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theEvangelist Lenten Season March 2010

A Seasonal Letter of Saint Matthew’s Anglican Catholic Church The Evangelist

March 2010

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Contributors Father Scarlett is Rector of St. Matthew’s Church. He can be reached at (949) 219-0911.

Lisa Marion, O/OSB, is Pastoral Assistant of St. Matthew’s Church. She can be reached at lisa@stmatthewsnewport.com

Skip Spindler is a member of St. Matthew’s Church, and supports many ministries around the world. He can be contacted at deforest1@sbcglobal.net.

Cover Art Philippe de Champaigne, Ecce Homo (1602-74) Musée du Louvre, Paris

Susan Lintz is a member of St. Matthew’s Church, and an Associate with the Order of Saint Benedict based in Lexington, Kentucky.

George Herbert (1593-1633) was an English poet, orator, and priest. He wrote mainly religious poems, and is considered one of the Metaphysical Poets.

Letter from the Editor

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s you may have noticed, the design of this publication has changed. Due to the amount of effort each issue demands, I have split the work between copy and design so that we might be more effective. The talented Gretchen Becher is now delivering the content of The Evangelist in the most visually interesting and appealing ways. This change highlights our commitment to provide you, the reader, with articles, poetry, and artwork that both spiritually and intellectually aid the life of prayer. We hope that you continue to discover new truths as we walk through the desert of this life together. In light of this communal growth, I wanted to note that we really do welcome your questions and comments. The contact information for each contributor is listed after their name, above, and my email address is gfort@stmatthewacc.com. In addition to your comments, we welcome anyone to submit their thoughtful contributions for publication. We can learn from our neighbor as well as our guide. It is our hope that these articles offer you spiritual answers (or questions) in this Lenten Season. - Gavin S. Fort

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the

list

evange

Father Scarlett

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Talking about God

Lisa Marion

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Deciding to Trust

Skip Spindler

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Casa Hogar Mexico Orphanage Update

Susan Lintz

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Saints Perpetua and Felicity and their Companions

Parish Life & Events

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Poetry George Herbert

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Love

www.stmatthewsacc.com (949) 219-0911 2300 Ford Road Newport Beach, CA 92660 office@stmatthewsacc.com

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March 2010

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Talking about God

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uch is said about the decline of faith in our culture, but you wouldn’t always know it by listening to the way people talk—even on TV. Frequently, the star player on the winning team makes it a point to thank God in the post-game interview. A recent entertainment industry awards show revealed that one famous singer begins every rehearsal with prayer. I recently read where President Obama was taken to task for not saying “God bless America” after a speech. The story showed that the charge was false; he had, in fact, on several occasions, invoked the required blessing. One wonders what it all means, especially when the talk about God seems at odds with at least some of the surrounding behavior. The player who thanks God is too often a player who behaved badly during the actual game. The aforementioned entertainer who prays before rehearsals performs in a very sexually suggestive manner. And one wonders about the impact of stock phrases like “God bless America” if they are not accompanied by a concerted effort on the part of actual Americans to do the will of God. Most of us encounter God talk in daily life as well. I was involved with a youth sports team where the coach

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Lenten Season

Fr. Stephen Scarlett

routinely began each game with prayer and talked a lot about God. The problem was that the coach’s behavior did not always match the prayer and the talk, and the dissonance was not missed by the parents. I’ve heard several reports over the years about vocal Christians in the work place who are very eager to tell co-workers about Jesus but not always as eager to do their job well. In making these indictments, there are three things to keep in mind. First, there are many good examples of consistent witness that I have not mentioned. Second, most Christians have been guilty of not living up to their words at some point in time. (I have over a quarter century of sermons that stand as a formidable body of self-incriminating evidence.) Third, we can’t stop taking about God. As Romans says, “How then shall they call on him in whom they have not believed? And how shall they believe in him of whom they have not heard? And how shall they hear without a preacher?” (10:14). We ought to aim at consistency and honesty when talking about God. By consistency, I mean that we ought to make sure that there is not a habitual conflict between our use of God’s name and our behavior—i.e., “He’s always talking about God, but he’s the first one to cheat


Love Love bade me welcome; yet my soul drew back, Guilty of dust and sin. But quick-eyed Love, observing me grow slack From my first entrance in, Drew nearer to me, sweetly questioning If I lack'd anything.

