Agriculture in the Bluegrass

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Agriculture

FREE TAKE ONE

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Come Sit A Spell

Tick Awareness

Rye, The New Crop

Spring 2021


Contents

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t i S e m o C a Spell

2021 Beef Expo Sales Exceed $770,000

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Help 4-H Youth Enjoy The Fruits & Vegetables Of Their Labor

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PEACH COBBLER

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Commissioner Quarles Honors Soybean Growers During Kentucky Soybean Week

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Building Back Better Casey County Bank Helps Farmers Succeed

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Understanding Fertilizers And The Secret To Healthy Soil

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Corn Pudding

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The Best Meal Of The Year

Russell County's Best Known Secret

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Tick Awareness

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Quarles Praises New USDA Hemp Rules

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Quarles To Host Restaurant Roundtable With Kentucky Proud Buy Local Restaurants

Help Young People Learn About Pollinators

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No Bake Chocolate Oatmeal Cookies

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How To Raise Yields And Reduce Your Input Costs

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Rye 41

Identifying Common Garden Pests

the

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New Crop


2021 Beef expo sales exceed $770,000 35TH ANNUAL BEEF SHOWCASE SAW HIGHER AVERAGE SALES OVER LAST YEAR

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RANKFORT (March 15, 2021)–The 2021 Kentucky Farm Bureau Beef Expo finished with more than $770,000 in total sales in the 35th edition of the event at the Kentucky Exposition Center during the first weekend of March. Total sales in 2021 were $773,590, a decrease of $215,040 compared to last year’s sales. Although total sales were down, the average sale increased by $142 to $2,191 per lot, with 129.5 less lots (353) auctioned this year. “As the largest beef cattle state east of the Mississippi River, Kentucky showcases that fact at the Kentucky Farm Bureau Beef Expo each year,” Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Dr. Ryan Quarles said. “After the coronavirus pandemic canceled or severely limited many events last year, there was concern the 2021 Kentucky Farm Bureau Beef Expo would see a similar fate. But we were extremely pleased to be able to have this year’s show go forward. Although the show was modified and sale totals were down, average prices

were up, showing promise as we continue to recover from the pandemic's hardships.” Gelbvieh cattle brought an average of $3,417 per lot to lead all breeds. The sale topper was a $9,500 Gelbvieh Balancer Grand Champion Female owned by Rumfelt B. Gelbvieh out of Phillipsburg, Missouri. The Beef Expo welcomed 12 states and 11 breeds this year. In the junior show, 525 cattle from 12 states passed through the show ring, including 267 from Kentucky. This year’s expo did not have a judging contest due to the restrictions placed on the event because of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The 2021 Beef Expo’s main sponsors were Kentucky Farm Bureau and the Kentucky Department of Agriculture.

Call Us Today For A Free Estimate

606-787-9004

Fax: 606-787-0556 dutchmanmetal.com dutchmanmetal@gmail.com 107 Thomas Ridge Spur Rd. Liberty, KY 42539


co-owner/general manager Amanda Merkel

co-owner Kris Merkel

publisher

Christian Dischler

Amanda Merkel

Ashley Osborne

copy editor

Katie Pratt

Chad Ruiz

art director

contributing writers

Suzanne Polk Fox

Heather Norman-Burgdolf

design/production

Diana Derringer

Claire Thomas

The information contained in Agriculture in the Bluegrass is intended for entertainment purposes only. A reader should never substitute information contained in Agriculture in the Bluegrass for the advice of a health care professional. Jumpstart Publishing, LLC and publishers of Agriculture in the Bluegrass, do not endorse or promote any of the products or services described in the pages of Agriculture in the Bluegrass and the publishers do not verify the accuracy of any claims made in the editorial or advertisements contained in Home & Garden. Readers should not use the information in Agriculture in the Bluegrass for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem or for prescription of any medication or other treatment. Readers should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or have or suspect they have a health problem.

© 2021 Merkel Marketing, Liberty, KY, All rights reserved, Printed in the USA by Merkel Marketing (merkelmarketing.net)

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INGREDIENTS  5 peaches , peeled, cored and sliced (about 4 cups)  3/4 cup granulated sugar  1/4 tsp salt FOR THE BATTER:  6 tbsp butter  1 cup all-purpose flour  1 cup granulated sugar  2 tsp baking powder  1/4 tsp salt  3/4 cup milk  Ground cinnamon INSTRUCTIONS  Add the sliced peaches, sugar and salt to a saucepan and stir to combine. *(If using canned peaches, skip steps 1 & 2 and follow the directions starting at step 3)  Cook on medium heat for just a few minutes, until the sugar is dissolved and helps to bring out juices from the peaches. Remove from heat and set aside.

 Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Slice butter into pieces and add to a 9x13 inch baking dish. Place the pan in the oven while it preheats, to allow the butter to melt. Once melted, remove the pan from the oven.  In a large bowl mix together the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Stir in the milk, just until combined. Pour the mixture into the pan, over the melted butter and smooth it into an even layer.  Spoon the peaches and juice (or canned peaches, if using) over the batter. Sprinkle cinnamon generously over the top.  Bake at 350 degrees for about 3840 minutes. Serve warm, with a scoop of ice cream, if desired. To substitute canned peaches, use 1 quart jar, undrained.

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4-H

HELP YOUTH ENJOY THE FRUITS & VEGETABLES OF THEIR LABOR By Ashley Osborne

MANY FAMILIES HAVE PLANTED GARDENS THIS YEAR AS AN ACTIVITY TO PASS THE TIME DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC. WITH MANY CROPS SOON REACHING MATURITY, HERE ARE SOME TIPS ON HARVESTING AND USING YOUR HOMEGROWN PRODUCE. 6

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nvite your young person to be involved with the harvest. Harvest will give them a sense of accomplishment in a job well done and is a perfect opportunity to teach them about plants, biology and their natural world. Many crops you planted in the early spring like cabbage, broccoli and carrots are ready to harvest. You may also have some tomatoes, corn or peppers that will be ready soon. If you are not sure when a particular plant should be harvested, your family can visit the Junior Master Gardener website at https://jmgkids.us/ lgeg/grow/harvest-indicators/ to learn about the signs of harvest for some of the most commonly grown fruits and vegetables. This site has visual images and quizzes that can help your

family learn when a particular crop is ready to be picked. Harvest time provides a great opportunity to teach your young person about nutrition and how plants positively contribute to our diet. Explain to them how certain vegetables give us essential vitamins and minerals and how we need to eat a variety of fruits and vegetables to get the nutrients we need to live healthy lives. For example, carrots are a great source of vitamin A, and vitamin A helps our eyesight, reduces our risk for certain cancers, boosts our immunity, supports healthy bones and reduces our chance of getting acne.


