Home & Garden Decorator 2

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home garden

D E C O R AT O R 10

SUCCEED WITH SEEDS

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THE BEST AIR FILTER EVER!

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COWBOY BACKYARD BARBECUE

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Falling Leaves… A Golden Opportunity

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UP, UP AND GARDEN AWAY

Fall 2015

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Fall 2015

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Contents

Falling leaves… A GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY Gold, brown, red and orange leaves present a golden opportunity for nutrient-rich garden mulch—free from mother nature! page 8

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DREAM KITCHENS BEGIN WITH ORGANIZED PANTRIES

5 TIPS FOR A QUICKER HOME SALE

UP, UP AND GARDEN AWAY

SUCCEED WITH SEEDS

HOME & GARDEN PRODUCT PICK

SO YOU WANT TO BUILD A HOME?

THE BEST AIR FILTER EVER!

COWBOY BACKYARD BARBECUE GOT JUNK? LISTEN, LEARN AND EARN!

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CANNING CALENDAR

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home garden ISSUE 02 | 2015

D E C O R AT O R

LETTER from the Editor Don’t you just love the fall? The leaves are changing to beautiful hues of orange, red and yellow and the air is crisp. It’s a great time to get outside and do some fall cleanup. Did you know that pressure washing your home can increase the value by $10,000? Read our article on curb appeal to find out more. In this issue we are going to make our own mulch, plant a vertical garden, sell some junk and once everything is cleaned up, we are going to celebrate with a Cowboy Backyard Barbecue! We hope you enjoy our tips for decorating and getting your home and yard in tip top shape for the winter! Yeehaw! Suzanne Fox

Executive Publishers Greg and Suzanne Fox Jumpstart Publishing, LLC Managing Editor Suzanne Polk Fox Editor Caitlin Watzke Contributing Writers Patricia Danflous Michele Robert Poche Christina Leidenheimer Contributing Photographers Milestone Photography www.milestonephotography.com Art Director Jennifer Caballero Graphic Design Tra Pham • Rachel Lambert Production Manager Debbie Weldon Sales Team Charlotte V. Morris • Vivian Dugas Lauren Calve' • Kelly Smith A special thanks to Diane and Buster Johnson for allowing us to use your beautiful garden for our Cowboy Barbecue!

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DREAM KITCHENS BEGIN with Organized Pantries

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By Patricia Danflous D E C O R AT O R


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emember when you bought that jar of autumn-colored sprinkles—the perfect topping for homemade sugar cookies? Do you remember where it is? Of course not. Months later, while looking for an expensive bottle of olive oil, you find the sprinkles next to several cans of expired vegetables. How many times has that happened to you? You rush in from the grocery, grab what you need for dinner, and randomly place everything else in the pantry. There’s always time to straighten things out later, right? Wouldn’t life be simpler if your pantry was organized and arranged in such a way that it would be easy to maintain that organization? It is achievable. With just a little planning and effort, organizational tools and labeling materials, you’ll be well on your way to an organized pantry and a dream kitchen. Whether you have a large food storage area or just a cupboard in an efficiency apartment, an organized pantry helps you to see what you have in stock and what you need to add. Best of all, you will find what you need quickly and easily. You will save time while saving money as you eliminate the need to buy another bottle of ketchup when you already have three hidden behind the cereal. Start with an open space. No, don’t throw everything away. Do take everything out of the pantry, and sort it on your counter or kitchen table according to food type—cereals, dry goods, canned meats and vegetables, and cookies and snacks, for example. Be sure to inspect each item and discard anything that has reached its expiration date. Now, take a good look at the space you have. Try sketching a rough format of the pantry. Think about what foods you use the most and what types of storage solutions—if any—will make life easier. Fill in that sketch before you

