in the broader context of network infrastructure. Taking in the estimated growth of video traffic, cost of expansion of network equipment, backhaul and other network-related costs and revenue opportunities associated with ‘operator CDN’ wholesale services, Edgeware is demonstrating what the company says are the benefits of a properly architected video delivery network based on examples and analysis. 4.B71

Gaze tracking eye control ETRI, Korea’s Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, is presenting gaze-tracking technology aimed at a faster and more intuitive control interface for IPTV. The technology, shown as a work in progress in the Future Zone, is based on the fact that a viewer looks at the TV screen before the handling of functions such as volume and channel control. The technology is claimed to be unique because it is designed for gaze-tracking on a largescreen TV at a distance. In addition, the user’s eye is captured by a remote gaze-tracking camera which does not require the user to wear any device. 8.G31

13.09.2011

Healthy times for satellite Africa represents a great focus of satellite operators, says Nabil Shanti, VP and CCO, Arabsat The satellite services industry continues to be very dynamic; business opportunities are increasingly growing on both sides of the industry; in telecom, and in broadcasting. On the telecom side, Africa still represents a great focus of satellite operators. In spite of the developing infrastructure and increasing fibre penetration through marine cables,

satellites still represent a cornerstone in major telecom applications i.e. GSM backhauling and internet backbone. Moreover, demand on broadband services and internet connectivity continues to be a major driver for satellite operators to expand their fleet, accompanied by better fleet optimisation and pricing, and hence, introduction of new supporting technologies like Ka-band act as a major step to achieve those goals. Arabsat-5C, Arabsat’s new satellite that was scheduled to be launched during IBC, was built on those two premises including 40 transponders in C-band, a payload directed to Africa, and 8 Gb Ka-payload for broadband services in the

Opinion

Nabil Shanti: The MENA region is flourishing, with 600-plus channels

Last chance for free hands-on tuition Low-latency

Even though it is the last day, IBC’s free workshop programmes in the Production Village and the post production area continue with a full schedule. These one hour sessions have p r ov e d p o p u l a r t h r o u g h o u t IBC2011, not just because they are packed with useful and relevant facts, but because they are delivered with wit and style by the excellent presenters. The sessions are informal but informative, with the chance to see and try as well as listen.

The workshops in the Production Village, in Hall 9, are targeted at three levels of interest: foundation, for those who need to refresh their thinking; advanced who want to develop specific skills; and in depth, small group sessions focusing on practical hands on tuition. Today’s programme covers camera work, including camcorder settings and DSLRs; lighting; and putting together a complete production kit on a budget. It also includes Alan Roberts’ fascinating session ‘Things we forgot we knew’ – a look

back at the basics of early film camera shooting and why they are relevant today. Over in Hall 7 today’s workshops are presented by Vidigo on graphics, Stryme on distributed systems management, Projection/design on the latest viewing systems, Blackmagic Design on its creative and restoration tools, and Digital Rapids on content encoding for multiple platforms. All these sessions are free for every visitor, but space is limited so book your place at the reception desk.

Geared towards systems integration Gearhouse Broadcast By Melanie Dayasena-Lowe Gearhouse Broadcast is using its appearance at IBC to highlight its expertise in systems implementation, from consultancy to project management, planning, design, engineering, installation, commissioning, training and after-sales support. UEF, M-Net, Al Jazeera and Astro are among the broadcast organisations to have selected Gearhouse Broadcast as their systems integrator of choice. Operating globally with offices in the UK, Australia, USA, Qatar and India, Gearhouse Broadcast

Al Jazeera selected Gearhouse Broadcast as its systems integrator of choice

works with international broadcasters and rights’ holders, production and post production companies, out-

The Future of TV is here Integrated. Multi-Device. Socially-Enabled. With the combined force of ioko, Megahertz and Polymedia, only KIT digital provides the breadth of experience and capabilities to guide our clients into the future of broadband-delivered TV. Production: Hall 11.F20 Tel: +44 (0)1904 438 000 EXT 2

Middle East for military, education and commercial purposes. On the broadcasting side, MENA region is flourishing with FTA TV channels, the number of channels exceeding 600. The trend toward HD is progressing slowly but surely and more than 30 HD channels are now available in the region. Arabsat takes pride in having more than 90% of the FTA HD channels in the market on its 26° East hotspot. More than 10 FTA HD channels are scheduled to be launched on Arabsat before the end of this year. Video contribution services are growing rapidly, demand on news exchange and events delivery is driving satellite operators to dedicate additional capacities for this purpose. All in all, the satellite services industry is experiencing healthy times that are expected to continue in the near future. 1.C38

Management and Delivery: Hall 1.D71 Email: IBC@KITD.COM

Web: KITD.COM

side broadcast companies, studios and freelancers. The systems integration division provides clients with complete solutions for a variety of broadcast system requirements. Current projects include the building of two HD OB trucks for a European broadcaster and an HD studio upgrade for a UKbased global producer and distributor of televised sporting events. The project solutions division delivers temporary broadcast facilities at major international televised events, while the equipment rental division stocks the latest broadcast equipment for daily, weekly and long-term rentals. 10.D46

wireless HD Pro-X By David Fox Pro-X has developed a new lowlatency, uncompressed HD wireless camera system for live, realtime viewing of video by a director and crew on field monitors. The new XW-HDU02 HD wireless transmission system is designed to work with any standard ENG broadcast camera, and has a latency of less than one millisecond. The trade-off is range, with a transmission distance or about 150 metres in open space or 30 metres through walls. The images are completely uncompressed, in HD, with embedded sound, and are encrypted for s e c u r i t y. T h e u n i t h a s H D M I input/output and automatically detects HD-SDI and SD-SDI video. The wireless transmission uses MIMO (multiple-input and multiple-output) and OFDM technologies, operating between the 5.1GHz and 5.8GHz bands. The compact transmitter, with no visible antenna, uses uni-cast and multi-cast modes for reception on up to four receivers simultaneously. 11.G60


The world’s first media convergence platform just got better. And managing hybrid broadcast environments has never been easier.

Media convergence delivered. Only at the Harris stand.

Hall 7 Stand G20 www.harrisbroadcastlive.com For more information, please email sales.europe@harris.com or telephone your regional office: North America +1 800 231 9673

Europe and Africa +44 118 964 8200

Asia, Pacific Rim +852 2776 0628

Middle East, South Asia +971 4 433 8250

Caribbean and Latin America +1 786 437 1960


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ACE upgrades its iQ Quantel WIN for DVStation-Mini2 DVB-T

By Carolyn Giardina

DVB-T monitor chosen by WIN Television Pixelmetrix By Ian McMurray Australia’s largest regional television broadcaster, WIN Television, recently chose the Pixelmetrix DVStation-Mini2 DVB-T fully-featured monitoring probe to monitor DVBT services at WIN transmission sites across Australia. The Pixelmetrix e q u i pm e n t was supplied and installed by local distributor Techtel. According to Pixelmetrix, the

DVStation-Mini2 DVB-T systems will provide unparalleled visibility into the quality of service reaching WIN’s network-wide audience. The DVStation-Mini DVB-T offers high quality DVB-T RF measurements and in-depth TS analysis, providing WIN with 24/7 operational monitoring and assurance of the quality and continuity of their DVB-T services. The system will also generate video thumbnails for H.264 video streams in both SD and HD.

Greg Lederhose, transmission broadcast director at WIN Corporation, commented: “Pixelmetrix were prepared to listen to our specific requirements, even offering to adapt their product to provide the results we needed. Their flexibility, coupled with a product that is easyto-use and which offered us all the monitoring features we needed, was ultimately what lead us to this decision. Pixelmetrix delivered their systems promptly and have done an excellent job.” 1.B28

Brussels-based film-effects facility ACE recently upgraded its Quantel iQ system, including installation of version 5 software. ACE’s upgraded iQ is at the heart of a workflow that includes Autodesk Maya, Foundry’s Nuke compositing system, a Coloris colour-grading station and additional PC-based systems. Stefan Ryken, managing director of ACE, commented: “The new v5 software and Quantel-configured PC will allow us to ingest and process 2K material and all RAW formats including Alexa, Red and Phantom in realtime, which is a definite advantage for us, providing

directors and colour graders with the kind of fast workflow they need.” ACE has enjoyed a long association with Quantel. Indeed, Ryken said that the brand “hasn’t just been a technical choice for us, but a key business driver to enable us to diversify into new areas in our relatively small market”. Looking forward, “we’re also seriously looking at a 3D Pablo as stereoscopic production is beginning to emerge in Belgium”. Martin Mulligan, Quantel sales and marketing director, summed up: “In a relatively small market, [ACE] has achieved a level of quality that puts them in the same league as leading facilities in Europe’s biggest countries. Their upgrade will enable them to develop business in new areas of the market.” 7.A20

Delta boosts One camera, three speeds Dr examines a novel OEMs’ video and multiple interfaces case for DSLR cameras Hitachi

Deltacast By Melanie Dayasena-Lowe Deltacast is presenting new products and features for the professional digital video market, including three low-prof ile HD SDI input cards. Delta-hd-elp 10, Delta-hd-elp 20 and Delta-hd-elp 40 are suitable for 1U-server OEM applications – previously only possible with the Deltaasi and sdi family. The Delta-hd-e 04 completes the hd family, which contains 13 cards with up to four I/O capability on the same video card, allowing developers to design higher-performing and more economical solutions for a variety of OEM professional video applications, says Deltacast. Meanwhile, the Delta-3G-e-key 22 is the latest addition to the Deltakey range of realtime keyer video cards developed to create OEM applications such as Full 1080p keyer, video overlay, character generator and graphical animation. It is based on the latest 3G SDI technology (SMPTE 424M) used in the Delta-3G family. 10.D10

By David Fox Hitachi is showing its latest 3Gbps HD 1080p broadcast camera system, based on the SK-HD1200 camera, with variants for 3x slow motion, PoV, wireless, fibre, triax, and solid-state recording. Several versions were shown at NAB, but it is the SKHD1500-3x slow motion version that has been launched at IBC this year. The system offers native 1080/150i and 50p (or 720/150P), and has three 2.3Mpixel 2/3-inch IT-CCDs, with 6Gbps transmission over SMPTE standard optical fibre. Its light sensitivity is F10 at 2000 lux in normal speed mode, but drops to F7 at 2000 lux at 150fps. Similarly, signal to noise goes from a typical -60dB at 50fps to -54dB at 150fps. The CU-HD1500 camera control unit offers selectable HD output (HD-SDI) – 1080/150i, 1080/100i,

1080/50i, 720/150p, 720/100p, 7 2 0 / 5 0 p – u si n g si n g l e l i n k SMPTE245 or dual link, and SD output (D1) of 480i/60, 575i/50. Power consumption should be 60W, without the viewfinder, and camera

150 fps: Hitachi’s new SK-HD1500 slow motion camera

head weighs 2.2kg (or twice that with the fibre adapter). The DK-H200 is a box-type version of the SK-HD1200 that is useful for graphics, point of view or remote applications. The head weighs 1.5kg and can be fitted with a fibre output. 11.F51

lens mounted. Removable internal dividers help secure contents and create pockets for storing a matteBy David Fox box, camera plate, follow focus, Petrol Bags has a new camera bag for camera light, viewfinder, cables, users of video-enabled DSLR cam- spare lenses, etc. Contents are surrounded and cushioned by eras. Based on its popusoft padded red fabric. lar Dr Petrol models, An LED lighting systhe new Dr DSLR tem illuminates the Camera Bag is a in te r io r, ma k in g practical design in contents easier to black 900D and find. ballistic nylon Twin brackfabrics, and ets on the boteven features tom of the bag internal allow quick lighting. connection to Inspired P e t r o l ’s by the tradiSnaplock wheel tional doctor’s and trolley sysbag, this semitem. Additional rigid equipment features include lambag is designed to inate panels for extra hold a videoprotection, ergonomic enabled DSLR camera neoprene shoulder strap, a flash and accessories comfortably memory card mini pouch (holds and securely. A hinged, extrawide opening provides fast, easy up to four cards), and dual-direction easy-glide zippers. The Dr DSLR access, says the manufacturer. The interior is contoured to fit a Camera Bag (PD443) is priced at €210 (£180). DSLR cam11.D61 era with the Open wide: Petrol’s new Dr DSLR Camera Bag

Petrol Bags


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New remote offers 3D control capability Chrosziel By David Fox Chrosziel’s Aladin Mk II is an eightchannel lens remote control, offering

3D control capability and versatility. Features include a modular handset and a small receiver that controls up to eight motors, which it calibrates automatically. More advanced setups can take advantage of the

receiver’s display, which means that there is no need for an extra monitor. For S3D shooting, the Aladin Mk II is claimed to be the only system currently able to operate focus, zoom and aperture on both camera lenses

as well as control angles and distance between cameras simultaneously, thanks to having eight channels. The system can control and power the internal motors of digital Canon and Fujinon lenses, with no external motors required for zoom, focus and iris, and no extra power supply. Communication and power run through the serial auxiliary port

Lens control genie: Chrosziel’s new Aladin Mk II has eight channels

of the control box, which makes life easier and is more cost-effective, especially when using a Steadicam. An RF spectrum analyser can help identify sources of wireless interference and pick the best transmission channel at any particular location. If there is interference on all 16 channels, the user need only attach a cable using the BNC connector and a standard Video-BNC line. Chrosziel is also developing an option to record timecode and metadata for post production. 11.E65

Haivision’s Viper takes an integrated approach to content

Fuelling the IP furnace Haivision By Anne Morris Haivision is showcasing its new Viper compact, integrated appliance for multistream content at IBC2011. As well as capturing, streaming, reviewing, distributing and publishing multistream content, the Viper can effectively off-load the recording from a facility’s Furnace IP video system. For clients that have large IP video recording requirements, establishing large central recording systems and assuring the ability to record any endpoint at any time may be impractical due to server or network capacity. Recording at the edge and publishing to a central video-on-demand system eliminates such dependencies. Combining Viper endpoints with a central Furnace IP video system provides a solution for large medical, educational and enterprise media systems, giving the flexibility to stream or record rich media events anywhere, anytime. The Viper can be managed by the operator, initiating streaming channels and publishing recording data, or can be centrally managed through the Furnace’s administrative interfaces. 13.451


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13.09.2011

Integration-friendly scalers Gefen By Carolyn Giardina Gefen is highlighting two new GefenPRO scalers that are designed to give broadcasters the ability to integrate consumer audio/video equipment with professional 3GSDI devices. Using the GefenPRO HDMI to 3GSDI scaler, an HDMI source from devices including Blu-ray players and gaming consoles can be output in the 3GSDI format. Con-

Pneumatic pedestal has a new head Shotoku By David Fox Shotoku Broadcast Systems has introduced a new manual two-stage pneumatic pedestal and a perfect counter-balance pan and tilt head. It will also show ease-of-use enhancements on its robotic products. T h e n ew T P 200 two-stage pedestal will take a maximum payload of more than 80kg and supports a wide-range of camera configurations. It has been designed for stability and operational flexibility. A one-step foot brake and singleaction cable guard enable precise movements and control for fast and easy positioning. The SX300 perfect counter-balance pan-and-tilt head is designed to suppor t por table cameras with viewfinders and prompters, and has a maximum payload of 38kg. Its mount can be either flat base or 150mm ball. Shotoku is also showing updates for a number of other products: TR-T touch control system, which now includes HD/SDI support and an advanced 16:9 acoustic-pulse touch screen; the TRP-100 Robotic Pedestal; and the Orchestra Camera Management System for legislative and conference automation. 11.G30

On balance: Shotoku’s new TP200 pedestal fitted with the SX300 head

tent from consumer devices may therefore be viewed on a professional display with video scaling in HD resolutions up to 1080p or 2K. Professional broadcast equipment-sourced m aterial ca n b e

viewed and scaled on a consumer display equipped with HDMI using the GefenPRO 3GSDI to HDMI Scaler. Images may be scaled in video resolutions up to 1080p or 2K. Both scalers come in a rack mount enclosure with a built-in power supply, RS-232 connectivity and IR control. 7.B30

GefenPRO HDMI to 3GSDI is one of two new broadcast scalers


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Keeping the noise down

Tomorrow’s world today Future Zone By Adrian Pennington Visitors to the Future Zone will be able to browse a range of concepts and prototypes from broadcast labs and university R&D departments that have yet to become commercial products. Incorporating the New Technolog y C am p u s, the F uture Zo ne includes exhibits from 20 research institutions, including a demonstration of the latest advances for ultraHD format Super Hi-Vision (SHV). “The popularity of NHK’s SHV from past shows led us to set aside a specific area dedicated to works in progress,” explained IBC CEO Michael Crimp. “None of these are presented as workable products but as visionary technology that will

hopefully make people re-think what is possible.” NHK is debuting a SHV programme production system including an eight-channel video switcher and slow motion equipment for live production. Other R&D highlights include: a social TV app which analyses online opinions about broadcast programmes and displays on mobile devices from KDDI R&D Labs; a means of controlling a TV by tracking the user’s own gaze from Korea’s Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI); and a Multi-Sensory Interaction System which combines audio visual with tactile and olfactory sensations. In this last-named demonstration from Japan’s NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology), users can interactively

Mode-AL By Melanie Dayasena-Lowe

High Dynamic Range capture to display system

experience the tactile sense of soft 3D virtual balloons and break them with an explosive sound and smell. The University of Warwick and its spin-out company goHDR are making the first demonstration of the High Dynamic Range (HDR)

World’s most affordable 3D rig launches Teletest By David Fox Costing under €10,000, Teletest’s Binorig is claimed to be ‘the world’s most affordable, fully motorised broadcast S3D camera rig’. Designed for use with cameras such as Sony’s HDC-P1 or PMWEX3 and the Red One, the Binorig, claims Teletest Managing Director Nick Rose, is as good as rigs that cost four or five times as much. The f i rs t b a t c h of 10 Binorigs h as already sold out, with a second batch expected in October.

Cheaper by design: Teletest’s Nick Rose demonstrates the new Binorig

“The production of S3D content has been stifled due to the prohibitive cost and complexity of S3D camera rigs,” Rose said.