Once you have harvested some vegetables, it is now time to prepare them. Continue to involve young people as the food moves to the kitchen. All young people can help in food preparation. Younger ones can wash produce and stir ingredients. Most youth will be able to help you measure ingredients, or you can teach them how. Older children can help chop vegetables. This is a great time to talk about food safety practices, such as hand washing, clean surfaces and proper cook times, and to reduce our risk of contracting illnesses. The University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service and the Kentucky Department of Agriculture have many great recipes that include seasonal produce through their Plate It Up Kentucky Proud project. These are available online at https://fcs-hes.ca.uky.edu/content/ plate-it-kentucky-proud. The Junior Master Gardener website also has several garden recipes and videos

available online at https://jmgkids. us/gardenkitchen/. Children are more likely to try new foods they have had a hand in growing and preparing. Now is a great time to use the garden as a tool to get your picky-eater to try new foods. After the meal is prepared, eat it together as a family. Talk about gardening with your children. Ask them questions about the garden. What do they think about the results? Would they like to grow the same thing or try something different next year? What was their favorite activity in the garden? For more information on gardening with your 4-H member, contact Meagan Klee (Meagan.klee@uky. edu or 606-787-7384) at the Casey County Extension Office of the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service. Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or so-

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COMMISSIONER QUARLES HONORS SOYBEAN GROWERS DURING

Kentuck y Soybean Week

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RANKFORT (March 8, 2021)–Agriculture Commissioner Dr. Ryan Quarles honored Kentucky’s soybean producers by proclaiming Soybean Week in Kentucky the week of March 8. “Most people don’t recognize how important the soybean industry has become as part of Kentucky’s agricultural economy,” Commissioner Quarles said. “Our soybean producers are tough as nails and have survived the ups and downs of the farm economy in recent years. Their labor results in feed for livestock and value added products like candles, oils, and even glycerin for hand sanitizer. I want to take a moment to say thank you to all of our soybean producers, the Kentucky Soybean Association, and the Kentucky Soybean Board for all they do for our communities.” Kentucky produced an estimated 100 million bushels of soybeans in 2020, up 30 percent from 2019, the National Agricultural Statistics Service reported. Kentucky growers achieved an estimated yield of 55 bushels per acre, up 9 bushels from a year ago and a new record. Henderson County was the top soybean-producing county in 2020,

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with 5.36 million bushels, followed by Daviess (4.94 million), Graves (4.65 million), Christian (4.49 million), and Logan (4.09 million), counties. “While we would like to be able to celebrate in person, the Kentucky Soybean Association appreciates Commissioner Quarles for helping us celebrate Soybean Week in Kentucky,” said Allen Pace, Kentucky Soybean Association President. “After last year’s record yield for average bushels per acre, we are optimistic about the prospects for the 2021 season.” “If 2020 showed us anything, it was that our soybean producers are resilient," said Jed Clark, Kentucky Soybean Board chairman. “It’s almost planting season across the commonwealth and Kentucky farm families are ready to go. We hope every Kentuckian takes a moment this week to recognize the many applications of soybean-derived products.”

Kentucky soybean producers are active at the national level as well. Gerry Hayden (Calhoun), Caleb Ragland (Magnolia), and Davie Stephens (Clinton) all serve on the board of the American Soybean Association. The United Soybean Board includes Kentuckians Barry Alexander (Cadiz), Brent Gatton (Bremen) and Ryan Dale Bivens (Hodgenville). Soybeans and their components, soybean oil and soybean meal, are used for feed for poultry, Kentucky’s leading agricultural commodity. Soybeans and their components also are used in livestock feed, biodiesel fuel, industrial applications, and as ingredients in food products, among other applications.


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t i S Come l l e p S a

By Diana C. Derringer

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n a guest bedroom, filled with pictures and family treasures, sits an old straight-back chair with a woven seat. The rear legs show wear from decades of propping against Granny (Haley) Beasley’s front porch wall. Everyone who stopped by Granny’s during the summer months received an invitation to “come sit a spell.” Because her house had only two rooms, the porch usually provided the most comfortable gathering spot. Granny had none of the conveniences we now consider necessities. Her air conditioning came in the form of open windows and doors and funeral home fans. The tail of her apron served the same purpose, especially if she had just prepared a meal. No fast food for her. She made everything from scratch. A biscuit left over from breakfast covered with homemade jelly or jam became every child’s favorite treat. She owned no television and seldom turned on the radio. We provided our own entertainment in the form of conversation, shared meals, jokes, and remembering when. Children played in the yard or sampled those pucker-your-mouth cherries that grew near the porch. We also walked up and down the road, still in sight of our parents’ ever-watchful eyes. Kicking up dust with bare feet never lost its appeal. Granny had eleven children. Those who lived out of state visited frequently during the summer, with extended family in tow. As a result, the front porch visitors often spilled into the yard. When she ran out of chairs, we found a spot on the edge of the porch or on the grass. Whoever coined the phrase, the more the merrier, probably knew my granny. The better part of an afternoon could be spent catching up on who lived where, who was engaged or recently married, who was sick or all better now, and how much everyone’s children had grown. And weren’t they cute!

Getting to spend the night with Granny was a real treat. When darkness fell and we went inside to bed, we continued talking and laughing—Granny from her bed and grandchildren usually from a pallet on the floor. Whether my sister and I visited alone or with other cousins, we loved it, because Granny loved us and we loved her. The teen years didn’t damper our enthusiasm for trips to Granny’s. We told our boyfriends how to get there, and she welcomed them with open arms…and an inspector’s eyes. They needed to know a few of Granny’s particulars. She expected strict adherence to whatever curfew our parents imposed. She tolerated no foul language. She wanted to know if you knew the Lord. She didn’t like pants and hated shorts, although she tolerated them on girls during those horribly sticky days. However, my boyfriend (now husband) learned the hard way that such tolerance did not extend to males. During a real scorcher, he arrived at Granny’s to pick me up as he had several times before. They enjoyed teasing one another as we sat visiting for several minutes. Just as we stepped off the porch on our way to the car, he asked Granny if she didn’t think he had pretty legs. Never missing a beat, Granny said, “Young man, you come back here again in those short-legged britches and you’ll go away with striped legs!” We enjoyed a good laugh, but out of respect for my granny, he never wore shorts to her house again. Long after Granny died, an aunt gave me a tape of odds and ends she recorded over the years. I expected the voices of several female cousins, all about my age who shared many of the antics at Granny’s house. What took me by surprise that Saturday morning was the wonderful trembling voice of my granny. I had no idea anyone captured her voice on tape. She didn’t like such tomfoolery. It embarrassed her. But there

she was. I never thought I’d hear that voice again this side of heaven. When we travel in the vicinity of Granny’s house, I still catch myself looking that direction, remembering all the good times. I can’t see the house from the main road, but that never stops my looking. Yet, I do see and hear—image after image in my mind: Granny gathering people into her open arms. Chairs lined up, waiting for the next round of visitors. Granny’s long white hair in its halo style. Her voice with just a hint of tremble. Laughter that came from deep within. Uncles and cousins propped against the posts that supported the front porch roof. Children running races and turning cartwheels in the yard. Adults sitting back, chuckling. Yes, I see, whether I’m passing nearby or sitting on my own front porch—a prerequisite when we built our country home.

DIANA DERRINGER is an award-winning writer and author of Beyond Bethlehem and Calvary: 12 Dramas for Christmas, Easter, and More! Hundreds of her devotions, articles, drama, poetry, and planning guides appear in 40-plus publications. She enjoys traveling with her husband and serving as a friendship family to international university students. Her blog, Words, Wit, and Wisdom: Life Lessons from English Expressions, helps people with a non-English background understand the meaning of unusual English expressions. It also offers a brief respite for anyone who enjoys word play. Visit her at https://dianaderringer.com.