"Truth, Lord; but I have marr'd them: let my shame Go where it doth deserve." "And know you not," says Love, "Who bore the blame?" "My dear, then I will serve." "You must sit down," says Love, "and taste my meat." So I did sit and eat.

"A guest," I answer'd, "worthy to be here:" Love said, "You shall be he." "I, the unkind, ungrateful? Ah, my dear, I cannot look on Thee." Love took my hand and smiling did reply, "Who made the eyes but I?"

- George Herbert

when he has an opportunity.” This is to take God’s name in vain. By honesty, I mean that we ought to readily admit our faults when we have not lived up to our profession, and we ought to go out of our way to make things right with those we may have offended. Admitting our faults is a more compelling witness than pretending to be perfect. When I was in high school, I had an older neighbor with whom I played basketball. He was in his 40s at the time and had played in college. He was also an evangelical Christian who often talked about God and Jesus. We played some very competitive games, and one game was competitive to the point of conflict. It got a little heated. However,

the next day he came by and apologized for his part in the conflict, saying he realized he should not have reacted as he did. Strangely enough, his behavior and apology had a more profound impact on me than if he had been the kind of Christian who was unwilling to play hard and was always being “nice.” I didn’t want to be like that. My neighbor showed me that you could be a real person and a Christian.

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alking about God is more challenging in our world because our culture is full of meaningless words. There is a constant stream of talk on the radio, TV, and Internet, not to mention the never-ending cell phone conversations

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Talking about God is more challenging in our world because our culture is full of meaningless words.

that surround us. When talk about God enters into this mix, there is a danger that God will be treated as just another topic to be discussed the same way we talk about politics or sports. This suggests that less is more. A constant stream of God talk is easily tuned out or discounted, just as we’ve learned not to listen to repeated commercial messages. If we are going to say something about God: we ought to make sure that someone is actually listening, we ought to talk in ways that reflect the weight and gravity of permanent things, and we ought to avoid stock or hackneyed phrases that are easily dismissed or laughed at. Our talk about God should also reflect a certain depth of thought, especially when we talk about how God is at work in the world. For example, a person might explain how God saved him from an accident by a miracle. While we can give thanks for his deliverance, it raises the question of where God was in the other accident in which no one survived. Now, I do believe God intervenes on occasion in miraculous ways and it is certainly right to talk about it. However, we must be careful not to give the impression that God is only present when a miracle occurs, or that when there is an accident or tragedy without a miraculous intervention this somehow means that God was not there.

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Jesus died on the cross to save us from sin and death. Through him, death has been conquered so that we need not be afraid of death, whenever it may occur. This victory is the focus of the coming Easter feast. As Jesus said, “I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live” (John 11:25). Consequently, when we talk about Jesus, we should bear witness that because of our faith we are not afraid of death. This is the powerful testimony of the martyrs. Many were converted in the early church, not because God saved Christians from physical death, but because Christians faced death without fear. We trust that “in all things God works for good for those who love him and are called according to his purpose” (Romans 8:28). Many Christians have died in the recent earthquakes, and we have also heard of miraculous rescues. We trust that God’s people who died were kept safe by God in death (cf. John 6:39), just as those who were miraculously saved were in God’s will. This same meditation applies to sporting events where the victors thank God. We might ask, “Is God not also in the other locker room with those who did not win?” In fact, it might be that the humility brought on by defeat leaves those who lost the game closer to God. A recent positive


example is Colt McCoy, the quarterback for the University of Texas, who is an evangelical Christian. He was injured at the very beginning of the national championship game, which, as a senior, was his last collegiate event. He hardly played and his team lost. This was a huge disappointment. However, when interviewed, he still talked about his faith. His talk about God in the face of disappointment was more powerful than hearing a winner’s thanksgiving. If there is a danger of talking too casually or thoughtlessly about God, there is also the opposite error. Some people never talk about their faith so that you would never know they were Christians unless you found out some other way. Some people are naturally quiet and shy, but some people are tongue-tied when talking about God. This is an especially interesting phenomena when it occurs in people who are otherwise very chatty—i.e., people who will all too eagerly inform us about their allegiances in politics and sports, but aren’t able to name the name of Jesus in polite company. Such people say that they don’t talk about religion because they don’t