There is also a remote control unit for the Binorig that costs just €1,000 (where rival units can cost €10,000 or more). “Teletest has spent over two years and hundreds of thousands of pounds developing the affordable and easy-to-use Binorig, which produces stunning results,” said Rose. “We designed a complete package, contained in two easy-to-manage flight-cases, for stereographers or for cameramen with little experience in shooting S3D,” he explained. C a m e r a s a r e mo u n t e d o n t o Teletest’s Teleplates, which in turn

compression system for capturing and displaying details in all forms of lighting which, it is claimed, will ‘bring a revolution in imaging equivalent in impact to the change from black and white to colour’. Hall 8 can be rapidly mounted onto the rig using the quick release system. “Using Teletest’s new S3D LCD monitor, the Cyclops-HD, setting up the Binorig takes only a few minutes,” Rose added. At 1,500nits, the Cyclops-HD is claimed to be ‘the world’s brightest broadcast LCD’. The S3D version, at €1,999, allows the input of two cameras on a mirror or side-by-side rig. The 3D card has been newly upgraded with extra functions added to meet requests from the monitor’s first users. S3D set-up can be achieved quickly using the grey difference screen; the S3D image can then be viewed with anaglyph glasses. 11.D80

Mode-AL has introduced a new range of soundproofed 19-inch rack enclosures at IBC2011. The ECS range of cabinets includes good ventilation and cable access while achieving 36dB acoustic suppression across the audible range. “The requirement for racked equipment in noise-sensitive areas has been around a long time, not just in broadcast but in recording studios, Telepresence, boardrooms a n d c o n f e r e n c e c e n tr e s ,” s a id David Lees, managing director of Mode-AL. “We have been delivering front of house rack cabinets for years, and now in response to requests from many customers we have added a high degree of noise isolation,” Lees explained. The cabinets, which are available in a choice of finishes to suit the décor of the installation, feature smoked glass doors front and rear, which are lockable and close to airtight gaskets to prevent sound spill. The side panels are lined with a high density polyurethane foam to provide excellent sound absorption, and a high mass barrier to extend the attenuation down to lower frequency ranges. 10.F30

Android gets more support NetUP By Anne Morris Russian IPTV headend manufacturer NetUP is now supporting client devices based on the Android operating system and is showcasing this development at IBC2011. Android is currently best known as a mobile OS for smartphones and tablets, but the OS is now being used in IP set-top boxes. I P s e t- to p b oxe s b a s e d o n Android provide a wide range of options: graphics acceleration, multitasking and plenty of different applications for installation. The NetUP IPTV application will allow Android-based devices to gain access to live TV channels, TV on demand and time-shifted TV, e le c tr o n ic p r og r am m e g u id e s (EPG), video on demand, and other interactive features. 13.383

Android in its latest guise


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MINIATURE (3G/HD/SD)-SDI to HDMI with De-Embedded Analogue Audio and NTSC/PAL Down-Converted Outputs

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ǁǁǁ͘ĚĞĐŝŵĂƚŽƌ͘ĐŽŵ FUTURE-PROOF SOLUTIONS


18 theibcdaily

13.09.2011

Satellite remains the crucial link Our entire operation is centred on satellite communications both as a manufacturer and as a systems integrator, explains Michael Schiestl, managing director, Hiltron Satellite links are not the first things that come to mind when you settle down to relax of an evening in front of a television. Unless it happens to be mid-winter and what my English colleagues call ‘the wrong kind of snow’ has accumulated between the dish and the feedhorn, requiring an ascent with a suitable tool to clear the stuff away. At Hiltron, our entire operation is centred on satellite communications both as a manufacturer and systems integrator. Why both? Because some components of systems we design simply were not available from other sources or were not up to the standards we required. In these instances, we develop our own. Satellite communication is a crucial element of today’s broadcast industry. Digital satellite newsgathering is one example, enabling an outside broadcast crew to establish and maintain high quality and highly secure point-topoint communication with their network’s headquarters from practically anywhere on the globe. Reporters operating far from the infrastructure taken for granted in developed countries similarly depend on satellite telephony to ensure that they can file video and audio back to base without needing to rely on wired communication. The latest addition to Hiltron’s range of own-design own-manufacture products is the HACU-DSNG controller

which makes its maiden appearance at IBC2011. Compatible with all leading motorised digital satellite newsgathering antennas, it provides fully-automated satellite auto-acquisition. The HACU-DSNG serves two key roles, being designed for integration into DSNG trucks or for refurbishment of existing SNG antenna control systems. Housed in a compact 2 RU 19 inch chassis, it provides easy and efficient control of three-axis motorised antennas of up to 2.4 metres diameter. Azimuth, elevation and polarisation control are performed entirely in software. Full control of the HACU-DSNG can be performed locally or from a remote IP browser. Local control is achieved via front-panel pushbuttons and a coloured touch-panel graphic display. In IP remote control mode, the entire system can be controlled from wherever is convenient to the DSNG operational workflow. Fully automated acquisition of accessible satellites can be achieved within less than two minutes. An internal DVB-S/S2 tuner is provided for satellite verification. Heading determination is performed using a fluxgate and/or GPS compass. The HACU-DSNG includes dual-axis compensation of truck inclination. It is compatible with resolvers, potentiometers, inclinometers and directcurrent drive-motors.

Too hot to handle A free two-part conference session this morning suggests that some issues facing the industry may be too hot to handle. The debate is organised by the European Broadcasting Union, moderated by the EBU’s David Wood, and hosted by IBC. In the first session, incendiary questions to be answered include is there hope for a common hybrid broadcast/broadband system, the future of digital radio, and why do

we need a 3D television broadcast system now? After a break for some well-deserved coffee the spotlight will fall on file-based production and the construction of an integrated programme bank, and how far we are from 1080p 50/60 mainstream production. Broadcasters and EBU officials will pose the questions and leading manufacturers, including Grass Valley, Panasonic, Sony and

Opinion Image Systems’ Golden Eye III is a high-res film scanner for DI and restoration

Focus on DI, restoration Image Systems By Carolyn Giardina

Michael Schiestl: IBC is the logical venue to launch satellite controller

IBC2011 is the logical venue for this latest addition to our product range not least because we will be exhibiting in the same hall as many of our most important clients. With the London Olympics now less than 11 months away, demand for dependable high-quality outside broadcast links looks set to increase substantially. Add to that rising audience expectations in a world of 2D and 3D high-definition broadcasting and it is evident that DSNG has a healthy future. Will IP links replace satellite communication? Absolutely not. The two platforms are closely intertwined and look set to remain so long into the future. 8.B51

Technicolor will be on the platform to respond. The audience will be encouraged to join in the debate, too. At the end of the morning the EBU’s Technical Director, Lieven Vermaele, will wrap up the debate and indeed wrap up IBC with a look at the issues, and the answers, that the industry will be pondering in the coming months and years. Despite the session title, these issues simply cannot be ignored. ‘Don’t touch these issues: they’re too hot’ starts at 9:30 in the Forum: all IBC visitors are welcome.

‘World’s first’ DVB-T2-MI solution Bridge Technologies By Ian McMurray New from Bridge Technologies are what the company describes as major advances in OTT service analysis and the world’s first DVBT2 MI solution. DVB-T2 is the system used in 70% of the contribution infrastruc-

ture currently under construction, and in many recent deployments in the EMEA region. Bridge Technologies says that it has solved the complex monitoring challenge posed by the DVB-T2-MI format, noting that T2-MI monitoring is now available as an option across the range of VideoBridge probes. The VB252 monitoring probe for DVB-T2 networks is also on

display. The dual-input VB252 provides external GPS lock for accurate drift monitoring for SFN networks, high-quality MER meas-

The new Image Systems – formed earlier this year when Digital Vision acquired Image Systems in a deal valued at €5 million – is showing a variety of DI and restoration workflows. Products featured in the workflows include the Golden Eye film scanners, Nucoda colour grading and f inishing systems, and Phoenix image restoration and repackaging software. N u c o d a 2 0 1 1 . 2 so f t wa r e includes: 64-bit support, with an eye toward large format digital cameras and image manipulation at 4K; updated features for Avid and Apple Final Cut editorial workflows, including Avid 4:4:4 codec and ProRes support; support for Red Epic and Arri Alexa, taking advantage of the Nucoda HDR toolset and

OpenEXR workflows; and new stereoscopic fix tools. Image Systems is also showcasing its Precision grading panel with five high-resolution touch screens with menu navigation and toolset control. Making its European launch at IBC, Golden Eye III is Image Systems’ high-resolution Golden Eye film scanner for DI and high-end restoration, which is being demoed as part of a workflow with Nucoda Film Master and Phoenix Finish software. Phoenix 2011.2 software aimed at restoration, re-mastering and repackaging includes 64-bit support and an integrated DVO toolset. In conjunction with the Phoenix software, the Golden Eye Archiver has been developed specifically to provide a more affordable, multi-format film scanning option for high volume archive facilities. 7.A28

Built on three pillars Envivio is demonstrating an architecture that is built on three pillars: Envivio 4Caster C4 multi-screen encoder/transcoder, the Envivio Genesis universal mezzanine format and the Envivio Halo Network Media Processor. . The Envivio 4Caster C4 multisc r e e n e n c o d e r / t r a n sc o d e r is , according to the company, the only software-based, multi-profile encoding solution in the industry that

simultaneously delivers traditional broadcast television services to m o b ile a n d in te r n e t- e n a ble d devices, as well as traditional television services, using a single platform and a single head-end. The Envivio Genesis is a unified, broadcast standards-based mezzanine format that supports multiple streams simultaneously. . T h e E nv iv io H a lo N e two r k Media Processor (NMP) is said to be the first solution of its kind that enables packaging, encryption and distribution of video streams at the edge of the network. 1.D73

urement and level readings. Suitable for monitoring at transmitter sites and field locations for quality validation, the VB252 is available from Q4 2011. Being demonstrated alongside the VB252 is the VB262 Dual Q A M / V S B i n p u t o p t i o n c a r d,

which Bridge describes as the solution for complete monitoring in DVB-C or hybrid DVB-C/IP networks, and which now has built-in spectrum analytics capability for advanced RF analysis. Up to four independent RF inputs can be analysed in one 1U chassis. 1.A30

Envivio By Ian McMurray

The new VB252 DVB-T2 monitor joins VB262


theibcdaily

08-13.09.11

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IBC2011 exhibitor list and floorplan Future Zone incorporating New Technolog Technology gy Campus & NHK (Japan Broadcasting Broaadcasting Corporation) Super Hi-Vision Big Screen Auditorium

Conference

Halls 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6 – Pii Halls 9, 10 & 11 – Pv Hall 7 – pviii, Hall 8 Pix Halls 12 & 13 Px Outside Exhibition area Pxi

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B144 A26

A29

WC WC

C20

B21

A19

C2 B22 C22

B09

A03

A01

A22

A20

AA28

A27

B20 C20

A25

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A24

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A41

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C4 41 C41

C61 AAppear TV

B40

Demonstration Area

B41

A47

A46

C4 49 C49 B49

A48

Publitron A49

A50

JĂźngger JĂźnger Audio Aud io

B51 A51 FOR-A UK

B59

C50

TMD C58

F71 D69

A62

C78

C79 C81

F75 C83 B81

C85 C88

A80 KIT Digital/iok Digital/ioko o

C5 C55 55

B89

B84

B71

C89

C57 C5 57 A71 NDS

A74

C59 C 59

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D71

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D73

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A80 A81

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Floorplans correct as of 28 July 2011

B78

C75

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Visitor Registration Visitor Registration & Exhibition Entrance Entrance

A75

B80

C5 53 C53

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B74

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A54

B77

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A61

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08-13.09.11

www.svpbm.com

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MEDIA BROADCASTING SOLUTIONS

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IV

theibcdaily

08-13.09.11

Exhibitor list (accurate as of 8 August 2011) 10 LiveDefinition 3.A15ci 2020 3D MEDIA 8.G35 27M Technologies 3.C30 2Connect-IT (Co-exhibiting with Thrane & Thrane)

OE202 8.E78 9.B40 13.193

2WCOM 3ality Digital 4Mod Technology A A&C Aastrolight Aaton AB on Air Abakus ABE Elettronica Abel DRM Systems Abilis Systems

11.C60 11.G61 11.D39 3.A15m 11.G29 8.D23 1.A76 1.C81 4.C81 13.115 6.A24 5.B11/6.A29/11.F61 5.B15d 5.C49 10.F24 8.E41 2.C40a

(Co-exhibiting with Nagra Kudelski)

Accedo Broadband ACCESS Accusys Ace Marketing Acetel Co Acorde Acrosentec Co Actia Sodielec Active Circle Active Storage

(Co-exhibiting with Global Distribution) 7.G16 Actus 4.A91 Acz Group 6.C22 ADB Lighting Technologies 11.A34 Adder Technology 7.B33 Adobe Systems 7.G27 Adtec Digital 1.D01 Advanced Broadcast Components 8.A30 Advanced Digital Broadcast – ADB 5.B48 Advantech Wireless 1.A11 AEQ 8.C55 Aeta Audio Systems 8.B30f AF Electronics 4.C53 Agama Technologies 4.A55 Agilent Technologies 2.A50 AIB (Association for International Broadcasting) 11.F02 AIC/Xtore 7.J49 AIRSTAR (Co-exhibiting with Matthews Studio Equipment)

11.G71

AirTies Wireless Networks 5.B33 AJA Video 7.F11 Akamai Technologies 7.A14 AKG Acoustics (Co-exhibiting with Harman 8.D60 International/Studer) ALBENTIA Systems (Co-exhibiting with BTESA – Broad Telecom) 8.B02 Albiral Display Solutions 10.A42 Albis Technologies 4.C71 Albrecht Elektronik 10.A40 Aldena Telecomunicazioni 8.E37 Allegro 1.A46 Alpermann+Velte 10.B48 Alpha Networks 9.A12 Alphatron Broadcast Electronics 11.B40 Altech GDL (Co-exhibiting with Altech UEC) 4.B50 Altech MediaVerge (Co-exhibiting with Altech UEC) 4.B50 Altech SetOne (Co-exhibiting with Altech UEC) 4.B50 Altech UEC 4.B50 Altera 5.A15 Altermedia 7.D02 Alticast Corp 1.F50 AmberFin 7.J15c Ambient Recording 8.A80 AMD 7.H35 Amino Communications 5.B40 Amos – Spacecom 1.C65 Amphenol Broadcast Solutions 9.B08 Amplidata 6.A05 Amptec (Co-exhibiting with DPA Microphones) 8.D70 Amsterdam inbusiness (Co-exhibiting with Dutch Media Hub) 9.A20 AnaCom 1.D91 Andersson Technologies 7.A03 Anet 9.B45 Anevia 4.B66 ANNOVA Systems 3.A31 Anritsu 1.C95

ANT Group ANT Software Ant Systems Antik Technology Anton Bauer

8.E20 4.C98 13.198 13.313

(Co-exhibiting with Vitec Group)

11.D61 7.K27 7.K21 1.C61 1.A81a

Apace Systems APANTAC Appear TV APRICO Solutions ARA – Antenna Research Associates (Co-exhibiting with Vialite by PPM)

ArabSat Arbor Media Archion Technologies

1.F29 1.C38 7.G15b

(Co-exhibiting with EMEA Gateway) 7.E06 Ardis Technologies 7.J17 ARET video and audio engineering OE201 Argosy 10.D55 Arion Technology 4.A71 Arkivum 8.G44 arqiva 1.B61 ARRI 11.F21 ARRIS 1.D41 Artec Technologies 7.G35 Artel Video Systems 2.A20 ASC Signal Corporation 1.C51 ASL Intercom 10.B31 Aspera 7.G11 Aspiro 13.223 ASSIMILATE 7.H11 Aston Group 2.A30e 1.B51 ASTRA (SES ASTRA) ASTRA Broadband Services (Co-exhibiting with 1.B51 ASTRA (SES ASTRA)) ASTRA Platform Services (Co-exhibiting with 1.B51 ASTRA (SES ASTRA)) Astro Strobel Kommunikationssysteme 3.C20 ATEME 1.F70 Atempo 7.J03 ATG Broadcast (Co-exhibiting with Dan Technologies) 8.B51 Atomos EMEA 6.C28e ATOS – Siemens 9.C25 Atos Origin 13.163 3.B20a ATS (Co-exhibiting with Enesys) ATTO Technology 7.F41 Audio AG – RME 8.A19 Audio Developments 8.D97 Audio Ltd 8.D96 Audio-Technica 8.D78 Aurora Lite Bank 9.B18 Austin Insulators (Co-exhibiting with Kintronic Labs) 8.E35 Autocue 11.E51 Autodesk 7.D25 Autoscript 11.D61a Avanti Communications 1.A50 Avateq Corp 4.C59 Aveco 3.B56 Avid 7.J20 Avitech International Corporation 7.K30 Aviwest 2.C21 AVL Technologies 5.A49 AVP Europa 10.E57 AVT Audio Video Technologies 8.E91 AWEX 10.D31 AWOX 2.C33 Axcera 10.F28 Axel Technology 8.C62 Axia Audio (Co-exhibiting with Telos System) 8.D29 Axon Digital Design 10.A21/10.B21 Ayecka Communication Systems 4.C51 Azden Corp 8.D80 Azure Shine International 6.A29c

B B&H Photo Video, Pro Audio Band Pro Munich Bangchen Barco Silex Barix Barrowa Bazhou HongXingJieTu studio lighting equipment Co BBC Academy BCE Beat the Traffic bebob

10.A01 11.F40 13.382 9.A57 3.A48 1.B26 11.F61b 9.A38 7.J40 2.A10 11.F54

BeeSmart 13.281 Beijing Brightcast Co 11.G80 Beijing Feiyashi Technology Development 11.F81 Beijing Hualin Stone-tech 11.F79 Beijing OSEE Digital Technology 10.F33 Beijing Phylion Battery Co 11.A20 Beijing Realmagic Technology Co 3.A52 Beijing United Victory Co 11.D71 Beillen Battery – JIADE Energy Technology 11.E80 Bel Digital Audio 10.A30 Belco 8.C60 Belden 1.C21 Belgium Satellite Services 1.A03 BES and Media Products 10.C51 BESAT Broadcasting Systems 9.C47 BETTERVIEW 3.A15ai BFE Studio und Medien Systeme 9.B25 BHV Broadcast 10.F35 Binocle 11.D70a BIRTV 10.A08 Blackmagic Design 7.H20 Black-Tek OE118 BLANKOM Antennentechnik (Co-exhibiting with BLANKOM Digital) 1.F51 BLANKOM Digital 1.F51 BLT Italia 8.A68 Blue Lucy Media 7.F04 BlueArc Corporation 7.E10 Bluebell Opticom 3.A68 Bluefish444 7.J07 BlueShape 11.A14 Bluestreak Technology 13.123 Bluetop Technology Co 5.C43 BMS Broadcast Microwave Services Europe 1.A10 BON ELECTRONICS, 11.D85 Boris FX/Media 100 6.A03 Boxx TV 11.C66 BPL Business Media 13.211 Bradley Engineering 11.C37 BRAINSTORM MULTIMEDIA (Co-exhibiting with FOR-A UK) 2.B59 Brexel 5.B15c Bridge Technologies 1.A30 BrightSign 3.C17 Bristol Vfx (Co-exhibiting with Photon Beard) 11.C44 British Kinematograph Sound & Television 8.B99 Society (BKSTS) Broadcast Bionics 8.D73 Broadcast Electronics 8.C91 Broadcast International 13.362 Broadcast Pix 7.B20 Broadcast Solutions 5.C29/OE110 Broadcast Traffic Systems 3.B25 Broadcast Unifying Gears (Bug.tv) 7.B01 Broadcom Corporation 2.C39 Broadcom 8.B38h Broadpeak 2.C40b Broadtec 3.A15c Bryant Unlimited 10.D15 BSI 9.A46 BTESA – Broad Telecom 8.B02 Building4Media – Primestream 7.D21 Bulcrypt 5.C46 Burli – EuMediaNet 6.A26 Büro Für Neues Fernsehen (Co-exhibiting with SeaChange) 1.C27 Burton 8.G48 BW Broadcast 8.E73 C C&C Technic Taiwan Co 5.C41 Cabletime Limited – IPTV 13.373 Cache-A Corporation (Co-exhibiting with Global Distribution) 7.G16 Caldigit 7.B42 Calibre UK 7.J43 Calrec Audio 8.C58 Camargus 9.D26 Cambridge Research Systems 8.B38b Camera Motion Research 9.A55 Canara Lighting & Sconce 11.E74 Canare 11.B63 Canford 9.C01 Canon Europe 11.E50 Carl Zeiss 11.D75 Cartoni 11.C30 Caspian One 4.A61hi Cavena Image Products 2.A47

