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“It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed. � Theodore Roosevelt


We’ve always had wings. Now we’re flying...

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E D I TO R I A L

Enrico Barbieri Editor In Chief

As the sun sets over Valencia we take a deep breath and watch the track one last time, whispering, “See you next year, baby”. It’s time to cool down, ladies and gentlemen; the engines, the tires, and our laptops too. Inspire raced its first season ever and we couldn’t be more satisfied with the result. Do you agree? Any suggestions? Drop us a line and we’ll be more than happy to get back to you. But, before you lay down your wish lists, take a look at what we have to offer in this issue. First of all I would like to personally congratulate Stefan Bradl for his amazing first season with both the LCR family and in MotoGP. Stefan will be riding our favourite bike for two more years and we couldn’t be happier. Go Stefan, go! This year, Red Bull and Felix Baumgartner pushed the bar some 39,045m higher than everybody else. You might have seen and heard everything about the Austrian daredevil so we chose to focus our attention on another key figure in the project, the living legend Colonel Joe Kittinger. While we were in Australia, we had the chance to the interview world-famous Carl Cox. He’s just turned 50, but you’d never believe it. And he’s not only superstar DJ, but a motorcycle enthusiast too. And are you fans of The Bourne movies? Well, we are – especially now, after we saw one of the most beautiful motorcycle scenes ever... and it happens on a Honda. And Quzandria Nur, who adorns our cover, is one of a kind. Not only is she a stunning athlete but she has a lot of attitude too. After winning gold medals everywhere in the world as a Dressage Grand Prix rider, the Malaysian beauty fell in love with fast bikes and racing tracks. Now she rides faster than ever on her pink Honda CBR 600RR. Check out her inspirational story ladies and gentlemen. See you next year…


K E Y N OT E

Elena Cecchinello LCR Costumer Care Executive Director

The end of the 2012 racing season brings the curtain down on the MotoGP Championship, and all the while, the winter’s cold draws in. The last campaign has been unique, and in my opinion, extremely intense. And because of that, the praise and the plaudits go to a great team and a great rider in Stefan who, through verve, control and no small amount of spontaneity, won the respect and affection of those around him. Race after race, the season offered some unforgettable moments, sensations I hadn’t felt for a while - a blend of different emotions, from stress mixed with joy, worry and excitement, anger and fervour. You know what it’s like - the blood pumps up in the veins, adrenalin charges through and you feel a grip in the stomach which rises right the way up to the throat. Sometimes, it’s just not possible to hold the emotions in check as the frenetic action switches between corners and overtaking manoeuvres. In those moments, I keep my fingers crossed. In those moments, the world around me disappears and I feel only the endless time of the race. I feel alive in those thrilling moments and I sense it’s a feeling shared by those around me, without exception - colleagues, friends and partners who carry with them the same passion for this sport, carrying and embracing commitment and sincere affection. Over the course of the year I saw the team growing and the friendships, all the time, become more solid, between colleagues, fans and supporters. Everybody gave us their precious support, even in the toughest moments, entrusting the skill of Lucio, the man who, let’s be frank, is the real motivation for all of us! This world is made by people who love pure, intense emotion. Those are the same people who are capable of describing and sharing with others something that goes beyond simple sport. It morphs into a way of life. To those who have screamed, cried, suffered and rejoiced with us, and to those who made this dream come true I want to send my sincere season’s greetings!


PHOTOGRAPHER

Red Bull Stratos

WATCH AND GET INSPIRED Courtesy by Red Bull Content Pool www.inspire-lcr.com/redbullstratos


Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria jumps out from the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, New Mexico, USA on October 14, 2012.


This is just a part of his collection

STILL WONDERING WHO HE IS? Follow the music and you’ll find out

56


INSPIRE

CONTRIBUTORS James Pipino Fashion/Celebrity Photographer based in Australia I shoot campaigns all over the world. I love creating images with a story and with a passion for all things motorsport I’ve been lucky enough to be involved with LCR.

Gigi Soldano Photographer, Photo Reporter and Cameraman I am sport and men of sport photographer. What does it mean? Before taking a photo of a certain sport you have to know that sport deeply and maybe practice it as well. You must understand the men of sport trying to be discreet, a class mate quiet and respectful. This is the only way to obtain a REAL photo.

