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THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO MEDICINE

DIGESTIVE DISEASES CENTER 2015–2016

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The Digestive Diseases Center at the University of Chicago Medicine is a collaborative, multidisciplinary network of physicians, researchers, and allied health professionals who share a legacy of innovation and a common purpose: to improve the lives of patients who suffer from digestive diseases.

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16 Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center 20 Celiac Disease Center 22 Center for Small Bowel Disease and Nutrition 24 Center for Colon and Rectal Diseases 26 Center for Esophageal Diseases 28 Center for Endoscopic Research and Therapeutics (CERT) 32 Center for Liver Diseases 34 Pancreatic Disease Center 36 Gastrointestinal Cancer Risk and Prevention Clinic 38 Basic and Translational Research 40 Center for Gastrointestinal Oncology 44 Center for the Surgical Treatment of Obesity 46 Clinical Research

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“Our care is based on a foundation of advanced, research-driven medicine. The same experts who are treating patients today are guiding research into tomorrow’s medical breakthroughs.”

NEIL H. HYMAN, MD Co-Director, Digestive Diseases Center Professor of Surgery

H ISTORY 1927

First full-time academic section in gastroenterology founded by Walter Palmer

1934

First hospital to use a gastroscope to view organs of the digestive system

1943

1940s

Developed first animal models of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Discovered that patients with active colitis lost high levels of protein

1960s

Developed vagotomy, still in use today, for treatment of ulcers

Developed surgeries to avoid the need for an ileostomy when removing the colon

1944

1985

Discovered the relationship between a shortage of dietary protein and decreased immune function and surgical infection

1947

Developed the “rat depletion model,” used to determine the minimum daily requirements for the essential amino acids, calories, and potassium

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First segmental liver transplant in the U.S.

1988

First split-liver transplant in the United States

1989

First successful living donor transplant in the world

other firsts

Identified roles of intestinal heat shock protein (Hsp70) in immunomodulation of intestinal lymphoid cells and host defense against invasive pathogens First to demonstrate that pain associated with peptic ulcers is related to acid, not stomach contractions First to demonstrate that ulcers can be caused by excess secretion of normal gastric juice One of the first to show increased risk of colon cancer in patients with ulcerative colitis One of the first centers in the United States to use deep endoscopy into the small bowel to control bleeding and provide diagnosis and therapy


“ We are immensely proud of our rich heritage, and from it find inspiration for our ongoing and future breakthroughs.”

DAVID T. RUBIN, MD Co-Director, Digestive Diseases Center Joseph B. Kirsner Professor of Medicine

MODERN I N NOVATIONS First to demonstrate that histologic normalization is possible in IBD Discovered the first Crohn’s disease gene (NOD2), which was a paradigm shifting both in promoting further scientific discovery and in how it translates into patient care Served a major role in spawning the era of Gut Microbiome research—  now believed to be central to the development of many GI and nonGI diseases, including IBD, colon cancer and metabolic diseases Launched NIH-funded Digestive Disease Research Core Center and Digestive Disease Training Center Leading the world in multiple-organ transplants, such as combined liver-heart-kidney transplantation Only Celiac Disease Center in the region One of only a few gnotobiotic germ-free facilities in the world Elucidated the genetic and immunological basis of celiac disease

Increasing understanding of vitamin D receptor biology and pathobiology Conducting research leading to the approval of numerous conventional, immunomodulatory, and recent biologic therapies for ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease Pioneered endoscopic ultrasound and mucosal resections for identification and treatment of extraluminal and mucosal tumors of the digestive tract Perform total pancreatectomy with islet cell transplantation, one of the few hospitals in the United States offering the procedure Created a mouse model of celiac disease, one of the first labs in the world to do so Discovered connection in pathophysiology between celiac disease and other autoimmune conditions Uncovered previously undescribed role for IL 15 and retinoic acid in promoting intestinal mucosal inflammation

Defining the role of environmental and dietary factors in triggering “Western” disorders, including IBD, Exploring the relationship between colorectal cancer, complex imidiopathic pulmonary fibrosis mune disorders, and metabolic (IPF) and gastroesophageal reflux diseases disease (GERD)— prospective, multicenter, randomized trial Elucidating the role of epigenetic funded by NIH changes in IBD and inflammation

Testing novel agents in GI malignancy First truly multidisciplinary bariatric surgery program in Chicago First in Chicago to perform totally laparoscopic gastric bypass First in Midwest to perform totally laparoscopic duodenal switch First in region to perform totally laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy First to study comparative outcomes of laparoscopic gastric bypass and duodenal switch in super-obese patients Participated in first study to validate next generation sequencing panels for Lynch syndrome patients Validated numerous Lynch syndrome prediction models Collecting the largest cohort of African American Lynch syndrome patients in the world Demonstrated the relationship between inflammation and cancer risk in ulcerative colitis

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WE PUT PATIENTS AT THE CENTER OF EVERYTHING WE DO. The commitment of the Digestive Diseases Center is to advance both patient care and knowledge. Our philosophy is simple. We believe that if all of us, clinicians and scientists alike, start with the patient and focus on serving that patient to the best of our ability, everything else will follow. All that we do—from diagnosis and treatment to science and technology to scholarship and teaching—is shaped by that conviction. And all that we know we can achieve in the years ahead, in science and in outstanding patient care, depends on it. 6


WE WORK AS A TEAM.

The reality of modern medicine is that most patients and most problems they face require specialists across different areas. Nowhere is that more true than in the treatment of digestive diseases. Diagnosis can be difficult. Treatment is often multimodal and can have profound implications for systems beyond those of the GI tract. You can not often separate questions of medication or surgery from questions of nutrition or psychology, and concurrent health issues are common. The Digestive Diseases Center does more than give patients access to all the specialists they may need to see. It removes the walls from between those specialties and brings everyone together around the patient in a single, multifunctional team.

For patients, the benefit of this approach is care in the University of Chicago Medicine tradition— care that is patient-centric and based on multiple perspectives and cross-disciplinary comprehensive problem solving. It is care that is more effective, more efficient, and frequently less complicated and stressful for them, their families, and their referring physicians. There are benefits for us as well: new perspectives on familiar problems, increased innovation and experimentation, and more nuanced understandings of the complexities at the heart of our field—the necessary components of advances and achievement in medicine.

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WE BRING SCIENCE TO THE BEDSIDE.

As you might expect from an academic medical center with a history of breaking new ground, our clinicians are also investigators. Diagnosis and treatment here are continuously informed by the most current and compelling evidence, and our patients routinely benefit from novel therapies and techniques available through one of the extraordinary number of clinical trials the Digestive Diseases Center initiates or participates in. What you might not expect is that our research scientists, too, are active partners in care, working with clinicians in parallel to solve the complex problems that patients face. Here, the dialogue flows from treatment room to laboratory and back again: “Here’s something that doesn’t make sense. How can we understand it better?” “Here’s an interesting finding. How might we translate this into something that benefits your patients?” When clinicians and scientists collaborate in this way, patients receive the best, most advanced care possible. As important, research agendas follow not just the individual investigator’s interests but emerging trends and changes in disease as well as critical issues in care. All our patients benefit from research, and all participate in it, whether that participation is as simple as becoming part of a registry and allowing us to follow them clinically or providing the tissue, serum, or stool that bring us one step closer to understanding and cure.

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It is a process in which clinical practice and basic and translational research form a seamless, virtuous circle, one that leads to better diagnosis, better treatment, and better outcomes for our patients and for patients and physicians everywhere. WE SHARE WHAT WE KNOW.