CB Electronics 8.A04 CCBN2012 8.F56 CEITON technologies 3.A60 Celeno Communications 3.A15f Cetel 3.A20 Chambre De Commerce Et D’Industrie De Paris 2.A30/2.B39/2.C40/3.B20/8.B30/8.D82/11.D70 Channelot 3.A15k Chellomedia (Co-exhibiting with Liberty Global Europe) 1.D39 China Anhui Modern TV Technology Co 7.D03 China Ruige 9.B06 Christie 9.B30 Christy Media Solutions – Broadcast Recruitment Specialists 6.C20 Chrosziel 11.E65 Chyron 7.D11 Cine 60 10.D57 Cine Power International 11.F11 Cinegy 7.A30/7.A41 Cineroid 11.A58 CINE-TV broadcast systems 11.B12 Cinevation (Co-exhibiting with DFT Digital Film Technology Munich) 7.E21 Cintel International 7.B35 Cisco Systems 13.197 City of Hilversum (Co-exhibiting with Dutch Media Hub) 9.A20 Civolution 2.C30 Clear-Com 10.D29a Cmotion 11.C40 Cobalt Digital 8.A94 Cobham 1.F41 Codan Satcom 4.C75 Code One 10.F38 4.A61g Cogent Technologies (Simtra) Cognacq-Jay Image (Co-exhibiting with MEDIA BROADCAST) 1.B79 COGNIK 2.B39e Colem Engineering 4.A61hii Colt Technology Services 3.C41 Commonwealth Broadcasting Association 10.A03 Communications Research Centre Canada 8.F49 Communications Specialties 8.A15 Comrex (Co-exhibiting with Vortex Communications) 11.G11 COM-TECH High Freq and Broadcast 8.C74 Comtech Telecommunications 1.F80 Conax 1.D69 Concurrent 4.B78 Conducfil 8.E79 Connected Home Academy 13.311 Conspin Co 4.C50 CONTENTUS (Co-exhibiting with European Broadcasting Union (EBU)) 10.F20 Contentwise 13.332 Convergent Design 7.A07 Cooke Optics 11.D10 Coolux 11.D66 CoreELTechnologies 1.F96 CoreTrust 13.421 Coship Electronics Co 1.A74 Cosmolight 11.C36 Cotech 11.A54 CP Cases 10.A44 CPE Italia 8.B11 CPI International 1.B41 Craltech Electronica 9.B14 Craze Productions 3.A15i Creative Network Design, Inc (Co-exhibiting with MSV) 8.A04 CreNova Technology Co 5.B15b Cryptoguard 3.C53 Crystal Vision 2.B11 CSE 2.C40c CSTB Russia 8.F57 CTE Digital Broadcast 8.C38 Cube-Tec International 8.D03 Cubiware 5.C35 CUK HING Industries (Hong Kong) 11.F61c CV Support 11.C84 CYTAGlobal 5.B05 (Co-exhibiting with MSV)

D D&R D.I.P. Company D4D INGENIERIA VISUAL d’accord broadcasting solutions Dalet Digital Media Systems

8.C70 7.D01 11.D70cii 9.A53 8.B77

Dan Technologies Group 8.B51 Danmon Systems Group (Co-exhibiting with Dan Technologies) 8.B51 Darim Vision 7.C10 Data Vision & Allied Vision Technologies 9.A50 DataDirect Networks 7.C30 Dataton 7.G12 Datavideo Technologies Europe 7.D39 DAVID Systems 7.F20 Dawson OE120 Dayang Technology Development 7.H39 Dazmo 9.A34 dB Broadcast 10.A28 DB Elettronica Telecomunicazioni 8.B16 De Sisti Lighting 11.D50 Decimator Design 7.B40 Dedo Weigert Film 11.D31 DEEP VISION 11.D70c Dega Broadcast Systems 7.G07 DekTec 2.A41 Delec Audio und Videotechnik 10.D30 Delta Meccanica 8.E36 DELTACAST (Co-exhibiting with DELTACAST.TV) 10.D10 DELTACAST.TV 10.D10 DEV Systemtechnik 1.F34 Deva Broadcast 8.D79 Devlin Keyboards 6.C28b devolo AG 13.273 DEXEL Lighting 11.G74 Dexin Digital Technology(Chengdu) Co 6.A29b DFT Digital Film Technology Munich 7.E21 DHD 8.A50 DiBcom 3.B51 Digidia 8.A13 Digigram 8.C51 Digimetrics-DCA 7.A01 Digisoft.TV 13.291 Digispot System 8.E83 DigiTAG (Co-exhibiting with European Broadcasting Union (EBU)) 10.F20 Digital Instruments 8.A11 Digital Nirvana 10.A12 Digital Rapids 7.G41 / 13.293 Digital Stream Technology 5.B15e Digital TV Group 5.A45 Digital TV Labs 2.A18 Dimetis 4.B77 DirectOut 8.E02 Discretix Technologies . 3.A15b Disk Archive Corporation 8.B38g DivX, now part of Rovi 5.A31 DK-Technologies 8.E60 DLNA 13.376 Dmlite c. 9.A04 DMT SyES 8.C49 Dolby 2.B28 Doremi Technologies 10.B10 Doteck Digital Technologies 2.C27 Double D Electronics 1.F58a Doughty Engineering 11.B61 DPA Microphones 8.D70 Draka 11.C31 DSPECIALISTS 8.E69 DTS 2.B50 Duma Video 5.C39 Dutch Media Hub 9.A20 DVB 1.D81 DVBControl 3.B50 DVEO division of Computer Modules 2.A48 DVLab 5.C07 DVS Digital Video Systems 7.E25 Dymo 3.C31 Dynacore Technology Co 11.E70 E e2v – Stellar Eardatek Easyrig EBH Radio Software EchoStar Europe ECRIN Systems Eddystone Broadcast Edgeware Editshare Eela Audio Egatel Egripment EgyptSat Elber Elbit Systems Land and C4I

1.A78 4.C67 11.A10 8.A02 1.F76 5.C21 8.B38e 4.B71 7.C21 8.E85 8.C16 11.A21 1.B91 8.C11a 3.A15di

(continued on page vi)


theibcdaily

08-13.09.11 Halls 9, 10 & 11

A A01

Pesa P esa A09 A11

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B12

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D21

D20

F20 D25

A24

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Clear-Comm Clear Comm

A0 04 A04 A29 A08

A17

B16

B17

L

D10

C15

A0 06 A06

A10

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B18

D29

F25 B31 A30

B25

A31 A Riedel Com Communications mmunications GmbH & Co. KG

WC C

W WC D26

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F23

Norwia Norw wia

B19

A1 A14 14 A20

F22

F31 F32 F344

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D20

AA16 16

F24 F26 F288

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C20 Ross Video Ltd A1 12 A12

F21

B29

B20

D30

F30

F29

D31 F38

B39

F33

A38

D30

F35 TSL

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A41

D42

B44

A30 A3 30 A33 A3 32 A32

A40

B30 Christie

A36

A3 34 A34

A35

A4 42 A42

A46

A4 A48 48

B48 F51

D40 C45 P Panasonic Marketing Europe GmbH

A40

D46

A49 A42

A3 A38 38

A4 44 A44

F39

D41 Professionaal JVC Professional Europe Ltd

C449 C49

B41

A45

OR G ORG

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D55

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A5 50 A50 A51

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Vortex V or tex Communica o Communications ations A20 D21

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C20 C2 20 Fujinon (Europe) (Europe) GmbH

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G29 B31 B331 A30

D30

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G33

D31 F31

F30 A31

B39 B

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D36

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D35

F35

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C40 A40

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Autoscript

F61

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Autocue C71 C73 C74

G70 E60

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F71

F70

G72

D75

A70

F73 F72

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C81 D80 D81

IBC CP Production roduction Village Village

IBC TV NEWS

C84

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D86

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VI

theibcdaily (continued from page iv)

Elecard Electronics Research Inc (ERI) Electrosys Elemental Technologies Elettronika Elrom Studios ELTI Emcore EMEA Gateway Emotion Systems emotion3D EMS Technical Personnel Enco Systems Encompass Digital Media Enensys Enigma Systems Ensemble Designs, Enterprise Europe Network

2.A28 8.E23 8.C40 7.H37 8.A35 3.A15g 8.A31 2.A24 7.E06 6.A23a 6.A01 1.B09 10.F26 5.C33 3.B20a 5.B21 8.B91

(Co-exhibiting with Dutch Media Hub) 9.A20 EnterpriseData Technologies 4.C89 Entone 13.266 Entropic Communications 3.A41 Envivio 1.D73 EPAK 2.C35 Ericsson 1.D61 ESL (Co-exhibiting with Thrane & Thrane) OE202 Espial 5.A18 Etere 8.B89 10.D31 ETILUX (Co-exhibiting with AWEX) ETL Systems 4.B84 Etnatel Consorzio Export 5.C30 ETRI 8.G31 ETSI 2.C29 Euro Light System (Co-exhibiting with Nila LED Lighting) 9.A19 Euro Video System 10.F25 European Broadcasting Union (EBU) 10.F20 Eurotek 8.A59 Eutelsat 1.D59/OE112 Eversat 1.A52 Evertz 1.A33/8.B40 Evoxe – Newsroom 2.C59 EVS 8.A96/8.B90 Exir Broadcasting 8.D28 Explorer Cases by GT Line 11.G76 Exterity 13.335 Extron Electronics 3.A51 Eyeheight Limited 8.D92 Ezako 8.B30c

F F&V LED Lighting 11.F70 F.A.Bernhardt, FAB 2.A21 Facilis Technology 7.D05 Factum Electronics 8.B92 Farmers Wife 9.A10 FascinatE 8.G44 Fast Forward Video 9.A16 Fiberfox 11.G59 FileCatalyst 7.H40 Film and Digital Times (Co-exhibiting with Transvideo) 11.F31 Film Gear – Eclalux 11.G48 Filmfabriek 9.B43 Filmlight 7.F31 FIMS (Co-exhibiting with European Broadcasting Union (EBU)) 10.F20 Fischer Connectors 11.E21 Flanders Scientific Inc (FSI) (Co-exhibiting with Zunzheng Digital Video Co) 10.F22 Floatcam 9.B51 Flolight (co-exhibiting with Prompter People) 11.G75 FLYING-CAM (Co-exhibiting with AWEX) 10.D31 Focal Professional 8.B30i FOR-A UK 2.A51/2.B59/11.A70b Forbidden Technologies 7.J15e FORTIS 5.B45 Foxcom 5.C40 France Broadcast 8.B30j Fraunhofer Alliance Digital Cinema 8.B80 Fraunhofer FIRST (Co-exhibiting with Fraunhofer Alliance Digital Cinema) 8.B80 Fraunhofer Gesellschaft (Co-exhibiting with Fraunhofer Alliance Digital Cinema) 8.B80 Fraunhofer HHI (Co-exhibiting with Fraunhofer Alliance Digital Cinema) 8.B80 Fraunhofer IIS (Co-exhibiting with Fraunhofer Alliance Digital Cinema) 8.B80 Front Porch Digital 7.C16 FTTH Council Europe 5.A10

08-13.09.11 Fujinon (Europe) Fujitsu Funke Digital TV Furukawa Future Media Concepts FX-Motion

11.C20 1.F90 3.C60 11.D11 5.C08 11.D81

G G Technology Hitachi 7.D12a G&G Tape Check 10.A38 Gazprom Space Systems 4.A95 GB Labs 7.J15b Gearhouse Broadcast 10.D46 Gefei Tech Co 8.E05 Gefen 7.B30 Gekko Technology 11.D40 Genarts 7.J15d Genelec 8.D61 General Dynamics Mediaware 9.A06 General Dynamics SATCOM Technologies 1.A41 Gennum Corporation 9.A45 Geolink Satellite Services (Co-exhibiting with Cetel) 3.A20 Gepco International/General Cable 9.B02 Geritel Giomar 8.E29 Ghielmetti 8.C77 Giga Communications (Gigasat & Giga-Com) 1.C30/OE207/OE208 Gigawave OE115 Gilat Satcom 3.A15w GkWare 2.C51 Glensound Electronics 8.E89 Glidecam Industries 11.G45 Global Crossing Genesis Solutions 13.297 Global Distribution 7.G16 Global Invacom 4.B75 Global VSAT Forum 8.F58 GlobalTT.com (GT&T) 1.F71 GlobeCast 1.A29 Globecomm 4.C74 Glyph Production Technologies (Co-exhibiting with Global Distribution) 7.G16 GoPro 9.A36 GOSPELL Digital Technology Co 5.B11a Grass Valley 1.D11/1.E02/OE301 Gravity – Rock Solid Recommendations 13.413 Green Wave Telecommunication 1.B90 GreenPeak Technologies 1.F94 Group 47 8.G49 Guntermann & Drunck 4.B74 Guramex 10.B20 H Haivision Network Video 13.451 Hamlet 9.D10 Hangzhou Xingfa Transmission Equipment Co 6.A29d Harman International/Studer 8.D60 Harmonic 1.B20 Harris Systems 7.G20 HDI Dune Europe 13.200 Headroom Broadcast 2.C57 Hego Group 6.C19 Hellas Sat Consortium 4.A80 HHB Communications 8.D56 Hi Tech Systems 10.A49 Hiltron 4.B89 Hispasat 4.C72 Hitachi Data Systems (Co-exhibiting with Hitachi Kokusai Electric Europe) 11.F51 Hitachi Kokusai Electric Europe 11.F51 Hitron Technologies 5.B13 HMS 8.C25 Homecast 4.B81 HoseoTelecom Co 3.B60 HS-ART DIAMANT Film Restoration (Co-exhibiting with DFT Digital Film Technology Munich) 7.E21 HTTV 4.C60 Huawei 13.111 Huawei Symantec Technologies Co 9.B17 Humax Co 4.B70 Hyperion Video (Co-exhibiting with Tcube) 8.B30a I I Tech Electronic 5.B11g I.S.P.A. – Group 9.B20 IABM 8.F50/8.F52/8.F54 IBC Partnership Village 8.F51 IBM 2.B31 3.B67 Icareus (Co-exhibiting with SysMedia) IdeasUnlimited.TV 8.C97 iDirect 5.B30

IDX Technology 11.C21 IEEE Broadcast Technology Society 8.F51b IET – The Institution of Engineering and Technology 8.F51c IGP 1.F58d Ihlas News Agency 3.A40 IHSE 7.B10 ikan Corp 9.B47 Ikegami Electronics (Europe) 11.A31 Ikonoskop 11.C87 Image Engineering 11.E16 Image Systems 7.A28 Image Video 8.A58 Imagine Communications 3.A15j Imagineer Systems 7.J47 Imaqliq 13.372 I-MOVIX 11.E60 Impeq 3.B31 Impire 2.C23 INA – Institut National de l’Audiovisuel 9.A17 IneoQuest 1.C39 Infomedia Digital Technology Co 2.C53 Inmarsat 2.A15 Institut für Rundfunktechnik 10.F51 Integral Systems 1.A01 Intek Digital 5.B37 INTEL 13.191 Intelsat Corporation 1.C71 Inter BEE 10.A02 International Datacasting Corporation 1.C29 Interra Systems 6.A15 10.D31 INTOPIX (Co-exhibiting with AWEX) IntraTec 8.B38di 1.D71 ioko (Co-exhibiting with KIT digital) IP4.TV 13.442 iPanel.TV 5.B11f IPE Products (Co-exhibiting with Global Distribution) 7.G16 Ipgallery 3.A15e iphion (Co-exhibiting with Dutch Media Hub) 9.A20 IPV 8.B59 Irdeto 1.D51 IRIS GATEWAY SATELLITE SERVICES LTD (Co-exhibiting with CYTAGlobal) 5.B05 IRTE 8.D10 Isilon Systems 7.H10 ItalTelec 8.A21 Itelsis 8.E19 J J.L. Fisher Jampro Antennas JK Audio (Co-exhibiting with Vortex

11.D51 8.B96

11.G11 JMR Electronics 7.F06 JoeCo 8.A17 Jos. Schneider Optische Werke (Co-exhibiting with Schneider Optics) 11.A28 Junger Audio - Studiotechnik 2.C49 Justad.tv 3.A15o Jutel 8.A24 JVC Professional Europe 10.D41

Communications)

K K5600 Lighting Kabelkom . Kaltura Kantar Media – Audiences KaonMedia KATHREIN-Werke KCEI KDDI Kino Flo inc/Cirro lite (Europe) Kinotehnik KINOTON Kintronic Labs KIT digital Czech

11.B31 8.E11 3.A15a 4.C57 1.B16 8.C29 2.B39f 8.F48 11.D35 11.F72 6.A10 8.E35

3.C35 KIT digital 1.D71 Klewel advanced webcasting solutions 4.C85 Kobatt Benelux 11.C81 Kontron 13.182 Korea Digital Convergence Association (KODICA) 5.B15h Korea Pavilion 5.B07/5.B15 Kramer Electronics 8.B81 Kroma Telecom 10.A24 Kronomav Sistemas (Co-exhibiting with Medialuso-Kronomav) OE204 K-Tek 8.A72 Kupo Grip 11.G69 Kvant-Efir 8.E75 (Co-exhibiting with Visual Digital)

L Labwise 5.C20 Lacie 8.D82b L’Aigle Paris 11.D86 LARCAN 11.G70 Lasergraphics 7.F01 Latens 4.B60 LAWO 8.C71 Lectrosonics 8.A60 LEMO Connectors 11.C41 Levira (Co-exhibiting with MEDIA BROADCAST) 1.B79 LGZ Broadcasting Tech (Co-exhibiting with Broadcast Solutions) OE110 Libec Europe 11.B55 2.A31 LiberoVision (Co-exhibiting with Vizrt) Liberty Global Europe 1.D39 Lightequip 11.C74 Lightstar (Beijing) Electronic Co 11.A38 Linear Acoustic (Co-exhibiting with Telos System) 8.D29 Lino Manfrotto & Co 11.F50 Litepanels (Co-exhibiting with Vitec Group) 11.D61 LiveU 3.A15x/3.B43 Livewire Digital 4.A61b LMC 11.D70ciii LMP Lux Media Plan 10.F21 LogicKeyboard – BSP 7.F49 Logiways 2.C40d LS telcom 8.E39 L-S-B Broadcast Technologies 8.C20 LSI 6.A27 LSI Projects 11.D41a LTO Program 10.D42 LUCI 7.A32 Lumantek 2.C19 Lund Halsey (Console Systems) 2.B10 LUTEUS 2.A30d Lynx Technik 8.E24 LYTEK International 11.F73 M Magic Software 3.A15l Magix 8.A14 MainConcept, now part of Rovi 5.A31 Mandozzi 8.A48 Mantrics 7.A09 Mariner 13.275 Mark Roberts Motion Control 11.G35 Marquis Broadcast 2.A58 Marquis Consulting (Co-exhibiting with Marquis Broadcast) 2.A58 Marshall Electronics 11.D20 Mart, JSC 8.B15 Marvell Semiconductors 13.301 Marvintech 7.K01e Masstech Group 8.B73 Masterclock 10.A10 MathEmbedded Consulting 4.A61hiii Matrox Video Products Group 7.B29 Matthews Studio Equipment 11.G71 Mayah Communications 8.B94 Maxon Computer 6.C10 MBT 8.D82a MEDIA BROADCAST 1.B79 Media Excel 13.353 Media Links Systems 1.B11 Media Logic 7.J18 MEDIA360/DEBRIE 7.E30 Media-Alliance 8.B71 MediaGeniX 3.C59 Mediaguru Consultants 10.F31 Medialuso-Kronomav OE204 Mediatec Group (Co-exhibiting with Broadcast Solutions GmbH) OE110 mediatvcom 2.B39c Meduza 9.A40 Megahertz Broadcast Systems (a Kit Digital company) 11.F20 MELTZER MOBILE 3.A15s Memnon Archiving Services (Co-exhibiting with STP) 8.C85 Merging Technologies 6.C29 MeteoGraphics 2.C48 Metracom 2.A30b MICRODOLLY HOLLYWOOD 11.A40 Microfilms 11.E61 Microtech Gefell (Co-exhibiting with SchulzeBrakel Schaumstoffverarbeitungs) 8.D77 Mic-W Audio 8.B09 Mier Comunicaciones 8.E30 MikroM 8.B95