Elisa Pavan LCR Team Press Officer and Logistics Coordinator aka La Pina , the Queen of organization. I love to chill and party with my colleagues from all the MotoGP teams.

Steve Burges Full time MotoGP consultant working with most teams and some riders. ‘Love MotoGP and could not think of anything better to do’

Fabio Alberti Business Developer and New Media I met my incredible wife 29 years ago and we are together since then. We have two beautiful kids that I love so much. I’ve been working in the communication and advertising industry for 14 years now and I joined LCR since 2009.

Errico Gasperoni LCR Graphic Division - Technical Area Director I have got many passions: music, technology and cuisine. Every time I travel around the word I like to experience local cuisine.


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S U M M A RY

44

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STYLE AND ATTITUDE LCR Fashion photoshoot

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GRAND PRIX OF JAPAN Race Highlights - Round 15

44

THE BOURNE SERIES Bikes and Movies

54

CARL COX Bikes and People

64

GRAND PRIX OF MALAYSIA Race Highlights - Round 16

80

JOE KITTINGER Great Life Stories

88

GRAND PRIX OF AUSTRALIA Race Highlights - Round 17

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54 88

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102

S U M M A RY 114

130

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TO THE CAPE From norway to kenya a journey that can change your life

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ANDREW WHEELER The Racing Spirit in One Shot

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GRAND PRIX OF VALENCIA Race Highlights - Round 18

128

A GIFT OF SAFETY FOR CHRISTMAS! Green Light, Drive Responsibly

130

SEASIDE SUMMER NIGHT LCR party in the hills

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FIM MotoGP AWARDS ‘12 Stefan Bradl takes 2012 best Rookie Of The Year Award

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passion recommends OUTBACK

| MONOKEY速 CAM-SIDE SYSTEM | ALUMINIUM STRUCTURE | REINFORCED TECHNOPOLYMER INSERTS | LOCKING MECHANISM IN DIE-CAST ALUMINIUM |


BorN IN KUaLa LUMPUr, QUZaNDrIa NUr IS MaLaYSIa’S FIrSt DreSSage graND PrIX rIDer. aPart FroM BeINg aN eXtreMeLY BeaUtIFUL aND SUCCeSSFUL athLete, reCeNtLY She DISCoVereD her NeW PaSSIoN: FaSt BIKeS text: Massimo Visconti - photo: Carolyn Chon & Julian Oh for Redd Bullets Hair and Makeup: KF Bong - Styling: Calvin Cheong


M

alaysia has a multi-ethnic, multicultural, and multilingual society. This might be the reason why Quzandria Nur is such a strong, smart, fashionable and polyhedric kind of woman as well. She has put so much effort throughout her life in order to stand out as a Dressage and Showjumping rider and she made it. She’s a multi medalist athlete and she has just widened her horizon once again. Two years ago she decided she wanted to be on a racing track, she wanted to ride motorbikes as well. Although she never tried before, her passion, perseverance and resolution made her succeed in no time. This girl really got game. Here’s her story. At what age did you start horse riding? Why did you choose this as a sport? “I started horse riding at the age of nine by accident. It is not a typical Eastern sport - considered a rare sport in Malaysia, in fact – but it all began when my family and I stumbled upon this hobby, which then developed to become a common passion of ours. My father had already envisioned for my siblings and I to represent Malaysia as national athletes.” A lot of training must go into it. What’s your routine? “When I am in Kuala Lumpur I train daily, but my main performance horses are based in Europe where I train and compete on a regular basis. I’ve actually spent most of my student life juggling studying with competition. I took my Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration (BBA) in Antwerp, Belgium. Then I moved to Germany, Holland, Denmark, France and England to pursuit my riding career. “When I am in Europe, I train during the week, and every alternate weekend I am also competing.” You did qualify for London 2012 but your horse got injured and you couldn’t take part in the Olympic Games. That must have been heartbreaking… “The Olympics is the dream of every athlete. It has always been the driving force that kept me yearning and hungry to reach my goals. The journey to the Olympics isn’t an easy one and I’m sure every athlete would have something similar to tell. I was let down not once but twice by really bad luck - once during qualification for the Beijing Olympics, and recently for London 2012, where I missed out by a fraction. Both incidents left me devastated, and both involved very similar injuries my horse involving its tendon. This time it happened just two days before I would have completed qualification. “The experience was bitter and it was difficult for me to swallow as I could smell, taste and feel the London Olympics. But I have accepted my fate.

