Page 1

12:00 - 13:30

15:00 - 17:00

PLENARY II: AFTER RIO+20: ON THE WAY TO GREEN AND CLEAN GOVERNANCE?

SPECIAL PLENARY: CORRUPTION IN SPORTS: WHAT’S THE PENALTY FOR SOCIETY?

THE IACC TODAY THUR08NOV2012 ISSUE02

THE 15TH INTERNATIONAL ANTI-CORRUPTION CONFERENCE NEWSPAPER

WWW.15IACC.ORG

© Virginie Nguyen Hoang

© Guilherme Kardel/Kardel Prod. Fotográficas

PEOPLE, COALITIONS, CHANGE. “The world we want can only be built on transparency,” proclaimed Dilma Rousseff, President of Brazil. With these words ringing in the air, the 15th IACC was officially declared open. How far have we come in the fight against corruption? What progress has been made? How do we go further still? Are we, as Lori Gold of 100Reporters asked in the plenary on mobilising people, ready to take anti-corruption to the point of no return?

© Virginie Nguyen Hoang

“Corruption is a plague on all our houses,” said Huguette Labelle, Chair of Transparency International, “but together we can and must find a sustainable cure.” “It is up to each and everyone of us to become agents of change,” said Jorge Sanchez, Chairman of AMARRIBO Brasil, echoing the theme of the conference. Never before have there been so many opportunities for ordinary people to engage in the fight against corruption. People empowerment is “starting to spread like wildfire and each one of us can get involved,” said Paul Hilder, drawing on examples from his experience at Avaaz and Change.org. From the Arab Spring to the Indian Summer and the Occupy Movement, people around the world, particularly young people, are demanding more transparency and accountability in their lives. “Don’t lose this opportunity,” Nobel Peace Prize winner Tawakkol Karman urged IACC participants. State capture, stolen assets, organised crime – corruption’s transnational nature means it cannot be tackled at the national level alone. Brazilian Minister

Jorge Hage Sobrinho labelled corruption as “one of the most serious threats to democracy, development and social justice”. He held up international initiatives like the Open Government Partnership as being critical for countries to learn from and support each other. Whether it is corruption fuelling impunity or impunity fuelling corruption, speakers from all sessions emphasised the pressing need for this destructive combination to be tackled. Markus Hardtke of the Cambodian Natural Resources Protection Group described the recent killing of his director that remains unsolved and his lack of trust in the responsible institutions. Looking ahead, Transparency International is set to campaign on impunity, reported the anti-corruption organisation’s founder Peter Eigen. As the first day of the 15th IACC came to a close, it is clear that there is much in store for the coming few days. In the words of IACC Council Chair Barry O’Keefe, “together we can succeed, together we will succeed.”


Q&A How is corruption fouling sport? "There are two type of corruption when it comes to sports: the one that affects the players, because not all that’s needed is being done to make sure they are trained and cared for; and the kind of corruption where people can be bought, therefore making the game dishonest, which could lead to a lack of interest from the people who were sports lovers to begin with." Ana Araujo, Brazil IACC receptionist "A lot of sports associations are very non-transparent at decisionmaking and you have to rely on being in favour with the big guys. If the message in sports is that you can get away with this, then that’s a problem – because so many young people look to sports as a source of inspiration. When they grow up it won’t be surprising if the standards and values that they adhere to have been corrupted."

TODAY

OPEN GOVERNMENT PARTNERSHIP

15:00-17:00

Empowering citizens through transparency and civic participation For democracy to function, citizens need to know what their leaders are doing. When governments act behind closed doors, the public is shut out from the decisions that affect their lives. Aiming to end this information divide, the Open Government Partnership was launched last year. Focused on increasing transparency, empowering citizens and harnessing new technologies, the initiative has already secured pledges from more than 50 countries around the world – meaning one in four citizens stand to benefit. It's an exciting start, but work is only just beginning. Join this session to find out more.

OPEN CONTRACTING

TODAY

Driving development through disclosure and participation

17:30-19:30

In many countries around the world, public revenues are not being generated, allocated or spent as effectively as they could be. The result? Wasted public money, poor quality roads, schools and service delivery. An emerging global initiative is set to tackle the issues that have traditionally held back public contracting. Open contracting works across sectors from infrastructure, to natural resources and service delivery, bringing light to complex types of contracts like concessions, licences or public–private partnerships. Join this session to find out what has been achieved in this area to date and what is in store for the future.