Miller Camera Support 11.D30 Mindspeed Technologies 10.F39 Minerva 13.342 Minexa 13.433 miniCASTER 1.A80 Minnetonka Audio Software 7.J01 Mirada 5.B26 Miranda Technologies 8.D41 MiraVid 13.434 MIS 6.B20 8.A04 MIT INC (Co-exhibiting with MSV) MITEQ/MCL 1.A18 MIT-xperts 3.A58 mLogic (Co-exhibiting with Global Distribution) 7.G16 Mobile Broadcast 3.B21 Mobile Viewpoint-Triple IT 13.363 Mode-AL 10.F30 MOG – Technologies 7.G39 Mole – Richardson Company 11.F35 Monarch Innovative Technologies. 7.K41 Mosart 5.C26 MO-SYS 11.A41 Motama 13.274 Motorola 1.D31 /4.A75 Movea 3.C11 MSA Focus International 3.B40 Mstar Semiconductor 3.A14 MSV 8.A04 MTF Services 11.C73 M-Three Satcom 8.C11c Multidyne Video & Fiber Optic Systems 2.A54 Murraypro Electronics 10.F23 MUSCADE (Co-exhibiting with European Broadcasting Union (EBU)) 10.F20 MWA Nova 7.J39 Myat 8.E17 N NAB Show 7.A43 nac Image Technology 9.A14 Nagra Kudelski 1.C81 Narda Test Solutions 5.B08 National Instruments 8.D71 Nativ 4.A61e Nautel 8.C61 Nautilus Studio 3.A26 ND SatCom OE219 NDS 1.A71 NEC Corporation 8.E10 Nediva (Co-exhibiting with CV Support) 11.C84 NEO TELECOMS 8.B30b Neotion 4.B53 NET INSIGHT 1.B40 Neta 3.A30 Netgem 4.B79/4.C79 1.A29 NETIA (Co-exhibiting with Globecast) Netris 4.C55 NetroMedia 6.B22 NetUP 13.383 10.D31 NEURO TV (Co-exhibiting with AWEX) Neutrik 8.C94 never.no 3.A36 Nevion 8.B70 Nevion (Co-exhibiting with Colt Technology Services) 3.C41 Newland Communication 5.B11c Newtec 1.A49 NewTek 7.K11 NEXTO DI 11.G37 8.A04 Neyrinck (Co-exhibiting with MSV) NHK 8.G01 NICT 8.F39 /8.G30 Nikon 11.A70a Nila LED Lighting 9.A19 Ningbo Eimage Studio Equipment 11.C75 NKK Switches 8.A70 No Tube 13.202 NOA Audio Solutions 8.D91 Nokia Qt 13.265 Nokia Siemens Networks 13.225 NorCom Information Technology OE215 Nordija 13.271 Norsat 1.F75 Norwia 10.F34 Novella SatComs 1.F58b NovelSat 3.A38 Novel-SuperTV 4.B61 Novotronik 1.A54 NSA Telecom 3.A15p NTP Technology (Co-exhibiting with Dan Technologies) 8.B51


theibcdaily VII

08-13.09.11 NTSI 2.B39b NTT Corporation/NTT Advanced Technology Corporation/NTT Electronics Corporation 2.C50 Nucomm/RF Central 1.D40 Numedia 3.B55 NVIDIA (Co-exhibiting with PNY Technologies) 7.J38 NWIEE 4.C83 NyeTec 2.C31 O OASYS 8.B38d Object Matrix 6.C28a Oconnor (Co-exhibiting with Vitec Group) 11.D61 OCTOPUS Newsroom 2.B19 OIPF (Co-exhibiting with Open IPTV Forum) 13.151 OiV 5.B04 Olympus 9.A35 OMB Broadcast 8.C92 Omega Digital Electronics 5.A16 Omnia Audio (Co-exhibiting with Telos System) 8.D29 Omnitek 6.A18 Onair Media 8.B05 OneSat 4.A61c ONETASTIC (Co-exhibiting with Elber) 8.C11a Open IPTV Forum 13.151 Open Text 13.203 Opentech 3.C10 Opera Software 5.B47 Opsomai 2.A30c Optical Cable Corporation 10.F29 Optocore 9.A47 Optoway Technology 8.A16 Opvision Technology Co 8.A40 Oracle 9.C15 Orad Hi-Tec Systems 7.B27 Orban Europe 8.D93 Orca Interactive 2.B40/3.A15v ORION TECHNOLOGY Co 5.B07b Oticom Corporation 5.B15f OVERLINE – Systems 10.E59 Oxygen DCT 10.B44 P P+S Technik 7.D07/11.E28 Pace 1.B19 Packet Ship Technologies 4.A61d PAG 11.E20 Pals Electronics Co 4.A51 Panasonic Marketing Europe 9.B42/9.C45/9.D40 Pandora International 7.K01d Panther 11.D21 Paywizard 13.185 Peak Communications 1.B10 Pebble Beach Systems 8.B58 Peer TV 3.A15h PENKI KONTINENTAI GROUP 13.331 Penta Studiotechnik 10.A41 Percon 10.E51 Pesa 10.A11 Petrol Bags (Co-exhibiting with Vitec Group) 11.D61 PGM Optical Fiber 1.D95 Phabrix 8.E25 Philips Home Control 1.A81 Philips uWand Remote Touch (Co-exhibiting with Philips Home Control) 1.A81 Phoenix7 3.C21 Phonak Communications 8.E95 Photon Beard 11.C44 Photron 11.G25 Pilat Media 3.A15q/ 3.B14 PIPTV 4.A61hiv Pixel Power 7.A31 Pixelmetrix Corporation 1.B28 Plaber – HPRC Cases 9.A42 PlayBox Technology 8.C30 Playcast Media Systems 3.A15n Plisch 8.B37 Plura Broadcast 8.C76 PNY Technologies 7.J38 Polecam 10.C49 Polymedia (Co-exhibiting with KIT digital) 1.D71 POND5 9.A01 Portaprompt 8.A90 Preco Broadcast Systems 8.E49 Pre-Met 8.B38dii Preview GM System 8.B61 Prime Focus Technologies 7.D20 Primera Technology Europe 7.H09 PrimeSense 3.A15z

Prism Sound ProConsultant Informatique Prodys Professional Show Professional Sound Corp Profitt Progira Radio Communication Promax Electronica Promise Technology Prompter People ProSat Solutions

8.E98 2.B21 1.B24 8.B31 8.D95 7.A04 8.D21 8.B22 9.A33 11.G75

(Co-exhibiting with Broadcast Solutions)

OE110 8.C48

ProTelevision Technologies Province of Noord-Holland (Co-exhibiting with Dutch Media Hub)

Provys PRO-X CO Publitronic Q Qbit QoE Systems Qphonics Quadrille Quadrus Technology Quantel Quantum Qube Cinema Quicklink Video Distribution Services Quintech Electronics QUOTIUM TECHNOLOGIES Qvest Media (Co-exhibiting with Wellen+Noethen)

9.A20 2.B49 11.G60 2.A49 8.A26 9.A05 8.C05 3.B20b 7.K31 7.A20 7.G30 7.F45 7.B13 4.C56 2.B39g 3.A35

R Rabbit Labs 3.A22 Radio Frequency Systems 8.B34 5.C07 Radiodar (Co-exhibiting with DVLab) Radioscape 8.D90 RaLex Solutions 8.D75 RAMI 8.B30g Rascular Technology 8.B38bi RealNetworks 13.285 Red Bee Media 1.A40 Red Digital Cinema 9.B49 Reelway Gmbh 13.232 Remote Solution 3.A54 Renesas Electronics Europe 1.B31 Reply (Discovery Reply) 8.C90 Research Concepts 1.F58c 8.C61 Rfmondial (Co-exhibiting with Nautel) RGB Networks 4.C78 RGBlink 7.F05 Riedel Communications 10.A31 Rights Tracker (Co-exhibiting with StorerTV) 2.C41 Rimage Europe 7.G15a RJS Electronics 6.C28d RO.VE.R Broadcast 8.C37 Robycam/Movicom 9.B41 Rockwell Collins Sweden (Co-exhibiting with SWE-DISH) 1.A31 Rohde & Schwarz 8.D35 Roland Systems Group 7.B17 Roland Systems Group UK (Co-exhibiting with HHB Communications) 8.D56 Romantis 4.C63 Root6 Technology 7.C17 Rorke Data 7.A10 Roscolab 11.G21 Rosenberger – OSI Fiber-Optics 11.C65 Ross Video 9.B12/ 9.C20 Rotolight 11.G73 Rovi 5.A31 RRsat Global Communications Network 1.A25 RS2I 2.C40e RSComm 8.E15 RT Software 2.B16 RTI Group 6.A21 RT-RK Computer Based Systems 5.A01 8.F51d RTS (Royal Television Society) RTS TELEX 10.D20 RTW 8.E76 Russian Satellite Communications Co 5.B20 Ruwido Austria 1.F68 RVR Elettronica 8.C28 Rycote Microphone Windshields 8.A86 Ryerson University 8.F41 RYMSA 8.D16 S S Net Media S&T (Strategy & Technology)

5.B15a 1.C31

S3 Group 3.B23 S3 Satcom 1.A99 S4M – Solutions for Media 3.B26 Sachtler (Co-exhibiting with Vitec Group) 11.D61 SAD 7.A12 SADiE 8.E96 Sagemcom 1.F40 SAIL LABS Technology 8.E13 SALZBRENNER STAGETEC MEDIAGROUP 8.C80 Sam Woo Electronics Co 8.E97/11.G33 Samim Rayaneh Co 8.B18 Samsung Electronics 1.D35 San Solutions 7.G01 Sanken/VDB 8.C01 SAPEC 1.F21 Sat-comm Broadcast OE101 Satlink Communications 5.A41 SatService 1.F47 SAV (Co-exhibiting with Vortex Communications) 11.G11 ScheduALL 1.D30 Schill GmbH & Co 11.C61 Schneider Optics 11.A28 Schoeps Mikrofone 8.E90 Schulze-Brakel Schaumstoffverarbeitungs 8.D77 Sconce Exhibitions (Co-exhibiting with Canara Lighting & Sconce) 11.E74 Scottish Development International 9.B16a Screen Plane (Co-exhibiting with Cmotion) 11.C40 Screen Service Broadcasting Technologies 8.C41 Screen Subtitling Systems 1.C49 Screenkeys 8.A54 SCTE 8.F51e SeaChange 1.C27 SecureMedia 13.233 SELECOM 8.B30h Selevision (Co-exhibiting with Gravity - Rock Solid Recommendations) 13.413 Sematron 1.A62 Sencore 1.C36 Sennheiser Electronic 8.D50 Service2Media 13.244 Servicevision 11.B51 SES (Co-exhibiting with ASTRA (SES ASTRA)) 1.B51 SES WORLD SKIES (Co-exhibiting with ASTRA (SES ASTRA)) 1.B51 Sezmi 13.231 SGI 9.A08 SGL 7.J15a SGO 6.A11 SGT 2.A30a Shantou Nanguang Photographic Equipment Co 11.E10 Shenzhen Advanced Video Info-Tech Co (AVIT) 5.B11e ShenZhen Geniatech 5.B11b Shenzhen MTC 3.A55 Shenzhen Ourstone Electronics 5.B11d Shenzhen Skyworth Digital Techonlogy Co 5.B46 Shively Labs 8.A18 Shotoku Broadcast Systems 11.G30 SI Media 8.B93 Siano Mobile Silicon 3.A15u Sichuan Changhong Network Technologies Co 6.A29e Sichuan Jiuzhou Electric Group Co 3.C56 Sichuan Video Electronic Co 5.B11h Sielco 8.A12 Sierra Video (Co-exhibiting with Kramer Electronics) 8.B81 Sigma Designs 4.C59 Signal 3G 3.A18 Signiant 13.341 Signum Bildtechnik 7.D31 Sintec Media 2.B41 Sinuta 4.C61 SIRA Sistemi Radio 8.C31 SIS LIVE 1.C55/OE205 Sisvel Technology 13.106 SJTek Co 5.B07c SkyDigita Co (Co-exhibiting with Rabbit Labs) 3.A22 Skyline Communications 1.A21 Skyware Global 5.C11 Slik Corporation 11.A30 SmarDTV (Co-exhibiting with Nagra Kudelski) 1.C81 Smart AV 10.F32

SMART electronic 3.A24 Smart TV Pavillion 13.192 Smartclip 13.412 SmartJog (Co-exhibiting with MEDIA BROADCAST) 1.B79 SmartLabs/In-Line 13.181 SMiT 1.F86 SMK EUROPE 1.C90 SMPTE 8.F51f SMT Electronic Technology 3.A19 SnapStream 6.A06 Snell 8.B68/13.381 Soft at Home 5.A11 SOFT VALLEE 8.B30k Softel 1.A27 Softlab – NSK 7.A05 SoftNI Corporation 1.A39 Softron Media Services 7.H01 Solarflare 9.A30 Solaris Mobile (Co-exhibiting with ASTRA (SES ASTRA)) 1.B51 Solectrix 11.G72 Solid State Logic 8.D83 Sondor/Marquise Tech 7.K25 Sonic Solutions, now part of Rovi 5.A31 Sonifex 8.E61 Sonnet Technologies 7.G03 sono Studiotechnik 8.C81 Sony Professional Europe 12.A10 Sorenson Media 6.A02 Sound Devices 8.E72 SOUND4 8.B30e Soundfield 8.A84 SPB Software 13.424 Spectra Logic 7.K36 Spinner 8.B27 SPX Communication 8.E93 Square Box Systems 7.F07 ST Electronics (Satcom & Sensor systems) 1.F55 St.Petersburg State University of Film and 7.D01 Television (Co-exhibiting with D.I.P Co) Stardom 7.G09 Starfish Technologies 2.C18 Starline Computer 7.H05 Step2e Broadcast 5.A03 Stereolabs 11.D70b Stereoscopic Technologies 9.D20 Stergen High-Tech (Co-exhibiting with Vizrt) 2.A31 Stirlitz Media (Co-exhibiting with Broadcast Electronics) 8.C91 STMicroelectronics 1.F36 Stordis 7.A16 StorerTV 2.C41 STP 8.C85 Stream Labs 7.G47 Streambox 5.C45 Streamit 8.A74 STRYME 7.C28 Studio Network Solutions 7.A08 Studio Technologies/E and E Exports 9.A48 Studiotech 8.A20 Suitcase TV . 2.C10/2.C15 Sumavision Technologies Co 1.C11 1.F59 Surface Heating Systems (Kirkcaldy) SVC4QoE project 8.F40 SVP Broadcast Microwave 1.C93 SWE-DISH by Rockwell Collins 1.A31 Swedish Microwave AB 1.A91 Swisscom (Co-exhibiting with RGB Networks) 4.C78 SWIT Electronics Co 11.D60 Switchcraft 9.C49 SysMedia 3.B67 Systembase 8.C03 T Tac System (Co-exhibiting with MSV) TAG V.S. (Co-exhibiting with Ayecka

8.A04

Communication Systems) 4.C51 Taiyang Movie and Television Equipment Co 11.F61d Talia 4.A61f Tangent Wave 7.B16 TangoTec 3.A15t Tata Communications 3.A61 Tata Elxsi 1.F31 TC Electronic (Co-exhibiting with HHB Communications) 8.D56 Tcube 8.B30a TDF (Co-exhibiting with MEDIA BROADCAST) 1.B79 Teamcast 2.B51 Technisat Digital 1.A44

Technocrane 11.B39 TechnoTrend Goerler 1.A58 Tedial 8.B41 Tektronix 8.C75 Teleca 13.315 Telecast Fiber Systems/Belden 10.B39 Telecommunications Technology Association (TTA) 5.B15g Teledyne Paradise Datacom 1.B22 Teleidea 13.195 Telemann Corporation 5.B07d Telemetrics 11.F45 Telenor Satellite Broadcasting 1.A59 Telesat 1.F56 Telespazio 4.C88 Teleste 5.C36 Telestream 7.D16 Teletest 11.D80 Television Research Institute 5.C37 Teliasonera International Carrier 3.C16 TELIKOU TECHNOLOGIES CO 11.A56 Telmaco 8.E45 TELMEC BROADCASTING 8.B21 Telos Systems 8.D29 Telsat 8.C11b Temwell Corporation 6.A29a Teracue 13.423 Teradek 9.A51 Teranex Systems 10.D21 Terrasat Communications 1.F81 Texas Instruments 9.B19 Thales Angenieux 11.F30 The Associated Press/AP ENPS 7.D30 The Bakery 9.A59 The Foundry Visionmonger 7.B21 The Israel Export & International Cooperation Institute 3.A15 The Pixel Farm 6.C18 TheLight 11.C71 ThinkAnalytics 1.D93 Thomson 5.A17 Thomson Broadcast (Co-exhibiting with Thomson) 5.A17 Thomson Video Networks (Co-exhibiting with Thomson) 5.A17 Thrane & Thrane OE202 THX 7.K01b Tieline Technology (Co-exhibiting with You/Com Audio) 8.E74 Tiffen International 11.D36 Tiger Technology 7.G05 Tightrope Media Systems (Co-exhibiting with EMEA Gateway) 7.E06 Tilta Technology Co 9.A03 TiVo 13.283 Tixel 7.A02 TMD 2.C58 Toner Cable Equipment UK 4.B91 ToolsOnAir 7.H32 TOUCHCAST (Co-exhibiting with AWEX) 10.D31 TRANSRADIO SenderSysteme Berlin 8.D30 Transtel Communication 7.K01a Transvideo 11.F31 TRedess 8.C10 Triada-TV 8.D31 Triaxes Vision (Co-exhibiting with Elecard) 2.A28 Tribune Media Services 13.276 Trident Microsystems 1.F49 Trilogy 10.A29 2.A28 Trinity (Co-exhibiting with Elecard) Tripleplay Services Holdings 4.A61a TriVis Weather Graphix 3.A50 True Lens Services 11.G65 10.D31 TSF.BE (Co-exhibiting with AWEX) TSL 10.B41 Turksat Satellite Com.Cable TV Operator 5.A21 TV Genius 13.325 TV ONE 7.C27 TV Skyline Plazamedia 11.C80 TVBEurope 11.F04 TVINCI 3.A15d T-VIPS 1.B71 TVLogic Co 10.B29 TVU Networks 2.C28 U UK Pavilion c/o Tradefair 4.A61/6.A23/6.C28/7.D12/7.J15/7.K01/ 8.B38/9.B16/10.D29/10.F30i/11.D41 Ultimatte Corporation 7.B25 Unique Broadband Systems 8.A28

(continued on page x)


VIII theibcdaily

08-13.09.11 ĂœBERFILM TECHNOLOGY MADE IN GERMANY STAND NO. 11.E28

WEISSCAM HS-2 MKII

PS-MAG 16D SR-III

Digital Film Camera Excellence A passion for innovation and exceptional pictures – that’s the maxim of P+S TECHNIK, the Munich-based manufacturer of high-end, professional ďŹ lm equipment.

P+S TECHNIK SCREENING “Inspirational Tools for Exceptional Images� ON THE BIG SCREEN Saturday, 10th September, 15.30 to 17.00

www.pstechnik.com Traditionally reliable. Daringly innovative.