Quality patient care and the best long-term patient outcomes depend on quality communication among all those who have a stake in the results: patients and their families as well as physicians and health professionals, those directly involved in a particular treatment and those who refer, provide follow-up care, or consult. We are committed to improving all aspects of communication, from increasing access to our physicians to increasing the quality of information available to patients and physicians about digestive disease and its treatment. WE ALIGN EVERYTHING—FROM PROCESSES TO ENTIRE FACILITIES—AROUND PATIENT NEEDS.

Seen from the perspective of the individual patient, not much in the traditional structure of a hospital or medical center makes sense. We are working to change that. We have established the Transitional Care Clinic— the only one of its kind in the Midwest—to help patients with digestive diseases make the transition from pediatric to adult care.


We have initiated something we call IBD 360, to improve the total experience of a patient in our Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, including arranging parallel visits with colleagues in rheumatology, dermatology, gynecology, psychology, and social work so that our patients are getting all the care they need for these complex illnesses. We have supplemented our traditional support groups for patients with IBD, hepatitis C, and other chronic digestive diseases with online forums and information sessions that extend support to patients who can’t easily travel to one of our locations. THE CENTER FOR CARE AND DISCOVERY

Our newest hospital complex, completed in 2013, was designed to facilitate modern, collaborative medicine and patient-centered care. Treatment suites accommodate concurrent procedures involving multiple specialties and modalities; biomedical research laboratories are on site, steps away from the procedure rooms and patients they serve. Operating rooms are equipped with sophisticated technologies, from robotics and high-definition surgical imaging systems to precision laminar airflow for advanced infection control. Within the hospital, the facilities of our Center for Endoscopic Research and Therapeutics (CERT) include the most advanced endoscopic and microscopic technologies in the region. CERT’s state-of-the-art equipment enables us to perform minimally invasive procedures that spare patients from major surgery, provide precision disease staging with onsite

cytopathologists, and allow diagnosis and treatment in a single visit. Information technology systems throughout facilitate real-time global communication, collaboration, and observation. Because wellness and healing also depend on patients’ daily comfort and peace of mind, the Center for Care and Discovery sets the standard for comfort, as well. Patient rooms, all of which are private and many of which feature separate alcoves where patients and family can gather to watch a movie or simply get a change of view, provide ample storage and the space to display items that can make a patient feel most at home. Panoramic views of parklands and skyline open up the space and connect patients to the city; soothing lighting and room-darkening shades shut out distractions and allow them to rest. Two exercise facilities, comfortable public spaces for people watching, as well as shops, cafes, and a fresh-food market help “normalize” patients’ stay; mobile wireless technology and a customized audiovisual interface keeps them connected to their dedicated nursing and medical team.

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“ We push the envelope—with science, discovery, and innovation. As an academic medical center, that’s our job, to continually push ourselves to find the next ‘best treatment option’ for our patients. I believe that the University of Chicago Medicine’s rich legacy and collaborative model will lead us to advances in our field and successes here that we have only imagined.”

DAVID T. RUBIN, MD Co-Director, Digestive Diseases Center Joseph B. Kirsner Professor of Medicine


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“ The University of Chicago Medicine has an amazing legacy with respect to innovation and discovery in digestive diseases. Key moments and landmark discoveries occurred at this institution, and our role is to continue in that tradition of innovation and discovery while ensuring patients receive the thoughtful and attentive care they deserve.�

NEIL H. HYMAN, MD Co-Director, Digestive Diseases Center Professor of Surgery

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The Digestive Diseases Center comprises thirteen areas of clinical and research strength at the University of Chicago Medicine.


I N FLAM MATORY BOWEL DISEASE CENTER The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center is committed to providing the highest caliber of care to patients who suffer from Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and related conditions. Our experts also perform medical research that advances the science and understanding of these conditions, as well as deliver unique and highly relevant educational programs for patients and professionals. Outstanding patient care is at the center of everything we do, from providing state-of-the-art medical therapies and nutritional counseling to using minimally invasive approaches for complex surgeries to decrease pain, scarring, and recovery times. Whether patients come to us directly or are referred by a physician, they benefit from treatment which is grounded in creative thinking, compassionate understanding, and the very latest research advances. For example, our unique Transitional IBD Clinic for Teenagers and Young Adults, helps to bridge the gap between pediatric care and responsible self management of chronic disease. We also have clinics that provide expert guidance related to pregnancy and fertility issues, precancerous and cancerous lesions of the bowel, and experimental clinical trials with innovative therapies to treat disease and minimize the impact on one’s quality of life. The IBD Center includes a dedicated inpatient wing that is located in the Center for Care and Discovery, the University of Chicago Medicine’s newest and most technologically advanced hospital. Patients receive their care directly from the IBD specialists, and, if surgery is necessary, recover in the same room. Our dedicated inpatient IBD nurse practitioner guarantees ongoing communication and updates to our referring colleagues. As one of only a limited number of research centers in the country testing new IBD treatments, we can offer a variety of clinical trial therapies—the most advanced treatments available—at the earliest possible time in patients’ care. Every patient benefits from the expertise of our world-renowned clinicians and researchers, whose multidisciplinary, collaborative approach extends from patient care to advancing the science of medicine.

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RUSSELL D. COHEN, MD

DAVID T. RUBIN, MD

ROGER HURST, MD

BARBARA D. KIRSCHNER, MD

MICHELE RUBIN, APN

Director, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center

Joseph B. Kirsner Professor of Medicine

Associate Director, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center

Associate Director, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center

Associate Director, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center

Physicians Adult gastroenterology Russell D. Cohen, MD Director, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center Professor of Medicine Sushila Dalal, MD Director, Program for Fertility, Pregnancy and Sexual Function in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Assistant Professor of Medicine Ira Hanan, MD Professor of Medicine Joel Pekow, MD Instructor of Medicine David T. Rubin, MD Co-Director, Digestive Diseases Center Joseph B. Kirsner Professor of Medicine Atsushi Sakuraba, MD, PhD Assistant Professor of Medicine Pediatric gastroenterology Ranjana Gokhale, MD Associate Professor of Pediatrics Stacy A. Kahn, MD Assistant Professor of Pediatrics Director, Transitional IBD Clinic for Teenagers and Young Adults Barbara S. Kirschner, MD Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine Surgery Lisa Marie Cannon, MD Clinical Associate of Surgery Roger D. Hurst, MD Professor of Surgery Neil H. Hyman, MD Professor of Surgery Konstantin Umanskiy, MD Assistant Professor of Surgery

Research Dionysios Antonopoulos, PhD Assistant Professor of Medicine Eugene B. Chang, MD Martin Boyer Professor of Medicine Associate Section Chief for Research Alexander Chervonsky, MD, PhD Professor of Pathology Bana Jabri, MD, PhD Professor of Medicine and Pathology Jerrold R. Turner, MD, PhD Sara and Harold Lincoln Thompson Professor of Pathology Advance Practice Nurses Gastroenterology Care Ashley Bochenek, APN Jennifer Labas, APN Alana Wichmann, APN Ostomy Clinic Janice Colwell, APN Michele Kaplon-Jones, APN Malou de Ocampo, APN Nutrition Elizabeth Wall, MS, RD Lori Welstead, MS, RD, LDN Surgical Care Michele Rubin, APN Noelle Kakuk, APN Services Secondary or tertiary care for the most complex and difficult IBD cases Advanced mucosal imaging techniques for surveillance and detection of cancer and precancerous changes in the bowel mucosa (chromoendoscopy) CT/MRI enterography

Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) Interventional endoscopy Enteroscopy, traditional and deep (balloon-assisted) Flexible sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy Positron emission technology (PET) scans Radionucleotide scanning Upper GI endoscopy, colonoscopy Ileoscopy Pouchoscopy Wireless capsule endoscopy (the “Pill Camera”) Ostomy care Surgical Services Bowel resections (traditional, minimally invasive, robotic) Strictureplasties “J” pouch formations Ileostomy, Colostomy Specialized surgeries Contact To learn more about the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, please visit: Ibdcenter.uchicago.edu For referrals and consultations please call: 1 (844) UCGIDOC (824–4362) An IBD Center Patient Support group meets regularly. Please visit ibdcenter.uchicago.edu for more information.