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t s e B The r a e Y e h t f o l a e M

By Diana C. Derringer

ASK, “WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE FAMILY MEAL,” AND TYPICAL RESPONSES INCLUDE THANKSGIVING, CHRISTMAS, MOTHER’S OR FATHER’S DAY, OR THE FOURTH OF JULY. PREDICTABLE AND ENJOYABLE, DEFINITELY, BUT NO MATCH FOR MY FAVORITE FEAST.

ALTHOUGH THE EXACT DAY VARIES FROM YEAR TO YEAR, THE MENU REMAINS CONSTANT. WHEN CIRCUMSTANCES ALIGN SO MY FAVORITE VEGETABLES CAN ALL BE GATHERED FRESH FROM THE GARDEN AT THE SAME TIME, WE’RE READY. FOR SOME REASON, MEATLOAF REMAINS MY ENTRÉE OF CHOICE, AND I’M DEFINITELY NOT A BIG MEATLOAF FAN. PERHAPS IT’S BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT MOM SERVED THE FIRST TIME I RECALL THIS PARTICULAR SPREAD. ANYWAY, THE FOLLOWING SIDE DISHES MAKE THE MEAL MEMORABLE, WITH OR WITHOUT THE BENEFIT OF MEAT.

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CORN ON THE COB: Definitely on the cob. This should be picked a few days before it’s fully mature. When I bite into those tender kernels, anyone sitting nearby needs to duck, because the juice is going to fly! A few stray kernels at the edge of my mouth or on the nose of a tiny relative represent nothing less than pure visceral bliss.

CORNBREAD: Made from scratch. I prefer the corner pieces with their extra crunch, if all four haven’t been taken before the plate reaches my end of the table.

GREEN ONIONS: Eaten from green to white, saving the best for last. If the blades have grown too tough, remove them and quarter the onion. Then peel a layer or two of the bulb for each bite. (Verify that any romantic interest has onion too, so bad breath goes unnoticed…or not, if you’re really hungry.)

BABY POTATOES BOILED IN GREEN BEANS: The potatoes require scraping rather than peeling, since they’re so new. Or simply boil them in the peel. Although I avoid rattlesnakes (the animal) with all the respect their fangs deserve, rattlesnake beans are a shoo-in for a first-rate meal.

SLICED CUCUMBERS: Not those tasteless monsters at the grocery, but the little ones so crisp you have to slice carefully or they break. You can smell their pungent earthy aroma from one side of the room to the other.

SLICED TOMATOES: Still warm from the vine and sliced thicker than a half-pound burger. The bowl has to be huge. If not, reinforcements must be sliced in the middle of the meal. A knife sits on the counter, just for that purpose. Red, pink, yellow, or striped matters not, although I prefer a sampling of each. Eventually I must pull back on my red tomato greed. A fine rash on my lips commands a less acid variety temporarily.

Dessert is optional. I prefer extra helpings of all the above over any sweet treat offered. Nevertheless, I’ve been known to force down a bowl of hot cherry cobbler à la mode. Those tart little guys with their pucker power make saying, “No, thanks,” impossible. Until his recent death, dad always began the meal with prayer. I must confess that, with taste buds in overdrive, my thoughts often echoed my younger brother’s request for a short one. I can’t help but believe that God understands and takes pleasure in our wholehearted enjoyment. Add to all these delicacies a houseful of relatives and whoever else happens by during the summer, and we’re set for a feast finer than any king’s. I’ve tried to replicate this menu and have come close. Yet it’s not the same when I cook it myself in an air-conditioned kitchen; I have no sweat beading on my face, requiring periodic swipes with an apron tail. Come to think of it, mom has air conditioning now and no longer wears aprons. Oh well, she can still pull it off, in spite of the latest luxuries. Bon appétit! Diana Derringer calls her Kentucky home the garden spot of the world. For a free copy of “Words of Hope for Days That Hurt” and her weekly Words, Wit, and Wisdom: Life Lessons from English Expressions, join her mailing list at https://dianaderringer.com.

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Alph a-g Sy ndr al ome

Tick Awareness By Jonathan Larson & Heather Norman-Burgdolf

During the summer, our chances of tick interactions increase. Most tick bites are an itchy nuisance that last between seven to 10 days, but ticks can also transmit diseases such as Lyme disease and erlichiosis, a bacterial disease. A relatively new tick-borne illness that is attracting attention is Alpha-gal syndrome. Known as the “red meat allergy,” alpha-gal syndrome was discovered by medical researchers in 2009 to be a reaction in humans from lone star tick bites. Scientists found the saliva the tick injects as it feeds causes individuals to develop a reaction to galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, a sugar found in mammalian meats. Alpha-gal is a rare disease but is becoming more common. Individuals who have alpha-gal syndrome can have reactions similar to individuals with other food allergies with symptoms that include skin irritations, hives, digestive tract issues and breathing problems. But unlike the typical person with a food allergy, a person with alpha-gal syndrome may have a delayed allergic reaction, anywhere between three and six hours after ingesting mammalian meat or its by-products. Medical professionals can diagnose alpha-gal through a blood test. Individuals who are diagnosed with the disease must refrain from consuming beef, pork, lamb and venison. Fortunately, they can still eat all fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts,

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legumes, poultry and seafood. Some people may also have reactions to mammal-derived products including milk, cheese, gelatin and lard. As a result, they and their family members must check ingredient labels before consuming pre-packaged food. As

individuals with alpha-gal tend to have different tolerance levels to these meat-derived products, individuals should work with a health care provider, such as a registered dietitian, to find a diet that works for them.


Education and prevention are key in reducing your exposure to ticks and any tick-borne diseases. The lone star tick is found throughout Kentucky and the eastern United States, most likely in or near wooded areas. The tick, which gets its name from the iconic white spot found on the female’s back, needs three blood meals for survival during its lifetime. It is most active during April through August. There are several effective precautions to take to lower your chances of getting a tick bite. Wear a repellent. One repellent containing permethrin can be put on clothing and is particularly effective. Avoid walking through uncut fields or brush and areas with tall vegetation

where ticks are most likely to occur. Wear light-colored clothing so ticks are easy to spot. If you are spending a significant amount of time hiking or pursuing other outdoor activities in a tick-prone area, check yourself, your children and other family members for ticks when returning home. Check pets when they come in from outdoors. Common places that you will find ticks are behind ears, hair, neck, legs and around the waist. If you find a tick on your body, remove it by using fine-tipped tweezers, getting as close to the skin as possible to make sure the entire tick is removed. Once it’s removed, you should wash the bite area and your hands and apply an antiseptic to the bite site.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE IN UK’S PUBLICATION ENTFACT-618: TICKS AND DISEASE IN KENTUCKY. IT IS AVAILABLE ONLINE AT HTTPS://ENTOMOLOGY. CA.UKY.EDU/EF618 OR THROUGH THE CASEY COUNTY EXTENSION OFFICE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE. EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS OF THE COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE SERVE ALL PEOPLE REGARDLESS OF ECONOMIC OR SOCIAL STATUS AND WILL NOT DISCRIMINATE ON THE BASIS OF RACE, COLOR, ETHNIC ORIGIN, NATIONAL ORIGIN, CREED, RELIGION, POLITICAL BELIEF, SEX, SEXUAL ORIENTATION, GENDER IDENTITY, GENDER EXPRESSIONS, PREGNANCY, MARITAL STATUS, GENETIC INFORMATION, AGE, VETERAN STATUS, OR PHYSICAL OR MENTAL DISABILITY.

