Active Living 6

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THE BEAUTIFUL POWERFUL LEMON TREE ARE YOU TIRED OF FEELING

Squishy?

Money

SAVE BY AVOI DING THE SALE

ELVIS

The Lost Years


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contents

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TECH TIPS FOR KEEPING UP WITH THE GRANDKIDS

5 GARDENING

The Beautiful, Powerful Lemon Tree

23 WELLNESS

How to Connect With Old Friends & Make New Ones

Tired of the Daily Grind? Try this Substitute for Coffee

8 PETS

24 TRAVEL

Should Your Pet Share Your Bed?

Follow the Red Brick Line

12 NUTRITION

26 FUN

15 HEALTHY BODY

10

4

Tech Tips for Keeping Up with the Grandkids

7 RELATIONSHIPS

When Life Gives You Lemons

ARE YOU TIRED OF FEELING “SQUISHY?”

22 GRANDCHILDREN

Balance the Mind, Body and Spirit with Pilates

Nostalgia, Facts and Games 28 HOLISTIC MEDICINE

Boost Your Immunity with Yoga

16 COVER STORY

Elvis––The Lost Years 20 FINANCE

Because Not Every Sale Saves You Money

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THE BEAUTIFUL POWERFUL

LEMON TREE By Patricia F Danflous

LEMON JUICE IS ALSO ASSOCIATED WITH: • assisting in a good night’s sleep • fighting the flu and common colds • detoxifying the liver • cleansing the bowel • dissolving gallstones, kidney stones and calcium deposits • destroying bacteria • maintaining a healthy blood pressure

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GARDENING

S

ingers Peter, Paul & Mary made the lemon tree a little more famous with their rendition of a Brazilian folk song comparing love to the citrus tree. The tree, with its bright, yellow fruit and colorful blossoms, however, has had a place in history for centuries. Called the “tree of the golden apples” in Greek mythology, the lemon tree was thought to provide immortality and fertility. In one myth, Hercules is tasked by the gods to steal the powerful tree for the goddess Hera. You will also find references to the lemon tree as a decorative accent in the homes and gardens of ancient China and Arabia. While no one is harvesting golden apples to take big bites, the fruit of the lemon tree is still recognized for some powerful benefits. Rich in vitamin C and nutrient-rich flavonoids, lemons help to restore balance to the body’s pH levels, which is why your doctor may have recommended drinking (a lemon juice-infused) glass of water each morning. A healthy lemon tree in your garden, on your patio or in your home will not only look and smell good but will provide you with fruit year after year. It is estimated that one tree will bear up to 600 pounds of lemons a year. You may want to try growing a lemon tree from seeds – a great project to do with grandchildren or select a young tree for outdoor planting from your local nursery.

“Come here and take a lesson from the lovely lemon tree…” Not ready for a big tree or don’t have room in the yard? Try growing a lemon tree indoors. Not only will you have a great houseplant with an intriguing history, but one that will supply you with healthy resources.

No06 / Spring 2017

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local credits

Executive Publishers H.G. FOX, SR. SUZANNE FOX Copy Editor LIZ MCGEHEE Contributing Writers TAMARA CHARBONNET PATRICIA DANFLOUS MICHELE ROBERT POCHE ANJA SPRINGTHORPE Production Manager DEBBIE WELDON

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Creative Director JENNIFER CABALLERO Art Director TRA PHAM Graphic Design DIANNE WALLER Web/Digital Design NEAL BOYD Sales Team VIVIAN DUGAS MICHELLE DUNN PAM ROGERS MELISSA FOSTER

© 2017 Jumpstart Publishing, LLC, New Orleans, LA All rights reserved Printed in the USA by Fox Print Services, igofox.com The information contained in Active Living is intended for educational purposes only. A reader should never substitute information contained in Active Living for the advice of a health care professional. Jumpstart Publishing, LLC and publishers of Inspire Health, do not endorse or promote any of the products or services described in the pages of Active Living and the publishers do not verify the accuracy of any claims made in the editorial or advertisements contained in IActive Living. Readers should not use the information in Active Living for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem or for prescription of any medication or other treatment. Readers should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or have or suspect they have a health problem. V-8

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RELATIONSHIPS

How to Connect With Old Friends & Make New Ones By Michele Robert Poche

S

timulating conversation for the mind, physical activity for the body and fresh air for the soul… there are many reasons to get out and connect with friends, both old and new. Research has shown that people who stay socially active and engaged with the world around them experience less cognitive and physical limitations as they age. They’re happier and more independent because they’re regularly surrounded by like-minded people who support and care for them. Where can you start?