start shopping for organizational tools and restocking the pantry. If your budget allows, professional organizers offer customized solutions to meet your family’s lifestyle and everyday needs. Doing it yourself, with suggestions from your home supply store or specialty organizing and container store, will work well. The key to a successful, organized start is knowing which foods you use the most, which items you use occasionally and which you should purchase on an as-needed basis. Storage solutions are abundant. Again, consider your budget, your space and your individual preferences. If you are constantly dieting but want to keep cookies around for the grandkids, you may decide an out of sight, out of mind approach is best and can choose non-see through baskets or containers with a simple label. Families with a morning dash out the door would be best to keep cereals and lunch-making items in clear, open containers on an easy-toreach shelf that encourages ease in putting things away. Remember that stackable square containers take up less space than round containers, and small tiered-shelving is a great way to handle spices, small jars and some canned products. Shelf dividers are also an option if you want to keep storage costs down. If you have a pantry with roll-out storage, you know that it is fairly easy to pull out the drawer for a full view of its contents. It’s also easy to cover

up a layer of cans or boxes with bags of chips. If you use a roll out system, commit to keeping like items together, and label each drawer. Don’t forget to maximize space. Specially designed back-of-the-door racks add space for spices, small bottles and canned goods. Some families designate the back of the pantry door for breakfast foods and after-school snacks—easy to see, easy to reach and easy to restock. Now that you are beginning to see the light, even way up on that top shelf, it’s time to develop a maintenance plan. You have good intentions, but things are not always going to stay as neat as they are today. Try straightening the pantry once a week or once a month if things start to get out of place. Invest in an inexpensive whiteboard to keep on your kitchen counter or inside the pantry door to track what you use and what you need. You may want to keep a separate list for those every-now-and-then items, such as holiday sprinkles!

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Falling leaves‌ A GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY By Christina Leidenheimer GOLD, BROWN, RED AND ORANGE LEAVES PRESENT A GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY FOR NUTRIENT-RICH GARDEN MULCH—FREE FROM MOTHER NATURE!

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oney may not grow on trees, but falling leaves can save you some green on garden mulch. Not only are leaves free and abundant during fall, they are an all-natural source of nutrient-dense, organic matter, perfect for protecting and nourishing plants through winter. Tree leaves are nitrogen rich, so using only leaves for garden mulch is not a good idea. Leaf mulch needs to be balanced with a rich carbon source, such as shredded wood chips. This ingenious combination will help each source decompose into healthy garden humus. Leaves can be very dry, too, so adding in the wood chips will help the soil retain a certain amount of moisture. This dynamic duo of wood and leaves will provide adequate protection for plants during the cold months ahead; they will work together to insulate the ground and reduce freezing. After they have done their work as a protective barrier, the leaves and wood chips will likely decompose into rich garden soil with a good pH, perfect for spring planting.

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Mow Your Mulch

In mid to late fall, rake a few medium piles of leaves together in long, but not high, piles. Shredded leaves, as opposed to whole leaves, will decompose better, so you will need to mow the leaves with your lawn mower a few times until you reach desired consistency. Take your mowed mulch and mix it with shredded wood chips (not sawdust). Do not use fresh wood chips, as these can be damaging to the plants as oils leak from the wood. Instead, use wood chips that are at least one to two years old. Once you have a good balanced mixture, begin spreading a hearty amount evenly around plants you want to protect and nourish. Make sure the mulch is thick enough to protect the plant through the winter.


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Succeed with SEEDS By Michele Robert Poche

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aking pumpkin soup anytime soon? What about pie? Ooh! Or a jack-o-lantern? In any event, you’re going to have seeds—lots of ‘em!—and the last thing you want to do is toss them. Not only are they filled with nutrients such as vitamin E, magnesium and zinc, they also make a great snack. Grab your roasting pan, and let’s get started. 1. Preheat oven to 300°. 2. Extract & clean. This is the hardest part. Plunge pumpkin contents into a pot of water, and separate seeds so they rise to the top. 3. Dry. You will get crunchier seeds if you let them dry out (perhaps even overnight) before the roasting process. 4. Coat. Melt butter (please use the real thing!) in microwave, and pour over seeds in large bowl. Add Worcestershire sauce, garlic powder and salt to desired taste. Mix well. 5. Roast. Spread in a single layer on a cookie sheet coated with nonstick spray, and place in oven. 6. Babysit. After 15 minutes, stir seeds to prevent scorching. Maintain single layer. Taste. Feel free to add seasoning, butter or cooking spray if needed. Roast another 15 minutes, then repeat inspection process. Continue this way until done. Total cooking time will vary depending on oven and seed quantity. On average, they’ll roast 45-60 minutes. •Don’t turn your back on them too long. Pumpkin seeds are like children. As long as they have almost all of your attention, they’ll turn out deliciously! •Add your freshly roasted pumpkin seeds to dried cranberries and sunflower seeds for a quick, delicious trail mix.