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W B40 B42 WASP3D 3.B62 Wave Science Technology 8.A44 Unitend Technologies 3.C51 e ee WaveStream 6.A20 A11 UnitronGroup 5.C23 A10 WAZE MOBILE 3.A15r Unity mobile (Co-exhibiting with Visual Digital) WB Walton EnterprisesL 1.F33 C A15 3.C35 

 

 Weather Central 3.B61 ee Universal Electronics 1.C41ee A18 2.C55 University of Essex 13.201 C01 Weather Services International A21 WeatherOne 2.C11 B2 (Co-exhibiting with Liberty Global Europe) UPC Omnitek A01 A02 A03 A04 A05 A066 A14 Well Buying Industrial Co 8.A22 B2 A25 C111.D39 C10 A16 A15 WellAV Technologies Limited A20 1.F11 Utah Scientific 2.B20 The Israel Export & A29 A24 A26 A27 A28 A23 A Wellen+Noethen 3.A35 A18 International International Cooperation Cooperation C16 C177 C1 Whisper Power OE221 V B09 A03 A01 AB on Air WIGE MEDIA 11.A60 Vaddio 11.F41 A22 WC WC Winmedia 8.B30d C2011.C11 C21 B21 varavon A19 C221 Sumav Su mav A24 WireCAD B111.F57 C1 A15 A11 B144 B10 VBOX COMMUNICATION 3.A15bi A26 Wireworx (Co-exhibiting with Broadcast Solutions) B23 13.403 A20 VBrick Systems OE110 VCS 3.C44 A30 Enensys Ene ensys B19 Wisi CommunicationsB16 5.B25 B 8.C01 C31 VDB (Co-exhibiting withB200Sanken) p Pace plc C Kaon Media A10 Wisycom 8.D89 A35 A36 VDL 8.C99 B25 C30 S4M M Wiztivi 13.432 A18 C Vector 3 7.C01 C35 B266 WMG, University of Warwick/goHDR 8.G41 A31 B31 Solutions Solut ions Venera Technologies 6.A28 KIT Digi Digital ital C A21 B22 for Me edia Media with AWEX) 10.D31 WNM (Co-exhibiting Verimatrix 4.B54 A38 Annova Anno va Systems Wohler Technologies OE225 Vestel 13.131 C4 C41 41 A40 VCS Wohler Technologies B24(Co-exhibiting with HHB A25 C44 1.A51 Viaccess A41 B40 A42 Communications) 8.D56 C Vialite byEntropic PPM 1.F29 Sea C Prodys ys A48 B20 Work Microwave Prody 4.B63Sea C51 C5 1 VianeosCommunications 2.A30f C48 Harmonic B43 B26 Working Easy 11.A50 VidCheck 10.A09 A50 A51 B500 C533 World DMB A27 9.D30 Videobewerken WorldCast SystemsB28 8.B50 A52 B51 11.F90 (Co-exhibiting A55with Zacuto) B566 B5 Wowza Media 13.121 C A54 VideoPropulsion 5.C25 B55 C56 A30 wTVision – Software for TV 3.C61 A58 Videosolutions Group 7.A06 C5 C599 S&T T Wuxi Huaxin Radar Engineering Co 1.C97 A60 Videssence 11.B10 B60 A61 C311 (Co-exhibiting with Commonwealth Media M edia G GeniX eWWBTI niX A29 VidiGo 7.H30 C60 B61 GlobeCast A68 Broadcasting Association) 10.A03 VidyoCast division, Vidyo 6.A25 C30 B31 Strateg Strategyy & B62 Wyplay 5.C42 Viewcast B67 13.199 C61 C6 61 Vigintos Elektronika 8.E21 C39 XYZ Viking Media Group 3.A16 X Frame Software 5.C13 C38 VimondInmar Media 13.391 A31 A33 Inmarsat sat Solution XCRYPT 5.B07a C3 Evertz Ever tz Vimond Media Solutions (Co-exhibiting with Vizrt) C1 A40 11 C11 B11 A15 B10 XD MOTION 11.D70ci A10 C102.A31 XDA44Productions A39 8.D82c Octopus C1 15 C15 (Co-exhibiting with Vitec Group) 11.D61 Vinten A18 Newsroom Ne wsroom B16 XenData 7.H47 (Co-exhibiting with Vitec C18 Group) C1 Vinten Radamec B40 19 C19 B19 XForm Systems C 11.D61 Starfish TTechnologies e echnologies A46 (Co-exhibiting with Penta Studiotechnik) 10.A41 Visio Light Inc. B20 11.F71 C2 21 C21 A41 A21 Xilinx 10.D25 B41 Vision Research 11.F60 C23 C B21 C28 A20 Xytech Systems 3.C48 Visiware 2.B39d C2 A50 27 C27 Yegrin LiteworksA49 9.A44 C B28 VISLINK 1.A61 A24 Yellowtec 8.A51 29 A52 A54 C29 Visual Research 7.J30 C2 Subti ubti Screen Su YoSpace 13.242 Visual Unity 3.C35 You/Com AudioVViaccess 8.E74 C A28 Vitec Group 11.A70c/11.D61 iaccess B31 C30 Yuvsoft 11.F74 31 C31 Vitec Multimedia 7.J31 C3 B51 A51 Zacuto 11.F90 C5 C3 33 C33 ASTRA Vivesta 2.A46 A31 Civolution (SES ASTRA S.A.) 9.A32 Zalman VIXS Systems Vizrt 5.A12 Zappware 4.B51 35 C35 A58 Vizrt 2.A31 C3 C40 B39 with Ambient Recording) Zaxcom (Co-exhibiting A30 A59 Vocas Systems 11.B43 C3 39 C39 8.A80 Voice Technologies (Co-exhibiting with Ambient A41 Zhengzhou KEMA MOVIE-TV Logiways Logiw a ys C4 41 C41 Recording) 8.A80 C B40 OPTO-ELECTRONICS CO 11.F61a Appe A Volicon A47 7.J16 B41 Zhuhai Hansen Technology Co 3.A42 A46 Vortex Communications 11.G11 C4 49 C49 B61 Zixi 13.351 A61 B49 C48 Arqiva VRT-medialab 8.G39Jßng Jßnger ger A48 Publitron Zoran Corporation 5.C06 DTS Audio Aud io V-Shine Technology Co 6.C11 A49 B50 Zunzheng Digital Video Co 10.F22 C A50 7.G33 C5 VSN (VIDEO STREAM NETWORKS) C51 51 A62 (Co-exhibiting with Zylight C508.A10 VTE Microwave Technologies B51 A54 C5 53 C53 Nila LED Lighting) 9.A19 Amos s– VTS Studiotechnik 8.A03

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The voice of the broadcast industry in print, online and face to face. Print: Reach 8000 senior broadcast professionals every month Online: Weekly newsletter, 3D Newsletter, Workflow files and Sports Broadcast Newsletter Conferences: 3D Masters, IT Broadcast Workflow and Fast Turnaround TV To subscribe, advertise or simply get further information, visit www.tvbeurope.com

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30 theibcdaily

13.09.2011

Financial pressures, competitive edge Screen Subtitling Systems By Ian McMurray Businesses with tightly-managed processes and eff icient project

workflows tend to benefit from a competitive edge over those that are less well-structured. Accordingly, Screen Subtitling Systems reports increased interest in its Translation Manager product as customers look

for ways to improve productivity. “Customers are under the same kind of financial pressures as anyone else in business and are expecting more for less and with tighter turnaround times,” said Screen’s

sales and marketing director, Gary Glover. “It appears that the translation and subtitling sector is no different and unless processes are st r e am l i n e d a n d m a d e m o r e resilient, some companies may lose new business tenders or even existing clients.” It is evident, says the company, that larger-sized firms have man-

Translation Manager simplifies workflow, says Screen Subtitling Systems’ Sales and Marketing Director Gary Glover

Photos : thepoeticimage - uwimages - F. Gärtner - rangizzz - R. Araujo - Fotolia.com VU DU TOIT

aged growth through investment in bespoke project management and tracking solutions, but the costs involved in development can be prohibitive for some smaller subtitling and translation companies. Translation Manager was introduced to Screen’s software suite as a complementary solution and is said to address a need in the overall subtitling and translation workflow – but, says the company, it now looks like it may be surfacing as an essential application. “Simple and effective workflow management is clearly a major benefit of Translation Manager,” observed Glover. “But for smaller businesses, it’s the ability to accurately quote and invoice for jobs and dramatically simplify how suppliers are paid that’s attracting interest, because of the obvious financial benefits. “Translation Manager can give mid-ranged subtitling and translation companies a very real competitive advantage without the cost of a prohibitively expensive bespoke system.” 1.C49

TV solutions tailored to your needs

Spotlight on standards Access By Anne Morris

Drive the content consumption revolution and provide a unique TV experience. TV Everywhere, OTT and Multi-screen,… Extend your reach, enrich and differentiate your service offering, and deliver a consistent cross device user-experience thanks to Viaccess’ advanced CA/DRM and Content Discovery/Recommendation Solutions. www.viaccess.com

Visit us at

IBC: Sept. 9th to 13th, Hall 1 - 1A51

Access is demonstrating its DLNA (Digital Living Network Alliance) and HbbTV (Hybrid Broadcast Broadband TV) solutions with televisions, set-top boxes, mobile phones, tablets and cameras. Access is showcasing its newly DLNA certif ied NetFront Living Connect solution, which allows users to seamlessly access, play and control digital media from any DLNA certified device on a home WiFi network. In addition, the company is demonstrating its NetFront Browser for HbbTV, a platform-independent HbbTV software solution. Access is also showing its BBC iPlayer solution: a modular, compact and platform-independent application that delivers advanced technologies while speeding time-to-market and reducing development costs. 13.115


32 theibcdaily

13.09.2011

Optimisation not compromise Cooperation between networks will help to successfully achieve the goal of the EU’s Digital Agenda, as far as wireless services are concerned By George Jarrett

Digital Dividend Bernard Pauchon is convinced that the right solution for spectrum management lies in cooperation between different networks. As chairman of Broadcast Networks Europe (BNE), Pauchon appraises what triggered the first digital dividend of a probable two. “The first relates to the re-farming of the UHF spectrum made possible by the digitisation of TV broadcasting,” he says. “It made it possible to use about six times less spectrum when compared to analogue transmission. “But to make it successful, that requires the vast majority of consumers to invest in digital receivers. The number of channels has multiplied by at least four. In addition

HDTV means extra spectrum consumption. However, HD has the benefit of the better compression efficiency given by MPEG-4, and there is the better modulation given by DVB-T2. “Even with these additional needs within broadcasting, it has been possible to make available the upper part of the UHF band (over 792MHz) to the broadband industry, and this precisely is the digital dividend,” he says. Pauchon believes a second dividend is not realistically achievable before 2020. Asked to make a case for EBU type broadcasters, and from his own BNE standpoint, he says: “First, DTT business is a combination of public services, commercial services, and payTV. The relative weight of these three categories varies quite signif icantly among different countries in the

Bernard Pauchon: IBC2012 will be the perfect time for debating the issues that are key to the future of content delivery – not least in spectrum management

“The right solution is cooperation, which could include Wi-Fi in 5GHz band, as promoted by Cisco, L Band as promoted by Qualcomm, or DVB NGH, hopefully developed in cooperation with 3GPP. The most efficient tool must be used in each specific service case.” He insists that ‘spectrum compromise’ is not the right depiction.

“Optimisation of spectrum management, taking into account technical, economical and social aspects will be the right approach,” he says. “This should be the purpose of the Radio Spectrum Policy Programme that EU institutions plan to set up. IBC2012 will be the perfect time for debating the issues that are key to the future of content delivery.”

Audio quality leads to new orders

D-cinema alternative content includes Wimbledon in 3D

IBC2011 comes during a busy and successful year, says Mikael Vest, sales director, NTP Technology

(image courtesy of Can Communicate)

Tracking the very latest developments in D-cinema For many years IBC has been seen as one of the leading forums for digital cinema. The creative, technical and commercial issues are debated here, in a range of sessions and across the show floor. The European Digital Cinema Forum (EDCF) has consistently worked with IBC, getting closely involved in a number of conference sessions. It regularly presents a Tuesday morning open meeting and this year is no exception. D-cinema continues to roll out across Europe. Audiences like the consistent quality of presentation and the growing roster of stereoscopic 3D films, and theatres are f inding new revenue streams in showing alternative content from sport to opera. The EDCF meeting brings together a number of influential figures to lead the debate. Kommer Kleijn of IMAGO, the European Fed-

world, and even in Western Europe. So not only EBU type broadcasters have to be considered. “BNE members are offering services for all these different categories of broadcasting services, but most of us also offer important services to telecom operators too. “The request by some parties for a further digital dividend, typically in the 700MHz band, comes from the exponential growth of mobile broadband data traffic, and some vendors would wish to have more spectrum for LTE to cope with this fact.” But reality is different, Pauchon insists. “Most of the traffic increase is due to TV and video content, but it has to be noted that TV is subscription based. Although being an excellently designed system, LTE is far from being the right tool, in terms of spectrum optimisation, quality of service, and economical efficiency.

eration of Cinematographers, gives the creative perspective: Siegfried Foessel of the Fraunhofer Institute looks at the latest technological developments; and David Hancock senior analyst, Screen Digest, has a commercial overview of progress. They are joined on the platform by vendors Barco, Doremi, TI and XDC, along with CJ Flynn, managing director, D-Cinema Compliance Group. Representatives of the EDCF’s organising body complete the panel for what is intentionally a broadly-based session. Anyone with an involvement or interest in D-cinema will find something of value. As par t of the Added Value stream, today’s meeting, titled Review of Progress in D-Cinema is open to all IBC visitors, and provides a natural conclusion to the dcinema programme which has been running throughout IBC2011. It starts at 10:00 in Room E102.

Business has been brisk at NTP Technology where we have recently completed contracts for large-scale digital audio routing systems and ultra high quality analogue to digital audio converters. The 625 MADI router we launched at IBC2010 is now in full production and enables a 2048x2028 matrix to be configured in just eight interface cards. The router is operated and supervised via TCP/IP and UDP using our RCS controller, which is an integral part of the router system hardware. The 625 MADI can also be accessed via NTP Visual Matrix Control client software. Spanish state broadcaster Radio Nacional de España recently ordered 15 NTP 625 digital audio routing systems for installation across its regional studios. This followed the installation of an 11-frame system at the network’s Madrid headquarters. Three-frame systems were installed at the largest regional centres, plus single-frame systems to handle smaller sections of the network. The existing installation at RNE Madrid is operated via an NTP 635300 controller running a version 3.0 QNX-based core, which offers mainand-redundant database support and fast TCP/IP control. The regional ver-

Opinion

Mikael Vest: Large-scale contracts have been completed across the globe

sions are controlled in the same way and provide full support for the NTP 715 multiplex consoles widely used by RNE. 32 digital audio routing systems have been delivered to China Radio International (CRI), the external voice of the People’s Republic of China. This latest order includes two NTP Penta 625 MADI and 30 Penta 725 systems were installed this summer at CRI’s Beijing headquarters. One of the Penta 625 MADI routers together with eight of the Penta 725 routers is configured as the main core system. The second 625 and a further eight 725

routers form a secondary or redundant core. Both these systems are located in a machine room close to the master control room. CRI’s headquarters building has 15 floors, each with four studios. A Penta 725 is located on each of the other 14 floors, serving as an input and output node. The new routers will replace an existing NTP 625-100D 128-square audio matrix which has performed reliably for many years. Benny Andersson’s Riksmixningsverket (RMV) recording studio chose NTP DAD AX24 ultra-high-quality analogue-to-digital and digital-toanalogue converters for its newly completed premises on the Stockholm waterfront. Four NTP AX24 systems have been delivered. Each incorporates a PHD interface for Avid Pro Tools and is being used in conjunction with a 64 channel Neve 8068 analogue mixing console. DAD AX24 analogue to digital converters have also been chosen for installation at the prestigious new Helsinki Music Centre in Finland. Scheduled to open just a few days before the start of IBC2011, the Helsinki Music Centre incorporates a 1,700-seat concert hall and ultra-modern recording facility. Located in the heart of the city, adjacent to the Houses of Parliament, the venue will be the new home of the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra, the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra and the Sibelius Academy. The message we are getting is that audio quality matters. It will matter even more as digital delivery platforms outgrow their current preoccupation with highly compressed file formats. 8.B51


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Consulting the Compass Miller Camera Support By David Fox Miller Camera Support’s Compass ra n g e o f f luid heads has been extended with the release of the new Compass 12 system packages. The launches are said to offer ‘premium camera support with optimal professional performance in costeffective systems package pricing’. The Compass 12’s design offers a wide payload range, selectable pan and tilt drag settings, and illuminated bubble level in a compact, lightweight 75mm ball levelling fluid head. The Miller range now includes the Compass 12, Compass 15, Compass 20 and the 100mm ball-based Compass 25 fluid heads. The Compass models use the same fluid drag system components as the Arrow range. This results in soft take-offs, stable pan/tilt moves and smooth stops, as well as settings of distinct levels of drag resistance. The 75mm fluid heads can take payloads of between 2-10kg for the Compass 12 and Compass 15 models, and 2-12kg for Compass 20. The 100mm Compass 25 has a selectable 4-14kg payload range. 11.D30

Under close observation Volicon By Carolyn Giardina Volicon is highlighting t h r e e Obser ver technologies at IBC: Observer TS (transport stream) logging system, Observer loudness monitoring and Observer Mobile. Volicon’s Observer video monitoring and logging system has 400 customers in over 40 countries, recording 6,000 channels worldwide. “Now more than ever, companies need comprehensive, reliable and effective monitoring tools to help them maintain quality of service, meet compliance goals, and repurpose and monetise their valuable content,� said Mike Asebrook, Volicon’s senior director of product

marketing. “At IBC, we’re showing several products on a variety of platforms that are helping our customers build a future-proof foundation for quality and compliance. One example is the loudness monitoring features within the Observer that lay the groundwork f o r c omp l i a n c e w i t h n ew a n d emerging loudness regulations.� To that end, Volicon says it aimed to develop a tool to enable TV stations and networks to monitor the loudness of their broadcasts in realtime to comply with regulations and improve the overall user listening experience for viewers. Using overlay controls within its webbased interface, loudness monitoring is integrated into the Observer system to provide continuous meas-

Observer TS is making its European debut at IBC

urements identifying programme loudness and true-peak signal levels. Making its European debut, the Observer TS logging system is developed to give broadcasters, networks and cable operators the ability to handle MPEG-2 and MPEG-4 transport streams natively over the WAN with a low-res proxy, retaining the content and associated meta-

data within the stream. According to Volicon, this new interface complements the existing Observer Enterp r is e a n a log u e , S D - S D I a n d HD-SDI systems. Finally, Observer Mobile is a Webbased interface that supports H.264 on Apple iOS devices using the Safari Web browser with native support for iPad and iPhone devices. 7.J16

Personal TV dreams come true at IBC

strated at the show. Orca and its parent company, Viaccess, are featuring interactive stands that emphasise live user profile-specific content discovery and recommendations through the new apps suite. Harnessing Orca’s RiGHTv and COMPASS, as well as Viaccess’ Flexible Rights Management, these apps create a highly personalised user experience for consumer profiles, says Orca. 2.B40

Orca Interactive By Heather McLean

The new Orca iPad app

Orca Interactive, provider of IPTV middleware and content discovery solutions, is showcasing a personalised TV experience through its new TV Everywhere offering. This fully fledged, ready-to-

deploy solution comprises a number of key building blocks which combine to secure and personalise the TV Everywhere experience. The solution is being demonstrated on the company’s stand through a new suite of companion device applications. The applications are a part of a range of offerings being demon-

RAI Amsterdam Conference 8-13 September : Exhibition 9-13 September

IBC2011 Mobile App As the leading event in electronic media, IBC presents more than 1,300 exhibitors and a conference programme packed over 6 days. The IBC2011 Mobile App contains everything you need to maximise your time at the show. Download the app and start planning your schedule today. UĂ&#x160;  Ă&#x201C;䣣Ă&#x160; Ă?Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;LÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;VÂ?Ă&#x2022;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;ÂŤ>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;`iĂ&#x152;>Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Â?Â&#x153;V>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;>VĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x201C;>ÂŤ UĂ&#x160; iÂ&#x201C;>Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;iĂ?Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;LÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;`Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;iVĂ&#x152;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iÂľĂ&#x2022;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;iiĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;iÂ&#x2DC;ÂľĂ&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E; UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;>VĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x201C;>ÂŤĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;iiÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;>Â?Â?Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;}Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;, UĂ&#x160; wÂ&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;>LÂ&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x20AC;`Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;<Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;  Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;}Ă&#x160;-VĂ&#x20AC;iiÂ&#x2DC; UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x2022;VĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;6Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?>}i]Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;`iĂ&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â?i`}i]Ă&#x160;  Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;iVĂ&#x152;i`Ă&#x160;7Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â?`Ă&#x160; iÂ&#x201C;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;i>Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; Ă?Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;LÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iwÂ&#x2DC;}Ă&#x192;

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Download the IBC2011 Mobile App for FREE today at: www.ibc.org/mobileapp

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www.ibc.org  Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;vĂ&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â?Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;>Â?Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;iĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; {Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D; Ă&#x160;1Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; TĂ&#x160;Âł{{Ă&#x160;­äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;nĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;{£ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160; FĂ&#x160;Âł{{Ă&#x160;­äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;nĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;{ÂŁĂ&#x17D;äĂ&#x160; E info@ibc.org


34 theibcdaily

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No-compromise integrated playout

Gallium is Pixel Power’s automation and management system for ChannelMaster

Pixel Power By Carolyn Giardina The ChannelMaster playout system from Pixel Power has been designed to combine the functions of video server, graphics engine, branding,

audio voiceover, open subtitling and master control switcher. The system is integrated into a single 3RU chassis for single- or dual-channel playout depending on configuration. ChannelMaster can be controlled by Pixel Power’s automation and

ScheduleSmart automates Softel By Ian McMurray Softel is showcasing subtitling and captioning solutions optimised for those pursuing next-generation workflows, transitioning to tapeless operation, upgrading multi-platform delivery, rolling out multi-language feeds, or focusing on 3D.