STEP 1 MAKE CONTACT. Reach out to old friends via phone or modern technology. Try emailing or even texting them. If you haven’t already taken the plunge, join Facebook with the help of a friend or family member. More than likely, the number of contacts you can make and sustain there will surprise you.

STEP 2 MAKE PLANS. If you live near each other, schedule a lunch or dinner together in the near future. Or, for something simpler, try a short meeting at a coffee shop. Invite other mutual friends to join you. The more friends you reach out to, the more opportunities you will have to reconnect and find the person (or persons) with whom you are best suited.

STEP 3 MAKE IT LAST. Keep the party going by shopping around for a longterm activity you can do together. Think about your common interests and pursue something as a pair (or even a group). Join a gym or community theater program. Take a class or nurture a hobby. Create a book group or card club. Or volunteer together for a cause you all support.

Join a gym or community theater program. Take a class or nurture a hobby. Create a book group or card club. No06 / Spring 2017

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PETS

SHOULD YOUR PET SHARE YOUR BED?

By Liz McGehee

Every person, pet and home is different. To determine your shared-bed-friendliness, answer the following questions:

1 2 3 4 5 6

o you or anyone else in the bed suffer from D allergies or asthma? Yes Maybe No Is your pet restless at night?

Yes

Maybe

No

I s your pet large or do you own multiple pets that compromise the bed space?

Yes

Maybe

No

Is your pet in danger of being smothered in the middle of the night?

Yes

Maybe

No

Do you share the bed with a partner?

Yes

Maybe

No

oes your pet jump on the bed without D permission whenever they wish?

Yes

Maybe

No

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you may want to rethink extending this invitation. However, if you answered no, try hitting the hay with your pet. According to webmd.com, there are many perks associated with spending this extra nocturnal time together. Owners are calmer and often sleep more deeply because cortisol (a stress hormone) decreases and serotonin (a feel-good hormone) increases. Additionally, owners report feeling more secure with their pet snuggled beside them for the night.

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Model: Mimi Attba Porche, fitness studio owner, professional dancer, Certified Zumba Instructor

EXERCISE

ARE YOU TIRED OF FEELING “SQUISHY?”

1. Grasp Ugi Ball with both hands. 2. H old in front of body with a 90-degree bend in the elbows. 3. Keep elbows close to the ribs. 4. S tand upright with a long spine, eye gaze forward. 5. P lant heels in a wide stance outside the line of the hips 6. Brace the core tightly for 30 seconds. 7. R epeat this move 5 times or move onto option B.

TONE-UP WITH THE UGI BALL!

T

By Tami Charbonnet

he Ugi ball is a colorful, updated version of the classic medicine ball. The Ugi’s feel is much different than a medicine ball. It is made from brightly colored leather and has an uneven “squishy” feel. As soon as you pick up a Ugi Ball, your sense of touch is immediately sparked. You feel the sudden need to kneel on it, stand on it, hold it, squat or lunge with it, and even plank on this ball. The softness makes the surface unstable. As a result, the core has to work extra hard to stabilize. This means you get more muscle tone with no impact. Exercising for 30-40 minutes every day with the Ugi

Ball is a safe, fun and effective way to work every muscle group. As a trainer, my favorite full-body Ugi Ball exercise is the stand to squat to press. This combined grouping of 3 exercises is an easy way to begin and stay challenged by your “Ugi” goals. Move through each exercise focused on being one step closer to your goal. Regardless of your current fitness level, there are options for everyone. Begin with option one and work your way to option 2 and then 3. Eventually, you will be strong enough to push through all 3 options. With time, perseverance and determination, you will conquer 5 -10 sets of the entire Ugi Ball sequence.

Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time. —Thomas A. Edison

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A. UGI STAND

B. UGI SQUAT

1. From Ugi Stand 2. Bend the knees and drop the hips as close to the knees as possible. 3. Keep the chest lifted, elbows close to ribs and the ball in front of body. 4. H old squat position for 15-30 seconds. 5. R epeat this sequence beginning with option A 5 times or move onto option C.

C. UGI PRESS

1. From Ugi Squat 2. C ome back to standing position 3. Keep 90 degree bend in elbows 4. Press the Ugi Ball upward toward the forehead 5. H old at forehead keeping bend in elbows 6. H old for 15-30 seconds keeping the core braced tightly 7. Relax, drop the ball and repeat sequence A, B, and C for 5 to 10 sets.


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NUTRITION

WHEN LIFE GIVES YOU

LEMONS…

YOU GET GREAT NUTRITION!

Starting your day with one 8-ounce glass of water with the juice and pulp from half a lemon not only helps your body to hydrate, but can provide as much as 70 percent of your daily recommended intake of vitamin C, supporting your immune system, skin glow and all round well-being.

By Anja Springthorpe

T

hought to originate from Asia, lemons these days are widely available and featured in countless recipes, skin care regimes and they add some zing to various refreshments. Despite lemons’ common use, their nutritional value is often somewhat overlooked. Being a member of the citrus family, lemons deliver great amounts of vitamin C, which provides many health benefits, such as boosting the immune system. Studies found that immune cells are stronger and more effective in protecting from bacteria and viruses if ample of vitamin C is present in the body. It doesn’t stop there. Vitamin C is an indispensable building block for the production of collagen, which is the structural component of skin, keeping it firm and taut. What’s not to like about that? It is not only the juice of lemons which brings along great nutritional value. The pulp and peel of lemons contain pectin, a type of soluble fiber which attracts water from your digestive tract to form a gel. This gel

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supports healthy bowel habits and detoxification, prolongs satiety and is associated with healthy cholesterol levels. Adding not only the juice, but also the pulp and zest of a lemon to your recipes or beverages will raise the nutritional value by default. Depending on location, lemons may not be in season all year

round, but that does not mean one can’t always enjoy the nutritional perks. Lemon juice can be frozen in ice cube trays and safely stored in the freezer for up to four months. Fresh is always preferable, as some nutrients may get lost in the freezing process, however, this is an easy and convenient alternative.

Vitamin C is an indispensable building block for the production of collagen


RECIPE

Liven Up Your Lemonade with Lavender By Liz Genest Smith

Ah, lemonade. Is there any other drink that more vividly evokes the fond memories of bare feet, front porch swings and lazy summer days? Just when you thought nothing could make this refreshingly simple concoction any better, someone goes and elevates it with the addition of lavender. To the right is a recipe that also substitutes honey in place of sugar. Not only is honey a healthier option, it also pairs beautifully with the floral essence of the lavender.

INGREDIENTS:  1 cup honey  5 cups water  1 tbsp dried culinary lavender (or 1/4 cup fresh lavender blossoms, crushed)  1 cup fresh-squeezed lemon juice (typically rendered from 6-8 lemons) L avender sprigs for garnish (optional) *Bare feet and front porch swing are optional. Just enjoy!

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DIRECTIONS: ❶ Boil 2 1/2 cups water.  Remove from heat and add honey, stir until dissolved.  Add the lavender to the honey water, cover, and let steep for at least 20 minutes.  Strain mixture and discard lavender. ❺ Pour infusion into a glass pitcher. ❻ Add lemon juice and 2 1/2 cups of cold water. Stir well. ❼ Refrigerate or pour over ice and garnish with lavender sprigs.