“It is amazing to be among 1500 champions of anti-corruption.” #15iacc - @OmaidSharifi - Omaid Sharifi

Eric Gutierrez, Philippines Christian Aid "One of the main problem areas is matchfixing, which increasingly affects all sports from football through tennis to cricket. The problem has grown firstly because of the internet, which makes it very easy to bet wherever you are; and secondly because of the rise of betting in Asia on western football. These floods of money have made it more lucrative to fix matches." Simon Kuper, United Kingdom Financial Times

TWEET IT, LIKE IT, SHARE IT. GET INVOLVED! © Virginie Nguyen Hoang

People around the world are joining in 15th IACC discussions through Facebook and Twitter. Stay informed of what everyone is talking about and be sure to add your voice to the debates!

www.facebook.com/ InternationalAntiCorruptionConference www.twitter.com/15iacc #15iacc © Virginie Nguyen Hoang

© Alexandre Alves/Kardel Prod. Fotográficas


TODAY'S PLENARIES: IN BRIEF

12:00 - 13:30 PLENARY II: AFTER RIO+20: ON THE WAY TO GREEN AND CLEAN GOVERNANCE?

RICHARD GOLDSTONE Former Judge and UN Investigator

15:00 - 17:00 SPECIAL PLENARY: CORRUPTION IN SPORTS: WHAT’S THE PENALTY FOR SOCIETY?

AFTER RIO+20:

CORRUPTION IN SPORTS:

Sustainable development is about ensuring that economic growth can happen globally and evenly, not at the expense of our planet or our health. Rio+20 recognised that human development, economic development and environmental protection cannot be treated as parallel agendas – if one fails, so do the others. But will this commitment translate into action?

The 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympic Games are set to spread the spirit of fair play in Brazil and among sport fans worldwide. Brazil’s Jogos Limpos, clean games initiative, aims to protect both events against any foul play. The links between money, power, society and sport need to be broken down to determine what is needed for 2014, 2016 and beyond.

200 countries signed the Rio +20

US$2.3 billion worth of television

+ TRANSPARENCY?

WHY THE PENALTY TO SOCIETY?

outcome document, which pledges urgent and decisive steps against corruption.

30%

In 2011, corruption prevented of all development assistance from reaching its final destination.1

15% and 30% of timber is

Between felled illegally.2

Two-thirds of the world’s poor live in resource-rich countries.3

US$100 billion

By 2020, an estimated will be spent annually on mitigating the effects of climate change.

and marketing deals have already been secured for the 2018 World Cup.4

179%

Olympic spending has been over budget on average for all games since 1960.5

41% of EU citizens see corruption as the biggest threat facing sport.6

US$50 billion

Around of illegal bets are placed on cricket matches each year.7

2,000 contracts were awarded for the 2012 Olympics.8

Bloomberg. 5Saïd Business School, University of Oxford. European Commission. 7International Cricket Commission. 8 The Guardian. 4 6

United Nations. 2World Bank. 3World Bank.

1

YOUNG JOURNALISTS AGAINST CORRUPTION

SOCIAL

“It’s been amazing – the young journalists are from all over the world, with different interests, different ages, different backgrounds. It’s a very rich, dynamic environment.” The IACC’s young journalist programme aims to engage young writers, broadcasters and photo journalists around corruption issues. According to participant Jessica Weiss, it’s achieving its goal. Coming to the IACC from their workplaces around the world – from Egypt to Nepal to Peru –

the team of 20 journalists were selected for their passion for social justice and high levels of expertise. They bring with them an impressive list of credits that includes Al Jazeera, National Geographic and The New York Times, to name but a few. During the conference, the journalists will be using this experience to capture the debates, ideas and interactions. From their news hub at the venue, the group are making sure the IACC messages are heard far beyond Brasília – writing for our blog, contributing to social media, and documenting the conference with photographs and video interviews. It’s a packed schedule, and according to participant Bolanle Omisore, their work will not end when they fly home. “We’ve talked about potential projects”, she says, discussing her plans to link up with her fellow journalists later. “We’ve worked on things together already, and we’re planning on collaborating again in the future.”