At Curtsinger’s Sunrise Outfitter’s we are proud of our Kentucky way of life and our rich outdoor traditions. Our humble beginnings run as far back as 1972, when Joe Curtsinger and his father leased an old service station to offer live bait/tackle and arrows for sale. Joe and his father later went on to purchase the corner store and over time expanded their business. Today we are a full service retailer offering many top name brands, products and expert services. In fact we are very well known for specializing in bow hunting supplies. We have it all from top of the line bows and quality arrows to targets, fishing poles, and clothing. We even have seen some big name celebrities walk through our doors and seek our quality products and services. Big names such as John Michael and Eddie Montgomery, Troy Gentry and Joe B. Hall just to name a few. Shoot…we even had Tubby Smith and a few members of his team stop by for directions one time! 1389 Old Stanford Rd., Danville, KY 40422 • 859-236-7030 Hours: Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. • Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m. • Sunday CLOSED


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QUARLES PRAISES NEW USDA HEMP RULES

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WILL SUBMIT NEW STATE PLAN TO USDA FOR 2022 GROWING SEASON

RANKFORT (March 17, 2021)– Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Dr. Ryan Quarles applauded the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) announcement that it will implement the final rule on hemp production developed under the Trump Administration. “The final rule on hemp production is much improved over the interim final rule previously issued by USDA,” Commissioner Quarles said. “The improvements were the results of work conducted by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture and other state agencies to provide feedback to the USDA. I am grateful for all of the work done by the previous administration, including that of former Under Secretary of Agriculture Greg Ibach and his team, to have an open line of communication with state leaders.” The 2018 Farm Bill defined hemp as the plant cannabis sativa with not more than 0.3 percent tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) measured on a dry weight basis and directed USDA to develop a regulatory framework for states to manage hemp programs. The final rule comes after state agencies, industry groups, and hemp growers across the nation provided feedback to USDA on the interim final rule. The final rule for hemp production was released January 19, but the new Biden Administration paused implementation for a temporary review. With the review complete, the final rule will take effect March 22. Commissioner Quarles sent two rounds of comments to the USDA about the interim final rule, highlighting potential sticking points with Kentucky’s current hemp program. USDA adjusted the rule to

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address nearly every concern raised by the Commissioner. As noted in the Commissioner’s comments submitted in October 2020, one of the major concerns about the previous rule was that it would have eliminated a key feature of Kentucky’s hemp program, the ability of growers to re-mediate elevated THC content through a post-harvest retest. The post-harvest retest gives growers an opportunity to realize a financial return on their harvests by giving them a second chance to achieve a compliant THC test result. Under the final rule, remediation and a post-harvest retest is allowed. OTHER SUCCESSFUL POLICY CHANGES INCLUDED: • On-farm disposal of non-compliant hemp material. • New rules which standardize and simplify sampling procedures for the part of the plant to be tested for compliance. • An increase in the “negligent” level of THC in the plant. With these positive developments, Commissioner Quarles plans to submit a revised state plan to USDA for the 2022 growing season. “I am encouraged by the progress USDA has made and have confidence in our ability to move into the federal framework as envisioned by the 2018 Farm Bill,” Commissioner Quarles said. “Additional challenges remain for the nation’s hemp industry, especially in light of the continued lack of action by the Food and Drug Administration. If this industry is to be successful, we need FDA to deliver clarity on hemp-derived cannabidiol products and their guidance cannot come soon enough.”


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Quarles to Host

Proud Buy Local Restaurants

Seeking to hear firsthand about challenges owners &

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chefs faced during the pandemic

RANKFORT (March 29, 2021) –Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Dr. Ryan Quarles will host a series of “Restaurant Roundtables” in the coming weeks to thank Kentucky small business owners and chefs for sourcing food from Kentucky farms and hear firsthand about the challenges they faced during the coronavirus pandemic. “No industry has suffered more during the coronavirus pandemic than those businesses in the hospitality space, namely Kentucky’s bars and restaurants,” Commissioner Quarles said. “Despite those challenges, our Kentucky Proud Buy Local restaurants have continued to support local farmers. Through these Restaurant Roundtables, I want to personally thank them for being part of the farm economy, hear directly from these small businesses owners about how they survived during the pandemic, and how we can partner with them to promote excitement as Kentucky reopens. Commissioner Quarles will kick off his Restaurant Roundtable Tour with stops in Lexington, Louisville, Bowling Green, Owensboro, and London, Kentucky. Each roundtable will follow recommended Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines for social distancing and mask wearing. “The Kentucky Restaurant Association is proud to support both our farmers and local restaurants,” said Stacy Roof, President and CEO of the Kentucky Restaurant Association. “We applaud Commissioner Quarles and the Buy Local program and enjoy helping our restaurants connect with local farmers in their communities.” Buy Local is a Kentucky Proud program for restaurants, caterers, schools, and other food service participants that source and support local farms. Offered by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture, this program rewards participants for enhancing their menus with locally-sourced Kentucky Proud farm ingredients. The Buy Local program is funded by the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund.

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BUILDING BACK BETTER: CASEY COUNTY BANK HELPS FARMERS SUCCEED

By Christian Dischler

T

he resilience of a farmer is tested every day. Between the uncertainties in weather patterns to the fluctuations in prices, something is always coming up. These adversities are common but still require a comprehensive approach to handling them. What many folks don’t realize is the team farmers build behind the scenes. One of the most important members of these unsung teams are the banks. Mark Wolford, President and CEO of Casey County Bank, is committed to providing his community with the financial security, assistance and wisdom to help them persevere through these challenges. Founded in 1939, Wolford describes the bank as “a real community bank, locally owned, managed and operated with local people. We make local decisions, provide local commitment and invest heavily into the communities we serve, Casey and Lincoln County.” Such selfless dedication to the local community is no surprise. The original charter owners of the bank passed ownership down to their

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children, and so forth. Meaning the bank remains in the same hands as those who envisioned a better community all those years ago. This storied history means the bank has seen tough times before. With the recent flooding in Kentucky, on top of the pandemic, Wolford discussed the ways in which Casey County Bank has been able to help. “To better serve our local businesses, we participated in the PPP Loan program with the SBA. Our loan staff took the initiative and contacted all eligible businesses, customers and self-employed customers to encourage them to apply. We provided assistance throughout the entire process. Had it not been for this, our business community would have suffered. We wanted to make this happen for the business owners in our communities. I am very proud of the bank’s efforts. This is just one component of being a community bank.” While the pandemic created problems across the globe, the flooding in Kentucky compounded those issues locally. Fences were washed away, structures damaged,

and land unexpectedly needed to be either excavated or tended to. Casey County Bank was able to provide the assistance to those who needed it in order to build back better. Wolford offered some advice for those who might be hesitant to ask for help. “I would encourage those who were affected to please come in and discuss their needs with a loan officer. For our customers who suffered flood damage, we are offering a loan at 1% for a 3-year term. All loans are required to be underwritten to determine ‘ability to repay’ and for ‘collateral analysis’, if collateral is required. “ “Visit www.CaseyBank.com to find more information for the financial help and services we provide. You can also find contact information for our loan officers and deposit staff, who are happy to answer any questions and discuss options.” Call 606-787-8394 to reach Casey County Bank and find out how you can receive help during difficult times, or to take your business to the next step.