RECIPE

LEMON

ICEBOX PIE By Liz McGehee

The South is synonymous with outstanding cuisine. Plenty of desserts, such as bananas foster and doberge cake, developed in this region and remain popular to this day. One such dish is Lemon Icebox Pie. If you’re not familiar with this treat, it’s a tasty, bake-less dessert typically served cold during those hot summer months. The name refers to the iceboxes these pies were stored in before refrigeration and electricity were common, household conveniences. While things have since changed, the tradition of icebox pie continues as a staple in the American South, but you don’t have to be from the South to enjoy a hot summer’s day or Lemon Icebox Pie. This recipe is fun to make with grandkids and easy as pie!

INGREDIENTS • 1 container of cool whip (8oz) • 1 package of cream cheese (8oz) • 1 can of sweetened, condensed milk (14oz) • ½ cup lemon juice (preferably fresh squeezed) • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract • 1 large graham cracker crust (premade)

DIRECTIONS

1. In a mixing bowl, combine cream cheese, whip cream, condensed milk, vanilla extract, and lemon juice. Stir by hand, or mixer for quick results, until the consistency is even. 2. Take your prepared graham cracker crust and fill with the mixing bowl contents. 3. Refrigerate. Try to leave overnight or until solidified. Enjoy!

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BALANCE THE

HEALTHY BODY

MIND, BODY & SPIRIT

C

WITH PILATES

reator and pioneer of Pilates, Joseph Pilates, suffered with asthma and many other ailments as a child. As a young man, he was determined to create a means by which exercise could be used to fight ailments. Joseph studied various exercise regimens to expand his knowledge base. He was intrigued by the concept of creating a balanced body, mind and spirit. He began to develop his own exercise system based on this concept. After years as the “workout of the elite,” Pilates entered the fitness mainstream about a decade ago. Pilates is a chronic stress reliever. It refreshes and relieves muscular strain and tension while building core strength and physical stability. Pilates increases mindbody awareness, helps center attention and even sharpens concentration. Pilates enthusiasts feel renewed and invigorated from using deep but short and simple muscu-

By Tami Charbonnet

lar movements. Dynamic movements work to tone difficult to reach core muscles, strengthen the spine and improve joint flexibility. Great news – Pilates has options for EVERYONE – from the deconditioned to the elite athlete. You don’t have time to exercise? No more excuses. Pilates will save you time. How? Pilates focuses on quality of movement rather than quantity. Pilates is efficiently organized, balanced and versatile. Gentle on the joints, Pilates enhances and improves posture and strengthens the core while creating long, lean muscles. You will ease your way into compound, dynamic movements designed in a specific sequence allowing the body to strengthen in just one session!

We Recommend Christina Alban: Pilates for Older Adults - Beginner.

Pilates inspired group fitness classes are popular at gyms and studios in most cities throughout the United States and Europe. Pilates exercise videos are also available.

Joe Pilates, inventor, physical fitness guru and founder of the Pilates exercise method instructs a client on the Cadillac and works her through an exercise routine in his 8th Avenue studio on October 4, 1961 in New York City.

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COVER STORY

ELVIS The Lost Years By Liz McGehee

I

n 1977, at the age of 42, Elvis Presley died of a drug overdose on the bathroom floor of his Tennessee home. With him went an untold story historians, journalists and music lovers are still piecing together nearly 40 years later. One of these storytellers is Florida reporter and Emmy award-winning journalist, Bob Kealing, who spent five years piecing together the earliest chapters of the King’s life and career in Florida. Quite a feat considering the star was notoriously private. Step into any casino or wedding chapel in Las Vegas, and you’ll find vestiges

of Elvis Presley alive in the endless stream of impersonators known to overwhelm the city. Decades of unvarying caricatures have solidified the King mid-life, bloated in a white, rhinestone jumpsuit and aviators. A look he sported in 1973 for his concert TV special Aloha from Hawaii, just four years before his death and at the height of his pill addiction and physical deterioration. Presley had little idea that he would go from an unknown, ostracized singer living in the ghettos of Mississippi to one of the wealthiest celebrities of his time. Despite his incredible popularity, he struggled with depression and substance abuse, reminding us that behind the iconogra-