“Hacking for #transparency at the #15IACC. @danielabsilva setting the stage #onibushacker. Ready, set, hack...” #15iacc - georg_neu - Georg Neumann

© Virginie Nguyen Hoang

“To really attack corruption one needs the institutions of democracy and the rule of law. If those institutions don’t exist, they have to be recreated, or created from scratch.” You have worked extensively in post-conflict states. How can corruption be tackled in countries that are in a state of transition with nonexistent or weak institutions? Well it’s very difficult, because to really attack corruption one needs the institutions of democracy and the rule of law. If those institutions don’t exist, they have to be recreated, or created from scratch. In South Africa we were lucky - we had the institutions of democracy which had been reserved only for white people, so when the majority came into government in 1994, they were able to use those institutions and make them work better than they’d ever worked before. But in a lot of countries those institutions don’t exist and this is where I think the international community has a great deal of assistance to offer. But one caveat - the local people have to own the process. It’s no use international people coming and saying “we gonna show you how to do it.” People have to learn, and they have to learn on the job. The international community should be very active, but at the same time very modest. You joined our plenary on ending corruption. Where have you seen progress in this area? What is needed in your view to bring an end to impunity? I think the recognition of international humanitarian law, which fights against huge crimes - unimaginably huge crimes involving the deaths and the rapes of hundreds of thousands of people - has really led to a movement against impunity. More and more, I think, there is a feeling in the global community that no decent system can contemplate granting immunity for people who perpetrate those sorts of crimes. And if there’s a cost, and there could be a cost with regard to negotiating peace, that cost has to be paid. I don’t believe there should be any compromise with regard to impunity at that level. Would you be able to tell us about the time you first realised corruption was a problem? It was really when I started to practice as a commercial lawyer in South Africa in the 1960s. I was amazed at how low the moral values were of respectable business people in South Africa - and I´m sure it’s common around the world. It struck me that so many businessmen found it amusing that I considered fairness and honesty important, which was a bit of a shock in my very early professional days. The above text is an edited excerpt from a video interview – to see the full video, visit www.youtube. com/15iacc


EVENING EVENT

DID YOU KNOW? FUN FACTS ABOUT BRAZIL

Brazil produces more than 25% of the world’s supply of coffee.

Brasília was designed by architect Oscar Niemeyer, who is considered to be one of the best architects in the world.

20:30 - 24:00 Networking event Set to the concept of ‘regions of Brazil’, the 15th IACC networking event will dish up food and entertainment that embodies the country’s many distinct regions. Renowned Brazilian musicians, including Gê Mendoça, Cássia Eller, Zélia Duncan and Lúcio Alvez e Tito Mad, will be bringing you an eclectic mix of music from every corner of the country.

There are over 700 airports in Brazil, the second largest number in the world, after the United States.

Brazil was named after the Pau Brasil tree, also known as Brazilwood.

DON'T MISS!

Brazil has the highest diversity of primates in the world.

HOW DO YOU SAY...? Hello - Oi

THE

Goodbye - Tchau

CORRUPTION CROSSWORD

Yes - Sim 8 4

No - Não

6

Good morning - Bom dia

5

Good afternoon - Boa tarde Good evening - Boa noite Good night - Boa noite Thank you - Obrigada (women say), Obrigado (men say)

3

2

Many thanks - Muito obrigada

7

Please - Por favor You’re welcome - Denada

1

My name is... - Meu nome é... Where is the... (toilet) - Onde fica o... (banheiro) How do I get to... (the station) - Como eu chego na .. (estaçao) Can you help me? - Voce pode me ajudar por favor? How much does this cost? - Quanto custa isso?

ACROSS

DOWN

1) Procedure where companies and individuals are excluded from participating or tendering projects. (9)

4) The concept that individuals, agencies and organisations (public, private and civil society) are held responsible for executing their powers properly. (14)

2) Form of favouritism in which a person is selected, regardless of qualifications or entitlement, for a job or government benefit because of political affiliations or connections. (9) 3) Form of favouritism based on acquaintances and familiar relationships whereby someone in an official position exploits his or her power and authority to provide a job or favour to a family member or friend, even though he or she may not be qualified or deserving. (8)

BRAZILIAN SAYING OF THE DAY De grão em grão a galinha enche o papo.

5) Characteristic of governments, companies, organisations and individuals of being open in the clear disclosure of information, rules, plans, processes and actions. (12)

Grain by grain the hen's stomach is full.

6) The total number of IACCs held to date. (7) 7) Based on core values, a set of standards for conduct in government, companies and society that guides decisions, choices and actions. (6)

EMERGENCY NUMBERS

8) The arena, outside of the family, state and market where people associate to advance a common set of interests. (5-7)

Ambulance - 192

Federal Police - 194

Fire department - 193

Civil Police - 197

Answers: 1) Debarment 2) Patronage 3) Nepotism 4) Accountability 5) Transparency 6) Fifteen 7) Ethics 8) Civil Society

© 2012 IACC. All rights reserved.

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