Farmers have always faced challenges. Our farmers have always met those challenges and been able to build back in the face of adversity.

J&K

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UNDERSTANDING FERTILIZERS AND THE SECRET TO HEALTHY SOIL By Christian Dischler

A

sk any farmer about the makeup of their soil and you’ll get all kinds of different answers. Some might know exactly what their soil is like, while others could respond with a shrug and a puzzled look. Justin Corbin, general manager of Warner Fertilizer in Liberty, understands that it might not be a priority for everyone. Which is why he takes pride in helping farmers obtain more knowledge of their land, and ultimately of the fertilizer that will best serve each acre or crop. According to Corbin, “Everyone wants to know ‘what can I put on this, or on that?’ I always feel like that’s a shot in the dark, we need to know what’s in the ground first. A soil test is the first step to understanding that.” All crops are different and require specialized mixes of fertilizer. Balancing the micro and macronutrients

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for a specific crop depends on the soil in which it’s being grown. Even though corn might need more nitrogen, how much it needs depends on what is already present in the soil. But there are other factors as well. “I’ve been experimenting with ammonium sulfate lately. In the past we didn’t need to apply it, but now that we don’t have as many coal burning power plants in the state there’s cleaner air, which means less sulfur in the atmosphere. I’ve seen more root development in soybeans and more flowers on pods, which equates to more beans. It will yield better because you’re giving the plant what it needed rather than some blanket coverage. And you don’t have to worry about over applying or run-off.” Taking the time to get a soil test and to have a company like Warner analyze your land can prove to be an investment that keeps on giving. By understanding the biological makeup

of your soil, you’re gaining control of the most important variable in your acreage, and your yields will increase. Corbin’s expert advice is invaluable and he’s continually educating himself in the field. “In the past two seasons my eyes have opened to how much things work in harmony. For example, pH needs to be right for the plant to take up the right nutrients. Grass needs to have 6.6 pH and I think corn does better with a 6.4. That one decimal point is either ten times more alkaline or acidic, depending on which way. That’s a huge difference as far as what it does to a plant.” Corbin also points to the recent hype of “celebrity farmers” who are toppling national bushel averages as a watershed moment in farming. “I think it’s made people more aware what’s possible if they did everything right to push their yield. We’ve been doing it on hay, corn and


beans to name a few. Anytime you can increase your yield on the same amount of land it’s a good thing. The shows are making people realize how much they can get off of an acre,” Corbin explained. Warner specializes in helping you understand and maximize the output of your land through education, technology and custom fertilizer blends. Using machinery that sends electro-pulses through the ground to create a digital “map” of your land, Warner can program fertilizer and seed spreaders to dictate precisely how much needs to be delivered to any given acre. Getting back to the basics by understanding the contents of your soil is the first step in unlocking the power of your land. Contact Justin Corbin at Warner Fertilizer to learn more. (606) 787-2215

CORN PUDDING INGREDIENTS  3 eggs  3 tbsp flour  1/2 cup sugar  2 cups milk  2 cups corn  1/2 tsp salt  1/2 stick butter

DIRECTIONS Combine eggs, flour and sugar; beat well. Add milk, corn and salt. Melt butter in dish; add to corn mixture. Bake at 400 degrees for 55 to 60 minutes.

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Russell County’s Best-Known Secret

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n the late 1950’s the Russell County Feed Mill was built, and began to serve the quaint farming community surrounding it. After exchanging ownership a few times, the store landed in the hands of Doug and Carole Loveless, who operated the business for the next 40 years. Brian McElroy began working for Doug and Carole in 2007. He and his wife Natasha seized the chance to fulfill their dream, and purchased the business in January 2010. “I saw an opportunity to reach out and provide some more services and assist people. There was a need for more products and services,” McElroy said. “After a lot of answered prayers, we knew it was the right opportunity for us to get started, and help people by providing a good product that was beneficial to them and their success.” “We purchased the business on January 1, 2010, and started out mainly making feed, with a small retail space. In 2013, we built a new 10,000 sqft. mixing facility making feed for mainly livestock. A couple

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By Christian Dischler years later we bought the next-door property to expand our retail store. Now, we offer a full line of farm supplies, home and garden equipment, and we still manufacture feed while specializing in animal nutrition,” McElroy explained. Serving the local community as well as surrounding counties, the McElroys and their staff take great pride in bringing quality customer service with an emphasis on reliable, trustworthy information. Whether it’s lawn furniture, fence posts for a DIY project, or a custom feed blend for your livestock–they have what the community needs.

“We have a knowledgeable staff and we can help folks figure out what they need. And not just sell them something, but sell them something that will be helpful. Reliable customer service is of utmost importance.” This outward generosity has helped make the Russell County Farm Store a well-known, one-stopshop among locals. But McElroy and his team are always expanding their capabilities, and by working with their livestock nutritionists they continue to supply farmers–even in dire times. The recent COVID-19 outbreak left a lot of industries struggling, and farming was no exception.


“With schools being shut down, they weren’t using as much food and milk as usual,” McElroy said. But the Farm Store persevered and continued to make deliveries. However, the pandemic’s impact didn’t stop there. “With people not being able to work, the long-term effect has been getting products. From manufacturers struggling to find help, to operating with smaller crews. And it seems like it’s gotten worse in the last few months. Like a backlog of problems finally catching up.” Despite these setbacks, the Farm Store saw an increase in retail sales due to people being home more, likely catching up on projects they’d long put off. Their vision to bring invaluable customer service while continually expanding their horizons has set the pace for the Russell County Farm Store. The Russell County Farm Store can be reached at (270) 866-3482 and is located at 533 W Steve Wariner Dr, Russell Springs, KY.

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s r o t a n i l l o P help young people learn about

P

By Jonathan Larson

ollinators are important because they help many of the plants we enjoy reproduce. If you like eating apples or watermelons or looking at beautiful flowers, then you enjoy the handiwork of pollinators. June is National Pollinator Month, and June 22-28 is Pollinator Week. In honor of these upcoming events, here are some ideas to teach youth about the importance of pollinators. While your mind might automatically go to honeybees, our world is filled with many types of pollinating

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insects. The United States is home to more than 3,000 types of wild, native bees. These types include bumblebees, mason bees, leafcutter bees, mining bees and sweat bees. After bees, adult flies are some of our best pollinating insects. Other pollinators include butterflies, moths and some ants and beetles. By participating in activities together, you can help young people learn about pollinators and how they transfer pollen. Make paper flowers and leave the centers white. Glue the flowers to a brown paper bag

filled with Cheetos. Make a bee finger puppet, and put it on the young person’s hand. Let them “fly around” and grab Cheetos from the bag. After they have eaten some of the Cheetos, have them “fly” to another flower and place their hand on it. Do not let them lick their fingers or wipe them off as it will lower the “pollen” on their hands. If you or the young person are not a fan of Cheetos, Skittles works too but there will not be as much “pollen transfer.” Another pollinator activity you can do as a family is make a bee


house or hotel to promote bees in your backyard. Take some hollow sticks or some paper straws and bundle them together with string to hang in a tree or shrub in your backyard. You can make a small structure to house these materials, if you choose. You can also purchase these at gardening centers. The best kind to get are those that can come apart or don’t have permanent materials glued inside. You need to be able to replenish the supplies inside or to clean pieces, otherwise it becomes clogged and disease ridden. Another way you can encourage bees in your backyard is to plant a pollinator-friendly garden. Plants that tend to attract bees during the spring and summer include peonies, milkweed, bee balm, lavender, phlox, zinnias, marigolds and goldenrod.