phy and cultivated facade, there is still much we don’t know about the singer. The University Press of Florida recently published Bob Kealing’s Elvis Ignited: The Rise of an Icon in Florida, a book exploring the King’s roots as an unknown performer across the state of Florida just before his rise to fame. Built from the accounts of young, female, Floridian reporters and eyewitness accounts, Kealing gives us never-before-seen glimpses of a young man trying to escape the southern slums, a young man who can’t help but stand out in a crowd, not quite country, not quite soul but something in-between. Through Kealing we meet a remarkably relatable, polite, southern boy as we bear witness to how his location came to catapult his career.

BOB KEALING is an Edward R. Murrow and five-time Emmy award-winning broadcast journalist who has appeared on Dateline NBC, C-Span, the Today show, CNN, MSNBC, and CBS This Morning. Kealing is the author of four books, including Life of the Party from Crown Archetype, in development as a major motion picture. Kealing’s research has led to

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the establishment of the Jack Kerouac House in Orlando and Gram Parsons Derry Down in Winter Haven, both historic landmarks. Kealing lives north of Orlando with his wife and two children.


We spoke with Bob Kealing to find out more about Elvis Ignited: Liz McGehee: I imagine writing a book about Elvis Presley comes with a lot of pressure. Did you feel stunted or affected by this pressure at any point while writing this book? Bob Kealing: Not at all. I knew this was an homage to his early years in Florida and the significance his barmstorming days here played in Presley’s rapid ascent to fame in 1956. To put it simply, that fame would not have happened without Floridians like Tom Parker and Mae Axton. LM: This book is heavily research based. You collected lots of first-hand accounts, articles, photos and other materials. How long did it take you to write this book, and how would you describe the writing process? BK: It took me five years. As is the case in my others books, which are all non-fiction, the writing is, by necessity, incremental. You can’t rush it. I find the work benefits with the slow passage of time. LM: What sets Elvis Ignited apart from other books about Elvis? Why was it important for you to write this book? BK: As historian Joy Wallace Dickinson wrote in her review of my book: “Elvis Ignited offers the first comprehensive record of a real turning point in American musical history, in Florida— a setting often overlooked by chroniclers focused on New York, California or Nashville.” Elvis was the Johnny Appleseed of nascent rock and roll in Florida, igniting the desire of legends to be like Tom Petty and Gram Parsons who saw him during Presley’s early days. Petty even met him on the set of Follow That Dream in Ocala.

Opposite Page Top: Promotional photograph of Elvis Presley, Wikimedia Commons, Arbresha12 Above Left: Elvis on his Harley-Davidson, January 2, 1956 Above Right: Elvis flirting with fan outside Copacabana Motel, Daytona Beach, FL, August 1956. http://scottymoore.net.

Promotional photograph of Elvis Presley, taken in 1954. Elvis performing in Tupelo, Mississippi, September 26, 1956.

LM: I see that you’re a local reporter in Florida with a background in investigative journalism. How has your career inspired, influenced or shaped the book? BK: I’m a digger by nature, a research nerd. To me, it’s a thrill to spend hours with the likes of Steve Binder, the genius who produced Presley’s landmark 68 comeback special. I know the value of primary sources and dug deep to find them. Annie Helm is another one; Presley’s lovely costar who remains so to this day. I spent a week in the Smithsonian archives researching the papers of Brownie Wise and Earl Tupper for my last book, the Tupperware saga, Life of the Party. LM: Why do you think people are so enamored with Elvis? BK: There had been, and very likely never will be, another like him. His voice and talent endure. He is a singular, iconic, cultural milepost to whom there really is no one else to compare. LM: Most fans would probably love to know more about Elvis’ early life; however, I can also see how a book like this might change longstanding perceptions of Elvis and elicit controversy. Have you received any criticism of the book or have you mostly received positive responses? Both? BK: My goal is always fairness. I don’t deal in speculation, I report and write about facts. The same goes for the more controversial aspects of this book; the beginning of his descent in to prescription drug use, his tendency to gravitate towards and romance underage girls, even as a twenty-six-year-old actor. The same goes for the singularly most controversial person in Presley’s life; his manager Tom Parker. No06 / Spring 2017

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Ardys Bell with Elvis Presley. Stripped to his waist after escaping from a fan riot, during the concerts performed in Jacksonville, Florida between May 12-13 1955. State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory.