“However, call it stubbornness, but this shall not stop me from trying again, perhaps for the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. Hopefully I’ll have a little luck on my side too this time around!” How did you fall in love with fast bikes and racing tracks? “I have always been fascinated by motorsport; in particular, motorcycles appeal to me more. I followed the MotoGP sport quite religiously on TV but never had a chance to watch a race in real life. That is, up until a couple of years ago, when I had a chance to watch my first MotoGP race in Sepang. I was like a child in Disneyland - so excited! I was looking through the glass above the pit lane and I saw the bikes passing by and thought they were unbelievably cool. That day I made a promise: whatever it’s going to take, I want to ride on the circuit, and I want to feel the adrenaline rush. The funny thing was that, at that time I didn’t even know how to ride a bike at all, let alone be on the circuit. A few friends thought I was insane, yet I’ve proven that it all begins with a dream. “After 12 lessons on the Aprillia Junior GP 50cc bike at the go-kart track, I managed to convince my parents to buy me a Honda CBR 600RR for my birthday that year, and there I was riding on the Sepang Circuit living what was once just an ambitious dream.” What about your family - how do they consider your new passion? “My parents were of course not keen on the idea of their only daughter riding a superbike on the circuit and they did worry that I could risk getting an injury that may affect my riding career. But I am very lucky to have parents who knew they could trust that I would never make rash decisions and I was also not one to be reckless. They knew as well from the way I couldn’t wipe the smile off my face whenever I had a session on the circuit, that there was no stopping me. “I’m very blessed to have understanding parents who are open-minded to my new passion.” It’s amazing how you can juggle these two sports and lifestyles. We can really say: no matter where you’re born, your sex or your religion, if you really want it, you can achieve it. Do you agree? “I completely agree with you. When I started both sports, it had nothing to do with me trying to prove a point or for the purpose of female empowerment; it was all 100% pure passion! And to me this is what makes it all the better - it’s so sincere and honest, it is a love affair I have with the sport that makes it so much fun for me, and now it’s like an addiction to me. But if I am able to inspire other women along the way, that would be yet another dream achieved!”

“I followed the MotoGP sport quite religiously on TV”


Quzandria Nur with her brother Qabil and competing in a Dressage and Showjumping contest


Quzandria Nur with her Honda 600RR both o and on track


JAPAN


RACE HIGHLIGHTS

CLOSING THE GAP text: Elisa Pavan - photo: Milagro

AT THE AIRASIA GRAND PRIX OF JAPAN DANI PEDROSA TAKES THE CHEQUERED FLAG, WITH LORENZO AND BAUTISTA COMPLETING THE ROSTRUM WHILE CAL CRUTCHLOW RUNS OUT OF FUEL AND IS FORCED TO RETIRE ON THE FINAL LAP. STEFAN BRADL STALKS CASEY STONER CLOSELY THE ENTIRE RACE AND FINISHES IN 6TH POSITION


BRADL IMMEDIATELY FAST

AT MOTEGI DAY ONE

M

otegi, 12th October: the MotoGP contingent has been pleased with a sunny and dry first practice day at Motegi race track for the first time in many weeks with LCR Honda racer Stefan Bradl posting another promising 4th lap time (1’46.428).

The German is keen to make amends for his DNF last time out in Aragón and he is a fan of Honda’s home track so the fourth fastest time of the day came out easily as the 22-year-old immediately lapped consinstently fast aboard his RC213V.


Stefan :

“Actually it’s a really good Friday for us. As we already started with a good base set up this morning I immediately felt comfortable on the bike and everything was working pretty good. In this afternoon session we made a little step forward but we need to improve the braking performance because we are pretty fast and stable in the first initial braking but as soon as we start to lean I do not feel very comfortable. This our biggest issue today: we have tried both rear tyres options and they are both working properly. Let’s try to maintain this good level even tomorrow and the same gap in tomorrow’s qualifying”.