want to offend anyone, but they are often quite willing to offend almost everyone with their opinions about other things. Not every one is called to be an evangelist or apologist for the faith. Non-verbal witness can be more powerful than speech. As St. Francis said, “Preach the gospel. Use words if necessary.” But words are sometimes necessary and we are called to use them wisely, bearing in mind a couple of biblical exhortations: “Sanctify the Lord God in your hearts, and always be ready to give a defense to everyone who asks you a reason for the hope that is in you, with meekness and fear” (1 Peter 3:15), and “Let your speech be always with grace, seasoned with salt, that ye may know how ye ought to answer every man” (Colossians 4:6).

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Deciding to Trust

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he Marions were happy to see 2009 go. The last half of the year was a blur. First there was Al’s broken and re-broken bone, then Vallee’s traumatic accident just a week and a half after returning from Workcamp. Looking back, it is hard to imagine how we made it through, but by the grace of God we did. In large part it was due to the prayers, love, and support showered on us by our family, friends, and the community of believers in which our lives are immersed. Before this summer, I had never spent more than two weeks away from home. My mind is befuddled when I imagine that I stayed at the hospital for 70 days, sleeping in make-shift beds and fold out chairs. Since returning home from that extended stay in the hospital, our lives have become complete chaos. I must confess: I am finding it difficult to be still and find peace. You would think that after all the trials we’ve recently been through I would have learned a lesson that would be strong enough to last through all other temptations and heartaches. Well, not so. In an odd way it was easy to find peace while we were in the hospital, perhaps because everything was out of my control. I could do nothing more for our daughter than I was doing—and that wasn’t much. The doctors knew far more than they were telling me and I watched helplessly, in awe of the nurses who cared for her. I was left to sit…and watch. The few times I became anxious, she became anxious. Even in a coma, she could sense my fear and anxiety. I had to behave bravely and handle myself as though everything would be fine, and in that environment it was easy to do. I knew that God was there and working in ways I could see; the evidence was right before my eyes. Since we’ve been home, the cares and worries of daily life have quietly crept back into my heart and mind. I can no longer depend on expert doctors or nurses. I’ve stepped back into the role of expert, manager, scheduler, coordinator, and although this is real life, I don’t like it. Of course I wouldn’t want our girl to suffer again (or anymore), but sometimes I think it would be easier to go back there, to the hospital. I’ve struggled wondering how I could possibly want to return to what, at the time,

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Lisa Marion

seemed like torture. Yet, I remember a peace there that I’ve only experienced a few times in my life. It was the paradoxical peace of the Christian life that comes from being completely helpless and completely dependent. Like a child, I trusted my Daddy to take care of things. This peace was given in exchange for my self-will. It was a gift when I let go of thinking I knew better, or that I could actually do something to remedy the situation.

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here is so much going on in our lives now. Days are filled with therapies, doctor appointments, school, dinner, and bills, and always lurking in the back of my mind are worries of the economy, the war, my daughter, and my family. Earlier this month I found myself very preoccupied with all these worries, almost unable to think. I began to panic, dread had a hold of me and my insides were churning. A wise friend suggested that I stop and take some time in the church. One of the beautiful benefits of being on staff at St. Matthew’s is that, since I am already at church, I can go into the empty Sanctuary and sit. There I attempt to reason with God (and sometimes myself) about things. I find that if I stop and give him time, he is faithful to provide an answer or direction to the issues on my heart. I’m not sure why this hadn’t occurred to me on this particular day, but I’m thankful my friend knew what I needed. The readings for Morning Prayer that day were: Psalm 56, Genesis 11:1-9, and Mark 9:2-13. The Holy Spirit wove these passages together to provide me an answer to my inability to find peace and trust. “Nevertheless, though I am sometime afraid, yet put I my trust in thee” (Psalm 56:3). These words went straight to my heart. The psalmist revealed the truth about my struggle: I am struggling with trust because I am afraid. It is true, I’m afraid of so many things that could happen. Not things that are happening, but that could happen. My mind is constantly a whirl with “What if this,” or “What if that”; the scenarios are frightening and I’ve got a good imagination. The fear of these imagined scenarios creates turmoil inside of me. I’m not sure why I don’t create positive scenarios, or wonderful