Dedicated small bowel radiography

FOR REFERRALS AND CONSULTATIONS CALL: 1 (844) UCGIDOC FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT: UCHOSPITALS.EDU/SPECIALTIES/GI

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STUDYING COMPLETE HISTOLOGICAL NORMALIZATION A groundbreaking study at the University of Chicago Medicine Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center has concluded that complete histological normalization (CHN) is possible in patients who have been diagnosed and treated for ulcerative colitis. Until now, little has been known about the predicting factors and outcomes for patients with IBD who achieve complete normalization of bowel histology. Investigators reviewed the records of 646 patients with a definitive diagnosis of ulcerative colitis who had had a baseline colonoscopy with biopsies in each segment of the colon (rectum, left-side and right-side) and then a follow-up colonoscopy more than one year later. Of these patients, 65 (10.1 percent) had CHN in all three segments of the colon, while 208 patients (32.2 percent) had at least one normalized segment. “This study refutes the common perception that once a patient has IBD, structural histological changes are permanent,” said Britt Christensen, BSc, MBBS, FRACP, MPH, one of the investigators. CHN has now been associated with superior clinical relapse-free survival compared to histological activity and quiescence in ulcerative colitis patients, and is more predictive than endoscopic mucosal healing. Relapse-free survival was compared between patients using Kaplan-Meier analysis, log rank test and Cox proportional hazard model with significance set at p ≤ 0.05. Results showed that patients with histological quiescence were 3.88 times more likely to suffer a relapse than those with CHN. Those with histological activity were 6.11 times more likely to relapse than those with CHN. The next study will look at whether de-escalation of treatment is possible for patients with CHN.

“Having such an immense population of inflammatory bowel disease enables us to ask critical questions and push the frontiers of our understanding. New therapies and better technology have enabled us to define a new level of remission, which could very well change how we use medical therapies in the future.”

DAVID T. RUBIN, MD Chief, Section of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition Co-Director, Digestive Diseases Center Joseph B. Kirsner Professor of Medicine

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“This study refutes the common perception that once a patient has IBD, structural histological changes are permanent. The next step is to study longer term outcomes of these patients.”

BRITT CHRISTENSEN, BSc, MBBS, FRACP, MPH

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CELIAC DISEASE CENTER The University of Chicago Medicine’s Celiac Disease Center is an internationally recognized center of excellence providing comprehensive patient and professional education, expert diagnosis and treatment for both children and adults, groundbreaking bench and clinical research, and active leadership in advocacy efforts. Our mission is to cure celiac disease. As we focus on research toward a cure, we also strive to raise awareness and diagnosis rates through education and advocacy.

“ Besides the gluten-free diet, which is the only treatment at present, we are involved in clinical studies to advance therapy for celiac disease.”

CAROL SEMRAD, MD Director, Adult Clinical Research Professor of Medicine

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STEFANO GUANDALINI, MD

BANA JABRI, MD, PHD

CAROL SEMRAD, MD

SONIA S. KUPFER, MD

HILARY JERICHO, MD

Founder and Medical Director, Celiac Disease Center

Vice Chair, Research (Basic)

Director, Adult Clinical Research

Director, Clinical Genetic Research

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics

Physicians Stefano Guandalini, MD Professor of Pediatrics Bana Jabri, MD, PhD Professor of Medicine Carol Semrad, MD Professor of Medicine Sonia S. Kupfer, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Edwin K. McDonald IV, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Hilary Jericho, MD Assistant Professor of Pediatrics Nutritionists Elizabeth Wall, MS, RD Lori Welstead, MS, RD, LDN Administration Carol M. Shilson Executive Director Ronit Rose Program Director

Services Expert diagnostic practices and evidence-based, patient-focused, and family-oriented care of adult and pediatric celiac disease patients Activities Patient education and resources, including an online Answer Bank and gluten-free “care packages” for newly diagnosed patients— regardless of where they were diagnosed—as well as free annual blood screening for their relatives and others at risk for celiac disease.

Number of patients treated in last 12 months Approximately 1,200 children and adults Contact To learn more about the Celiac Disease Center or explore our physician and patient resources, please visit: cureceliacdisease.org To refer patients to one of our celiac specialists, please call: 1 (773) 702–6140 for adults; for children call: 1 (773) 702–6169.

Professional education, including the annual Preceptorship Program, an unparalleled two-day intensive course on celiac disease for doctors and other medical professionals. Research resources, including a database of all celiac patients at the University of Chicago Medicine, to facilitate the study of trends and patterns as well as publishing regarding celiac disease.

Diane McKiernan Research Study Coordinator

FOR REFERRALS AND CONSULTATIONS CALL: 1 (844) UCGIDOC FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT: UCHOSPITALS.EDU/SPECIALTIES/GI

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CENTER FOR SMALL BOWEL DISEASE AND NUTRITION The University of Chicago Medicine’s program for the treatment of Small Bowel Disease and Nutrition includes comprehensive management of small bowel bleeding, short bowel syndrome/intestinal failure and celiac disease. The University of Chicago was one of the first centers in the United States to perform Double Balloon Enteroscopy for the treatment of small bowel bleeding. The center utilizes expert radiologists in small bowel imaging/interventions and minimally invasive small bowel surgery. The University of Chicago Medicine is also uniquely staffed by a multidisciplinary Nutrition Support Team to diagnose and manage short bowel syndrome/intestinal failure, diarrhea/malabsorption syndromes and patients with feeding difficulties. The team, established in 1980, provides expert administration of parenteral and enteral nutrition in the inpatient and outpatient setting. Clinical research is aimed at novel therapies in the treatment of short bowel syndrome and other intestinal disorders.

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CAROL E. SEMRAD, MD

EDWIN K. MCDONALD, IV, MD

ELIZABETH WALL, MS, RD,

Director, Center for Small Bowel Disease and Nutrition

Associate Director, Adult Clinical Nutrition

CNSC, LDN

Physicians Gastroenterologists Carol E. Semrad, MD Professor of Medicine Edwin K. McDonald IV, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Associate Director of Adult Clinical Nutrition

Registered Dietitian

Nutrition Support Team Elizabeth Wall, MS, RD, CNSC, LDN Annie Widlicka, MS, RD, CNSC, LDN Jean Herlitz, RN Physician Resource Nurse

Hilary Jericho, MD Assistant Professor of Pediatrics

Scott Lozano, PharmD, BCNSP Clinical Pharmacist

Surgeons John C. Alverdy, MD, FACS Professor of Surgery

Services Video Capsule Endoscopy

Vivek Prachand, MD, FACS Associate Professor of Surgery

Double Balloon Enteroscopy Laparoscopic resection of small bowel lesions

Mustafa Hussain, MD Assistant Professor of Surgery

FOR REFERRALS AND CONSULTATIONS CALL: 1 (844) UCGIDOC FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT: UCHOSPITALS.EDU/SPECIALTIES/GI

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CENTER FOR COLON AND RECTAL DISEASES Our experts in the Center for Colon and Rectal Diseases are fully prepared to comprehensively treat a wide range of challenging colon, rectal and anal diseases, including pelvic floor disorders and perianal disease. Our surgeons are recognized experts in the surgical treatment of these diseases and, when appropriate, use some of today’s most advanced, leading-edge surgical techniques. In fact, more than half of colorectal surgeries performed at the University of Chicago Medicine are done using minimally invasive techniques, and our program ranks among the top five percent of academic medical centers in the country for volume of laparoscopic colorectal procedures performed. Although our surgeons’ clinical expertise go far and wide, the outcomes of our patients largely depend on a team approach that includes physician assistants, medical assistants, nurses and nurse practitioners, as well as highly experienced enterostomal and wound care nurses. The combined expertise of these professionals ensures that each patient receives the care he or she needs to thrive after surgery.

