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INSPIRE FIRST QUARTER 2021

PICTURE THIS NEW HEART, NEW LUNGS, NEW LIFE

K a t h l e en r e f f e h S

Empowering Healthy Living in Parker & Palo Pinto Counties

Eat Fresh to Lower Your Blood Pressure DROP YOUR SMOKING HABIT

Spinach and Lentil Soup

A Special Section of the inspirehealthmag.com ยง #inspirehealthmag

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recipe

SPINACH & LENTIL SOUP By Christian Dischler INGREDIENTS  3 tbsp olive oil  1 onion, diced  1 carrot, peeled and diced  1 red bell pepper, seeded and diced  4 garlic gloves, minced  1 tbsp tomato paste  1 1/2 tsp ground cumin  1 1/2 tsp ground coriander  1/4 tsp cayenne or red pepper flakes  1/2 tsp salt  1/2 tsp black pepper  1 bay leaf  1 quart vegetable stock  1 1/2 cups green or red lentils  2 cups water, as needed  2 cups fresh spinach  1/4 cup chopped cilantro  1 lemon or lime, juiced

DIRECTIONS  In a large cast iron or ceramic pot, heat olive oil on medium high until shimmering. Add onion, pepper and carrots. Cook until onions begin to turn golden brown. Add garlic and cook for additional 2 minutes, stirring frequently. Add spices, tomato paste and flour. Cook until fragrant.  Add vegetable stock to mixture and continue stirring until liquid comes to a boil and paste is incorporated. Add lentils to liquid and cook on high heat for 5 minutes. Lower to simmer, place lid on and cook for 20 minutes, or until lentils are tender.  Add spinach, cilantro and citrus juice. Cook until spinach is tender. Add water to the soup as needed to reach desired consistency. Season to taste and enjoy.

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contents

10

issue 2

3 RECIPE

14 FEATURE

7 RECIPE

15 RECIPE

Spinach and Lentil Soup Apple Zinger Smoothie

12 MIGHTY KIDS

Drop Your Smoking Habit Crispy Roasted Duck With Orange Glaze

4 Ways Helicopter Parenting Can Negatively Impact Your Child

EAT FRESH TO LOWER YOUR

BLOOD PRESSURE

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First Quarter 2021

NEW HEART NEW LUNGS NEW LIFE

KATHLEEN SHEFFER


Thanks for the win.

Thank you for making us your Readers’ Choice All Star Winner for “Best Hospital.” At Texas Health Neighborhood Care & Wellness Willow Park, care is closer to home. We help you get healthy with a 24/7 emergency department, therapy services and physician offices. And we help you stay healthy with educational classes and events, mammography, and a Fitness Center that offers child care and a smoothie bar. Plus, parking is always free and right outside our doors. So you can get in, get healthy and get on with your life. And, as always, we have protocols in place designed around your safety.

Call or go online to find our full list of services. 1-877-THR-WELL TexasHealth.org/Discover-Willow-Park

Doctors on the medical staffs practice independently and are not employees or agents of Texas Health hospitals or Texas Health Resources. © 2020


editor’s letter

A New Slate

The start of a new year can be a blank slate for many things, including health. Some of the most common New Year’s resolutions revolve around health — losing weight, eating healthier, etc. These are all well and good, but remember that your goal doesn’t have to be lofty to achieve success. For instance, if you’re not keen on working out and want to start being more active, ease in. Start with walking, a low-impact and stress-relieving activity. If you have a personal tracker, you can start by counting how many steps you normally take in a day. Then add 1,000 the next week and keep adding regularly until you reach 10,000 steps, or whatever your goal may be. When it comes to dieting, start small. Replace an afternoon snack with fruit for a week. Then replace a side dish with healthy vegetables for another. And finally, go easy on yourself. Mistakes and setbacks may happen, because we are, after all, human. But if at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. Sally Sexton Managing Editor

publisher Lisa Chappell editor Sally Sexton advertising director Michelle Roberts account executive Mary Gray