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r i A t s e The B Filter Ever! PET DANDER, DUST MITES, INSUFFICIENT VENTILATION, MOLD… OH MY! THESE ISSUES, ALONG WITH OTHER COMPOUNDING FACTORS, COULD BE CONTRIBUTING TO POOR AIR QUALITY IN YOUR HOME. DON’T DESPAIR—THERE IS ONE SIMPLE THING YOU CAN DO TO TODAY TO DRAMATICALLY IMPROVE THE AIR YOU BREATHE.

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By Christina Leidenheimer

ome specific indoor plants may facilitate the removal of toxic substances from the air, according to results of the NASA Clean Air Study1, which was conducted in 1989 by NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) and the Associated Landscape Contractors of America (ALCA). In fact, the natural filtration system these plants provide may even help neutralize the effects of sick building syndrome (SBS), a term that was coined in a 1984 World Health Organization report. The report suggested that up to 30 percent of new and remodeled buildings worldwide may be the subjects of complaints specifically related to poor indoor air quality. These complaints ranged from headaches and eye, nose or throat irritation to difficulty concentrating. Surprisingly, many SBS complaints are related to new construction. However, whether you

have a new home (post-construction), newly remodeled home (post-renovation) or an older home, toxins could be culminating in the air, causing you some measure of discomfort and adversely affecting your health. So, how can you start improving your indoor air quality today? Start by adding indoor plants to your home and/or office, and let them do their air cleaning magic! Not only is indoor greenery aesthetically appealing, the symbiotic relationship between humans and plants is one that contributes greatly to health. According to a University of Agriculture in Norway study, indoor plants can go to bat for us, reducing fatigue, coughs, sore throats and other cold-related illnesses by more than 30 percent. Not only do they improve physical health, they also improve mood; various studies suggest that being around plants can make us feel happier and calmer.


Marginata Harness the power of plants by adding an English ivy to your office space or a bamboo palm to your living room or bedroom. Decorating with living plants is fairly inexpensive, revitalizes indoor air, reduces the risk of various ailments, and makes you smile, all of which are exceptional reasons to take advantage of the best air filter ever! According to the NASA Clean Air Study the top 10 plants most effective in removing formaldehyde, benzene, and carbon monoxide from the air are:

Bamboo Palm

Peace Lily

1. Bamboo Palm 2. Chinese Evergreen 3. English Ivy 4. Gerbera Daisy 5. Janet Craig 6. Marginata 7. Mass Cane/Corn Plant 8. Mother-in-Law’s Tongue 9. Pot Mum 10. Peace Lily

Corn Plant

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a r o f s p i T 5

Quicker Home Sale By: Suzanne Fox

Nothing looks worse to a potential home buyer than an unkept home that shows signs of lack of regular maintenance. If you are trying to sell your home, or if you just want your home to look better, take a few simple measures to make sure your home measures up to the neighborhood and other homes on the market.

Scout for Ideas

Drive around and get ideas from your neighbors. See how they have landscaped, used color schemes and hidden unsightly air conditioners or garden hoses. You will be amazed at some of the tricks of the trade, like lattice work around an air conditioner with a pretty vine to conceal the dull putty-colored unit.

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First Impressions

Would you believe your mailbox is one of the first things people will notice about your home? A old rusted mailbox that is falling down is going to make a potential buyer think you haven’t maintained your home. Your local home store has pre-cut posts and mailbox kits that are easy to install.