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NEIL H. HYMAN, MD

LISA MARIE CANNON, MD

ROGER HURST, MD

KONSTANTIN UMANSKIY, MD

Chief, Colon and Rectal Surgery

Clinical Associate of Surgery

Professor of Surgery

Assistant Professor of Surgery

Physicians Lisa Marie Cannon, MD Clinical Associate of Surgery Roger Hurst, MD Professor of Surgery Neil Hyman, MD Chief, Colon & Rectal Surgery Professor of Surgery Konstantin Umanskiy, MD Assistant Professor of Surgery

Dynamic and MRI defecography and transit studies Prolapse repair Treatment of constipation

Polyposis Laparoscopic colon cancer surgery Robotic rectal cancer surgery

Fecal incontinence

Trans-anal endoscopic microsurgery (TEMS)

Colon and rectal disease Complicated diverticular disease

Diagnostic and surveillance colonoscopy

Pre-sacral tumor excision

Endorectal ultrasound and pelvic MRI

Treatment of colonic volvulus

Advance Practice Nurses Noelle Kakuk, APN Nurse Practitioner

Endometriosis

Inflammatory Bowel Disease Crohn’s disease

Lower GI carcinoid

Ulcerative colitis

Michele Rubin, APN, CNS, CGRN IBD Nurse Specialist

Perianal disease Hemorrhoids

Perianal fistulizing disease

Anal fissure

Laparoscopic surgery for inflammatory bowel disease

Management of abscess and fistula

Re-operative disease

Deborah Walsh, APN Nurse Practitioner Wound Ostomy and Skin Care Nurses Janice C. Colwell, RN, MS, CWOCN, FAAN Stoma Nurse Michele Kaplon-Jones, MSN, RN, ANP-BC, CWOCN Stoma Nurse Maria Lourdes De Ocampo, RN, CWOCN, APN Stoma Nurse

Recto-vaginal fistula treatment Sexually transmitted diseases Pruritis ani Pilonidal disease Paget’s disease of the anus Oncology Colon cancer Rectal cancer

Services Pelvic floor disorders Endoanal ultrasound

Anal cancer

Anorectal manometry, electromyography, and pudendal nerve testing

Management of hereditary colorectal cancer

Second opinion services

FOR REFERRALS AND CONSULTATIONS CALL: 1 (844) UCGIDOC FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT: UCHOSPITALS.EDU/SPECIALTIES/GI

J-pouch procedure Advance enterostomal nursing care State-of-the-art diagnostic imaging Contact To learn more about the Center for Colon and Rectal Diseases, please visit: uchospitals.edu/ specialties/colorectal/ To schedule an admission, make a referral, or request a consultation, please call UCM Physician Connect at: 1 (800) 824–2282.

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CENTER FOR ESOPHAGEAL DISEASES One of the few centers in the U.S. dedicated solely to the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal disease, the Center brings together nationally and internationally recognized clinicians and researchers in a variety of related disciplines to provide patients with advanced options, resources, and a level of experience and innovation available at only a handful of leading medical centers in the world. Our approach is both personalized and multidisciplinary; our outcomes are considered a model for outstanding patient care.

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MARCO G. PATTI, MD

ROBERT T. KAVITT, MD, MPH

VANI KONDA, MD

Director, Center for Esophageal Diseases

Medical Director, Center for Esophageal Diseases

Director of Endoscopic Research and Educational Programs, Center for Endoscopic Research and Therapeutics

Physicians Surgery John C. Alverdy, MD, FACS Sara and Harold Lincoln Thompson Professor of Surgery

Imre Noth, MD Professor of Medicine Director, Bronchoscopy and Interstitial Lung Disease Program

Mark K. Ferguson, MD Professor of Surgery

Ear, Nose & Throat Elisabeth Blair, MD Associate Professor of Surgery

Mustafa Hussain, MD Assistant Professor of Surgery

Louis de Guzman Portugal, MD Associate Professor of Surgery

Marco G. Patti, MD Professor of Surgery

Medical oncology Victoria M. Villaflor, MD Associate Professor of Medicine

Mitchell C. Posner, MD Thomas D. Jones Professor of Surgery Vivek N. Prachand, MD, FACS Associate Professor of Surgery Gastroenterology Robert T. Kavitt, MD, MPH Assistant Professor of Medicine Vani Konda, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Uzma Siddiqui, MD Associate Professor of Medicine Irving Waxman, MD Sara and Harold Lincoln Thompson Professor of Medicine and Surgery

Pathology John Hart, MD Professor of Pathology Nurses Kim Harris, RN Donna Kahn, RN Leslie Mote, LPN Donna Nozicka, RN, BSN Julia O’Malley, RN Mariana Winslow, RN Services Endoscopy Evaluation and treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis Endoscopic dilatation

Pulmonology Edward Garrity, MD Professor of Medicine

Endoscopic ultrasound

D. Kyle Hogarth, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Director, Bronchoscopy and Minimally Invasive Diagnostics Co-Director, Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Risk Clinic Medical Director, Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program

Endoscopic mucosal resection

Wireless pH testing Radiology ENT evaluation of vocal cord problems related to GERD Evaluation of respiratory disorders such as cough or asthma of unknown origin, IPF Minimally invasive myotomy for achalasia Minimally invasive antireflux surgery Minimally invasive treatment of paraesophageal hernia Multimodal therapy for esophageal cancer Minimally invasive resection for esophageal cancer Cryotherapy Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy Optical Coherence Tomography Number of patients in last 12 months More than 1,000 Contact To learn more about the Center for Esophageal Diseases, please visit: uchospitals.edu/specialties/esophageal/ To make a referral or request a consultation, please call: 1 (844) UCGIDOC (824–4362).

Radiofrequency ablation

High-resolution esophageal manometry Catheter-based pH/impedance testing

FOR REFERRALS AND CONSULTATIONS CALL: 1 (844) UCGIDOC FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT: UCHOSPITALS.EDU/SPECIALTIES/GI

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CENTER FOR ENDOSCOPIC RESEARCH AND THERAPEUTICS (CERT) CERT offers patients and their referring physicians the benefits of endoscopic expertise as well as a comprehensive approach to patient care. Our Center’s resources, from cutting-edge technology to physicians, advance practice nurses, and scheduling staff, are exclusively dedicated to serving CERT patients and the physicians who refer them. CERT’s state-of-the-art endoscopy suite is located in the University of Chicago Medicine’s newest hospital, the Center for Care and Discovery, completed in 2013. The suite offers the most advanced complement of technologies in the region. Our team uses these technologies to diagnose and/or treat a wide variety of complex gastrointestinal disorders—from esophageal to pancreatic cancers; large colon polyps; pancreatic and bile duct stones; pancreatitis; and Barrett’s esophagus. Our top-ranked team of physicians, directed by one of the world’s leading authorities on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), Dr. Irving Waxman, includes experts in surgery, oncology, pathology, radiology, and radiation oncology. Our team can provide rapid evaluations that provide accurate diagnoses and staging of cancers with appropriate surgical and oncological follow-up care scheduled. Furthermore, in many cases we perform complex endoscopic procedures that can spare patients from major surgery. Our volume—and the experience it represents—contributes to both our excellent patient outcomes and our low rate of complications. CERT’s interventional endoscopy program is one of the region’s largest, placing us in the ranks of the nation’s leaders in progressive techniques. Similarly, our continuing medical education programs in interventional endoscopy are ranked by the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy as among the nation’s best.