LM: I was struck by some of the feminist undertones throughout the book. For instance, you credit the accounts of female, Floridian journalists as a major source for your book. You’ve also mentioned that Mae Axton co-wrote "Heartbreak Hotel", the song that launched Elvis’ career. Then there are the inexhaustible, female fans. How do you see the role or importance of women in Elvis’ early life and career? BK: Women were absolutely vital to the role of Presley and your sense of this is right on target. Presley represented a cultural awakening for young people of the 1950s. And women like Mae Axton and early female journalists like Anne Rowe and Jean Yothers, showed why women’s places were NOT necessarily or exclusively in the home. LM: One reason this book is so fascinating to me is that you manage to make one of the most famous singers of all time into a remarkably relatable, young man. We get to see some of the people that shaped him early on in his career. His relationship to manager, Tom Parker, is particularly significant. (In many ways, Parker seems to be a father figure to Elvis. This is made complicated by his controlling behavior.) Why did you feel the need to include this particular relationship in the book? BK: Parker has very deep Florida roots. When readers find out about where Parker came from and his criminal past here in Florida, it’s impossible to ignore. It also makes Parker’s exploits awfully impressive knowing how he buried all of the things about that past to build a successful career upon a mountain of dedication, hard work, loyalty, lies and deceit. LM: Elvis was clearly very ambitious, but do you think he was ready for the level of fame he received? Or did he become “a prisoner of his own fame and fortune?” Why or why not? BK: No and yes. Early on, Presley saw how trying it was to tour when the level of adulation reached a fever peak in the summer of 1956. He also wanted

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to be an actor from the very beginning. Sure, he would have liked to have more challenging roles and some would say the years 1960-68 showed his complacency to make very well-paying but rather dull and formulaic films. He wanted more challenging roles and was offered them, but Parker always nixed them for fear of controversy. That’s where the boredom exacerbated Presley’s desire to occupy a cloistered existence. It had to be exhausting and overwhelming otherwise. LM: Is there something you learned while writing this that you’ll never forget? BK: I’m struck at the undying love and loyalty of those who were lucky enough to see and meet Presley; those who were touched by the phenomenon of his rise to fame in 1956. It’s as if he’s a cherished member of the family. LM: What didn’t make it into this book? BK: I took out a chapter about how of the more minor characters in Presley’s career ended up killing a business partner and was put on trial for murder. He ended up successfully arguing self-defense.

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FINANCE

BECAUSE NOT EVERY SALE SAVES

YOU MONEY By Michele Robert Poche

“A bargain ain’t a bargain unless it’s something you need.”

P

– Sidney Carroll

icture it. You’re in the checkout line. You’ve adhered to your list religiously. Then you see it: a yellow, tweed jacket that has been twice reduced and is now only $19.99. You don’t like how you look in yellow, but the original price was $99! How can you resist, right? Wrong.

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Buying something simply because it’s on sale is a lose/ lose situation, resulting in a cluttered house and an empty bank account. Before you grab your wallet, ask yourself this question: Would I pay full price for this item? If the answer is no, you probably don’t need it. So how can you safeguard yourself against these moments of weakness?

com or bizrate.com) to find the item at a steep discount. No gimmicky sales needed! Carry cash. If you’ve followed Take inventory. steps 1-3, you should Canvass your home know what you’re buying and list any items you purchased but never use. as well as its cost. So you Your number of impulse know how much money to bring. If possible, leave buys will likely be eye credit cards, debit cards opening. And you’ll get a better idea of what you and checkbooks at home. They create the illusion of a truly need. bottomless budget. Pinpoint your Be in the right purchase(s). mindset. Before walking into a Don’t shop when tired, store or visiting a website, give some thought to what hungry, rushed or stressed as these emotions can affect it is you actually want. your spending habits. Yes, Don’t settle for less. that means you’ll almost Plan ahead. Use price compari- never go shopping. Isn’t that the whole point? son tools (pricegrabber.