outcomes. I’m bewildered at my own pessimism. In order to avoid these imagined outcomes, I’m consumed with anxiety about my own lack of action. My brain then takes me through a list of things I feel I should do (or get others to do). I’m thankful that the psalmist was honest enough to admit that he was afraid. I realize that although I do worry, I’m in good company. As I continued to read on this particular morning, I was taken to the story of the Tower of Babel, which is recounted in the eleventh chapter of the Book of Genesis. The nations of the earth, united by a common language, decide to make a monument for themselves by erecting a tower. They weren’t making a monument to God, but to themselves; they weren’t seeking God or his will for their lives. This was a mighty nation of people bound by a common language, and a common thought, and I’m sure they thought they could do great things without God. Huh! This is me, attempting to create the life that I desire, that I want. How often do I proceed with my plans without consulting God or even first examining my motives? I read on, “…and they had slime for mortar.” The imagery is strong. Slime for mortar. I am using slime as the building materials in my life. The thought was revolting. What materials would God provide for me if I let him? Or even at least if I came alongside him and helped him work, instead of doing things my way. What precious building resources does he want to provide for me? If I knew, I’m certain I wouldn’t choose to slime over his elements. Yet, herein lies the rub: he already knows the outcome, and I don’t. He decidedly has an advantage over me. He knows what he’s building, but I insist on introducing my suggestions. I’m like Peter in the final reading of the day, the account of the Transfiguration of Christ (Mark 9:2:13). In a miraculous turn of events, Peter witnesses the true glory of Christ, transfigured in intensely white garments. At the same time, he finds himself in the presence of Moses and Elijah. Instead of being still in this phenomenal moment, Peter interrupts Christ’s conversation. He’s got a great idea, “Rabbi, it is good that we are here. Let us make three tents, one for you and one for Moses and

one for Elijah.” The next line explains why Peter said this, “For he did not know what to say, for they were terrified.” I have to laugh at Peter because that is me. Christ is preparing his heart for the impending torture he must suffer and Peter thinks it is a good idea to build a more permanent dwelling for him, Moses, and Elijah. How often do I miss God’s hand in a circumstance and, in fear, offer him a puny idea. Yet in every situation, God, in his greatness, has a more magnificent, fully developed plan in mind. My role is to be present and to be quiet. There isn’t anything that I can think of that he hasn’t already considered. If, in my fear, I insist on having my way, I waste my time building a deficient monument from the slime. In my willfulness, I miss his orchestration of a fuller masterpiece. I’ve been a Christian long enough to have a great many memories of God’s provision in dark, needful moments. Why don’t those memories sustain me? Why does the feeling of peace seem so transient? I’ve gone round and around with myself on this and I believe it comes down to one simple truth: day-to-day I must make a decision to trust God. I have to stop anticipating that the feeling of trust will engulf me. I must find peace in knowing that, although sometimes I’m afraid, I must make a decision to put my trust in God. All I can do is pray, take action where I can, then simply trust that God will take care of the rest. He may not have devised the ending that I desire, but he has never, nor will he ever, let me down.

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hrough the gracious generosity of many individual parishioners at St. Matthew’s Church, 143 children are being supported at three different orphanages in the state of Veracruz in Southeastern Mexico. The names of these three Christian facilities are Casa Hogar Peregrinos de la Palabra de Dios (meaning Home for Pilgrims of the Word of God); Hogar Franciscano de Nuestra Senora del Perpetuo Socorro (Home of our Lady of Perpetual Succor); and Fundacion Juan Nicolas’ Casa Hogar de Niñas (Foundation John Nicolas’ Home for Girls). The first one, Casa Hogar Peregrinos de la Palabra de Dios, is an orphanage that has been supported by St. Matthew’s since 2002 when it opened at its current location. Prior to that, there were 60 children living in a 2,500 square foot, four-bedroom home on an 8,000 square foot lot within the city of Cordoba. With God’s grace a lot was found and the new facility was built. Casa Hogar is now a