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IRVING WAXMAN, MD

UZMA SIDDIQUI, MD

Associate Director Director of Center for Endoscopic Research of Center for Endoscopic Research and Therapeutics and Therapeutics

VANI KONDA, MD

ANDRES GELRUD, MD

Director of Endoscopic Research and Educational Programs

Director of the Pancreatic Disease Center

Physicians Irving Waxman, MD Sara and Harold Lincoln Thompson Professor of Medicine and Surgery Director of Center for Endoscopic Research and Therapeutics

Ablation of cholangiocarcinoma with photodynamic therapy (PDT) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA)

Number of patients seen in last 12 months More than 2,000

Lithotripsy of large biliary and pancreatic duct stones

Uzma Siddiqui, MD Associate Professor of Medicine Associate Director of Center for Endoscopic Research and Therapeutics

Ampullectomy

Contact To learn more about the Center for Endoscopic Research and Therapeutics, please visit: uchospitals.edu/cert

Vani Konda, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Director of Endoscopic Research and Educational Programs Andres Gelrud, MD Associate Professor of Medicine Director of the Pancreatic Disease Center Services Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) Celiac Plexus Nerve Block Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) Cholangioscopy

Endoscopic Mucosal Resection (EMR) Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection (ESD) Complex polypectomy Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Barrett’s esophagus, radiation proctitis, and gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE)

To schedule an admission, make a referral, or request a consultation, please call UCM Physician Connect at: 1 (800) 824–2282 or contact the Center directly at: 1 (773) 702–1459.

Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (CLE) Pancreatic pseudocyst drainage and necrosectomy Endoscopic suturing Palliative stenting of GI tract and pancreaticobiliary malignancies Extra-corporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for pancreatic stones Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM)

FOR REFERRALS AND CONSULTATIONS CALL: 1 (844) UCGIDOC FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT: UCHOSPITALS.EDU/SPECIALTIES/GI

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“ We start where diagnostic endoscopy ends—we’re what comes next. We specialize in minimally invasive endoscopic therapies, novel imaging techniques that allow us to identify precancerous problems before they can even be noticed with an endoscope, and highly sophisticated cancer staging. I think the other thing that makes us unique is the fact that from our nurse coordinators and advanced practice nurses to our specialists, this is all we do, focus on these particular problems.”

IRVING WAXMAN, MD Director, Center for Endoscopic Research and Therapeutics

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CENTER FOR LIVER DISEASES At the Center for Liver Diseases, decades of experience, a culture of innovation, and a robust program of clinical research combine to yield outstanding clinical outcomes in two major areas: hepatitis C and liver transplantation. For more than 20 years, we have helped set the standard of care for the management of chronic hepatitis C, being actively involved in the ongoing development of both treatment strategies and new therapies for the disease. The evolution of hepatitis C therapy has recently been accelerated, and we are approaching the pinnacle where almost all cases can potentially be cured with therapy. Our experienced team of hepatologists, midlevel providers, and specialty nurses have the expertise in working with patients to effectively manage both the disease and their particular therapy, achieving cure rates well above 90 percent in those who are treated. Our liver transplant program is known nationally and worldwide. Since its inception, we have performed more than 1,600 liver transplants. Our program has the highest liver transplant rate in Illinois, that is, patients on our waiting list having a statistically higher chance of receiving a liver transplant than patients on other waiting lists. We have excellent graft and patient survival rates that are either at or above expectations for our patient population. Our Center also ranks at the top nationally in multi-organ transplant procedures. In terms of both volume and experience, we have performed the most number of combined liver, heart, and kidney transplants, and are fourth in combined liver and heart transplants in the country. The knowledge, skills and experience of our top-ranked hepatologists and surgeons are part of our patients’ success, but a multidisciplinary approach is essential to effectively address the complexity of the clinical cases we treat. With the teamwork of physicians, specialty nurses, midlevel providers, a nutritionist, a social worker, and a psychologist within our center, and the collaborative work of outstanding specialty teams in pathology, radiology, and oncology, our patients benefit greatly from a comprehensive and integrated management that is tailored to their individual needs.

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J. MICHAEL MILLIS, MD

HELEN S. TE, MD

JOHN RENZ, MD, PhD

NANCY S. REAU, MD

K. GAUTHAM REDDY, MD

ANDREW ARONSOHN, MD

Surgical Director, Liver Transplantation and Hepatobiliary Surgery

Medical Director, Adult Liver Transplant Program

Professor of Surgery

Associate Professor of Medicine

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Physicians Hepatologists Andrew Aronsohn, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Nancy S. Reau, MD Associate Professor of Medicine K. Gautham Reddy, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Helen S. Te, MD Associate Professor of Medicine Ruba K. Azzam, MD Associate Professor of Pediatrics Medical Director, Pediatric Liver Transplant Program Surgeons J. Michael Millis, MD Professor of Surgery John Renz, MD, PhD Professor of Surgery Advanced Practice Nurses/ Physician Assistants Elizabeth Boyle, APN Hepatology Nurse Practitioner Melanie Samardzija, APN, PhD Hepatology Nurse Practitioner Services Multidisciplinary evaluation and management of hepatitis, fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, liver cancer, benign liver masses, hepatic vascular disorders, and other liver diseases Liver biopsy

Liver transplantation, multi-organ transplantation Clinical trials for novel therapies of liver diseases and the complications of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and for novel immunosuppressive agents Innovative management strategies for difficult cases, such as liver transplantation for more advanced hepatocellular carcinoma and for obese patients Locations Hyde Park Campus Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine 5758 S. Maryland Ave. Chicago, IL 60637 Phone 1 (773) 702–6140 Fax 1 (773) 834–1288 Bourbonnais Clinic 1615 N. Convent St. Bourbonnais, IL 60914 Phone 1 (815) 937–5200 Fax 1 (815) 937–2063

New Lenox Clinic Silver Cross Hospital 1890 Silver Cross Blvd., Suite 215 New Lenox, IL 60451 Phone 1 (815) 602–8251 Schererville Clinic 222 Indianapolis Blvd. Schererville, IN 46375 Phone: 1 (773) 702–6140 Fax 1 (773) 834–1288 Contact To learn more about the Center for Liver Diseases, please visit: uchospitals.edu/specialties/gi/liver/ For referrals for liver transplantation, please call UCM Liver Transplant Intake Center at: 1 (773) 702–4500. For other referrals and consultations, please call UCM Physician Connect at: 1 (800) 824–2282. A Hepatitis C Patient Support Group meets regularly. Please visit: uchospitals.edu/specialties/gi/liver/

Huron Clinic 150 E. Huron St., Suite 900 Chicago, IL 60611 Phone 1 (773) 702–6140 Fax 1 (773) 834–1288 Matteson Clinic (Surgery only) 4749 Lincoln Mall Drive, Suite 500 Matteson, IL 60443 Phone 1 (773) 702–4500 Fax 1 (773) 702–4788

Hepatobiliary surgery Laparoscopic liver surgery

FOR REFERRALS AND CONSULTATIONS CALL: 1 (844) UCGIDOC FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT: UCHOSPITALS.EDU/SPECIALTIES/GI