BRADL TO LINE UP IN 8th POSISTION

AT MOTEGI GP

M

otegi, 13rd October: second day of practices at the 4.801km Japanese circuit saw LCR Honda’s Stefan Bradl placing his RC213V in 8th place (1’45.848) ahead tomorrow’s 24-lap race. The German dedicated the majority of his time on track today to improve his feeling in the hard bra-

king zones.Bradl stayed solely on used tyres and finished ninth in this morning free session and continued work on his brake set-up but his qualifying session got off to a bad start with a crash from which he escaped unhurt to rejoin his colleagues in the latter part of the qualifying.

Stefan: “Well…the initial plan for today’s qualifying was different but probably I was

too aggressive in the first part of the session and crashed out. This changed completely our plan and we could not adjust the bike properly because we had to chase the best lap time for tomorrow’s grid. There was not enough track time to improve the bike and we are still struggling with the same problem in the braking zone. The bike is too nervous and I can not be as precise as I want in the entry of the corners. After the crash I was okay and could go immediately faster on the other bike so this is a positive thing because it means that the crash did not affect our pace”.


ARM PUMP SPOILS

BRADL’S JAPANESE GP M

otegi, 14th October: in today’s cloudy and crowded Japanese Gran Prix, LCR Honda’s Stefan Bradl managed to finish the 24-lap race in 6th position battling with some arm pump problems. The German made his first visit to Twin Ring Motegi as a MotoGP rider but his weekend has been more difficult than he was expecting. In yesterday’s qualifying Bradl went down very early in the session and had to chase a fast lap time to get as far up the grid as possible. He was relatively satisfied with the work carried out over the course of the four sessions but was aiming to improve his overall package for today’s race. Unfortunately after some laps Bradl had to cope with some arm pump problems that heavily affected his performance.

Stefan: “We had a little problem with my arm today and I was not really able to steer the

bike and after 10 laps I was struggling a lot and I have never had such a big problem with the arm pump. At the beginning I could easily follow the group in the front of me with Stoner and Dovizioso but the problem with my breaking hand got worse and worse lap by lap and I could not go any faster. I had to slow down and managed to finish the race 6th. It’s a bit frustrating and this was surely not a perfect weekend for us but I aim to bounce back in Malaysia next weekend”.


BEHIND THE SCENES


That’s a motorbikes circuit Aleix..not a slide for kids! – Is Valentino doubting about his new agreement with Yamaha? Do not think so! - Lorenzo is promoting himself in the Japanese market: ARIGATO from the local fans – The Japanese version of Italian Spaghetti is called Udon: but Italians do it better! photo: Milagro 39 OCT - NOV 2012


It looks like Lorenzo met a new friend at Motegi circuit: a Japanese T-Rex? – Hands Up for Alvaro on the podium and front wheel up for Nicky – Maybe Cal should have called a cab: there’s no space for his bag on Lorenzo’s bike

photo: Milagro


41 OCT - NOV 2012


TRACK KEY NOTE


TRACK KEY NOTE

CIRCUIT INFO LENGTH: 4.801 M. / 2,983 MILES WIDTH: 15M LEFT CORNERS: 6 RIGHT CORNERS: 8 LONGEST STRAIGHT: 762 M. / 0,473 MILES CONSTRUCTED: 1997 MODIFIED: 1997

Located amongst the vast natural beauty of the northern Kanto district, the twin ring circuit at Motegi in Japan consists of a 1.5 mile oval and a 2.9 mile road course constructed to international standards. Built by Honda as the ultimate test facility in August 1997, the road circuit became home to MotoGP in 2000 whilst the oval is designed to introduce American motorsports culture to the country. Twin Ring Motegi is a major attraction for motorsports fans all year round as it is the venue for the Honda Collection Hall, a museum which houses an illustrious collection of motorcycle, car and racing machines from throughout the ages. The complex also includes a safety and riding school, dirt track, go-karts, hotel, restaurant, shops and event halls and currently employs some 300 staff.