Chapel music at Hogar. 10

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Grand Opening of Casa Hogar in 2002. 10,000 square foot facility on five acres just outside of the city of Cordoba. Since the opening at this new location, the generosity of St. Matthew’s and its parishioners has kept the orphanage operating on a continuing basis. The children have flourished at this facility and there is an ongoing effort to continually improve it. Currently there are 78 children living at Casa Hogar. The local government brings children who are orphaned or abandoned, or the victims of child abuse or neglect to the facility for care. They range from newborns to teenagers. Some stay for months, while others stay until they grow up and leave home as young adults. Santa and Chucho Torres are the directors and very strong Christians. They provide an amazing and loving environment for all of the children. Santa and Chucho had three children of their own and had adopted two more before getting involved with orphans. They live to nurture young lives! It shows in the way the children adjust and become part of the extended family. Chucho tells

the children that when they are Christians they are adopted into the family of God, and at the orphanage they become “adopted” into a new, caring, and loving family. No matter where their lives take them, they will always have the love and encouragement of God, their true Father, and His Son, Jesus, as well as the life skills learned at Casa Hogar.  It has been a joy to see two young children grow who were brought to the orphanage as infants shortly after it opened. Rosario is now six and Christian is five, and they both attend a private school, Serradel School, in Cordoba. The owner of the school has accepted 30 children from the orphanage at her private school as long as they test well and have good study habits; the orphanage can provide their uniforms and study materials. Casa Hogar provides separate study rooms for the boys and the girls to complete their homework, and has also started a library for the children.   There is always plenty of activity around the orphanage! When new chil-


dren arrive, they are welcomed and made We refer to these facilities as “orphanto feel a part of the family. The most im- ages.” They are because many of the chilportant way this is achieved is through dren truly are orphans with deceased chapel services that all attend. One of parents and no relatives with the abilthe new arrivals is eight-year-old Carlos. ity to care for them. Other children are He is developmentally behind for his age separated from their parents for many but has found love and acceptance by all. reasons: abusive families, drugs, crime, The children have lots of room for soccer prostitution, divorce, and abandonand outdoor activities as well as farm an- ment. In all cases a vacuum is created imals to take care of. They even sell some that leaves children in need of what is of the animals to help offset the expenses.                                             most important: love.    They get that at The older girls help Santa prepare each facility. They are able to develop a meals, thirteen-year-old Richard Mata sense of family and become a functionhelps too. He is excelling in school ing part of the community. The leaders and has great English skills. He has of these homes teach the children first brothers who also lived at Casa Hogar.  and foremost about God’s love for them The second orphanage, Hogar Fran- and how He sent His only Son, Jesus ciscano de Nuestra Senora del Perpetuo Christ, to become their Lord and Savior.  Socorro is located in a poor neighborJesus said, “Suffer the little children to hood in the city of Orizaba next to come unto me, and forbid them not: for Cordoba. It was started in 1984 by Frey of such is the kingdom of God” (Mark (Friar) Ruben who entered a Franciscan 10:14). Thank you to all who support Order in 1953. He is now 78 years old. the St. Matthew’s Mexico Orphan OutThis home is a refuge for boys Frey Ru- reach ministry financially and with your ben finds living on the streets of Orizaba. prayers. He wanders the streets of Orizaba in his brown monk’s habit seeking support for Skip Spindler these boys. He is grateful for what help we give him in order to support his work.   The third orphanage we support, Fundacion Juan Nicolas, is also located in the city of Orizaba. Here there are 42 girls in residence. This is an all girls facility and is run by Madre Alberta and several nuns. Juan Nicolas, the founder and original supporter of the home, is now deceased. He started this Casa Hogar de Niñas (Home for Girls) in the 1960s. Here the girls learn the Christian faith, have shelter and clothing, and are given responsibilities around the home. They are taught to sew and cook, and are expected to attend school. 

The children at daily church services in the chapel.

New resident Carlos.

Girls at Casa Hogar de Niñas.