M A G A Z I N E executive publishers Hal G. Fox & Suzanne Polk Fox

managing editor Suzanne Polk Fox

copy editor Christian Dischler

contributing writers Anthony Baker Bea Conrad Patricia Danflous

Angie Edward Annie Franklin Liz McGehee Sarah Kirkland Christina Leidenheimer Laine Morris Nellie Palmer Amy Smith Anja Springthorpe Liz Strand

creative team production and design

Suzanne Fox Claire Thomas

Christian Dischler

The information contained in Inspire Health is intended for educational purposes only. A reader should never substitute information contained in Inspire Health for the advice of a health care professional. Jumpstart Publishing, LLC and publishers of Inspire Health, do not endorse or promote any of the products or services described in the pages of Inspire Health and the publishers do not verify the accuracy of any claims made in the editorial or advertisements contained in Inspire Health. Readers should not use the information in Inspire Health for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem or for prescription of any medication or other treatment. Readers should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or have or suspect they have a health problem. V5

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recipe

INGREDIENTS

• 3 large oranges • 2 Gala apples • 1 cup fresh carrot juice (about 5 carrots) • 2 tsps. freshly grated ginger • 1/2 cup ice

DIRECTIONS

 Wash the apples and carrots.  Core and chop the apple.  Cut oranges in half.  In a juicer, juice the carrots.  Squeeze the juice from the oranges.  Then grate the ginger.  Pour all prepared ingredients into a high-powered blender. Blend on high for 1 minute or until smooth.  Enjoy!

GARNISH

For healthy munching, garnish with 3 apple slices.

APPLE ZINGER

SMOOTHIE By Christina Leidenheimer

weight-loss tip This smoothie is high in fiber. Just one apple contains 3 to 5 grams of fiber, and much of it is in the skin. Fiber and ginger are a dynamic duo in this smoothie. Ginger helps spice things up, stimulating digestion and giving your metabolism a healthy nudge, which potentially leads to increased calorie burning. Not to be forgotten, is the fat-fighting vitamin C swimming in the sweet fresh orange juice.

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eat fresh

EAT FRESH TO LOWER

YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE By Bea Conrad

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H

igh blood pressure remains one of the most common and dangerous problems facing people today. It can lead to serious medical issues, including heart disease and stroke, so it is important for those who are prone to do what they can to keep their blood pressure under control. There are a host of different drugs intended to treat high blood pressure, but many individuals prefer to look for a natural approach instead. A lot of blood pressure medications can have unpleasant side effects, and many people have found that a combination of lifestyle changes and natural herbs can provide excellent results. There are a number of herbal remedies that have been used to treat high blood pressure, and there is a great deal of ongoing research into the effectiveness of various herbal preparations. Herbs have been used by indigenous cultures throughout the world for centuries, and science is finally beginning to take this vast store of traditional knowledge seriously. Among the herbs that have been used to treat high blood pressure are such household names as:

root is Valerian used nly commo stress ce to redu n sio and ten

Garlic Ginkgo Biloba Valerian Root Cinnamon Ginger Nutmeg Hawthorn Gingko Biloba is perhaps the most widely used and studied of these herbs, and remains the subject of a great deal of scientific examination. Gingko Biloba is thought to relieve high blood pressure through the relaxation of blood vessels, allowing blood to flow freely. Research shows garlic working in a similar fashion. Hawthorn is thought to be helpful at dilating blood vessels, thus lowering blood pressure. Valerian root is commonly used to reduce stress and tension, helping to keep blood pressure under control. Cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger are all beneficial for an array of reasons and can easily be included in one’s diet in a multitude of ways. Diet and lifestyle changes can have a profound impact on blood pressure, and it is important for individuals to combine any herbal therapy with quality medical care, and healthy eating habits. Getting plenty of exercise and eating healthy foods can have as great an impact on blood pressure as medication, and it is important to treat this common condition with a whole body approach. This should include a combination of dietary changes, lifestyle changes, stress reduction, herbal therapies and traditional medical treatments.

aps oba is perh Gingko Bil nd a idely used the most w s b these her studied of

lood elaxes b Garlic r ing blood to allow vessels ely flow fre

Hawthorn is thought to be helpful at dilating blood vessels

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cover story

Picture This NEW HEART, NEW LUNGS, NEW LIFE By Patricia Danflous

W

hat’s the difference between blue and pink? Kathleen Sheffer can answer that question with exuberance and energy. It’s the difference between living a step away from death and having a second chance for living a full life. For most of her 27 years Sheffer’s complexion was tinged with blue. Now she is pink, rosy and occasionally celebrates when her skin breaks out–just like a normal, healthy young woman. The color of her life changed July 1, 2016, when she received a heart and double lung transplant. “I can’t say that I felt great when I came out of the transplant surgery,” the San Francisco native said. “But