MOTEGI LORIS CAPIROSSI text: Nelly Pluto-Prondzynska

A fearless speed merchant who spent 22 remarkable years riding in Grand Prix… a daredevil who scored a total of 29 wins and 99 podiums… a triple World Champion whose 328 races established him as a true legend of MotoGP. Ladies and gentlemen, we give you the short story of Loris Capirossi. Despite scoring his first 500cc win with Honda and his last podium with Suzuki, ‘Capirex’ will forever be remembered as a long-time rider with Ducati. It was in 2003 that the Italian decided to join his native team, a perfect figurehead for their return to MotoGP. In the same year, after a succession of amazing battles with Valentino Rossi, he finally tasted his first ever triumph, taking the race in Catalunya on his much-loved Desmosedici. His best season in MotoGP was in 2006, a year which saw him win three

races and finish third in the championship, repeating a feat he had achieved on a 500cc machine in 2001. A favourite track was undoubtedly Motegi in Japan. At that particular circuit, Capirossi won three races in a row, first taking the chequered flag in 2005. Following a big crash in Catalunya, the Italian was some way off his best at the beginning of the 2006 season before once again rediscovering his form in Japan; his hat-trick win the following year was perhaps the most understated – it came on the day his teammate Casey Stoner claimed his first MotoGP crown. At the very beginning of a meteoric rise, Capirossi was aged just 17 when he took part in his first GP. What is all the more remarkable, he won his maiden title in the very same year and to this day remains the youngest ever GP world champion. The following season he was once again the best around in the 125cc class, leading to his eventual promotion to the 250cc division. He later stepped up again, to the 500cc level, winning his home race at Mugello, before returning briefly to the ‘quarter-litre’ ranks and taking a third world title in 1998. 43 OCT - NOV 2012


BIKES AND MOVIES

BOURNE THE

SERIES text: Massimo Visconti


ACTION-FUELLED, FAST-PACED, INTELLIGENT - THE BOURNE MOVIES HAVE ALWAYS DELIVERED. THE BOURNE LEGACY’S HIGHVELOCITY 14-MINUTE MOTORCYCLE CHASE SCENE ON A HONDA CRF 450 THROUGH THE STREETS OF MANILA WAS, THEREFORE, SOMETHING WE WEREN’T PREPARED TO MISS…


D

uring a stormy night a human body floats among the waves in the Mediterranean Sea off Marseille. A fishing boat passes by, a group of Italian fishermen notice the corpse and haul the man onto their ship, believing him to be dead.” This is how Robert Ludlum set the scene back in 1980. The Jason Bourne character - a former CIA assassin suffering from extreme memory loss - was given to the world. One day he’d conquer it too - first starting from the book stores, then ruling on TV and, ultimately, taking over the silver screen. Ludlum, an American author, died in 2001. Yet Bourne wasn’t ready to retire. Eric van Lustbader continued the franchise and there are now more than 290 million copies of his books in print, while the translations of his works are up to 32 different languages and counting. The Bourne Identity was first adapted into a fourhour telefilm for ABC (American Broadcasting Company) in 1988, with Richard Chamberlain playing the lead role. Matt Damon was in as the new face of Bourne for the first three episodes of the more recent movie franchise but refused the offer of a fourth. When Jeremy Renner was asked to take over for Legacy, however, the Californian actor wasted little time in stepping in. Both the Bourne Ultimatum and Bourne Legacy (respectively the third and fourth episodes of the saga) feature breathtaking motorcycle chase scenes. In the latest episode, the scene runs for an almost unthinkable 14 minutes, making it the longest chase scene on motorcycle ever. That Renner is accompanied by a beautiful and half-frightened to death Rachel Weisz only adds to the scene’s appeal. More impressive are Renner’s riding skills though. The scene was shot in the Philippines, on the streets of Manila, and the actor couldn’t use any stunt doubles. As director Tony Gilroy recalls: “You’re not on a set, you’re not any place else, you can’t hide. You don’t control anything, so it’s like the fifth dimension of difficulty out there. We were there for months shooting all that on the streets.” Could we miss the chance to pay tribute to these two amazing actors and their Honda bikes? Of course not. Enjoy the pictures. The Bourne Identity had to overcome countless production obstacles before making it to cinema screens around the world. Indeed, it took five years


Jeremy Renner as Aaron Cross in “The Bourne Legacy”