1.

4.

2.

5.

3.


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GRANDCHILDREN

A

band concert Monday, dancing on Tuesday, soccer practice Wednesday -- life gets busier every year. These days, kids have lives of their own, and the best way to keep up with them is to jump in with both feet and learn their language. It’s spoken fluently in two of the most popular forms of social media for the younger generation today. Both apps are free, so download one of them, and create an account to get started. SNAPCHAT  Learn your grandchildren’s usernames and “add” them, then have them “add” you back.  Use the app’s camera to exchange goofy pictures (zany “filters” optional).  View the “story” they create with pictures that

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Tech Tips for Keeping Up with the Grandkids

they take throughout the day. You can also message each other privately with the app. (Note: None of these pictures or messages is saved to your phone unless you elect to do so.) INSTAGRAM  Learn your grandchildren’s usernames and “follow” them, then have them “follow” you back.  Use the app’s camera to take pictures (“filters” optional), or upload them directly from your phone’s camera roll.  View pictures taken and posted by your grandchildren. (Note: While some kids might not mind your comments, most would prefer that you only “like” their pictures by pressing the heart symbol.) For more detailed instructions, visit dummies.com or wikihow.com and search the app.

“Grandchildren

are the dots that connect the lines from generation to generation.” – Lois Wyse

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WELLNESS

TIRED OF THE DAILY GRIND? TRY TEA INSTEAD OF COFFEE

A

By Anja Springthorpe

ccording to the Harvard Public School of Health, more than 50% of all Americans consume coffee on a daily basis. While drinking moderate amounts of coffee is associated with health benefits, such as reduced risk of depression or type-2 diabetes, coffee often is a main culprit for consumption of excessive calories, as it is regularly laden with creams, sugars and syrups. Furthermore, coffee can be an irritant to the gut and can increase blood-pressure, and therefore, may best be avoided by sensitive individuals.

But what to do when the craving for a cup of coffee hits? Herbal infusions may be the key. Made by steeping prepared herbs, fruits, roots or leaves in boiling water, herbal infusions are largely caffeine-free, making them a safe choice if caffeine is off-limits. Different herbal infusions not only provide different tastes but also bring along different benefits for health and wellbeing.

Dandelion and nettle leaf infusions support detoxification and reduce water retention. Meanwhile, peppermint and chamomile infusions have been found to aid digestive functions and reduce bloating, so they are best enjoyed after a meal. To get a restful sleep, try passion flower infusion, which helps you rest and combat stress. If you can’t live without the pick-me-up effect of coffee, try yerba mate tea, an infusion made from dried South American holly leaves. Yerba mate contains caffeine-like compounds, which have stimulating effects that increase alertness and energy. Even better, yerba mate tea also appears to provide some protection from food derived bacteria, such as E. coli, salmonella and listeria. Herbal infusions are zero calories, caffeine-free and can be enjoyed either hot or cold, making these drinks a healthy, convenient and tasty alternative to coffee.

For restful sleep, try passion flower infusions, which helps you rest and combats stress.

No06 / Spring 2017

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TRAVEL

FOLLOW THE RED BRICK LINE By Liz McGehee

If you’re travelling to Boston anytime soon, you might want to consider visiting its historic Freedom Trail. Covering 2.5 miles of downtown Boston, the trail brings you to 16 historic locations. You can view a tour schedule, purchase tickets online and onsite at any of the visitor centers or simply follow the red-line.