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Saints Perpetua and Felicity and their Companions

Martyred at Carthage March 7, A.D. 203

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erpetua and Felicity were two early Christian women living in the Roman world of Carthage, North Africa (now Tunis, Tunisia), when Christians were actively and violently persecuted for their faith. Actual events surrounding the lives of early saints and martyrs are often blurred by time, but this story is remarkable in that Perpetua wrote of her experiences and visions in Latin while she was imprisoned before her passion, or martyrdom. One of the other martyrs of that same day, Saturus, also wrote of his experiences in prison. Saturus is believed to have been the teacher who prepared them for baptism. There are also contemporary observer accounts, and these provide detailed descriptions of actual events. It is especially memorable for young women living at the turn of the third century to be so regarded and venerated. The memory and martyrdom of these Christians has been very important in church history and is recounted in liturgies to this day. Perpetua was a twentytwo year old woman of noble birth. Her mother was Christian and her father pagan. Because of her status as nobility she had standing in the community and was well educated. At the time of her martyrdom she was the mother of an infant. Her husband is not mentioned in any account, so it is presumed she was a widow. Felicity was her personal slave 12

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and was pregnant when they were im- trated her to know that the devil was prisoned. They were also with several behind his arguments as he continually other male companions, Saturninus, Se- tried to get her to denounce her faith. cundulus, and Revocatus. They all had At the same time, she was comforted in that he was saying these words out of his love for her. She would not give in and asked him to look at a pitcher and asked if it could be called anything other than what it was. He said it could not. She replied that neither could she be called anything other than what she was, a Christian, and that God’s will would be done, not hers or her father’s. When she was initially imprisoned, the greatest suffering to her was because her infant child was taken away from her. Two deacons of her church were able to move her and the infant was brought to stay with her in order to nurse. When that happened, it appeared to her that the dark prison had turned into a glorious palace. She seems to have comforted her mother and brother more than they comforted her when they came to visit. She was known to have a special gift of receiving messages from God. In prison she had several that strengthened her enormously. She and her brother prayed together been preparing for baptism and were ar- and prayed to know if what was ahead rested for their open expression of faith would be a passion or deliverance for and put into prison to await a hearing. her. She had a vision that she relayed While in prison, Perpetua’s father vis- to her brother the next day. She saw a ited her many times to beseech her to bronze ladder going up to heaven and renounce her Christian belief in order each side of the ladder was covered with for her to avoid a fate of death. It frus- spears, hooks, and knives. At the base of


the ladder was a serpent, which she trod to the very end (and new beginning). The early Christian community suron by climbing the ladder. She was with She went into early labor and gave birth rounding these women was a very Saturus and when they came to the top to a daughter. A Christian sister adopted strong and supported each other at great of the ladder they saw a beautiful gar- the baby and Felicity was able to prepare risk. The courage and steadfastness in den with a man in shepherd’s clothing for their entrance to the “Gate of Life.” their faith and strength they found in sitting in the middle of the garden surBefore the festival day, Perpetua had Jesus Christ and in loving one another rounded by sheep and many thousands another vision that she was combat- was an inspiration to many non-Chrisdressed in white. He welcomed her and ing the devil in the arena. She awoke tians, particularly the guards who had gave her sweet milk curds to eat. She refreshed and knew she would be tri- imprisoned them as well as those who awoke with a sweet taste in her mouth umphant. On the day of the games, the watched the games that day. So, by their but knew that her passion was at hand. women were given Roman priestess good death, many were converted. It is a Meanwhile Felicity was imprisoned costumes to wear but refused. Joyfully, touching and inspiring story of faith and with her and was in the late stages of preg- they were led in to the arena to face a love that has stayed alive in the Christian nancy. Perpetua, Felicity, and the others wild cow. The cow gored Perpetua, but community through time. It is a remindwent before the Roman tribunal. They she was unaware and got up, straight- er of the strength that comes with putwere ordered to denounce Christianity ened out her dress and re-pinned her ting one’s life in Jesus’ hands and of the and perform a sacrifice to acknowledge hair to keep it neat. She then went over sacrifices love will make for God’s glory. the emperor as a god. They stood firm to Felicity to help her up off the ground. and would not. So they were sentenced They stood together and asked what Susan Lintz to be thrown to wild animals in the coli- happened to the cow. She called her seum on the festival day celebrating his brother to her and said to him, “Stand birthday. The problem was that since fast in the faith, and love you all one Felicity was pregnant, under Roman law another; and be not offended because she could not be executed because that of our passion.” In the end, they all would kill the innocent life within her. gave each other the kiss of peace beFelicity wanted to stay with her friends fore finally being killed by swordsmen.