Matt Demon as Jason Bourne in “The Bourne Ultimatum”


for director Doug Liman to adapt the first novel into the movie screenplay. Matt Damon spent three months training in stunt work, weaponry, boxing, and Kali (a martial arts discipline) to be ready to shoot The Bourne Identity. While filming, Damon said he disliked some of the changes made to the script he had last approved, forcing the production team to add another scene (the farmhouse one). After a test audience watched the movie, the entire cast had to fly back to Paris in order to add some more action to the plot. The release date was pushed back by nine months and the studio had to add an extra $8million onto its budget. In the end $60million was spent on the film. It grossed $214million. It was probably worth it. The Bourne Ultimatum was shot across seven countries. The locations included Paris, London, Madrid, Berlin, Tangier and New York. While filming the car chase scene in downtown Manhattan, the NYPD set a speed limit of 35 miles per hour for public safety reasons. Watch the movie though and you really can’t tell. ‘On August 3 Bourne Comes Home’ – that’s the slogan daubed on a 50ft high billboard inadvertently placed on the side of Matt Damon’s Manhattan apartment block. Before deciding on Jeremy Renner, 14 other names were on the list to take over from Damon, including Jake Gyllenhaal, Tobey Maguire, Taylor Kitsch and Michael Fassbender. The number of Oscar nominations among a starstudded cast was an impressive 15. Renner and Edward Norton both have two, while Weisz owns one. None of them come near the legendary Albert Finney however. He has five. Something of a motorcycle enthusiast, Renner is the proud owner of as many as 10 bikes. In the film, he did almost all of his own stunts. The Bourne Legacy’s motorcycle chase scene required 300 extras, 200 local workers and 90 cars. With a $130 million production budget, Legacy is the most expensive of the Bourne movies yet. Combine the worldwide grossing figures for the first three movies and you reach a highly lucrative $945 million. It all makes impressive reading. But the big question is this - will Universal Pictures be able to turn Bourne into an evergreen Bond-like hero who thrills, fascinates and entertains his audience for 50 years? On that one, we’ll just have to wait and see.


Jeremy Renner and Rachel Weisz on a Honda CRF 450 during the chase scene in “The Bourne Legacy”

WATCH AND GET INSPIRED www.inspire-lcr.com/thebournelegacy


www.arrow.it


“Another one bites my dust ”


BIKES AND PEOPLE

text: Shaun Curran - photo: James Pipino

LEGENDARY DJ CARL COX SWAPS A PAIR OF DECKS FOR A PAIR OF WHEELS AS HE REVEALS THAT MOTORBIKES PROVIDE THE PERFECT SOUNDTRACK TO HIS LIFE AWAY FROM THE NIGHTCLUBS


N

o matter what criteria you use, Carl Cox is the ultimate Superstar DJ. Ever since the acid house explosion of the late 1980s changed dance culture forever, Cox has been the prominent dancefloor filler of his generation (among some fierce competition), packing out raves everywhere from Ibiza to Australia, from the underground clubs of London to the vast fields of Eastern Europe. And with a work portfolio that takes in his own record label, a hugely successful global radio show and numerous hit albums, Cox, even at 50 years of age, commands a respect from peers and punters alike that keep true the notion that he is ‘the people’s DJ’. You only have to chat to Cox for a short while to realise how accurate a tag that is. Cheery and humble for a man who not only has a job that many would die for, but has become an extremely wealthy and influential figure off the back of it. And really, his assertion that he is “only playing music that he hopes people will like” is a typically modest response from someone who is clearly still in love with what he does. But then this attitude can be traced back to his teenage years: Cox has been in the game ever since he was given a pair of turntables aged just 15 when growing up in Carshalton, south London. It’s reassuring that after so long a prominent figure, his enthusiasm for his work shows no sign of abating. Ask him to reflect on his 2012, and he can barely contain his excitement. “It’s been another massive year,” he says with strong emphasis, as if he can barely believe it himself. “I was in Ibiza over the summer again, that’s 11 years now in this club called Space. We had our 10-year anniversary last year which I never thought I’d get to, of course. I just thought as a resident DJ it would last as long as it would last, but this year has been our biggest year yet. So whatever we’re doing, we are obviously doing it right,” he states with his trademark infectious laugh that makes the sound of a man enjoying himself. “So in the sense of entertainment, people are still enjoying it after all these years, which is great. And if people are enjoying it, then so am I.” The punters can’t get enough, but that is largely because they see a lot of themselves in Cox, whose love of discovering new music and offering it the most sought after of platforms is as infectious as it is unwavering. “I feel the same as I did when I first started out,” he says. “I just want to play good music to a room full of people and watch them have a good time. It still has the same feeling as back then, too. That feeling of breaking an act and watching people dance to your music is amazing. I don’t think I’ll ever tire of that.” Reactions from ravers around the world are remarkably similar, in that unadulterated fervour follows Cox wherever he leads, although he reserves special praise for crowds in Italy. “It’s crazy! It’s as if I’ve scored the winning goal in the dying