The company says that its range of solutions offers full support for all major formats in multi-language, multi-platform operation across any number of channels. On show at IBC is Softel’s Automated Subtitling and Captioning Control Centre, ScheduleSmart. Described as a sophisticated workflow technology that uses proprietary heuristics and algorithms to

management system, Gallium, and is also capable of integration with existing automation and asset management systems by way of an open XML protocol. James Gilbert, joint MD of Pixel Power said: “Other integrated playout systems compromise in many areas and are usually locked to a specific automation system; our goal with ChannelMaster is to deliver uncompromised video quality, bestof-breed graphics and support for live events with an optimum mix of software and hardware whilst being automation system agnostic through an open XML protocol. “As channel identity and branding becomes increasingly important in a crowded EPG, the graphics workflow and feature set is evermore crucial for channels that want to stay ahead of the competition,” Gilbert explained. 7.A31 determine the optimum point in the workflow at which to bind subtitles, captions and ancillary data to content, ScheduleSmart is said to introduce unparalleled flexibility in subtitling workflows by automatically assessing whether there is time to ingest data to media servers or a digital asset management (DAM) system. If the system determines that early or late binding is not possible, live systems are automatically directed to perform the bind at time of air. 1.A27

Augmenting reality with camera control

Virtually ready: Egripment’s new full camera studio automation system

Egripment By David Fox Egripment’s main focus at IBC is on virtual reality, using full camera studio automation and its lightweight

ProTraveller crane. A fully encoded package for virtual studios or augmented reality production is now available for several Egripment cranes, including the TDT System and the 305/306 remote heads. There are also optional encoders for use on track dollies. To date, the encoding package has been certified for rendering engines from Vizrt, Neuro TV, Orad, Brainstorm and Ventuz; other vendors could also be implemented. The package is claimed to deliver “high quality, precise and reliable crane operation in a much more affordable price range than other systems currently available in this market”. Egripment now offers a fully

integrated camera studio automation system, capable of meeting the reliability requirements of channels that broadcast 24/7, with a highly redundant system architecture requiring minimal maintenance. All of the systems can be controlled from a joystick or a touch screen as well through a complex automation system. All of the cameras deliver absolute tracking data for VR studio use. ProTraveller, meanwhile, is a 37.4kg jib/crane system for compact cameras, such as DSLRs or Canon XF305 type camcorders, supporting a maximum weight of 10kg. It is claimed to offer a very smooth, highquality crane movement. 11.A21

Regis Le Roux CEO, Enensys Technologies

Q&A

Has IBC come at a good time for the electronic media industry? Why? IBC comes really just at the right moment where manufacturers can showcase their latest technologies and electronic media companies can pick up the latest information to prepare next year’s budget in accordance. From the beginning, Enensys participates to IBC as exhibitor to introduce its cuttingedge broadcast grade products and its test and monitoring tools.

What do you think are the key developments in, or threats to, your market sector at the current time? Definitely, DVB-T2 has taken off since the first launch in the UK at the end of 2009. Enensys has invested in the technology since 1997 and provided the world’s first DVB-T2 modulator to Arqiva in early 1998. After the successful launch in the UK, Sweden, Finland and Italy, Enensys keeps on helping operators to migrate, or start DVB-T2 services by delivering DVB-T2 gateways and modulators.

Why should delegates visit your stand at IBC? At this year’s IBC, Enensys is demonstrating its comprehensive DVB-T2 solution, which supports regional TV service broadcasting over SFN, using the innovative T2Edge product. We have unveiled IPGuard, the world’s first automatic IP switch for redundancy between two MPEG-2 TS/IP streams. We are showcasing the market leader RF-T2 analyser, Referee-T2, and the T2-MI stream analyser and player, DiviDual T2-MI.

3.B20a

The TXS 3453 delivers high performance transcoding and transrating

Effective distribution for multiple SD/HD services Sencore By Ian McMurray Signal transmission technology developer Sencore is highlighting solutions that enable the efficient distribution of multiple SD and HD video services, as well as approaches to system monitoring and signal analysis – all designed for seamless interoperability and ease of integration. The company is offering a variety of product demonstrations at its

stand, including what it describes as the latest technological advances in transcoding, transrating, content delivery networks and video-ondemand services, along with the use of bandwidth-saving DVB-S2 and H.264 standards in news gathering and distribution. Among the products on show is the TXS 3453 transcoder, which Sencore says delivers multiple channels of high-performance, reliable transcoding and transrating in a high-density 1RU chassis. With configurable transcoding engines and versatile multichannel input/output architecture, the TXS 3453 can perform MPEG2 to H.264 and H.264 to MPEG2 SD and HD transcoding, as well as transrating of MPEG2 or H.264 streams, at what is claimed to be an unbeatable cost per channel. Key features include a compression engine supporting H.264 and MPEG2 codecs with user-selectable advanced video pref ilters and encoding settings, and MPEGoIP and ASI input and output support. The TXS 3453 offers up to 16 channels of transcoding or transrating along with dual power supplies in a 1RU platform. 1.C36


IBC2011@RAI, Amsterdam Stand# 2.A51 (HALL 2)

www.for-a.com G Head Office (Japan) G USA Western (CA) G USA Eastern & Midwest (NJ) G USA Southern (FL) G Latin America & Caribbean (FL) G Canada (Toronto) G UK (London) G Italy (Milan) G Korea (Seoul) G China (Beijing)

Tel: +81 (0)3-3446-3936 Tel: +1 714-894-3311 Tel: +1 201-944-1120 Tel: +1 305-931-1700 Tel: +1 305-931-1700 Tel: +1 416-977-0343 Tel: +44 (0)20-8391-7979 Tel: +39 02-254-3635/6 Tel: +82 (0)2-2637-0761 Tel: +86 (0)10-5170-9870


36 theibcdaily

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Avita engine drives fast control for live production Hi Tech Systems By Melanie Dayasena-Lowe Hi Tech Systems is demonstrating the Avita live production control

system. Avita is a ‘unique’ hybrid control system designed to easily and quickly capture, edit and play out media from multiple sources. The newly launched system uses the latest touch-screen technology

and modular hardware panels to allow multiple users access to multiple server ports over a network. The core of the system is the Avita engine, providing video clip management tools with shared databases,

multiple playlists and enhanced search facilities. Avita may be supplied as a software-only system, can be fully driven by a touch-screen, and features gesture control of the various system applications. Alter-

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UÊ Ê*Àœ`ÕV̈œ˜Ê6ˆ>}i – presenting the latest camera technology in a purpose built environment, plus the home of IBC TV News onsite in Hall 11

UÊ Ê œ˜˜iVÌi`Ê7œÀ` – including free exhibition business briefings and demonstration area in Hall 13

UÊ Ê iÀ̈wi`Ê/À>ˆ˜ˆ˜}Ê *Àœ}À>““iÊÊ – offering hands on training in Apple, Avid and Adobe

UÊ Ê ˆ}Ê-VÀii˜ – providing the perfect platform for manufacturer demonstrations and the Saturday Night Movie, Transformers 3: Dark of the Moon*

UÊ ÊÜ>À`ÃÊ iÀi“œ˜ÞÊÊ – recognises those who have made a real contribution to the industry on Sunday 11 September at 18:15

* in stereoscopic Dolby 3D and Dolby 7.1 ‘Courtesy of Paramount Pictures International’

Scan for more information

ÜÜÜ°ˆLV°œÀ} IBC Fifth Floor International Press Centre 76 Shoe Lane London EC4A 3JB UK / +44 (0) 20 7832 4100 Ê +44 (0) 20 7832 4130 ÊÊ Êˆ˜vœJˆLV°œÀ}

Avita is a hybrid control system for capture, editing and playout of media from multiple sources

natively, Avita can be supplied as a system of hardware consoles and mix-and-match control modules, enabling a panel to be constructed to suit the operational requirements of a particular workflow. The system is expandable and has software extensions such as a MOS interface, multiple server port control from one panel, scheduled play and record, a remote tablet PC interface for studio floor recall of recordings, logging and highlights applications, tape archive ingest, and automated playout. Tom Favell, Hi Tech’s managing director, said: “Avita takes Hi Tech’s control expertise right to the heart of production workflow, providing financial and operational benefits to our customers. Clips can be created and recorded instantly just by pressing the record button, thereby saving vital seconds from the incoming source; an efficient alternative to traditional controllers.” 10.A49

Industrial labelling solutions Dymo By Heather McLean Dymo, the manufacturer of handheld labelling machines, is showcasing its Rhino industrial range. Rhino labelling tools offer labelling solutions for applications in datacom, IT, pro-AV and other industrial environments. The PC-connectible Rhino 6000 is billed as the ultimate tool for industrial labelling and is said to provide a multitude of advanced features to make the user’s job easier. Powered by optional rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, the handheld Rhino 6000 lets users prepare and print labels on site or at a desk. Features such as intuitive Hot Keys are intended to make high-end, demanding installation jobs easier. Using thermal transfer printing technology, Dymo-printed labels are said to withstand moisture, heat, solvents, oil, dirt, chemicals and UV rays without smearing, fading or peeling. 3.C31


theibcdaily 37

13.09.2011

The future of targeted advertising As operators roll out multiscreen services they must look beyond traditional ad insertion capabilities, argues Ramin Farassat, VP, product marketing & business development, RGB Networks

Opinion

Ramin Farassat: operators can monetise content

Catch-up TV and video-on-demand are fast becoming required complements to the traditional TV experience, with consumers increasingly expecting nothing less than the ability to access content on any device, over any network, at any time. As a result, operators need to bear the cost of delivering the high-quality services consumers want, without eating into their profit. However, many operators in Europe don’t have the infrastructures or the

balance sheets to cope with this explosion in demand, and are struggling with the challenge of how to monetise content in the connected home in ways that expand and complement what they are doing today. As ever, the challenge is how to deliver these services while at the same time avoiding the well-documented costs associated with offering ondemand services to a mass audience and a growing number of device types. Fundamentally, operators need advanced ad insertion capabilities to stay ahead, as they must deploy seamless personalised services to meet the needs of customers, while delivering highly targeted advertisements to generate revenues from advertisers across all video screens. For many years, US cable operators have augmented their revenues with local and zoned ad insertion, enabling them to offer subscribers additional services, such as VOD, freeof-charge or at a reduced rate. And of late, targeting has become more granular, allowing for addressability down to the individual home. In contrast, targeted advertising has always been more of an idea than a reality in Europe — however, this looks set to change. Over the next two years, targeted advertising will become a focal point for the European video service industry, as providers fight to offer consumers the most cost-competitive option. European operators also have the added chal-

lenge of their customers’ reluctance to pay extra for any on-demand content or TV Everywhere. This means they urgently need to find new revenue streams if they’re going to cover the cost of upgrading their networks to support large scale deployments of both on-demand and linear content delivered to TVs, PCs, tablets and other mobile devices. This will undoubtedly be a key driver in the shift towards deployment of full ad insertion ecosystems for multiscreen IP environments. For operators the answer lies with adaptive streaming, which allows for the segmentation of content into small chunks of different sizes for flexible delivery. This means operators have all the advantages associated with internet advertising, but over video delivery network infrastructure. This essentially gives operators simpler, cheaper and more scalable ad insertion than offered by traditional methods, while allowing targeting at granular levels down to individual devices and subscribers. Using adaptive streaming ad insertion, operators can therefore take charge of and monetise content in a way they were unable to before. As operators in Europe accelerate the rollout of TV Everywhere multiscreen services, the investment in new IP infrastructure means they must look beyond the traditional ad insertion capabilities, towards this new ‘hyper-targeting’ adaptive streaming method, in order to monetise content and off-set costs. 4.C78

Live: now anyway, anyhow, anywhere Broadcast Networks By David Davies Visitors to IBC have the chance to take a guided tour of systems integration specialist Broadcast Networks’ new ‘go anywhere’ live production vehicle: a custom-built Land Rover Discovery with Sony Media Backbone HDXchange server.

The latest collaboration between Broadcast Networks and Sony is designed to help meet the demand for small, durable live production vehicles that can be depl oye d quickly with minimal crew – in this case, one or two people. Sony Media Backbone HDXchange offers a collaborative network-editing environment where material can be ingested, stored

and edited ‘on the fly’. Once the event has been recorded, the data can be taken to the broadcaster’s facility and transferred onto the main post production server for final editing and transmission. B r o a d c a s t N e t wo r k s ’ ‘ l ive ingest’ solution features Media Backbone HDXchange contained within a Land Rover Discovery 4. The rear interior has been stripped

S&T Player with back-office integration is an MHEG application for VoD services

Technology solutions for digital interactive TV Strategy & Technology By Ian McMurray S&T (Strategy & Technology) – which specialises in the provision of digital interactive TV solutions using public standards – is demonstrating a digital TV receiver client software product at IBC2011. RedKey3 enables the integration of the NetFront Browser from ACCESS with HbbTV signalling and S&T’s DSM-CC client. The company is also showcasing the S&T Player, an MHEG application for Video on Demand services for both MHEG-IC and CI+ Connected TV platforms, with flexible back-off ice integration using S&T’s Mediator. Also on show is RedKey2. This MHEG-5 middleware engine offers a modular architecture and supand fitted with a sliding custom-built rack (for ease of use and servicing) and features a 5 K VA 2 4 0 V generator. Th e n ew Broadcast Networks live production vehicle i s o n sh ow a t the Sony stand. 12.A10

ports all of the current international profiles of the MHEG interactive TV standard, as well as the CI+ browser. It is joined by TSBroadcaster 2, the second generation of S&T’s DSM-CC Object Carousel p r o d u c t f o r DV B ( M H E G - 5 , HbbTV and MHP), OCAP/tru2way and ETV platforms. The demonstration line-up is completed by: TSMonitor for automatic monitoring of MHEG and ETV interactive applications using scripted test-cases on virtual r e c e ive r s r u n n i n g o n a r a c k m o u n t e d s e r ve r ; M H E G E P G , which is described as a complete MHEG-5 platform EPG including PVR integration for both Pay TV and Freeview operators; and MHEG Presenter, a general-purpose publishing application for MHEG-5 platforms. 1.C31

IBC visitors have the opportunity to see Broadcast Networks’ new ‘go anywhere’ live production vehicle


38 theibcdaily

13.09.2011

Intercom anywhere with Gemini

of a failure. Gemini’s IP credentials are further enhanced with its bandwidth management capabilities,

allowing accommodation of variable network conditions. Gemini matrices are scalable and can be linked to form a network of 256x256 ports, offering uncompressed programme quality audio communications. The Gemini intercom system is fully non-blocking, allowing any combination of sources including programme audio to be mixed and routed to any destination. Also launched at this IBC is Watchdog, a highly conf igurable Changeover Unit that extends the capability of its Mentor XL Master Reference Generator. Mentor XL boasts a specif ication including: multi-format operation within any analogue, SD or HD environment; 3G/1080p Test Patterns; SNMP; remote browser based configuration and recall of all timing and test signal parameters; LTC/VITC; NTP functionality, and integration of GPS synchronisation. 10.A29

tive content and services to the video. By adding an augmented layer on top, or at the side, of the video layer, Aspiro TV will allow third parties to add any feature to the live TV or video broadcast by reusing their existing web services. Ty p i c a l e l em e n t s wo u l d b e adding sound or graphics to the video according to the nature of the displayed video content, allowing, for instance, sports scores on TV

during a match, contextual betting, promotions, realtime voting or recommended items. User authentication and billing will be automatic, allowing users to interact in realtime without leaving the video view or making additional logins. The use of HTML also enables immediate portability across a number of platforms, including smartphones, tablets, web browsers, open set-top boxes and connected TVs. 13.223

Trilogy Communications By Melanie Dayasena-Lowe Digital intercom and Master Reference Generator specialist Trilogy Communications has launched its innovative ‘Intercom Anywhere’ concept for Gemini. The move extends its IP capability to a range of Gemini compatible panels, as well as developing fully featured intercom access from wireless devices including laptops, tablets and smartphones. Each Gemini matrix is able to directly support up to 32 traditional and IP connected intercom panels, in addition to other IP equipment such as SIP-enabled phones and radios. Gemini is set upon a dualredundant ring of audio traff ic

The Gemini intercom system is fully nonblocking, allowing any combination of sources including programme audio to be mixed and routed to any destination

flowing over industry standard Cat5 or fibre infrastructure, offering absolute resilience in the event

Video gets interactive layer It’s TV, Jim, but not as we know it

Aspiro TV By Anne Morris Aspiro TV is introducing a technology to its TV and video streaming service platform that allows its customers to augment the video by adding contextual web-based interac-

NovelSat is presenting its latest developments in satellite comms

Bandwidth expansion NovelSat By Heather McLean NovelSat is showcasing its NS3 third generation satellite communication technology. NS3 is designed to u p g r a d e th e DV B - S 2 . N S 3 increases satellite bandwidth by 20% to 55% over current DVB-S2 and DVB-S standards respectively, for 36MHz transponders, and up to 78% for 72MHz transponders. Using its NS3 technology, NovelSat is expanding the capacity of the satellite broadband spectrum, a utility used by the massive installed base infrastructure of satellites. With its third generation NS3 technology, NovelSat says that it meets the critical need across multiple market segments for expanded broadband capacity for wireless transmissions. 3.A38


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Gold Mount power comes to Alexa, F3 and AF101 Anton/Bauer By David Fox Anton/Bauer is demonstrating the capabilities of its advanced Gold Mount System with new power packs for the Ar ri Alexa, Sony PMW- F 3 , Panasonic AGAF100/AF101 and DSLRs. New Gold Mount options will include: the QR-HotSwap-AR for Arri’s Alexa digital camera system; t h e Q R - L ocaster for the Ar ri Locaster light; the QRC-Dual-PT