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when my sister showed me a picture of my pink and healthy hand, I knew my life had changed.” A surgical patient at seven days old, Sheffer’s congenital heart defect would limit and sometimes restrict her life for more than 20 years as her heart worked overtime to keep blood flowing through her body. “Today, surgery can correct the congenital arterial problem I had,” she explained. “I had a repair procedure that had an impact on my lungs with the potential for a heart transplant always a concern.” You know how easy it is to jump in the shower after exercising or to get ready for a special event? For Sheffer, the process required 30 minutes of preparation and after care. “For 16 years I was on continuous

intravenous medications with a central line in my chest,” she noted, explaining that bandaging the area was a precise necessity. While sitting on the sidelines watching her sister’s success as a competitive swimmer could be disheartening, Sheffer didn’t take time to feel sorry for herself. “I could be competitive in a different way,” she stated. “I focused on academics and even though my parents were nervous and worried, I made my way to the University of California– Berkley, not too far away from home.” With a degree in Architecture, Sheffer took a detour from that field, turning her sharp appreciation for detail and creative vision toward photography. A highly respected


corporate event photographer, her first out-of-town assignment not only acknowledged her talent and reputation but also raised a red flag on her medical problems. “I flew to Seattle for that first corporate assignment and stayed with a friend from college,” she said. “I woke up in the middle of the night, couldn’t breathe and was soon coughing up blood. My friend called a Seattle hospital hotline and I experienced a 15-day stay in intensive care.” “This is not good,” she remembered her Stanford doctor explaining when she was able to transfer back home. Sheffer’s condition was rapidly progressing. It was transplant time. Twenty-eight days later, and sooner than anticipated, she got the call that one family’s loss and the generosity of an organ donation was her lifeline. “I spent the fourth of July holiday recovering from surgery to replace a heart that had worked so hard it was four times the normal size, and lungs that could no longer

function. It was a total remodel of my chest area,” she said smiling. “During the days after surgery I also celebrated and silently thanked those I didn’t know for helping me to live,” she emphasized. The color of her skin is not the only thing that changed posttransplant. “I never imagined how transformative good circulation can be,” Sheffer said. “I can exercise, do laundry and make dinner without stopping to rest every few minutes. I never learned how to exercise because I couldn’t. Now I have started to play tennis and the first Christmas after the transplant I went on a seven-mile hike with my parents in Sedona, Arizona.” Sheffer’s isn’t just exercising and adding sports to her repertoire of life experiences. She’s winning medals. Two years after her transplant she joined Team NorCal, a group of transplant recipients, living donors, donor families and caregivers, participating in the Transplant Games of America. The highly competitive event showcases

the impact of organ, eye, and tissue registration while celebrating life and remembering donors. A member of the badminton, cycling and table tennis teams, she brought home a gold medal in badminton and two gold medals in a cycling competition–racing through the high altitude of Salt Lake City, Utah. “The 2020 Games were canceled due to COVID-19, but I am looking forward to the upcoming games, especially 2022 when they will be in San Diego, close to home,” she said. “I would like to honor my donor by wearing their name on my team shirt, but I have yet to make contact with them. I have written letters of thanks, which the organ procurement agency passes on, but haven’t gotten a response. I may never hear from the donor family, but I do want them to know how grateful I am.” As an organ recipient, Sheffer fell into the high risk category when COVID-19 made its impact on the world. “Just a few days after we had finished remodeling my childhood home, now my home and studio, the country went into lockdown,” she said. “I am anxious to return to shooting corporate events and had to be a little creative while isolating. Taking photos of food and products is not as much fun as interacting with people, but it is a challenge that is sharpening my techniques.” Sheffer accepts the gift of life from her unknown donor seriously, making health a priority as well as compliance with COVID guidelines. “I have a responsibility to the donor and their family to take good care of the organs they generously donated,” she said. “I want to stay healthy for all of us.” To see more and learn more about Kathleen Sheffer, visit her website at www.kathleensheffer.com or find her on Instagram @kathleen.s.photography. INSPIRE HEALTH