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PANCREATIC DISEASE CENTER Diseases of the pancreas require comprehensive care from a multidisciplinary and integrated team of experts. At the University of Chicago Medicine, our pancreatic disease team includes recognized leaders in specialties from gastroenterology to interventional radiology and pain management and extends to include highly trained nutritionists, nurses, and genetic counselors. Together, we offer unparalleled expertise in diagnosing and treating all types of pancreatic conditions, including severe acute pancreatitis; chronic pancreatitis; complications from pancreatitis; pancreatic pseudocyst and walled-off necrosis; treatment of large pancreatic duct stones using extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL); pancreatic cystic lesions; genetic conditions that affect the pancreas including CFTR, PRSS1, CTRC, SPINK; and autoimmune pancreatitis, among others. In conjunction with the Center for Endoscopic Research and Therapeutics, we are leaders in the use of minimally invasive, per oral techniques for complex conditions that might otherwise require major surgery, as well as in early detection in patients who are at high risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Our physician scientists are involved in several multicenter research trials examining novel genetic links to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, new medications that improve outcomes after total pancreatectomy and islet autocell transplantation, and treatment outcomes after transmural treatment of walled-off necrosis (a complication from severe pancreatitis). Our work with the research of the North American Pancreatic Study Group has already improved patient care at the University of Chicago Medicine and across the country by changing the way we, as physicians, practice pancreatology. Whether the goal is providing a cure or ameliorating the condition and improving a patient’s quality of life, we provide extraordinary and effective care, offering patients diagnostic and treatment options that are available at only a handful of hospitals nationwide.

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ANDRES GELRUD, MD, MMSc

JEFFREY B. MATTHEWS, MD

HEDY KINDLER, MD

BLASE POLITE, MD

JESSICA STOLL, CGC

Director of Pancreatic Disease Center

Chair, Department of Surgery

Medical Director, Gastrointestinal Oncology

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Cancer Genetics Counselor

Physicians Gastroenterology & Interventional Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Andres Gelrud, MD, MMSc Associate Professor of Medicine Sonia Kupfer, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Uzma Siddiqui, MD Associate Professor of Medicine Irving Waxman, MD Sara and Harold Lincoln Thompson Professor of Medicine and Surgery Genetics Jessica Stoll, CGC Medical Oncology Daniel Catenacci, MD, PhD Assistant Professor of Medicine Hedy Kindler, MD Associate Professor of Medicine Medical Director, Gastrointestinal Oncology Mark F. Kozloff, MD Clinical Associate of Medicine Blase Polite, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Manish R. Sharma, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Nutritionists Andreas Mykoniatis, MD Clinical Associate of Medicine Lori Welstead, MS, RD, LDN Pain Management David Dickerson, MD Assistant Professor of Anesthesia & Critical Care

Magdalena Anitescu, MD, PhD Associate Professor of Anesthesia & Critical Care

Jeffrey B. Matthews, MD Dallas B. Phemister Professor of Surgery

Pancreas Transplant Surgery Piotr Witkowski, MD, PhD Assistant Professor of Surgery Director, Pancreatic and Islet Transplant Program

Mitchell C. Posner, MD Thomas D. Jones Professor of Surgery

Pathology John Hart, MD Professor of Pathology Radiation Oncology Stanley Liauw, MD Associate Professor of Radiation and Cellular Oncology Ralph R. Weichselbaum, MD D.K. Ludwig Professor of Radiation and Cellular Oncology Radiology Abraham H. Dachman, MD Professor of Radiology Brian Funaki, MD Professor of Radiology Section Chief, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Aytekin Oto, MD Professor of Radiology and Surgery Section Chief, Abdominal Imaging Jeffrey A. Leef, MD Associate Professor of Radiology Surgery John C. Alverdy, MD, FACS Sara and Harold Lincoln Thompson Professor of Surgery Mustafa Hussain, MD Assistant Professor of Surgery

FOR REFERRALS AND CONSULTATIONS CALL: 1 (844) UCGIDOC FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT: UCHOSPITALS.EDU/SPECIALTIES/GI

Vivek N. Prachand, MD Associate Professor of Surgery Kevin Roggin, MD Associate Professor of Surgery Services Minimally invasive pancreatic procedures and surgeries Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for patients with chronic calcific pancreatitis Minimally invasive pancreatic surgeries such as laparoscopic and video-assisted retroperitoneal debridement (VARD) Total pancreatectomy with islet autocell transplantation (autologous islet cell transplantation) Pylorus-preserving pancreatic resection (Whipple procedure) for benign and malignant disease Vascular reconstruction for major cancer operations Duodenum-sparing pancreatic operations for chronic pancreatitis Contact To learn more about the pancreatic diseases group, please visit: uchospitals.edu/specialties/ pancreas To make a referral or request a consultation, please call: 1 (877) DOM–2730.

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GASTROINTESTINAL CANCER RISK AND PREVENTION CLINIC The Gastrointestinal Cancer Risk and Prevention Clinic offers personalized and precision medicine for patients at increased risk for or survivors of gastrointestinal malignancies. As gastroenterologists, genetic counselors, oncologists, and surgeons, we work together in a multidisciplinary collaborative team to provide state-of-the-art cancer risk assessment, genetic testing, management of hereditary syndromes, and cancer prevention strategies such as control of inflammation in colitis.

Physicians Sonia S. Kupfer, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Andres Gelrud, MD, MMSc Associate Professor of Medicine Neil H. Hyman, MD Professor of Surgery Blase Polite, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine David T. Rubin, MD Joseph B. Kirsner Professor of Medicine Uzma Siddiqui, MD Associate Professor of Medicine Affiliated Faculty Jane E. Churpek, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine General Cancer Risk Program Assistant Director, Section of HONC Susan Hong, MD, MPH Associate Professor of Medicine Director, Breast Cancer Survivorship Program

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Olofunmilayo Olopade, MD Walter L. Palmer Distinguished Service Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics Director, Center for Clinical Cancer Genetics General Cancer Risk Program Director, Section of HONC Cancer Genetic Counselors Jessica Stoll, MS Services GI cancer risk assessment and genetic testing Cancer prevention counseling Colorectal cancer screening and surveillance Pancreatic cancer screening for high-risk patients Gastrointestinal surgical procedures Colitis prevention

Number of patients in last 24 months 250 Contact Appointments: 1 (773) 702-6140


SONIA S. KUPFER, MD

Director, Gastrointestinal Cancer Risk and Prevention Clinic

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BASIC AND TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH At the heart of the Digestive Diseases Center lies basic and translational research, the latter defined as the application of basic knowledge to clinical practice. In this regard, our program is uniquely and intimately connected with the clinicians and clinical research programs at the University of Chicago research. Within the Digestive Diseases Research Core Center (DDRCC)—first funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) nearly two decades ago and one of only seventeen such centers in the U.S. today—researchers focus on building a better understanding of gastrointestinal diseases in order to improve diagnosis, treatment, and patient outcomes. Our research programs are also supported by investigator-initiated grants of nearly $10 million per year from the NIH, Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America, Gastro-Intestinal Research Foundation of Chicago, Broad Medication Research Program, and other sources of extramural and philanthropic funds. The DDRCC promotes collaborative, multidisciplinary development of research and technology. The Core Center’s support of GI research has led to the discovery of the first IBD gene (NOD2), new understanding of the causes and management of celiac disease, insights into the role of gut microbes in complex immune disorders, and elucidation of the genetic and dietary mechanisms causing colon cancer. We are internationally renowned for our work on the gut microbiome, mucosal immunology, host-microbe interactions, and cancer. Strong interactions and collaborations with Argonne National Laboratory and the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole (both affiliate research institutions of the University of Chicago) complement and extend our reach, as does our participation in SHARE, a consortium of seven research institutions whose pooled patient databases and other resources permit studies that otherwise could not be conducted by a single institution. In all that we do, our purpose is to advance the practice of personalized medicine for those who suffer from gastrointestinal and metabolic diseases.