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Composed of vermillion and rust-colored brick, the red-line guides you to a number of significant sights through parts of downtown Boston, Bunker Hill and Charleston, making it difficult to get lost along the way. If you don’t want to book a sidewalk tour but find yourself curious about the different locales, the Freedom Trail offers an app for $4.99 that facilitates self-guided tours. Google Maps also provides the “Boston Freedom Trail Map and Tour,” a free, interactive map which includes historical significance and detailed descriptions of all sixteen sites. During your journey, you’ll get a taste of the 1700s as you meet soldiers and townsfolk from the American Revolution. The official tour guides, known as the Freedom Trail Players, lead you around the cobbled streets of Boston. Dawning 18th-century costumes and accents, the Players add a charming authenticity to your Revolution experience. Standard tours last 90-minutes, but extended tours are also available. From revolutionary women to historic pub-crawls, there is something for everyone on the Freedom Trail, which currently offers eight public tours. Even if you’re not much of a history buff, the Freedom Trail is fun for the whole family—as long as you don’t mind a bit of walking. Getting out and moving will keep you healthy and active as you explore a new city, and who knows? You might just be surprised at what you find when you let your sense of adventure take the reins.

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FUN

DID YOU KNOW THESE ELVIS FACTS? 5.

6.

SUDOKU

7.

He was the biggest taxpayer in the United States in 1973. He once met with the Beetles, who he considered to be a bad influence on American youth. His favorite actors were James Dean and Marlon Brando. Brando was not a fan. He was outlived by his

2

1

WHAT THINGS COST… 1959 New House: $30,000 Annual Salary: $5,000 New Car: $2,200 Gas: 25¢ Bread: 20¢ Milk: $1.01 Postage Stamp: 4¢

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grandmother, Minnie Mae. 8. He loved pro-wrestling. 9. He nicknamed Muhammed Ali “The People’s Champion” and gave him a robe with this stitched across the back. 10. Former father-in-law to king of pop, Michael Jackson, who suffered a similar, pre-mature death by overdose.

2017 New House: $350,000 Annual Salary: $73,298 New Car: $34,300 Gas: $2.49 Bread: $2.42 Milk: $3.09 Postage Stamp: 47¢

SUDOKU ANSWER KEY

3.

4.

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Elvis had a black belt in Karate and was the first entertainer to perform the sport in an American film. His manager, Tom Parker, turned down a role costaring Marilyn Monroe. He never toured outside of North America and Hawaii. He was planning his first European tour when he died.

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HOLISTIC MEDICINE

Boost Your Immunity with Yoga

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By Anja Springthorpe

s you may know, yoga combines mental, spiritual and physical practices, using breathing techniques and meditation, as well as different positions, to improve balance and strengthen core muscles. While it long has been acknowledged that yoga supports a healthy posture and mind, recent studies

suggest that it may also affect our immune systems. Psychoneuroimmunologists (let’s break down that intimidating word: psycho-neuro-immunologists) investigate how our mind and body influence each other in health and disease. They found that practicing yoga can have profound effects on our immune health. Only 10

Studies have shown that mindful breathing increases the activity of “natural killer” cells.

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weeks of regular yoga practice has been shown to increase resistance to infections, which is attributed to yoga’s ability to reduce overall stress levels, resulting in a measurable drop of the stress-related hormone cortisol. Because cortisol suppresses immune cell function, yoga directly supports healthy and effective immune cell activity and thereby, boosts immunity. Yoga’s cortisol-lowering effect may also explain why yoga supports deep and restful sleep, another vital pillar for a strong immune system. Another interesting aspect of yoga is the mindful deep breathing, which aims to achieve full relaxation and a focused state of mind. Studies have shown that mindful breathing increases the activity of “natural killer” cells. These cells roam our bodies to detect and defend against any unusual cell growth and viruses, and therefore, are essential in preventing cancers and reducing virus-related infections, such as the common flu. It does seem that our state of mind can directly influence how effective our immune system functions, and hence, how resistant we are to infections, cancers and chronic diseases. Yoga focuses on connecting the body and mind by learning to listen to physical sensations and to respond from within. Such mindfulness has been found to provide many benefits, such as ability to focus on the moment and be positive, as well as improve overall well-being, all of which reduces stress and improves our immune system.


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