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mighty kids

4 WAYS Helicopter Parenting Can Negatively Impact Your Child By Laine Morris HELICOPTER PARENTING IS AN OVERPROTECTIVE STYLE OF RAISING CHILDREN. A HELICOPTER PARENT WILL PREVENT THEIR CHILD FROM TRYING NEW ACTIVITIES IF THEY ARE CONCERNED ABOUT THE SAFETY OF THAT ACTIVITY. NORMAL AGE-APPROPRIATE ACTIVITIES LIKE WALKING TO SCHOOL OR GOING TO A SLEEPOVER MAY BE FORBIDDEN BY A HELICOPTER PARENT. WHILE MOST HELICOPTER PARENTING COMES FROM A DEEP FEAR FOR A CHILD'S SAFETY, KEEPING YOUR CHILD CONSTANTLY WITHIN ARMS-REACH CAN BE PSYCHOLOGICALLY DAMAGING TO CHILDREN. IF YOU THINK YOU MAY BE A HELICOPTER PARENT, CONSIDER THESE NEGATIVE IMPACTS IT MAY BE HAVING ON YOUR CHILD.

1.

INHIBITING LEARNING As scary as it may be to allow your child to go out into the world and potentially get hurt, that is how they learn. We have all experienced scrapes, pain and illness, but every discomfort is a learning experience. Yes, your child may fall off the monkey bars, but they will grow from that experience. Children learn from new experiences, including the discomfort that may come along with them.

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DISCOURAGE AUTONOMY Helicopter parenting involves making choices for your child that they can make for themselves. If you cook every meal for your child because you don't want them to get burned on the stove or you pick out their outfits so they'll be matching, you are taking potential choices away from your child. Having autonomy over their own lives is absolutely crucial for your child's development. By making all of their choices for them, you are stunting their growth and undermining their independence. It will be more difficult for your child to make decisions as an adult if they rely on you to make all their choices as a child.

3.

LOW CONFIDENCE When a child has been sheltered from the world, they will subsequently learn to fear it. If you teach them that the world is a scary place and they need to rely on their parents for safety, they are not going to trust in their own ability to handle life. You may stress about your child walking to the bus stop on their own, but simple tasks like walking alone with other kids gives your child confidence to be out in the world. And

when your child subsequently sees their friends exhibit more freedom than they do, they're going to begin to wonder why you don't trust them to do age-appropriate activities. Your distrust of your child's ability to handle themselves will bleed into their self-esteem. Your child will inevitably learn not to trust themselves.

4.

MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES Helicopter parenting is a consequence of fear and anxiety. If you don't learn to control your fear about your child's safety, they are going to learn that same fear. Your child may struggle with depression and anxiety if they learn from you that the world is a scary place. If they are not safe within the world and need constant supervision, that will carry over into anxiety in their adult life. Your child may also be less open to new activities if you hold them back from new experiences. If you fear you're falling into helicopter parenting patterns, it's not too late to loosen the strings and allow your child room to grow. The psychological benefits of giving your child more control over their lives and their decisions are endless.


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wellness

DROP YOUR SMOKING HABIT By Angie Edward

IF YOU'RE A SMOKER,YOU'LL WANT TO THINK TWICE ABOUT YOUR HABIT WHEN A DEADLY RESPIRATORY VIRUS COMES YOUR WAY. VIRUSES OF THIS NATURE AFFECT THE LUNGS, AND IF YOURS ARE CONGESTED OR SMOKE DAMAGED, THEY'LL BE ILL-PREPARED TO COPE. COUNTLESS MEDICAL STUDIES HAVE PROVIDED DATA THAT BACKS UP THIS CLAIM: SMOKERS FARE FAR WORSE THAN NON-SMOKERS WHEN BATTLING A RESPIRATORY VIRUS. THE GOOD NEWS IS A SMOKER'S LUNGS WILL AUTOMATICALLY START TO REPAIR THEMSELVES AFTER SMOKING CEASES, SO IF YOU STOP NOW,YOU'LL IMPROVE YOUR CHANCES FOR A FULL RECOVERY FROM RESPIRATORY VIRUSES. BREAKING THE HABIT IS EASIER SAID THAN DONE, BUT THIS INSIGHT AND THESE PROACTIVE TIPS WILL HELP YOU.

Think of the benefits for your family

Should you and your loved ones come down with a respiratory virus, you'll want to get back on your feet as soon as possible so you can tend to the others. But the more you smoke, the slower your recovery will be. It’s possible your relatives would have to look after you and deal with the complications if your lungs are clogged up from the start. Consider that when you reach for your next cigarette and it might help you resist. Keep in mind that the smoke you emit poses a risk to those around you as they battle the virus too. If you're still tempted to smoke, consider that cigarettes cost money, and when people close to you are sick, medicines are the first priority on a shopping list.