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EUGENE B. CHANG, MD

BANA JABRI, MD

Director, Digestive Disease Research Core Center Director, Host-Microbe Core

Co-director, Digestive Sara and Harold Lincoln Diseases Research Thompson Professor Core Center of Surgery Director, Integrated Trans- lational Research Core

Principal Investigators John C. Alverdy, MD, FACS Sara and Harold Lincoln Thompson Professor of Surgery Dionysios Antonopoulos, PhD Assistant Professor of Medicine Joint appointment with Argonne National Laboratory Institute for Genomics and Systems Biology B. Marc Bissonnette, MD Associate Professor of Medicine Eugene B. Chang, MD Martin Boyer Professor of Medicine

JOHN C. ALVERDY, MD, FACS

JOEL PEKOW, MD

Instructor of Medicine

Bana Jabri, MD, PhD Professor of Medicine and Pathology Neil H. Hyman, MD0 Professor of Surgery Vani Konda, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine

Kristi Milam, RN Clinical Project Director, SHARE Research Program and Genesys Translational Research Core

Sonia Kupfer, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine

Lici Shen Study Coordinator

Cathy Nagler, MD Professor of Pathology and Pediatrics

Contact To learn more about the University of Chicago Digestive Diseases Research Core Center, please visit: uchicagoddrcc.org.

Alexander Chervonsky, MD, PhD Professor of Pathology Chair, Committee on Immunology, Department of Pathology

Folker Meyer, PhD Computational Biologist, Argonne National Laboratory Professor of Medicine, The University of Chicago

Yan Chun Li, MD Associate Professor of Medicine

Joel Pekow, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine

Erika Claud, MD Associate Professor of Pediatrics

Mitchell L. Sogin, PhD Marine Biological Laboratory Senior Scientist

Sushila Dalal, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine

Research Associates George Gulotta Database Manager

Jerry Turner, MD Professor of Pathology

FOR REFERRALS AND CONSULTATIONS CALL: 1 (844) UCGIDOC FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT: UCHOSPITALS.EDU/SPECIALTIES/GI

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CENTER FOR GASTROINTESTINAL ONCOLOGY The Center for Gastrointestinal Oncology brings together experts from two of the University of Chicago Medicine’s nationally recognized programs, cancer and gastroenterology. Both are consistently ranked among the top in the nation; both include physicians who are internationally recognized for their expertise. The Center’s approach to diagnosis and treatment is multidisciplinary and consensus based, so that patients, including those with rare or complex disease, benefit from collaborative problem solving among specialists in medical, surgical, and radiation oncology, general surgery, and gastroenterology. Whenever possible, we offer minimally invasive, including robotic, procedures for GI tumor biopsy and resection. Our team includes some of the leading interventional GI specialists in the world, physicians who are pioneers in the use and development of endoscopy, including the use of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE). Patients receive extensive access to clinical trials, offering the next generation of treatment to those suffering from gastrointenstinal cancer. Through innovative surgical and radiation techniques, investigational and established medicines, and novel molecular targeted therapies, our physicians can offer patients the highest chances of success against a wide variety of cancers.

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HEDY LEE KINDLER, MD

MITCHELL C. POSNER, MD, FACS IRVING WAXMAN, MD

Medical Director, Medical Chief, Surgical Oncology Director, Center Medical Director, Clinical for Endoscopic Research Oncology Care Programs and Therapeutics Physician-in-Chief, Comprehensive Cancer Center

Leadership Medical Oncology Hedy Lee Kindler, MD Medical Director, Medical Oncology Associate Professor of Medicine Surgical Oncology Mitchell C. Posner, MD, FACS Thomas D. Jones Professor of Surgery Chief, Surgical Oncology Medical Director, Clinical Cancer Programs Physician-in-Chief, Comprehensive Cancer Center Interventional Gastroenterology Irving Waxman, MD Sara and Harold Lincoln Thompson Professor of Medicine and Surgery Radiation Oncology Stanley Liauw, MD Associate Professor of Radiation and Cellular Oncology Principal Physicians Colon and Rectal Surgery Neil H. Hyman, MD Professor of Surgery Section Chief, Colon and Rectal Surgery Konstantin Umanskiy, MD, FACS Assistant Professor of Surgery Lisa Marie Cannon, MD Clinical Associate of Surgery

NEIL H. HYMAN, MD

Professor of Surgery

Surgical Oncology Eugene Choi, MD Assistant Professor of Surgery Mustafa Hussain, MD Assistant Professor of Surgery Jeffrey B. Matthews, MD, FACS Dallas B. Phemister Professor of Surgery Marco G. Patti, MD, FACS Professor of Surgery Vivek Prachand, MD, FACS Associate Professor of Surgery Kevin Roggin, MD, FACS Associate Professor of Surgery Interventional Gastroenterology Andres Gelrud, MD, MMSc Associate Professor of Medicine Uzma Siddiqui, MD Associate Professor of Medicine Advance Practice Nurses/ Physician Assistants Medical Oncology Christine Racette, APN Surgical Oncology Barb Gordon, MSN, APN Alaine Kamm, RN, APN Alicia Wilson, APN

Number of patients in last 12 months Medical Oncology, 800 new patients Surgical Oncology, 1,850 new patients Services Minimally invasive esophagectomy, gastrectomy, pancreatectomy, hepatic resection, and colorectal resection Diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy for pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and esophageal cancers Laser confocal microscopy, using advanced technology that allows physicians to view live images of internal human tissues at the cellular level so they can identify and remove cancerous tissue sooner Gene therapy for upper GI cancers Combined chemoradiation therapies Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), which targets tumors better than conventional radiation Organ preservation for patients with rectal cancer Small bowel resection

Colon & Rectal Surgery Noelle Kakuk, APN Michele Rubin, APN

Segmental colectomy

Total proctocolectomy

Mark F. Kozloff, MD Clinical Associate of Medicine

Ostomy Jan Colwell, APN Michele Kaplon-Jones, APN Malou de Ocampo, APN

Blase Polite, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine

Bariatric Surgery Angela Willis, APN

Medical Oncology Daniel Catenacci, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine

Total abdominal colectomy

Stoma creation

Manish R. Sharma, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine

FOR REFERRALS AND CONSULTATIONS CALL: 1 (844) UCGIDOC FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT: UCHOSPITALS.EDU/SPECIALTIES/GI

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CENTER FOR GASTROINTESTINAL ONCOLOGY CONTINUED Dedicated wound and ostomy care Staging laparoscopy Transanal endoscopic microsurgery Duodenum-sparing pancreatic head resection

Contact To learn more about the Center for Gastrointestinal Oncology, please visit: uchospitals.edu/specialties/cancer/gi For admissions, referrals, and consultations, please call UCM Physician Connect at: 1 (800) 824-2282.

Beger procedure Frey procedure Bern modification Spleen-preserving pancreatic tail resection Endoscopic placement of pancreatic stents Pancreatic duodenectomy (Whipple procedure) Robotic surgery

“ Just like the best science is team science, the best care for patients is team care, and that’s particularly true in the case of GI malignancies. Our center offers comprehensive care, in that we partner with our colleagues in both the Digestive Diseases Center and oncology to formulate the best and most appropriate treatment plans, plans that are individualized to each and every patient. Really personalized care—the eventual ability to molecularly define every patient’s tumor and tailor therapy to that specific tumor, for that specific patient—that’s the future of the Digestive Diseases Center, at least as it relates to malignancies. It’s the focus of our research and the goal of our practice.”