Under Pressure

A little pressure washing can go a long way and increase the value of your home by thousands! A clean house that has been pressure washed and is free of mold, mildew, dirt, grime and water marks is going to make you and the new buyer see the real potential in your home. If your paint is chipping, you may have to add a fresh coat, but make sure it is the same or a similar color. It will cost you a lot less in the long run to paint your house the same color. Stay away from wild or bright colors that do not fit with surrounding homes, as it could cost you a lower appraisal. Pay special attention to the entrance of your home. Paint the door if needed, and make sure the porch or landing is clean and inviting with a new welcome mat.


Top It Off

A new buyer is not going to want to deal with repairing a roof. Replace broken or faded shingles and soffits. Your house value could be reduced by the amount of the repairs, so go ahead and make the repair. You stand a better chance of someone going inside if they don’t see a lot of repairs required on the outside.

Color My World

An overgrown garden is not appealing. Trim, cut and maintain the yard with weed killer or fertilizer. Weed and mulch flower beds, and, most importantly, add color. A couple of $15 flats at the home store can add thousands to the curb appeal of your home.

! g n i l l e S y p p Ha

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& E M O H RDEN k c i GA uct P d o r P

By Melissa Bugaj

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iving on the side of a mountain means there's lots of extra dirt, rocks, wet leaves and...did I already say dirt? Never mind how the falling leaves fill our gutters and ponds. That's where the Ryobi 3100 PSI Gas Pressure Washer saved our days: days it would take to wash down the house, days it would take to scrub the green grime off our deck and days it would take to shovel out goopy build-up in the ponds. Being a petite person, I wanted to see how hard it would be to actually get this machine up and running. Honestly, it took a few turns of the screwdriver for some quick accessories (like the spray nozzle holder), a quart of oil, some soap and, of course, gas.Then came the real test...for me, at least. Could I pull start this myself? The answer was yes. Not only could I start it with minimal effort, but I could also maneuver it up the rocky hill in our yard to the front of the house. Once I had it secured in a more level area, the fun began. The results were immediate. We were thrilled, so we power washed everything in sight, from the windows to the concrete patio to the front door. There was no doubt this machine held up to its reliable Ryobi name.

Not only could I start it with minimal effort, but I could also maneuver it up the rocky hill in our yard to the front of the house.

RYOBI 3100 PSI GAS PRESSURE WASHER powered by Honda · 3100 PSI (pressure per square inch) · 187 cc Honda engine · Idle-down technology for better fuel efficiency · 5-in-1 nozzle for easy spray-pattern changes · Detergent tank and accessory storage · 25' ultra flexible high pressure hose · 12” wheels, which allow for easy handling as you roll it across the terrain in your yard · Weighs 65 pounds (Compared to carrying both my sleeping kids upstairs from the car, this was a piece of cake to lift.) · Three-year unit limited warranty and a two-year engine limited warranty · Accessories such as a Gutter Cleaner and Turbo Nozzle (both sold separately)

For more information, visit: www.ryobitools.com.

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Cowboy Backyard Barbecue By: Suzanne Fox

Harvest your sunflowers, add a few mums (which are plentiful in the fall), find a pair of cowboy boots, and you have the beginning of a cowboy-themed backyard barbecue. Bright yellows, browns and orange with a pop of turquoise are all the rage this fall. You are going to see this color combination everywhere!

Yellow bandanas for napkins with cowboy hat napkin rings made from small cowboy hats found at the craft store are a nice touch. Use twine, ribbon or leather strips to tie to the napkins. Rust colored chargers are actually 10� candle plates. Have cowboy boots? Put a vase or mason jar in the boot and fill with flowers! Fill rust or tin cylinders with suflowers and top the entire table off with turquoise stained mason jars for glasses.

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Create a scene with a hanging element: a simple mason jar chandelier that you can make in an hour or less.