seconds for Italy to win the World Cup - that’s how it feels when I play there. I’m seen as a DJ icon over there, but really I’m just a guy from Carshalton who plays music!” If that seems unnecessarily self-effacing, Cox knows what he has achieved. “Turning 50 this year has made me think,” he says, “and I’ve ended up with 500,000 fans, been DJing for 36 years, I’ve been in electronic music for 27 years, and I’ve just done my 500th radio show globally worldwide to 15million listeners. That’s how hard I’ve been working all these years. So do I need a holiday? Hell yes!” It may not have always been the case, but these days hard work is prioritised over any trappings of fame. If the idea of one of the world’s most renowned DJs traveling the world over conjures a picture of a hedonistic lifestyle then that would be understandable: after all, sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll are synonymous with the culture in which Cox operates. But those days are fully behind him, and when he isn’t at the turntable, Cox cuts a tranquil figure. “I just kick back really,” he admits. “I don’t go clubbing. I just like to kick back. I watch films, I’ve always been into films. I like being social, having friends around, which I don’t get to do very often unfortunately. And if I can see my family, for sure, I’ll try to see my sisters and their kids as much as I can. Plus my mum and dad live in Barbados, so I am over there whenever I can get there! “I’m a big kid at heart. And I don’t want to change; I don’t want to get too old. I love the outdoors, being adventurous. I like fishing as much as I can as well, although it’s not my forte! It’s a good way to relax. I just like doing stuff I never got to do too much when I was younger. But there is one pastime that really engulfs Cox – motorbikes. A portly 50-year-old DJ may appear on the surface as an unlikely candidate to hit the high road, but his collection of bikes is now an obsession, and on that he will happily talk about at length. “Ah, the bikes!” he says with a huge guffaw, knowing he is about to embark on quite the ode to his second love. “Yeah, I can’t tell you how much I love them. I have just bought bikes 47, 48 and 49. I’m just waiting for my Ducati Diavel AMG. That will be my 50th bike and I can’t wait for it to turn up.” How did Cox become the Superstar DJ who rode superbikes? “Ever since I passed my test really, when I first started riding I was just finding out what was what about bikes. And it grew from there. It’s addictive. My first real superbike was a Reptile Honda, although I didn’t pick that up until 2007. That was the bike that changed it all for me in the sense of riding and what a bike can actually do. But also I like the power of them. I mean, everybody likes the

power, the controllability, how easy it is to ride. “Your top riders who have initial skills beyond these bikes say that these bikes are so easy to ride that they get bored. I don’t know how you can get bored with 1,000cc worth of superbike! The way these go are enough for me in terms of adrenalin! “But it got to the point for me where I didn’t want to keep buying the same bike year after year, so I stopped at Fireblade 2007. The way bikes keep developing there is not much more they can do for me where I am at with my collection now, so I have actually started going backwards in my collection, buying Mustangs and things like that. It’s become a bit of an obsession. I have come so far with these bikes and into this industry.” Cox even sponsors a race team -Ducati, back home in the UK in the 848 Challenge – “we had a few thrills and spills with riders, but I enjoy being part of the team and hopefully we can win the championship next year” – but his real passion is getting on the bikes himself. “I just enjoy bikes in general. Getting on two wheels has meant a lot to me in my life. I always felt that there was something missing in my life all the years that I hadn’t been riding, and it has come to a point where my life has become complete due to my love of motorcycles. I enjoy the freedom, the open road, all the clichés! “And with the job I have, it clears the head, and that is important. Sometimes it can get a bit much, and it is a great thing to be able to stop thinking about things. Is it relaxing? Well, riding a Honda or a Ducati on the open road around twists and bends isn’t too relaxing to be honest! But when you’re in control, all you’re thinking about is riding and when you get home you feel good about what you’ve just done.” And Cox has done more than most, but as he leaves his youth behind him, there is no sign of this Superstar DJ calling it a day just yet. “I’ve achieved so much in my life,” he reflects. “There isn’t much more that I want to do other than carry on as I am. I make my own music in my studio, and for as long as I have that creative outlet I will always be happy. I still do my record label in the UK, too, and my radio show has been going for 10 years now, listened to by 15 million people each week. That is a real milestone. And of course, my DJing, which I still love. “Because as much as I love relaxing, when it is over I want to get back to work. It is never ending. Every weekend, there’s always a party somewhere and they want me to play. And I’m able to pick and choose how and when I do it, and that’s a great place to be at.” He lets one last laugh out. “Everything is just perfect at the moment”.