Put your cigarettes out of reach

However much you may wish to drop the smoking habit, it can be extremely hard to do when cigarettes are within reach. But if they're locked away in a strongbox at the back of a shelf in a far corner of your home, you'll be less tempted. Make an inconvenient home for your cigarette stash, and if you still can't trust yourself not to access them, give them to a house mate or neighbor to hold until the virus risk is over.

Take up a hobby to ease the cravings

When your mind is occupied you're less tempted to smoke, so choose a new hobby for yourself. It could be anything

from a new sport to a tedious craft. Many people like to look into their family histories, and others enjoy learning a language or musical instrument. The more absorbed you become in your project, the less you'll crave cigarettes. Depending on the activity, you may not be able to smoke anyway. Try doing so while performing gymnastics or blowing a trumpet, it’s not easy.

Consider quitting cigarettes as part of an all-round health drive

Staying strong in body and mind is integral to surviving a major virus outbreak. Whether you catch the disease or not, you'll need mental and physical resilience to ride out the challenges it poses to you and your family. Fill your lungs with air instead of smoke as part of a comprehensive coping strategy. Other steps could include a balanced diet, increased exercise and more sleep. This broader health drive will incentivize you to drop the smoking habit, and make it an obstacle in your path to a healthier life. Lead by example and you'll inspire other smokers to turn their habit around too. If you've been trying unsuccessfully to give up smoking, the threat of a respiratory virus could be the incentive you need. If you have no intention of stopping or reducing the habit, you might think differently when facing an influx of a contagious virus. Quit now to be best prepared, and empower yourself with this wisdom to succeed in defeating potential viruses.

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recipe

Crispy Roasted Duck WITH ORANGE GLAZE By Christian Dischler INGREDIENTS FOR GLAZE: •1/3 cup brown sugar • 1/2 cup fresh orange juice • 2 tbs apple cider vinegar • 2 sprigs thyme • 1 sprig rosemary Cook sugar in heavy saucepan until it begins to melt. Keep stirring until it becomes a smooth caramel. Add orange juice and vinegar slowly with caution, as mixture may bubble and sugar may harden. Cook on medium heat, stirring for several minutes until caramel is dissolved in mixture. Add herbs for final minutes of cooking then set aside. Before serving, warm sauce if necessary and remove herbs. FOR DUCK: • 1 whole duck (5-6 lbs) • Coarse salt and fresh cracked pepper • 2 oranges, sliced and seeded • 8 cloves peeled garlic • 1 onion, sliced • 1 carrot, peeled and sliced • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary

• 2 sprigs fresh thyme • 1/2 cup orange liqueur • 1/2 cup water or stock DIRECTIONS • Preheat oven to 475. Rinse duck in cold water and pat dry. Using kitchen shears, trim excess fat off bird near base of neck and rear cavity. Clip wing tips off and set aside with neck bone. Prick duck skin with sharp fork all over, being careful not to make an incision into the meat. Paint duck with orange liqueur. Rest for 10 minutes. Season inside and outside of duck with salt and pepper. • Place rack in roasting pan. Place half of vegetables and herbs, neck bone, wing tips and one sliced orange at base of pan. Pour ½ c water or stock into pan. Place whole duck breast side up on roasting rack. Fill cavity with remaining vegetables, herbs and orange slices. Score breast fat in crosshatch pattern without cutting into flesh. Place on middle oven rack and cook 30 minutes. • Remove entire pan from oven. Place

in safe spot. Tilt duck to drain juice from cavity into pan. Remove rack with duck and place over sink or towel to catch drippings. Skim fat off roasting pan liquid with spoon or baster (save fat in container for later use if desired). Place rack with duck back on pan. Lower temperature to 350 and place duck back in oven. • Cook duck until thermometer placed in thick part of thigh reaches 165. Remove duck and repeat skimming process. Set oven to high broil and place duck under broiler for 3-5 minutes while checking frequently. Remove duck and let rest for at least 10 minutes. Skin should be golden and crispy. • Carve duck and serve with orange glaze and chopped fresh rosemary. • Optional: Reduce 1/2 cup red wine in separate saucepan then strain pan drippings into saucepan. Reduce until thick for a quick sauce au jus. *Chicken can be substituted in recipe by skipping fat scoring step.

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