Gold standard: Anton/Bauer’s Gold Mount is claimed to be the industry’s most widely used battery mount

for the Sony PMW-F3 camera; the QR-C80P for the Panasonic AGHMC80 professional AVCCAM HD shoulder-mount camcorder; and the Q R C - V B G for the Panasonic AF100/AF101 series HD. Also new is the QR-DSLR for Canon’s EOS 5D Mark II, 7D and 60D digital SLR cameras, which will run monitors, lights, transmit-

ters and other accessories not possible with a standard OEM battery. It uses the Logic Series batteries and can mount to most third-party support rigs, such as Redrock Micro, Zacuto, Genus and Cinevate. It can also be configured in a pouch pack for handheld production. “The key to our success and foundation of all of our technology begins with the Gold Mount System,” said Shin Minowa, VP of marketing and business development. “At IBC, we are showcasing many new and existing Gold Mount solutions – the most secure mounting system available for professionals. The last thing Anton/Bauer Gold Mount users will have to worry about is a power failure because of a bad battery connection when shooting on location.” The Gold Mount is forwardcompatible to allow for new cell chemistries as they develop, allowing today’s battery to perform seamlessly on a charger purchased 10 years ago with only a si m p l e firmware upgrade. Central to the Gold Mount’s performance are three solid mechanical connections that lock into place, providing secure contact, with self-cleaning goldplated pins rated for high current. It includes an InterActive Viewfinder Fuel Gauge communicating directly with the camera’s viewfinder. 11.D61

Convergence highlighted

Delivering 3D to the home Stereoscopic 3D television has rightly been a hot topic throughout IBC this year. But, as with any broadcast format, the job is not done until it is delivered into the home. Can our cable infrastructures be adapted for the task? Each year the Benelux chapter of the SCTE holds an open technical symposium at IBC, and invites all visitors to join in the debate. This year the focus is on the transport issues which stereoscopic cont e n t r a i s e f o r C AT V a n d f i b r e networks. From Hollywood and from specialist television producers the content is there, so cable engineers have to solve the issues and deliver the quality of experience which subscribers demand. Today’s solutions involve compressing the two streams of stereo-

Mistika flies with monsters

By Carolyn Giardina

Flying Monsters 3D with David Attenborough (photo courtesy of Atlantic Productions)

SGO is showcasing its flagship Mistika DI system and product family, including Mistika Live and Mistika On-Set, at IBC2011. The Mistika toolset supports resolutions including 4K and 5K, stereo 3D images, as well as realtime native Red, ARRI, SI-2K and other data workflows, according to SGO. It is also designed to integrate timeline-based editing, conforming, compositing, colour-grading and image restoration tools. A key Mistika feature is Equaleyes, a recently launched automated stereoscopic image-matching

MAM centralised control Dalet By Michael Burns Dalet Digital Media Systems is showcasing Dalet Enterprise Edition, its Media Asset Management (MAM) platform, and other technology solutions. Dalet Enterprise Edition offers end-to-end media management, a workflow engine and multiple integration paths to unify disparate systems. The open platform solution can

be integrated with a wide range of non-linear editors, including Avid, Apple Final Cut Pro and Adobe Premiere Pro. Graphics, arc h ive , automation and other systems can also be integrated using a variety of methods, including with SOA compliant tools like Web Services APIs. The company claims that, together with Dalet Brio server technology, Dalet Enterprise Edition provides flexible management of content across multiple production, distribution and business systems.

In brief

The format of the symposium encourages a lively debate

SGO

Users can access tools to ingest, edit, script, schedule, playout and distribute their audio, video and multimedia from their desktops – all from the same interf ace, said Stephane Schlayen, chief operating officer, Dalet. The MAM layer with cross-system metadata management, customised reports and workflow engine delivers genuine business benefits. Productivity is improved, information is consolidated, assets gain value, and distribution to new media platforms is easier. On the showfloor, IBC visitors are able to see complete demonstrations of Dalet MAM-driven workflows and productivity tools. 8.B77

scopic 3D into a single HD channel. If 3D becomes as popular as some predict, inevitably there will be calls for full HD resolution for each eye, and maybe even 1080p. Can cable infrastructures support this? The morning is chaired by Henk de Goede, consultant with GMS BV. It includes presentations from a number of global vendors, including ADB, BigBand Networks, Cisco Systems and Entropic. The format of the symposium encourages a lively debate, so expect the technical solutions proposed to be challenged and probed. The SCTE offers a warm welcome to all IBC visitors to attend this symposium as part of the Added Value stream session 3D and Cable: technical challenges and business opportunities. This starts at 10:00 in the Emerald Room. tool. Equaleyes provides an automatic assessment of the geometric errors between left and right images, using proprietary image recognition technology. This assessment then generates settings to cor rect not just positional, rotational and scale differences, but also keystoning challenges. Mistika also features a two-step colour-matching algorithm. The first is designed to colour-match the majority of stereo 3D shots by creating an overall colour grade to match one eye to the other. SGO explained that the second step, where needed, is developed to execute a pixel-by-pixel match in order to repair stereo oddities such as polarised light that creates spot-differences in textures between images. 6.A11

GlobeCast and Netia – which are coexhibiting at IBC – are highlighting solutions geared towards the convergence between the broadcasting and telecommunications sectors. In particular, their stand highlights the ability of broadcasters to ingest content locally, manage their media, and play out content in several regions of the world. The main tool for this is Netia’s new and improved Content Management System, which allows customers to streamline all of their production processes through easy-to-manage workflows and task automation. Users can now manage all of the processes within the production environment from editing through post production and distribution with one unique interface. 1.A29

Vimond Media Solutions Vimond Media Solutions is showing new enhancements and additions to the Vimond OTT platform, including Connected TV, a new solution for live and video-on-demand streaming to template-driven portals on connected TVs and Blu-ray players. Also new is 3D adaptive streaming, which provides a solution for live and VoD streaming in 3D to web and connected TV. New integration with Google Widevine is also being highlighted. This development enables multiplatform DRM and adaptive streaming on multiple devices, including connected TVs. 2.A31

New HDMI converters Lynx Technik is debuting two new yellobrik HDMI to SDI converters: the CHD 1812 and CHD 1802. The new units convert HDMI video into broadcast quality SDI video, supporting SD, HD and 3G-SDI as well as 3D video formats. The CHD 1812 includes an integrated frame synchroniser and is a fullyfeatured HDMI-to-SDI converter with two electrical SDI outputs as well as an optional fibre optic output. Audio in the HDMI signal is embedded into the SDI output and the two external analogue audio inputs can be embedded into any AES channel. The CHD 1802 is the lower-cost version, with reduced functionality, suited to HDMI-to-SDI conversion applications that don’t require a frame synchroniser or analogue audio inputs. 8.E24

Dimetis/Media Links

Production and editing tools such as MediaCutter are fully integrated in Dalet Enterprise Edition

Media Links and Dimetis recently issued details of a strategic alliance between the two companies. The relationship, they say, facilitates the use of their complementary strengths and expertise to offer unified video and data delivery solutions to the broadcast and network service provider markets. While Media Links operates in the field of advanced transport of video, audio and data over multi-service networks, Dimetis offers solutions including flagship product BOSS LINK Manager, enabling the unification of network management across broadcast and telecom equipment. 4.B77/1.B11


40 theibcdaily

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Pushing 3G Triax HD connectivity Draka Communications + Fischer Connectors By David Fox Working together, Draka and Fischer Connectors promise to push

the limits of 3G Triax HD connectivity even further at IBC, with a claimed 50% improvement since last year.

Draka Communications, which i s n ow a p a r t o f t h e P r y smi a n Group, is building on its relationship with Swiss manufacturer Fischer Connectors for Triax cable connectivity solutions that can

extend the lifecycle of Triax interconnected HDTV equipment. The companies will demonstrate that Triax continues to prove its versatility by breaking new records for 3G transmission lengths. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Especially for major sports outside broadcasts, we see Triax reaffirming its position as a trusted and reliable solution,â&#x20AC;? said Oli Hentschel,

Extending triax: Drakaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Marc-Oliver Hentschel

RAI, Amsterdam Conference: 8 - 13 September : Exhibition: 9 - 13 September

Supporters  

              

Drakaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s product manager and studio broadcast specialist. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With a much closer eye on capital expenditure than before, broadcasters can get the best of both worlds with Triax by maximising their investments while delivering full HD and 3Gbps capabilities.â&#x20AC;? Longer cable transmission distances â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as determined by the synergy between cable and connectors constitute an important parameter for broadcasters, especially for sports events in large-scale venues. 11.C31 (Draka)/11.E21 (Fischer)

Just the Job for increase in workflow NOA Audio Solutions By Paul Watson

TM

NOA Audio Solutions is showcasing advances in all three of its product lines: Job Database, mediARC and IngestLine. NOA Job Database V3.0 is now available on the Windows 7 platform. It supports MSSQL 2008 and introduces new redirection parameters to enable cross-hierarchy workflows. A large number of workflows can now be imported and exported directly from NOAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s online Wiki and leads to full flexibility when applying new workflows. NOA mediARC 1.6 provides a number of upgrades. The audio and media archive management system now includes fuzzy search algorithms, advanced sorting options, file attachment management over the internet, sharing of search definitions, a complete API to the metadata content, and enhanced active directory user replication for large institutions. NOA IngestLine has undergone a number of improvements including new expert profiles, better segmentation possibilities for pre-imported track-based media and products for video management. Due to its tight interface to Job Database and mediARC, the system now benefits from a number of updates, designed specifically to eliminate the need for manual response in the case of error notifications. 8.D91


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Linear broadcasting Shipshape challenge is not the only way

In brief

SIS Live/Gigawave

By David Fox

Conference Analysis Chris Forrester Traditional broadcasters may not like it but there are plenty of heavyweight players looking to tempt viewers away from regular network TV. Typical is Spencer Stephens, SVP Sony Pictures Entertainment, who told IBC delegates that services like his own ‘Crackle’ OTT are increasingly important in the marketplace. “We have a lot of content, and UltraViolet is one of our initiatives that permits the sharing of content amongst devices in and around the home. Crackle has movies, TV shows and short-form content on it. We started out with a site, and then partnered with Sony Electronics to place it on their Bravia sets and Blu-ray players and it has since gone to Google TV. We are now migrating it to iPads and similar tablets. It might well disturb broadcasters but we feel there’s room for it.” Another high-profile supplier is Simon Morris, CMO at UK’s LoveFilm, which claims 1.5 million members. Now controlled by Amazon, it is present in the UK, Germany and the Nordic region, and streams a bundled hybrid offer of content including some 4,700 movies to subscribers on

Q&A

Spencer Stevens: Sees OTT as having a major impact

console devices like PS3s as well as internet-connected TVs. Morris says it is vital to focus on the consumer. “The game-changer for us was the introduction of the UK’s iPlayer. This put a massive adrenalin shot into the concept and lifted consumer responses, and people got into the habit of consuming content without buying packaged media and no longer accepting that linear network broadcasting is the only way.” Stephens said Sony is increasingly licensing its content to these new players. “There are many of them out there, and I see [OTT] as being disruptive to the old broadcasting model. It may be a 10-year cycle that we are at the beginning of, but I see it as having a major impact.” increasingly being delivered to the broadcaster electronically rather than as a physical asset.

What do you think are the key developments in, or threats to, your market sector at the current time?

Donald Sievewright, EMEA Sales Manager – Video Products Group, Matrox Has IBC come at a good time for the electronic media industry? Why? Yes, because technology continues to drive significant change in the media industry. It is now common to see web and computer sourced material on our TVs as part of mainstream programming, for example Skype and Google Earth in news. Also, traditional fieldfootage (often news or sport) is

Lower-cost, broadcast quality scanconversion is enabling web-based content and video to be delivered in SDI format in a cost-effective way, thus allowing more creativity for broadcasters and more engaging content for viewers. Low-cost, high-quality/speed mobile H.264 encoding is revolutionising news gathering and delivering content faster and with more detail than ever before – again, offering a more compelling viewer experience.

Why should delegates visit your stand at IBC? Matrox is demonstrating our award-winning ConvertDVI family of DVI to broadcast-quality video scan-converters which allow costeffective delivery of web-based material (Skype, Google Earth, YouTube or web-pages) as broadcast-quality video. Also demonstrated is the Matrox MAX portable H.264 encoding solutions that have driven many changes in field-based newsgathering by allowing efficient delivery of assets to facilities via regular DSL FTP processes.

7.B29

The America’s Cup is one of the most complex events to cover for broadcast, with multiple cameras on board the yachts, which are racing offshore, making it a challenge to provide live links and remote control. SIS Live has a three-year contract to provide broadcast services and technology for the Cup, and has designed all the agile, remote-controlled camera systems built into the racing yachts (four per catamaran, plus cameras on chase boats), as well as a waterproof surround-sound microphone.This content has to be brought back to the fly-away control room on shore using H.264, from distances of about 7-8km, for which it brought in Gigawave. When the Cup was covered in SD it used a helicopter for the links, which limited transmission in heavy

Water and distance were just two problems David Meynell had to overcome for the America’s Cup

weather, which can provide the most exciting racing, so links had to be direct. The system designed for the event used transmitters and receivers with ultra-low delay encoding, employing two video channels (one for preview, the other for the on-air signal), plus remote camera control. “I don’t think anyone has ever provided this amount of cameras and RF scale for an event on the water,” said David Meynell, SIS Live’s MD. 1.C55, OE205/OE115

Camcorder can convert

The missing optical link: Longhurst demonstrates Lemo’s HD Z-Link

Lemo By David Fox Lemo’s new HD Z-Link is a compact digital optic link that turns any camcorder into a broadcast system camera. “It has dual 1.5Gbps HDSDI channels, which allow us to run 3D or connect two cameras,” explained Phil Longhurst, Lemo’s fibre optic R&D manager.

Z-Link can carry 3Gbps for 1080p, genlock cameras to each other, and has two return video channels, plus six stereo audio channels for surround sound, as well as HDMI and Ethernet ports. It also allows the use of an RCP in an OB truck to control the camera via the serial data port. There is a lockable, highly configurable control panel on the side. “It is very userfriendly to configure,” Longhurst said. There is a slimline power pack that can take power from an OB van for the Z-Link, camera, prompter and other systems. It can also be battery-powered. Lemo hopes to deliver Z-Link in December, but “there has been tremendous interest at the show,” and demo prototypes are going out to several broadcasters, such as BBC Scotland. The full system will cost €11,500, but there will also be a basic system (with 1080p, HD down converter, 3D, dual-link HD-SDI, and several control features) for €7,500. 11.C41

AimTrack automatic head Mark Roberts By David Fox The new AimTrack tracking system from Mark Roberts Motion Control is designed for location and studio presenter tracking. It includes a high-speed precision pan tilt head, with an advanced image processing system and a touch-screen interface, in a portable unit. It allows users to easily select on screen which person, or face, or object to follow, and the pan/tilt head (an SFH-50 head is being shown at IBC) will automatically track and ensure that it remains centred on it.

A reporter or presenter could conduct interviews while moving around without the need for a camera operator. The system could be told to track a hand-held microphone and as it is passed from person to person it will remain in frame, or it could be used to track a horse as it moves around a stable, or be used in dangerous environments by war correspondents to make reports without needing to risk additional lives. Besides tracking the object, the exact position of the head and object is output in realtime via serial or UDP/Ethernet connections for integrating with virtual studio applications, or for the on-set addition of foreground or background graphics. 11.G35

Sony scores Qatar deal At IBC, Qatar TV announced that Sony Professional Solutions MEA has been awarded a deal, worth approximately US $13 million, to supply and integrate three full HD studios in their premises in Qatar. The studios will be designed to be 3G ready with Sony’s high end HDC-1500 fibre cameras, MVS-7000 switchers and OLED technology monitors. Samer Younes, consultant engineering, TV support and development committee, said they had selected Sony based on the company’s wide range of quality products and expertise in integrating similar projects. The project is expected to be completed in November 2011. Hall 12

New presentation tools A full range of AccuWeather’s broadcast products is displayed on Brainstorm’s stand, where the company has set up a large pod. The new AccuWeather Video Blogger is a social media tool for broadcasters. It authors content for all social media platforms – web, mobile, Facebook, Twitter, and more.The portable Video Blogger can be used from any location with Wi-Fi. Through proprietary software and an integrated web cam, talent can record, annotate, and discuss daily events or breaking stories, and engage audiences in commentary and conversation. It also imports HD and SD video, images, Skype and other AV content. The application’s graphics tools make it easy to include a station’s branding, says the developer. 2.B59

10-4 good buddy Described as the first software suite that supports the company’s Distributed Video Delivery Network (D-VDN) strategy for network operators, Edgeware has announced Convoy VDN. Edgeware’s D-VDN is a unified framework for video delivery, providing what the company says is a simple and highly scalable platform to deliver next generation video services with the highest Quality of Experience (QoE) to any screen, independent of the underlying network infrastructure. D-VDN connects the cloud and the subscriber, allowing operators to monetise this connection. As part of the company’s D-VDN, Edgeware says that the new Convoy VDN makes it simple for operators to implement advanced video services to subscribers, ensuring the highest possible QoE, while providing integrated wholesale CDN video delivery and management capabilities. This is possible by offering QoE as a differentiated service back to the content provider to create new revenue generating opportunities. It is, according to Edgeware, the ideal solution for operators to tap into new revenue streams that were once reserved for CDN providers. As a result, operators can reduce opex by up to 80%, achieving significantly faster ROI. Convoy VDN integrates core functions, such as request routing, content gateway and reporting, with highly distributed Edgeware video server based asset propagation, statistics management and pre-processing. 4.B71


42 theibcdaily

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Hidden costs to the consumer of radio over IP are a ‘real worry’

Bertram Hock: BMW’s new system integrates DAB+, FM and IPbased services

Internet radio ‘prohibitively expensive’ Conference Analysis By Ann-Marie Corvin Internet radio may be a sexy proposition for the high-end car manufacturer but technologists have warned that cost is still a huge barrier to take-up. Speaking at the session Digital Radio – the Technologies, the Consumers and the Future, Quentin Howard, CTO of UK forces service provider BFBS, pointed out that for both consumers and broadcasters IP-based radio was “prohibitively expensive” and that “no one seems to want to sort the problem out”.

Howard added that since the number of delivery platforms and services has increased, transmission costs have risen three-fold and that hidden costs to the consumer of radio over IP were “a real worry” especially via mobile. “You can consume 500MB in about 20 hours of radio. People are being hit with very high bills. And if you’re roaming and listening to radio then you might as well forget it.” Lindsay Cornell, principal systems architect at the BBC, said a recent Arqiva study looked at the possibility of setting up a car radio service via a 3G or 4G mobile operator.

