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chapter 7 — personal strategies

• Think of your own safety and the safety of others. This can help you calm yourself. • Be patient and extra courteous. Remember that all drivers make mistakes. Take a couple of moments to calm yourself down and leave your problems behind before you start to drive. If you can’t focus, don’t get behind the wheel. • Be honest with yourself. Admitting to yourself exactly how you feel can often help to calm you down. • Open the windows to let in some fresh air and take a few deep breaths. • Listen to the radio or a relaxing CD. • Loosen your grip on the steering wheel. This will help to ease your arm and neck muscles and reduce the chance of you getting a headache.

crash fact Throughout B.C. an average of 78 people are killed each year in crashes involving impaired driving. Source: Police Traffic Accident System, 2010 to 2014.

Impairment You in the driver’s seat You’re going home from a party with your friend. It’s pretty late and you’re anxious to get to bed. It’s been a long day. Your friend runs a yellow light, just catching the beginning of a red. You notice he is staring straight ahead, his eyes not moving. The car starts to weave and then lurches to one side as he brakes hard. “Hey, what are you doing?” you ask. “It’s okay, I thought I was at the intersection…a little early, huh?” he laughs. What should you do?

Facts about alcohol Here are some ways that alcohol can interfere with seeing, thinking and doing. Chapter 9, your licence, talks about some of the fines and charges for impaired driving.

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Profile for Insurance Corporation of BC

Learn to Drive Smart  

This guide is designed for new drivers in British Columbia. It is also helpful for experienced drivers who are new to British Columbia, taki...

Learn to Drive Smart  

This guide is designed for new drivers in British Columbia. It is also helpful for experienced drivers who are new to British Columbia, taki...