You may be nervous about being around pollinating bees out of fear of getting stung, but when pollinators are feeding, they generally don’t pay much attention to us. However, if you or a family member has a bee allergy, you should exercise the utmost caution around them. The bigger issue comes when we discover a nest of a social species like honeybees or bumblebees. This will elicit a defensive response from them. Less social bees, like mason, leaf-cutting

NO BAKE CHOCOLATE OATMEAL COOKIES

or mining bees, do not have nests to defend and are much less aggressive. For more information on pollinators, contact the Casey County Extension Office of the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service at 606787-7384. Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

INGREDIENTS • Pinch of salt • 1/2 cup milk • 4 tbsp cocoa • 2 cups sugar • 1/4 cup butter • 1 tsp vanilla • 1/2 cup peanut butter • 3 cups oatmeal DIRECTIONS Bring to boil, salt, milk, cocoa, sugar and butter; cook 1 minute. Remove from burner. Add vanilla and peanut butter. Stir until melted. Add oatmeal; mix well. Drop by teaspoon onto wax paper.

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How to Raise Yields and Reduce Your Input Costs By Christian Dischler

T

he year was 2006 and Chris Miller was on the move. His home state of Pennsylvania was in the rear view, and his future in the great state of Kentucky was anything but certain. Early on he received some advantageous advice from his brother-in-law, who opened his eyes to an agricultural community that would help propel him towards success. Utilizing the AgroVantage System by Conklin, Miller has been able to increase the yield of his crops and reduce input costs; while continuing to educate himself and others along the way. “The unique part of why I started working with Conklin was to help put the power back in the hands of farmers. With the AgroVantage system, the goal is to raise our crops for quite a bit less and put that money back in the farmer’s pockets,” Miller said. The Conklin system is designed to integrate the farmers into the

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business model and eliminate the expensive “middleman” of the industry. That means a different kind of approach: educating the farmers to be independent distributors of Conklin’s Feast fertilizer, as well as being proficient in understand and optimizing their soil. “As an independent distributor, I buy wholesale and I help other farmers buy wholesale. I’m capable of taking my own soil test, running it through an independent lab, getting my own report out and buying my inputs factory direct. Feast fertilizer is sold in 4,000-gallon loads, that are shipped directly to the farm. That drops my input costs 20-30%. Testing shows that we can expect an increase in corn yields of 6-10 bushels per acre, and comparable responses are seen in other crops. The product is non-corrosive and requires less labor because it’s applied in row at planting time,” Miller said. “Now the farmer doesn’t have to have a sales-


man coming out to the farm to take an order and charge 40-50% more.” Shifting the power into the farmer's corner is a powerful tool and brings exciting benefits. While input costs are reduced and crop yields are increased, there’s also an added bonus of a commission structure. This creates a network of individuals working together to achieve a greater goal. It also provides an avenue for success outside of the farm in the event of a catastrophe. Miller experienced this firsthand after his tobacco crops sustained total flood damage a few years ago. “I knew I wouldn’t have any tobacco to harvest. Instead of struggling through something that wasn’t possible, I reinvested in people and went to work helping others that didn’t have flooding. We expanded their interest in farming and were able to make our payments with commission structure rather than a crop. If I wouldn’t have built a team of farmers working together, I would’ve

Chris B. Miller Sales Director 563 Burkley Rd. Cadiz, KY 42211 Agriculture Products Animal Products Building Products Lubricants Family Care Products

probably had to sell the farm,” Miller recalled. “If you’re interested in dropping your input costs 20-30% and raising your yields above county averages, talk to me. I’m looking for young, open-minded, aggressive farmers that want to make a difference. We’ll work to create a yield goal that fits your budget and let the soil test tell us how to operate. When we go with Conklin AgroVantage system, we create a soil fertility program that will change your soil life. Getting farmers directed towards using softer chemistry will do themselves a big benefit and let us steer the soil like a piece of machinery, instead of just doing guesswork.” To learn more about becoming involved with the AgroVantage System, contact Chris Miller by phone at (270)-271-9383 or email: cmillerroofing2006@gmail.com.

I n d e p e n d e nt B u s i n e s s O w n e r

Home 270-271-9383 Voice Link 888-266-0014 ext. 8384

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IDENTIFYING COMMON GARDEN

s t s Pe

AS YOU AND YOUR 4-H MEMBER CONTINUE TO MONITOR YOUR GARDEN’S PROGRESS, THE CHANCES ARE HIGH FOR RUNNING INTO A FEW UNINVITED AND UNWANTED VISITORS. IF YOU FIND DAMAGE, YOU AND YOUR 4-H MEMBER CAN PRETEND TO BE GARDEN INVESTIGATORS. LOOK FOR CLUES, GATHER THE SUSPECTS AND THEN ELIMINATE ALL OF THEM BUT ONE. HERE ARE SOME HELPFUL HINTS TO HELP YOU GET TO THE BOTTOM OF INSECT DAMAGE.

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KNOW YOUR PLANTS Sometimes, plants suffer because they were planted in the wrong location. Plants in areas that do not receive the correct amount of sunlight and water will never thrive, and that makes them susceptible to opportunistic insect pests. Usually only a handful of insects attack each type of common garden plant. Knowing the common pests for your crops will help you quickly narrow down your list of suspects. It is important to note that insects are not responsible for all garden problems. Diseases, slug damage and wildlife damage can sometimes look like insect damage.

KNOW YOUR INSECT MOUTH-PARTS

Insects have different mouthparts, and their damage can help you determine the culprit. Many insects have chewing mouth-parts that eat away chunks. Common garden pests with chewing mouth-parts are beetles, caterpillars and grasshoppers. Other insects have piercing tubes that suck out plant juices and do not remove parts of the plant. Their damage causes wilted or discolored areas. These insect pests include aphids, stink bugs, whiteflies and squash bugs.

KNOW YOUR BENEFICIAL INSECTS Just because you see an insect in the garden does not mean it is going to cause damage. Some insects prey on the pests. For example, ladybugs and green lacewings (both larvae and adults) feed on aphids. Virtually every wasp found in a garden is a beneficial predator. All spiders and centipedes are predators too. Some insects like bees and butterflies are beneficial pollinators and help plants produce some of your young person’s favorite foods like apples, potatoes, peaches and blueberries. Flower flies—the little guys that hover in place and look like tiny bees—are important pollinators, and their larvae eat aphids.

CHECK THE (ENT) FACTS Now that you know about your plants and observed the damage and the insects in your garden, use the University of Kentucky Department of Entomology’s ENT Facts to determine what is causing the damage. We have one on nearly every common insect pest problem in Kentucky. Find the ones about your plant and see if you can find a match.