The study concluded that to provide a quality service would require multiple cells and sites creating an expensive network that would cost listeners anything up to £300 to listen to the car radio for half an hour on their way to work. Wi t h i nt er net radi o share accounting for only 3.2% of all listening hours in the UK, Cornell added that, “it is not currently economic for broadcasters to deliver mass content by internet and it doesn’t seem to be the way that people want to consume it”. This has not deter red some manufacturers from creating IP-

Dangerous Li-ions tamed for travellers Anton/Bauer By David Fox From testing, packaging and recycling to tra in in g p e r s o n n el, Anton/Bauer has made a significant investment in lithium-ion safety, so that broadcast battery users can travel with confidence. “What we’re trying to do is be proactive,” said Katherine Finn, Anton/Bauer’s manager, compliance and regulations. Governments have tightened regulations for carrying batteries by air, with a wide range of different international regulations. “We strive to meet the strictest requirements.” Well-designed Li-ion batteries have built-in safety mechanisms,

Shin Minowa: Travel regulations mean batteries can be dangerous goods

such as the honeycomb cell design, where each battery cell is self-con-

tained, preventing damaged cells from affecting adjacent cells. Li-ion batteries regarded as ‘dangerous goods’ are those over 160 Watt hours. Between 101Wh and 160Wh they sometimes incur carry-on and check-in luggage limitations, which is why Anton/Bauer’s batteries are sold with compliable packaging and inspected to UN standards – whether classified as dangerous goods or not. “We understand the importance of travel for many of our customers who shoot on-location,” added Shin Minowa, VP of marketing and business development. “We offer the utmost safeguards so they need not worry.” This means training staff to handle dangerous goods, factory certification four times a year, certification and destruction testing of cells and batteries, and custom boxes for carrying Li-ion products. 11.D61

based products and Betram Hock, head of development, broadcast receiver at BMW Germany told I B C d e l eg a t e s o f B M W ’s n ew entertainment system that inte-

Clipster gains extended support: Version 4.3 of Clipster has debuted at IBC, with new key features aimed at filebased workflows, writes Carolyn Giardina. This includes mezzanine format mastering for IMF workflows with extended JPEG2000 support. The Interoperable Master Format, or IMF, is a proposed mezzanine format that is the subject of a SMPTE Working Group that aims to standardise IMF. Clipster’s batchlist function enables independent and automated processing of DCI, IMF and other distribution jobs. DVS says that with the Clipster, users can also record directly and losslessly into JPEG2000 file sequences. Clipster now enables high-speed processing of Raw files from digital cameras such as ARRI Alexa and Red Epic. For stereo work, new capabilites included integrated STAN (Stereoscopic Analyzer) software. Also in the new version, DCI mastering capabilities now include stereo productions. With the new version, DVS has increased the number of codecs supported in Clipster to include AVC-Intra Class 200 which is part of Panasonic’s AVC-Ultra codec group. DVS is also previewing future support for new codecs including Pro Res.

7.E25

AVB introduced for Artist Riedel By David Davies The emergence of AVB (Audio/ Video Bridging) has been one of the defining technological developments of pro-AV during the last few years. Now, Riedel Communications has announced the creation of a suite of AVB products for the Artist digital matrix intercom platform. Promoted and supported by the AVnu Alliance – of which Riedel is

grates DAB+, FM and IP-based services into its interface and can seamlessly switch from one platform to the other without a loss in quality of service.

Get yourself connected: Riedel’s new product suite includes Connect AVB

a member – AVB facilitates the transportation of AES3/EBU audio in realtime with guaranteed band-

width and quality of service (Qos), via IP-based LAN. The Riedel AVB products include the AVB-108 G2 card, a regular Artist client card to be used inside the Artist mainframe that can convert eight Artist matrix ports into AVB – and vice versa. The Connect AVB Panel Interface is a small external unit for converting an AES signal into AVB and vice versa, and is designed to connect one Artist control panel in one or two-channel mode to the intercom matrix through IP-based LAN. Finally, the Connect AVBx8 – ‘the big brother’ of the Connect AVB – converts eight AES signals to AVB and vice versa. 10A31

Transmitter offers 50% energy saving: The Futhura Plus has been announced by Thomson Broadcast, writes Ian McMurray. Described as an ultra-efficient, high power television transmitter, the Futhura Plus is said to offer broadcasters substantial energy savings, with a 50% improvement in efficiency over current standard transmitters on the market. With its innovative drain modulation technology, the environmentally friendly Futhura Plus is claimed to be a major advance toward meeting lower energy consumption targets in the broadcast industry. For use in initial deployments or for extending existing digital networks, the UHF wideband Futhura Plus offers high-power capability suitable for HDTV and 3D services, with up to 35-percent transmitter efficiency and market-leading power density of up to 12.6kW OFDM. Equipped for all OFDM standards in the UHF frequency band, the Futhura Plus features Thomson’s latest software enhancements for the exciters, and a range of passive components including RF filters and new RF channel combiners. “The Futhura Plus is the most advanced and efficient energy-saving transmitter available to broadcasters today,” said Nicolas Dallery, president of Thomson Broadcast. 5.A17


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theibcdaily 45

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BBC-Lite in West London DVB By George Jarrett BBC R&D started a test trial to assess DVB-T2 Lite on the day the standard was approved, and here at the show it repeats what it has currently in West London in terms of live transmission and modulation. “The T2 base is intended for transmission to roof-top aerials, with lots of directional gain, and that would display several HD services,” said project director Justin Mitchell. “But mobile is intended to be much more robust and work on hand-held devices in the street and off it. “In terms of delivering T2 Lite services there are lots of ways of configuring it. What we chose to do for the trial is to say the normal UK mode is about 40Mbps and reduce

Justin Mitchell: “Mobile is intended to be much more robust and work on handheld devices in the street and off it”

that down to 33Mbps for the base,” Mitchell continued. “This probably costs you one HD service. Next we used the 7Mbps to get 1Mb of mobile service, and the reason it is

7:1 is that the mobile service needs to be more robust.” The BBC team uses QPSK and code rate half whereas the base service uses 256-QAM, rate two

thirds. What can broadcasters expect T2 Lite to offer? “Potentially it might enable you to start transmissions of a mobile service using your existing infrastructure without having to build out an entire new network,” said Mitchell. “There would be a significant cost saving. “But part of the technical trial is to assess how many fill-in transmitters you would need to close the gap,” he added. “You would n o t c ove r t h e wh o l e c o u n t r y with mobile services with our existing network.” Asked what applications T2Lite is good for, Mitchell said: “Transmission to hand-held devices is probably the main one, but there could be devices in the car, the home, and tablet devices in offices that people want to reach.” In the stand demo, BBC R&D show they can car r y both the base service and four pictures of mobile service. 1.D81

The pay-TV business is driven by the ‘three Cs’

NDS’ Peled speaks his mind By Chris Forrester Dr Abe Peled was recently promoted to executive chairman at NDS, and used his annual IBC press lunch to introduce his new CEO Dave Habiger. Peled said 2011 was proving to be a very important year for the TV distribution business. “Topics like OTT seeming to be making headlines everywhere.

“We have been talking for many years about how pay-TV operators will embrace broadband and use it to link their set-top boxes to hybrid connections, and in the process expanding consumer choice and options. It is becoming the reality and has been endorsed by such technology luminaries as the BBC saying that hybrid is the way to go.

Peled’s OTT one-liners Success or failure for... Apple TV? “Failure” YouView? “Will be a failure” NetFlix? “They can’t supply X-Factor to 30 million viewers” SeeSaw “Never heard of it” Google TV “Failure” Microsoft TV? “Watched by a few unfortunate people” Hulu? “They keep losing content”

“Combined with this is the proliferation of mobile devices,” Peled continued. “What’s particularly exciting for us is the chance to see some real interactivity come into the home. In the past people have been reluctant to press a button and move away from the picture on screen. These new devices make it very easy to draw down extra information while leaving the main set alone. “But in my view, whether content is delivered over-the-top, or by telepathy, is not a big question,” Peled considered. “What is important is what’s available, and how users identify it. Let’s be clear: the only thing the studios like is money, and they want to know whether there’s money in OTT. “If they can get an extra $1 by telling Comcast or DirecTV that they can add this show or that film to the

IBC 2011: First time impressions Peter Sellar, broadcast technical manager at Freesat and RTS Young Technologist of the year, shares his perceptions and observations from a first ever visit to IBC. “As a first time visitor to IBC, my overriding impression of the show is that it’s big – big in terms of size, ideas and possibilities. The amount of technology and innovation on offer is astonishing but what becomes quite apparent almost immediately is that ever yone, wherever they are in the broadcast chain, is working to make multiscreen happen. As a result it’s impossible not to appreciate that multiscreen delivery is a main driver for exhibitors in every hall.

The ‘big’ time: Peter Sellar is wowed by IBC2011

“The key challenge as far as I can see is to ensure that the right type of content finds its way on to

the right screen. With multiscreen being an accepted opportunity for content owners, service providers and platforms, the industry needs to ensure that it is offered up in a way that will sustain the business models being designed around it. Being aware of how well the delivery complements the content it displays is a deciding factor in multiscreen’s success, and IBC demonstrates that we are now witness to a growing understanding in the industry that multiscreen must be viewed holistically. “For example, companion-type devices such as the iPad or iPhone can be used effectively to support video with metadata or with advertising that balances TV content, not

OTT is all about explanding consumer choice for Dr Abe Peled (right) and NDS colleague Dave Habiger

library then that’s what they’ll do,” said Peled. “Our customers tell us that once they have a broadband connection to the box then they can buy these same Library Rights because they’ll then have a delivery mechanism. “The pay-TV business is driven by the ‘three Cs’: Choice, Convenience”. And Quality! So OTT is all about expanding consumer choice, havi ng ever yt hi ng from one provider, on one input on the TV,” concluded Peled.

necessarily as the destination for that content. But as platforms try to surface content in as many ways as possible, what strikes me is that however you do it, multiscreen needs to be a fluid, natural experience that is easy to use and that gives people what they want in the best possible way. Let’s call it intelligent discoverability. “The other technology that has given me food for thought is Super High Def inition (SHD) where incredible image quality and around 20 channels of audio really involve you in what is going on and delivering on the ambition of audience inclusivity. The issue for SHD is going to be bandwidth, and I fear that we are some way away from finding a solution to this constraint – but it’s inspiring to see what can be achieved.”

In brief Mobile device headaches cured Broadcasters are struggling to manage the process of getting content correctly formatted and out to the multitude of different mobile devices now in use by consumers, said an industry pundit from Vizrt. Petter Ole Jakobsen, Vizrt CTO, said the biggest headache for broadcasters is how to manage the plethora of mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, which now also need to be served with content. “This problem isn’t a surprising one; it’s a big change for broadcasters, having to go from one line to many,” said Jakobsen. “At the moment, broadcasters have to set up separate production lines for each different device type, but you can’t staff-up to make it work; you need to fix the workflow to make it economical. “We realised we have all the skills we need in-house to make this situation better, from video to graphics and transcoding to handheld devices, so we created a plug-in, the Viz Media Engine (VME) which is now commercially available here at IBC, and is to go live with customers soon,” Jakobsen continued. Jakobsen said VME will change the situation for broadcasters caught in the Catch 22 tail-chaser of needing to serve programming to mobile devices, but not having the time and resources to do it. “Programmes will actually look good on your iPhone now,” explained Jakobsen. “Yet most people don’t realise there is now an easy way to distribute and format video and graphics to all these different screens; they don’t have an easy way to solve the problem, other than adding people, which is just not going to happen. “Everybody has to do this, so if someone shows it’s possible, everyone else will in no way be happy with what they have,” Jakobsen concluded. “It’s ok if everybody looks bad, but if one person makes it work, the level of the playing field has to change very quickly.” 2.A31

Version 4.1 focuses on end-to-end quality Version 4.1 of the Agama DTV Monitoring Solution for IPTV, cable, broadcast and OTT operators has been announced during IBC. The Monitoring Solution is described as a complete solution for continuous realtime monitoring and quality assurance of all forms of video delivery. The system allows operators to maintain control and understanding of the service quality distribution throughout their deployments with rapidly visible effects on operations bottom-line, such as reduced time-to-fix, avoidance of needless truck rolls, and increased end-customer satisfaction. “Our existing product line already covers the OTT head-end, offline verification of ondemand content, as well as embedded monitoring clients for multi-screen scenarios and devices like set-top boxes, residential gateways, PCs and tablets,” said Johan Görsjö, director of Product Management at Agama. “With v4.1 we extend our offering to complete end-toend support for video assurance in the OTT environment as well, by presenting additional components for adaptive bitrate streaming confidence monitoring and CDN monitoring.” 4.A55


46 theibcdaily

In brief

13.09.2011 ‘We need to peel back a bit and think about what viewers want’

Convergence: Now it’s TV’s turn Conference Analysis

November in Tokyo The 2011 edition of professional audio, video and communications event Inter BEE will take place at the Makuhari Messe, Tokyo, between 16 and 18 November. Organised by Jeita, the Japan Electronics and Information Technology Industries Association, Inter BEE attracted 824 exhibitors (vs 816 in 2009) and a grand total of 31,567 visitors – 962 of which were from overseas markets – to its 2010 edition. Inter BEE also incorporates extensive content forum and tutorial sessions, with topics to be addressed this year including loudness, S3D fundamentals, high-quality digital video content, microphone principles and applications, and MXF (Material Exchange Format) basics. For more information and updates, see the Inter BEE website at www.interbee.com. 10.A02

SaaS production tool S4Production, which is available as an enterprise product, can now be used as a hosted solution. It ensures a complete overview at any stage of the production cycle, says the developer. The system supports the production process, from first inquiry to final offer, and from scheduling, production planning and implementation, to billing for the entire project. The SaaS product is aimed at companies that have traditionally used Microsoft Excel to manage their production workflow, but who now require a more sophisticated system without the significant acquisition cost and ongoing maintenance requirements of an enterprise level product. Andreas Jung, broadcast management systems director of strategic development at S4M, stated: “Smaller production companies liked but couldn’t afford these big systems, and we didn’t want to strip the product down to offer them a version with less functionality, so we decided to start a rental model. “We are now launching this project here at IBC. It’s a new market segment that we’re entering; we’ve never done SaaS before, so it will be interesting to see what will happen in the next year in terms of what we see in growth.” 3.B26

SGT partners Antidot SGT has announced a new partnership with Antidot for the integration of a semantic search solution in its content management software suite Veda and Mediaflow. As from 1 January 2012, future versions of Veda and Mediaflow, the latter gained by SGT via its acquisition of Vivesta in February this year, will allow the use of semantic search in all the product functions. “Our customers’ need is to handle a greater amount of content, and their staff is used to the semantic search engines offered on the highest performing e-commerce websites,” said Guillaume d’Azemar de Fabragues, chairman of SGT. “Vivesta and Antidot provides us with a simple and efficient solution so that each of our customers can set search adapted to their needs, their usage, and their thesaurus.” 2.A30a

By Ann-Marie Corvin

Anna Cronin: UK free-to-air commercial broadcaster need to forge new partnerships

Without a trusted brand or channel to guide consumers towards the content they want viewers will get lost, argued Channel 4’s convergence exec in an IBC session that looked at how Connected TVs were democratising content. “As the content space becomes more crowded, people will look to broadcasters for a more curated experience. What they will not want is an overcrowded interface with reams of icons. Now it’s TV’s turn to join the party,” said Anna Cronin, commissioning editor, converging formats, C4. With responsibility for a £2 million convergent formats fund, which launched this March, Cronin said that she was in the process of “casting the

Vega has flexible future Snell By Michael Burns

tional inputs or outputs they require by purchasing a larger router. However, this type of design is wasteful in terms of unused ports, added cost, and the greater amount of space required. Vega eliminates this waste by allowing users to conf igure any unused inputs as additional outputs, or vice versa, as the application demands. The use of small f ibre

Vega, Snell’s new asymmetric routing platform, has been unveiled at IBC. The company is pitching the space-saving 96-port I/O box as a highly flexible and economic routing platform. Vega has 96 signal Norman Rouse: ports on its rear panel. “It’s bridging The fully asymmetric the worlds of I/O port designation of fibre and the platform enables the copper” user to conf igure the router with just one input and 95 outputs, 95 inputs and one output, or any combination in between. Traditionally, broadcast and media companies have obtained the addi-

BT and Colt sign agreement Colt By Heather McLean Colt, the information delivery platform for European business, and BT Wholesale, the largest wholesale telecoms business in Europe, have signed an access agreement to join their respective media delivery networks, covering Europe, Asia and the US. BT Wholesale has a strong media network in Asia, the US and the UK, while Colt has a firm foothold in Europe. Now Colt’s customers are able to access content from Europe’s largest media market exchange at the BT Tower in London, plus access out to Asia and the US. BT adds Colt’s network in Europe to its artillery. Greater access to televised content and worldwide markets will enable broadcasters to unlock poten-

tial distribution or syndication revenue opportunities by delivering more sports and news coverage to viewers, Mark Webb, business development manager, media, Colt Technology Services, claimed. “The broadcasting sector is currently going through a number of significant transformations with the onset of digitisation, transition to high definition services, convergence of IT networks and content delivery platforms, and the proliferation of devices consumers use,” said Webb. “This agreement, on top of Colt’s existing broadcast-specific service capability, ideally positions us to help our customers offer reliable, high quality content from sporting and news events to a wider geographic reach.” Added Mark Wilson-Dunn, BT Wholesale’s media and broadcast director of global sales: “Our strat-

net wide”, adding that the UK freeto-air commercial broadcaster needed to forge new partnerships with new creatives “who may never have made a TV show in their lives”. She added: “They could be gamers, user experience experts... We can’t solely rely on the same big production companies – new ideas can come from anywhere.” According to Cronin, the only advice she would give potential applicants was to play to TV’s strengths. “What’s happened to the market so far is that there are lots of apps, it’s very overwhelming, and there are very high barriers to entry, and it’s very hard to discover that content. I think we need to peel back a bit and think about what viewers want when they sit in front of a TV screen and how that might be complemented on other devices.” plug-in modules and/or miniature coaxial connector types also means that this design yields 50% more signal ports than a conventional router of the same rack height. Each pair of ports consists of a receptacle cage that accepts a very small plug-in module supporting either fibre (LC-type small formfactor pluggable, or SFP) or copper coaxial (HD BNC and/or DIN 1.0/2.3) connectivity. “It’s bridging the worlds of fibre and copper,” said Norman Rouse, Snell’s vice president of Global Marketing and PR. “It can have fibre or copper coax on any input or any output. You can change them literally by pulling out one connector and putting in the other – while the router is on. It does all this with total redundancy.” 8.B68 egy has been to encourage people to connect, from channel owners and content owners, through to the end user. What this effectively means is it’s a shrinking world when it comes to content. There’s no such thing as local content any more, which increases the demand for mediagrade connectivity, rather than just standard data and call connectivity.” 3.C41

Mark Webb, Colt, shakes with Mark Wilson-Dunn, BT Wholesale

Dan Danker: Make the customer experience simpler

TV ‘should be effortless’ Conference Analysis By Kate Bulkley Dan Danker, general manager of BBCiPlayer, threw down the gauntlet to TV industry manufacturers to make the customer experience simpler. Using the example of his 67-year-old mother who struggled to set up her new Blu-ray disc player, Danker said that manufacturers need to “completely redesign” TV remote controls and make accessing interactive content on connected TVs “effortless”. If this is done he believes that a “huge lost opportunity” can be redressed in terms of people who are not accessing interactive content because it is too difficult. “Why are we allowing our end-users to stitch together the parts in our organisation that do not talk to each other?” he asked the audience at the Devices, Devices Everywhere session. “In the UK alone, 50% of people are online and eight out of 10 of those have yet to access BBC iPlayer. That’s 28 million people,” said Danker. “By 2017 nearly every UK household will have a connectable TV, according to industry forecasts, but whether they use it or not is down to us.” Jaime Fink, senior vice president of technology at Pace, agreed that service providers are not traditionally good at helping consumers. “We have found that through our work with service providers that some 90% of product returns have no problem found. That is operators replacing their own products because they don’t know how to diagnose them.” However, Dan Saunders, head of content services at Samsung, agreed there are problems but defended the industry saying that the connected TV out-of-box experience is “already pretty good”. “It is not the typical PC experience. Manufacturers have been keen to recognise that people don’t want to go into detailed instruction manuals to get these devices to work. It’s not perfect but it’s not God-awful either.” Danker said he disagreed: “I think if you have to do a firmware upgrade on your new TV device then we haven’t quite gotten there yet. We need to be a little more determined in what we are trying to accomplish here. We can’t say it’s good enough when you have to enter a WEP password... we have to set the bar higher.”


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The IBC Daily 2011 – 13/9/11 Issue  

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