Mason Jar Chandelier

Supplies:  ½” x 6” board cut to 24” (If it isn’t pre-cut, the home store will be glad to cut it. We used pre-cut poplar because it is lightweight.)  8’ of rope (Clothesline nylon rope works just fine.)  4 pint mason jars  4 battery-powered candles  Paint (Use any color to go with your theme.)  Drill with a ¼” bit  Boat anchor rope  S-hook or clip hook  Small nails  Hammer  Beads or filler for the mason jars 1 2 3 4 5

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Drill a hole in each corner of the board, 1” from each side. Paint the board any color you want. Cut two 4-foot lengths of rope and loop around the hook so you have four 2-foot lengths of rope. Paint your board, top and bottom. Thread each end of the rope through the holes in your board and knot them. Burn the knots to seal them. You can also use Gorilla Glue on the knots. Make sure the rope lengths are even so that the board hangs level. Paint the lids of the mason jars (optional). Nail the lids of the mason jars onto the underside of the board. Fill jars approximately 1” to 2” high with beads, sand or any filler you wish. Put battery candles or battery string lights in the jars, and attach the jars to the lids. Use the S-hook to attach the chandelier to the anchor hook. Fall 2015

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Take the popular mason jar salad to the next level and serve them in a wheelbarrow. There’s nothing worse than wilted lettuce at a barbecue. The individual mason jars allow you to keep the salads on ice and fresh until they are ready to shake and pour onto your plate.

Take the popular mason jar salad to the next level and serve them in a wheelbarrow. There’s nothing worse than wilted lettuce at a barbecue. The individual mason jars allow you to keep the salads on ice and fresh until they are ready to shake and pour onto your plate.

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Cowboy Burgers Ingredients:  Fresh ground turkey or ground sirloin (1 lb. makes 4 ¼-lb. burgers or 8 to 10 sliders) Per 1 lb. of meat add:  1 heaping Tbsp. mayonnaise  2 heaping tsp. black pepper  1 cup grated cheese (any kind)  ¼ cup chopped banana peppers or jalapeño peppers, if you want some heat  Pepper jelly Directions: 1. Mix turkey, mayonnaise, black pepper, cheese and banana peppers or jalapeño peppers together. 2. Form into patties, and grill. 3. Top with pepper jelly.

Mason Jar Salad Recipe Mason jar salads are a great way to keep salads fresh, and they are easily customizable so that your guests have several options to choose from. Your guests simply pick a salad, shake it to mix with dressing, and pour onto a plate. You’ll have fresh, crisp lettuce every time. (Make ahead—salads can hang out in the jar for a week in the refrigerator.) Ingredients:  Dressing  Nuts or trail mix  Dried fruit  Cheese  Vegetables such as carrots, peppers, cucumbers, broccoli or cauliflower  Lettuce, kale or spinach Directions: 1. Layer all ingredients, starting with dressing and ending with lettuce, kale or spinach. Do not let dressing and lettuce touch or the lettuce will wilt. 2. Shake and serve! Fall 2015

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Up, Up

y a w A n e d r a and G By Patricia Danflous

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WHEN JACK’S MOM THREW HIS MAGIC BEANS ON THE GROUND, SHE HAD NO IDEA SHE WAS PLANTING THE FIRST VERTICAL GARDEN IN FAIRY TALE HISTORY. AND WHAT A VERTICAL GARDEN THAT WAS—A THICK, LUSH BEANSTALK LEADING TO GOLD AND RICHES.

tainer,” Hirling says. Begin with patience and plan on investing in caring time; a little extra watering and occasional fertilizing may be necessary. The results will be worth it. Imagine black-eyed Susans climbing up your backyard fence or highlighting a corner of your apartment balcony. Other flower choices include wax flowers, ivy geraniums, lipstick plants, peace lilies and dwarf rowing a vertical marigolds. Pansies are not only colorgarden may not be as ful but also easy to grow season-round easy as planting magic in most regions. beans, but your results “If you are a first-time or infrewill have a happily ever quent gardener, consider planting a after ending. vertical vegetable garden,” Hirling Master gardener Jane Hirling advises. “Placed in the right position explains that vertical gardening is relatively easy for first-time gardeners, with a range of options for the novice and the experienced. “A vertical garden is ideal for growing flowers, greenery and vegetables in small spaces indoors or outdoors,” she says. “But don’t dismiss vertical gardening if you have a large space. Verticals can dress up or hide a fence, serve as barriers between different spaces or dress up that quiet morning coffee corner on your patio. “What I like the best about a vertical garden is its flexibility to enhance your home or to camouflage an unattractive area,” she continues. Before you get started on your garden, decide what you want to plant, where you will place it and what type of support system you will use. A fence, a trellis (which you can make yourself), a purchased wall system especially for vertical gardening or wooden pallets are excellent supports for vines, flowers and vegetables. A trellis placed in front of a fence, on an outside garage wall or along the side of your house works well. A small wire tower rooted in a container is a good choice for an apartment balcony or small patio. “Vines, such as ivies, wisteria or jasmine, are not difficult to grow and add interest to a large wall space or twirling around a pole in a small con-