HERE ARE SOME HELPFUL LINKS Ornamental Landscape Plants Pests: https://entomology.ca.uky.edu/ landscape Fruit Pests: https://entomology. ca.uky.edu/fruit
 Vegetable Pests: https://entomology.ca.uky.edu/vegetable If you have trouble determining the source of crop damage, remember the UK Cooperative Extension Service is here to help. We have extension agents in every county who can help you find solutions to common garden problems.

If your young person really enjoys looking for insects and learning more about them, consider having them complete a 4-H entomology project. More information on 4-H entomology opportunities is available at the Casey County Extension Office of the UK Cooperative Extension Service at 606787-7384. Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of economic or social status and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnic origin, national origin, creed, religion, political belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expressions, pregnancy, marital status, genetic information, age, veteran status, or physical or mental disability.

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LEXINGTON, KY., (OCT. 8, 2020)– AN IDEA THAT STARTED WITH THE CURIOSITY OF AN ENTERPRISING SOUTH-CENTRAL KENTUCKY FARMER IS SHOWING PROMISE AS ANOTHER CROP FOR KENTUCKY SMALL GRAIN PRODUCERS, AS WELL AS A RELIABLE SOURCE OF KENTUCKY-GROWN CEREAL RYE FOR BOURBON DISTILLERS, BAKERS AND MILLERS. IN A STATE LONG RECOGNIZED FOR ITS PROGRESSIVE FARMERS, THE HALCOMB FAMILY OF WALNUT GROVE FARMS IN LOGAN COUNTY ARE KNOWN AS SOME OF THE MOST INNOVATIVE. IN 2009, THE LATE DON HALCOMB BEGAN EXPERIMENTING WITH CEREAL RYE AS A COVER CROP ON HIS GRAIN FIELDS. LIKE SOME KENTUCKY FARMERS, THE HALCOMBS CHOSE TO PLANT RYE AS A COVER CROP, BECAUSE IT PRODUCES AN ELABORATE ROOT SYSTEM THAT REDUCES SOIL EROSION AND KEEPS NUTRIENTS ON THE FARM. IN 2012, HALCOMB STARTED WONDERING WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IF HE ALLOWED THE CROP TO PRODUCE GRAIN. “MY DAD WAS A FIFTH-GENERATION FARMER, AND MY BROTHER JOHN AND I ARE SIXTH-GENERATION FARMERS IN SCHOCHOH,” SAID SAM HALCOMB, DON HALCOMB’S SON. “WE KNOW THAT EVERY GENERATION HAS TO MODIFY THEIR OPERATION AND BUSINESS PLAN TO SURVIVE. WE HAVE TO BE OPEN AND LOOK FOR NEW IDEAS. CEREAL RYE SEEMS PROMISING, IF WE CAN FIGURE OUT THE AGRONOMICS AND MARKETING.”

e Ry the

New Crop

By Katie Pratt

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LONGTIME FRIENDSHIP SPARKS RESEARCH BEGINNINGS Don Halcomb first shared his idea of producing cereal rye for grain with University of Kentucky wheat breeder David Van Sanford. Having worked on numerous research projects together for more than 30 years, the two were longtime collaborators and friends. Halcomb also started talking to craft distilleries and sold a small amount of rye to some of them between 2012 and 2014. “Don and I talked casually about rye for a few years, and then in 2015, he planted a few strips of KWS hybrid rye on the same farm where we had the wheat and barley variety trials,” said Van Sanford, a professor in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “We harvested part of the strips and estimated the yield, and then he took the grain down to the Walnut Grove shop to evaluate the quality.” The Halcomb family was pleased with the yield, the quality and the crop’s potential. They were not the only ones. INTEREST GROWS The Kentucky Small Grain Growers Association was becoming involved as more farmers were showing interest in growing the crop. More UK specialists were coming on board too, including Chad Lee, director of the UK Grain and Forage Center for

Hostetler Concrete Pumping Owner: Stephen Hostetler Phone: 270-841-9247 1021 Dennis Road Russellville, KY 42276

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Excellence. Lee began to take on a leading role studying the crop’s agronomics. “This project is exciting, because we could potentially develop a new crop for Kentucky farmers and improve the health of our soils at the same time,” he said. Barbara Hurt, executive director of DendriFund, was ecstatic at what she saw when she was invited to attend a UK rye field day at Walnut Grove Farms in 2015. DendridFund is a foundation started by Brown-Forman and the Brown family, sixth-generation owners of Brown-Forman. The foundation works to inspire joint action to improve the natural, social and economic environment for future generations. “I got really excited, because the idea of bringing commercial rye back to Kentucky incorporated all three aspects of how DendriFund defines sustainability,” she said. “Without a way to financially support the adoption of environmentally beneficial practices, it is hard to sustain these practices beyond initial trials. The Halcombs cracked the code of improving long-term soil health and water quality without sacrificing short-term requirements for sustainably living off the land.” LEARNING FROM EUROPE Before Prohibition, Kentucky producers regularly grew rye, but after that, rye production moved to colder climates. “Currently, distilleries are sourcing their rye from Canada and Europe,” Hurt said. “If we can get a local source, these distilleries can reduce their transportation costs, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and further support the local economy.” In 2017, DendriFund sponsored Don Halcomb, fellow Kentucky farmer Bob Wade Jr. and Chad Lee to visit Germany and Poland to learn more about modern rye production and meet Ela Szuleta, a student studying rye genetics in Poland. They returned with six varieties and

six management styles to start experimenting with small plots. Szuleta is now a UK graduate student pursuing her doctorate under Van Sanford and Tim Phillips, UK grass and rye breeder. DendriFund is funding her graduate work. The Halcombs grew more rye in 2016 and 2017. Van Sanford first included rye in his UK small plot research trials in 2018. In 2019, things really ramped up.


“We got serious about planting rye plots with the 2019 crop, when we planted a trial involving different rye cultivars including hybrids on three different planting dates,” Van Sanford said. “We repeated the study in 2020.” INCREASED OPPORTUNITY FOR MORE FARMERS In 2019, DendriFund secured grants for four, geographically dispersed Kentucky farm families to produce 25 acres of rye, expanding the project to farm-scale trials with UK. They used varieties and practices that were showing promise in CAFE research. Woodford Reserve Distillery purchased the rye in Sep-

tember, after three of the four farms passed their quality standards. The money the farmers received from the sale went back into the fund to help the program become self-sustaining and involve more producers. Woodford Reserve will use the rye for distillate flavor research in partnership with Van Sanford. The distillery made a 10-year commitment in 2020 to repeat distillation trials for another four years to evaluate the grain in the project through maturation. Woodford Reserve agreed to share the results of their sensory research with farmer participants and other distilleries to further encourage funds raised through purchase.