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Parish Life

at St. Matthew’s Church

Weddings Kimmy & Todd Tennison

January 16, 2010

Our special day was wonderful! With the beautiful ceremony, fantastic In-and-Out Burgers, and being surrounded by our family and friends we could not ask for a better wedding. We took our honeymoon in Hawaii which was gorgeous. One week is too short to see all that Big Island has to offer.   Our plans for the next year is for Todd to finish school, expand our career options, and one day live in a place with a little more space. We have two families living in a two bedroom home right now.  Most of all we want to grow as a couple and family with God’s grace and love.

Births

Scarlett Edythe Becher 12/10/09,  6 lbs 11 oz

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Gabriel Thomas McGrath 12/12/09,  8 lbs

Lenten Season

Madeline Michelle Keller 12/27/09,  6 lbs 11 oz

Cecily Margaret Marie Smith 1/7/2010, 7 lbs 2 oz


Baptisms

from left to right

William Lenoard Anderson IV (a.k.a. Bear) Scarlett Edythe Becher Talula Victoria Pooley Cecily Margaret Marie Smith

Milestones Congratulations to Jon Michael and Helen Geiger on earning the level of Black Belt in Tae Kwon Do. My name is Jon Michael Geiger. I started Tae Kwon Do training when I was six years old. I began training with Master Hwang because my sisters and I were enrolled at a different school where they taught “karate.” My father thought we should join a real Tae Kwon Do School. He thought Master Hwang’s was the best. In the last three and a half years, I have trained at the studio about five-hundred times and I have competed in four tournaments. I have won ten medals, three trophies, owned four uniforms and I am only 9 years old. With the support of my parents at home and the guidance and training of Master Hwang and others, I have earned fifteen belts and all of these things I have accomplished are only the beginning of training, hopefully, for the rest of my life.     One of the many things I have learned in my Tae Kwon Do training is that it is not all hard work. Part of it is fun and you can make friends. I have enjoyed hanging around at tournaments with my dad and with my teammates. We learn to encourage each other, to do our best, and not to be afraid. There are other fun activities like Discipline Camp and Summer Camp where we get to play dodge ball and learn to use nunchucks.

Another major lesson for me especially has been self control. Master Hwang has helped me learn how to control my temper and anger and not let it get out on others. The Bible says, “Be quick to listen, slow to speak and slow to become angry, because the anger of man does not bring forth the righteousness of God’s will.” In many ways, this lesson will be one of the most important lessons for me and for my whole life. Finally, I have learned many lessons about winning and losing; mainly that you sometimes win and you sometimes lose but you should never be discouraged by failure. The Bible says in II Timothy 1:7, “For God did not give us a spirit of timidity but of power, of love, and of self-discipline.” I have learned that to be successful, I have to do my best, not only in Tae Kwon Do but in all my life. I want to offer my grateful thanks to Master Hwang for all his teaching over the last three and a half years and for many more to come.

             

The Evangelist

March 2010

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Events for the Lenten Season  Holy Week Schedule 

March 28 - April 3

Palm Sunday March 28 Join us as we reinact Christ’s Triumphial entry into Jerusalem The children will lead the way with palms in hand   Maundy Thursday April 1 7:00 p.m. Commemoration of the Last Supper  Maundy Thursday Watch Enter the ancient excersize of Watching with Christ 9:00 p.m. Thursday through 3:00 p.m. on Good Friday A sign up will be available in the Parish Hall You may Watch for an hour or throughout the whole night at our Altar of Repose   Good Friday April 2 3:00 p.m. Commermoration of the Crucifixion of our Lord Easter Vigil April 3 7:30 p.m. First Service of Easter, re-affirmation of our Baptismal Vows EASTER SERVICES 7:45 a.m., 8:45 a.m. 10:45 a.m. Holy Communion 9:45 a.m. Traditional Easter Egg Hunt for children through 5th grade   EASTER FEAST April 9 6:30 p.m. Our Lenten Fast being over we celebrate annunally with a heavenly Choral Evensong followed by a delightful Feast

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The Evangelist

Lenten Season


The Evangelist