MITCHELL C. POSNER, MD, FACS Thomas D. Jones Professor of Surgery Chief, Surgical Oncology Chief, Section of General Surgery Physician-in-Chief, University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center

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FOR REFERRALS AND CONSULTATIONS CALL: 1 (844) UCGIDOC FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT: UCHOSPITALS.EDU/SPECIALTIES/GI

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CENTER FOR THE SURGICAL TREATMENT OF OBESITY The Center for the Surgical Treatment of Obesity provides exceptional, compassionate, and truly multidisciplinary care to help those with severe obesity achieve the best health outcomes possible. Our program epitomizes individualized, patient-centric care. We realize that obesity is a multifaceted disease with many causes and treatments. We make our recommendations based on the individual circumstances of our patients so that they may be successful in attaining their desired or needed health goals. Our physicians work side-by-side with our dieticians and psychologists in the clinic, both pre- and post-operatively, and we are committed to lifelong follow-up of the patients who undergo surgery at the University of Chicago Medicine. We are the only center in the region that individualizes recommendations and performs all four surgical options for the treatment of obesity. Our expertise in the treatment of super obesity (BMI >50) has garnered numerous invitations to present and demonstrate our approach and outcomes at local, regional, national, and international conferences. We are the regionallyrecognized referral center for complications and other suboptimal outcomes following procedures performed at other institutions, and we routinely serve as educational hosts for visiting surgeons, dieticians, and program managers as they initiate the incorporation of more advanced procedures and techniques into their practices. As we continue to grow the Center for Surgical Treatment of Obesity, it will soon become part of a larger initiative – currently called the University of Chicago Center for the Treatment of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders. Led by Endocrinologist Silvana Pannain, MD, Gastroenterologist Edwin K. McDonald IV, MD and Bariatric Surgeon Mustafa Hussain, MD, this new initiative will interface with multiple specialties and departments with the goal of reinforcing and formalizing an integrated, innovative leadership role in obesity and provide a platform for experts to collaborate regarding transplants, obstetrics, endocrinology, bariatrics, gastroenterology, hepatology, pain management and orthopaedics. It will offer a customized approach to weight management, the prevention of weight gain, minimize the short-term and long-term obesity related complications from surgical procedures and will ultimately encompass all University of Chicago obesity-related clinical and research activities. In addition to endocrinologists, gastroenterologists and surgeons, the center will include dietitians, psychologists, exercise physiologists and sleep specialists. 44


MUSTAFA HUSSAIN, MD

VIVEK N. PRACHAND, MD, FACS

JOHN C. ALVERDY, MD, FACS

Medical Director, Bariatric Surgery

Chairman, Surgical Quality Improvement and Patient Safety

Sara and Harold Lincoln Thompson Professor of Surgery

Physicians John C. Alverdy, MD, FACS Sara and Harold Lincoln Thompson Professor of Surgery

Services Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy

Mustafa Hussain, MD Assistant Professor of Surgery

Duodenal Switch

Vivek N. Prachand, MD, FACS Associate Professor of Surgery Edwin K. McDonald IV, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Associate Director of Adult Clinical Nutrition Silvana Pannain, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Advanced Practice Nurses/ Physician Assistants Angela Willis, APN Bariatric Program Manager Laura Kujawa, BA Intake Coordinator Dietitians Kristyn Clark, RD Jessica Schultz, RD Psychologists Andrea Goldschmidt, PhD Kristen Anderson, LCSW Sara Desai, LCSW

Rou-en-Y gastric bypass

Laparoscopic Adjustable gastric banding Revision of previous bariatric surgery Comprehensive management of complications of bariatric surgery Monthly support group sessions led by psychology team; open to all Weekly live patient information sessions Patient webinar: uchospitals.edu/ programs/bariatric-surgery.html Number of patients in the last 12 months Over 200 complex laparoscopic bariatric procedures Contact To learn more about the Center for the Surgical Treatment of Obesity, please visit: uchospitals.edu/ specialties/general-surgery/obesity To schedule an admission, make a referral, or request a consultation, please call UCM Physician Connect at: 1 (800) 824-2282.

FOR REFERRALS AND CONSULTATIONS CALL: 1 (844) UCGIDOC FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT: UCHOSPITALS.EDU/SPECIALTIES/GI

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CLINICAL RESEARCH At the University of Chicago Medicine, clinicians, patients, and researchers participate in and benefit from a rigorously research-based approach to patient care. Year after year, we conduct or participate in more clinical trials than any other hospital in Illinois, offering patients and the physicians who refer them access to the most promising treatments and new standards of care. New ideas and new information shape the daily practice of medicine here. They deepen our understanding of health and disease and amplify our ability to develop better treatments for all medical conditions, from the simplest to the most complex. Within the Digestive Diseases Center, a database of material pertaining to more than 5,000 patients is the vital infrastructure for clinical trials of conventional and novel medical therapies intended to diagnose and treat a wide range of digestive diseases. In hepatology, for example, research is currently underway in the areas of liver transplantation, viral hepatitis, and other inflammatory liver disorders; research in nutrition is studying the impact of lactose intolerance in minority health outcomes as well as obesity and celiac disease. Other studies are examining the optimization of colorectal cancer screening for average and high-risk patients, the effects of genetic counseling, and the possibilities of chemoprevention. More than 200 research studies on human subjects with digestive diseases are currently active here. This includes 20 IBD-related clinical trials including an NIH-supported human microbiome study that seeks to understand the role of intestinal microbes in the development of IBD. Whether working independently or as part of multicenter research teams, Center physicians are asking—and answering—the questions that will lead to more effective treatments, better practice, and better patient outcomes for healthcare professionals across the country and around the world. To learn more about our clinical trials, call 1 (773) 702-5382.

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Clinical trials in Digestive Diseases: Novel therapies for Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis Medical therapies for celiac disease Interventional trials related to advanced endoscopy The utility of chromoendoscopy in ulcerative colitis surveillance The role of the microbiome in IBD pathogenesis Disparities in digestive diseases delivery of care Phase 3 clinical trials for Hepatitis C Assessment of robotic and minimally invasive surgical outcomes Anastomotic leak prevention Innovative treatment trials in esophageal, hepatic, pancreatic, gastric and colorectal cancer Prospective study of siblings of IBD patients

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The primary research and treatment facilities of the Digestive Diseases Center at the University of Chicago Medicine are in the Chicago neighborhood of Hyde Park, about six miles south of the downtown business district. We also have a general clinic at Huron Street, off Michigan Avenue in Chicago’s Gold Coast shopping and cultural district. Hyde Park 5841 South Maryland Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60637 Downtown Chicago 150 East Huron Street Chicago, Illinois 60611 Orland Park (coming soon) Contact us GI Physician Connect 1 (844) UCGIDOC 1 (844) 824-4362 referral assistance, patient appointments or consultations

It is our policy to see doctor-referred patients as soon as possible, within 7 days for cancer diagnoses, and within 14 days for all other digestive diseases. To learn more about the resources available to you and your patients at the Digestive Diseases Center, please contact us at 1 (877) DOM-2730. You can use the number 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to request a consultation, arrange for patient admission or transfer, or get information about grand rounds, clinical trials, or continuing medical education. You can also contact any of the twelve centers that comprise the Digestive Diseases Center directly. We look forward to speaking with you. Connect with us on Facebook at: facebook.com/UChicagoMed To sign up for our quarterly e-newsletters, http://learning.uchospitals.edu/ email-newsletters-for-medical-professionals. To see the most recent version, visit http://learning.uchospitals.edu/news. For news on the latest research and other advances, visit our blog at http://sciencelife.uchospitals.edu/

UCM Physician Connect 1 (800) 824-2282 referrals UCM Transfer Connect 1 (855) 834-4782 urgent patient transfers

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University of Chicago Medicine Digestive Diseases Center  
University of Chicago Medicine Digestive Diseases Center  

The Digestive Diseases Center at the University of Chicago Medicine is a collaborative, multidisciplinary network of physicians, researchers...

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