“Kentucky-grown rye could have a flavor and taste that is unique to Kentucky,” Van Sanford said. “It could result in distilleries producing many specialty products featuring Kentucky rye. If it has the same flavor as imported rye, there is opportunity for us in current products” said Chris Morris, Woodford Reserve master distiller. UK researchers hope to work with their colleagues at the James B. Beam Institute for Kentucky Spirits at the University of Kentucky to increase local distilleries’ interest in Kentucky-grown rye. In 2020, UK and DendriFund asked American Farmland Trust to become a partner in the program and steward the project’s management. American Farmland Trust applied for and received a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board for the Kentucky Commercial Rye Cover Crop Initiative on behalf of the partners. This funding will help expand the initial pilot project to 20 producers, each growing 25 acres of rye for the 2020-2021 growing season. “This project is exciting, because not only are farmers raising Kentucky-grown rye for the brewing, baking and distilling industries, but they are improving soil health at the same time. At American Farmland Trust, we are conserving farmland by the acres and by the inch, and these farmers are keeping the land in agriculture,” said Billy Van Pelt, who is the senior director of external relations for the trust and a 1997 graduate of the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “Our overall goals for the project are to have Kentucky farmers producing 3,000 acres of rye within three years and to have 10,000 acres in rye production by 2030. We estimate those 10,000 acres would provide an additional $5 million in farm revenue.” Scott Franklin is the rye project manager for American Farmland Trust and is working directly with participating farmers.

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“Through this initiative, we can be innovators in agriculture conservation, protect our farmland, and keep farmers on that land,” he said. “Ultimately, this project gives farmers another option, and more options are a good thing.” “The flavor profile and product yield of the first Kentucky-grown rye used at the Woodford Reserve Distillery has been of the highest quality,” “We are very pleased and encouraged by these early results and look forward to another year of testing." FINDING WHAT WORKS This fall, the 20 producers will plant different varieties and use different management practices that are showing promise in UK small plot research conducted by Van Sanford, Phillips and Szuleta and also use recommendations that come from agronomic and plant pathology studies conducted by UK Grain and Forage Center of Excellence researchers Lee, Carrie Knott, UK grain crops specialist, and Carl Bradley, UK plant pathologist. “This pilot project is going to give us a lot of climates, soil types and growing conditions to determine whether Kentucky farmers can consistently grow rye and meet food and beverage quality standards,” Lee said. “We still have much to learn as we are using borrowed genetics and still determining the management practices for rye in Kentucky.” Agriculture and natural resource agents with the UK Cooperative Extension Service are working with Lee

to recruit farmers and scout fields during the season. “I’ve had several growers ask about the project, because there are distilleries nearby,” said Traci Missun, Oldham County agriculture and natural resources extension agent who scouted producers’ fields during the 2019-2020 season. “It’s definitely viable, but it can have some of the same challenges that wheat has as well as some new weed control obstacles.” This fall, the Halcombs plan to plant 70 acres of rye. They hope interest in the project continues to grow. “It is great that we have a team of scientists at UK that can help us investigate new crop opportunities,” Sam Halcomb said. “When you also have support from the industry and commodity groups, then this crop has a great potential to make a contribution to Kentucky’s agricultural economy.”

More information on the Kentucky Commercial Rye Cover Crop Initiative is available by contacting Franklin at sfranklin@farmland.org or 502-272-0726.

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2695 South Fork Creek Rd, Liberty, KY 42539 Hometown Family Owned for 67 Years. Located in downtown Liberty, KY

Featuring Brands:

Ashley, Coaster, England Lazy boy, Catnapper For all your Kitchen, Living Room, Dining Room and Flooring needs.

606-787-6591

33 Hustonville St., Liberty, KY 42539 Hours: Monday-Friday: 8am–5pm, Saturday: 8am-1pm Closed on Sunday

FATHER' S DAY RECLINER SALE JUNE 14TH-19TH


CODE

BAGGED FEED 50 LB

210

ORGANIC BROILER GROWER RSB 20%

$20.17

POULTRY

211

ORGANIC BROILER STARTER RSB 23%

$21.04

POULTRY

240

ORGANIC SOY PR FREE BROILER GROWER 20%

$20.38

POULTRY

241

ORGANIC SOY PR FREE BROILER STARTER 22%

$23.61

POULTRY

233

ORGANIC PULLET DEVELOPER 15.5%

$18.26

POULTRY

234

ORGANIC PULLET STARTER 19%

$19.66

POULTRY

244

ORGANIC SOY PR FREE CORN FREE PULLET GROWER 16%

$19.74

POULTRY

218

ORGANIC CHICKEN LAYER RSB 16%

$18.20

POULTRY

242

ORGANIC SOY PR FREE CHICKEN LAYER 16%

$19.65

POULTRY

243

ORGANIC SOY PR FREE CORN FREE CHICKEN LAYER 16%

$18.42

POULTRY

263

ORGANIC TURKEY GROWER 22%

$20.87

POULTRY

264

ORGANIC TURKEY STARTER 28%

$21.97

POULTRY

255

ORGANIC SOY PR FREE TURKEY GROWER 22%

$22.42

POULTRY

256

ORGANIC SOY PR FREE TURKEY STARTER 24%

$23.07

POULTRY

224

ORGANIC DUCK FINISHER 16%

$18.59

POULTRY

225

ORGANIC DUCK GROWER 18%

$19.33

POULTRY

227

ORGANIC DUCK STARTER 22%

$20.72

POULTRY

215

ORGANIC CALF STARTER 18%

$19.87

DAIRY

222

ORGANIC DAIRY 15%

$18.57

DAIRY

245

ORGANIC SOY PR FREE DAIRY 15%

$18.14

DAIRY

267

ORGANIC DRY COW PREMIX

$33.07

DAIRY

237

ORGANIC SHEEEP GRAIN MIX 16%

$18.82

SHEEP

250

ORGANIC SOY PR FREE SWINE GROWER 15%

$17.98

SWINE

258

ORGANIC SWINE GEST RSB 12.3%

$17.15

SWINE

259

ORGANIC SWINE GROWER RSB 15.2%

$17.89

SWINE

260

ORGANIC SWINE LACT RSB 16.7%

$18.06

SWINE

261

ORGANIC SWINE STARTER RSB 18.8%

$19.15

SWINE

268

ORGANIC DEER MINERAL

$29.41

SPECIAL

228

ORGANIC GOAT GRAIN MIX 16%

$18.73

GOAT

All prices are subject to change without notice.

ORGANIC

-BAGGED FEED-TOTED FEED-BULK FEED-ORGANIC APPROVED SOIL AMMENDMENTSAll our feeds are non-gmo and certified organic

270-265-5004

We want to be your supplier for all your organic feed & fertilizer needs. Custom mixes available. We provide free consultations and recommendations.


For more information on advertising in any of our upcoming editions contact us at 606-510-1311 Upcoming editions include: Home and Garden-fall edition Agriculture in the Bluegrass-fall edition

Promotional products available!

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Amanda Merkel Owner/General Manager

amarketing1017@outlook.com www.merkelmarketing.net


hitz halter

THE SUPERIOR INSULATION FOR ALL BELOW-GRADE APPLICATIONS! QUALITY • PERFORMANCE • LASTING VALUE ENERGY EFFICIENCY • TERMITE RESISTANCE • STRENGTH • R-VALUE • INSTALLATION EASE SHIPPING & STORAGE

15-YEAR IN-SITU RESEARCH SHOWS HITZ HALTER OUTPERFORMS XPS IN R-VALUE RETENTION David & Frieda Zimmerman • 270-885-5118 • 270-886-6606 933 Pembroke Fairview Rd, Pembroke, KY 42266 Business Hours: Monday 8:00 a.m.–6 p.m. • Tuesday 8:00 a.m.-6 p.m. Wednesday 8:00 a.m.–6 p.m. • Thursday 8:00 a.m.–6 p.m. Friday 8:00 a.m.–6 p.m. • Saturday and Sunday closed