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for sunlight, and with just a little tender care, you will enjoy the satisfaction of successful gardening and fresh ingredients in your kitchen. Start off with peas, beans, tomatoes, squash or cucumbers and experiment with other vegetables based on the season and your individual taste.” Find information on vertical gardening in old-fashioned libraries, on the Internet—try your state agricultural department’s or university agricultural center’s Web sites—or by asking a member of a local garden club. For the best results, consult your local garden supply store for more information on vertical gardening and guidelines for your regional climate.

Add interest and a calming effect to your vertical garden with a DIY waterfall created with wooden boxes.

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Fall 2015


So You Want To Build A Home?

Home Builder Jason Yancey

By Suzanne Fox

HOME BUILDER JASON YANCEY GIVES US THE LOW DOWN ON WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW.

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uying a home is one thing, but building a home is a whole different ball game. We met with home builder Jason Yancey to find out just how difficult it is. We discovered that if you are prepared with a little know-how, things can go very smoothly for you. First, know your budget. Get pre-approved. It’s that simple. If you know how much you have to spend, you can focus on a home in your budget. No one wants to build a home without knowing what it is going to cost. The same goes for hiring a builder or contractor. They need to know how much you want to spend before they help you with plans or selecting a neighborhood. Once you are pre-approved, you can research neighborhoods you

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like. Chances are, when you find a neighborhood, you may also find a builder. Some builders buy lots in particular neighborhoods in order to build custom homes for buyers. That same builder may also have spec homes in the neighborhood. These homes have been built with the intention of selling them. Ask the builder if they have a spec home in the neighborhood. You may find one that suits you. When choosing a builder, make sure to consider how they lay their foundation. Have them explain their process and possibly show you a house that is having the foundation laid. According to Yancey, a sound foundation is the most important part of home building. Have the builder show you homes in different stages of construction so you can see

the quality of their work. The finishing touches really set builders apart. Make sure the finishes you like are available within your budget. Show the builder pictures of homes you like to see if they can build that type of home. If they can, they probably have plans for you to choose from. It’s easier for you and the builder if you know what you want. Consider your


er d l i u b e h t d n a u o It's eauskiernofworwyhat you want and if yo e a list of requirements. hav

family's needs when choosing a plan. Will your family expand, or will your children soon leave on their own? Will you require a guest room, craft room, office, hobby room or play room? Make sure you don’t spend money building rooms that never get used. More families are going with open floor plans where everyone gathers in living, dining and kitchen areas instead of formal dining and living rooms. Don’t forget storage space! A good builder can help you with all of these decisions, but it is easier if you have a list of your requirements. Your final walk-through can be very exciting. Don’t get caught up in the moment by overlooking items that require attention from the builder. Make a list of things that should be completed or corrected before you sign the final dotted line. Attention to detail will leave you and the builder more satisfied with your home.

TIP: If you see a home builder’s home for sale, consider buying it. The upgrades, attention to detail and high-quality construction are well worth the price!

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Fall 2015


Got Junk? Listen, Learn and Earn! By Michele Robert Poche

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et me guess…Your closets are cluttered, your cabinets are crowded, and your shelves are disheveled. Sometimes it seems like everything in the house is completely overstuffed—except, of course, your wallet. I have a solution. About a year ago, a friend talked me into making extra money by unloading some junk we had around the house. No, I’m not talking about a garage sale. Work all day from dawn to dusk selling things for a nickel then pretend to be proud of making $200? No, thank you.

I’M TALKING ABOUT SELLING ON EBAY. AFRAID? DON’T BE. IT’S EASY. AND HERE’S HOW. 1. Download the app on your smartphone. I can check things on the go and list the average item in about a minute. Because of the camera, I actually prefer using my phone for listing. 2. List just one thing at first. Find something in your house you think would sell—such as sports memorabilia, an old smartphone or designer clothing—and walk yourself through the listing process line by line. Before setting your price, look up similar listings for comparison.

3. Use suggested shipping charges. Unless you offer free shipping, the buyer covers the postage. So it’s up to you to make sure you’re covering your expenses but not overcharging the buyer. This knowledge comes with experience. As a new seller, use eBay’s suggested amounts as your guideline. 4. Designate somewhere in your home as your “mailroom.” You’re going to start accruing boxes, envelopes, tape and, most of all, stuff. As in things you’ve already listed and things you plan to

list. Before your addiction grows, pick a spot and get organized. 5. BE HONEST! Your success as a seller is largely dependent on your reputation. For that reason, you want to be 100 percent accurate about everything you sell. If the item is used, say so, and point out any damage or defects in your listing. Take a picture of it. eBay allows you to upload a certain number of free pictures, so take advantage of it. Put yourself in the shoes of the buyer. What would you want to know and see?

It’s been 14 months since I became an eBay seller. How have I done, you ask? Well, I’ve sold everything from a $0.99 book to a $128 iPhone. It’s all just stuff from my house. And so far, I’ve made nearly $1,900. That’s a little better than a garage sale, isn’t it?

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Protein Packed HEARTY TURKEY CHILI

Ingredients:  2 lbs. ground turkey breast (omit for vegetarian)  2 medium zucchini, cubed  2 medium yellow squash, cubed  1 medium red pepper, cored and chopped  1 medium green pepper, cored and chopped  1 medium onion, chopped  4 cloves garlic minced  2 tbsp coconut oil  2 cans organic kidney beans  2 cans organic black beans  1 28-oz. can San Marzano diced tomatoes  1 15-oz. can organic tomato sauce  3 tbsp. chili powder  1 tsp. paprika  1 tbsp. oregano  Fresh ground black pepper  Sea salt to taste  ¼ cup organic red wine Directions: In large Dutch oven, brown turkey and drain excess fat. Add vegetables, half the garlic, and coconut oil; sauté until tender. Add undrained tomatoes, tomato sauce, and beans. Bring to a boil, then simmer for 20 minutes. Add rest of the garlic, spices and red wine. Mix well. Simmer for 15 more minutes. Let set 20 minutes before serving.

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g n i n n Ca

Calendar Fruits and vegetables taste best when they are in season, but that doesn’t mean you can’t eat them all year round. Canning can help you enjoy your favorite fruits and vegetables whenever you want. This calendar will show you what crops are ready to be harvested in your state so you can pick them at their maximum freshness and lock in that fresh-from-thegarden taste you love. Credit: pickyourown.org Crop / Available

Jan

Feb

Mar

April

May

June

July

August

Sept

Apples Asparagus Beets Blackberries Blueberries Broccoli Cabbage Carrots Celery Cucumber Figs Grapes Melons Nectarines Peaches (see below for dates for specific varietes)

Mid May on

Pears Plums Pumpkins Raspberries Spinach Squash (summer) Squash (winter) Strawberries Sweet corn Tomatoes Vegetables (misc summer)

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some in Sept, not many!

Oct

Nov

Dec


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home garden ISSUE 02

D E C O R AT O R 10

SUCCEED WITH SEEDS

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THE BEST AIR FILTER EVER!

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UP, UP AND GARDEN AWAY

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GOT JUNK? LISTEN, LEARN AND EARN!

y o b w o C

Backyard Barbecue

Fall 2015 Bright yellows, browns and orange with a pop of turquoise are all the rage this fall. You are going to see this color combination everywhere!

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