“My first real superbike was a Reptile Honda”


Carl Cox rides in style in his Mustang


RACE HIGHLIGHTS

WET-WEATHER

MASTER CLASS

text: Elisa Pavan - photo: Milagro

AT A RAIN-SWEPT SEPANG INTERNATIONAL CIRCUIT THE RACE GETS REDFLAGGED BECAUSE OF DANGEROUS CONDITIONS. DANI PEDROSA KEEPS THE PRESSURE ON MOTOGP CHAMPIONSHIP LEADER JORGE LORENZO AFTER NOTCHING A FIFTH VICTORY IN SIX RACES.


MALAYSIA


MIXED OPENING DAY AT MALAYSIA CIRCUIT FOR BRADL

S

epang, 19th October: in the opening day of the Malaysian GP, riders were met with the typically hot and humid conditions at the track, with grip levels characteristically low in the first morning practice, prompting most riders to head out on the softer option tyres including LCR Honda’s Stefan Bradl. The German rookie made a solid start to the weekend in seventh and was looking to improve his machinery overall package but the afternoon session was marred by mixed weather conditions and the 22-year-old could not replicate this morning performance.

Stefan: “This morning first outing was very difficult because the surface was very dirty and

the grip very low. We struggled with some chattering problems which we wanted to adjust in the afternoon but unfortunately the weather was unstable with patches of heavy rain in some parts of the track and we could not proceed our job. Let’s see what’s going on with the weather tomorrow because we have a lot of things to test”.


CHATTERING PROBLEMS HINDER

BRADL’S MALAYSIAN GP QUALIFYING

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epang, 20th October: the second day at the Malaysian Grand Prix was invariably humid and hot with premier class riders chasing the best set up after yesterday’s useless afternoon due to the inclement weather. Even LCR Honda’s racer Stefan Bradl had to cope with the lack of track time and the demanding ambient conditions managing

to get the 8th spot on the grid (2’01.491). At the end of the 60-minute tough qualifying session the MotoGP rookie riding the RC213V is disappointed he is not higher up the grid after showing good form in the previous rounds but yesterday’s chattering issue stop Bradl from riding his Honda properly.

Stefan: “Today’s qualifying was extremely tough for us because we did not improve our set

up before the afternoon session. This morning we have tried to find the right way to reduce the chattering because I could not entry the corner and we are losing too much in the middle of the corner and we are struggling to find the solution because we never had such a big chatter issue in the past. In these conditions I do not have enough confidence and this cost me a lot of time that’s why I am too slow in those areas. In the beginning of the session on used tyres it looked like we were capable to reduce the chattering problem but as soon as we went out on new rubbers the problem was still there. The guys are working hard to adjust the bike ahead tomorrow’s race and I am confident”. 69 OCT - NOV 2012


BRADL OUT OF LUCK

IN A DRAMATIC WET SEPANG RACE

S

epang, 21st October: this morning the temperatures were the hottest they have been so far at Sepang track for the warm up session but the sunny skies suddenly changed to a typical rainstom with the premier class riders involved in a hugely dramatic and soaking wet Malaysian Grand Prix which was red-flagged with 7 laps to go. LCR Honda’s Stefan Bradl had a good start from the third row running with a good rhythm in the wet but the conditions deteriorated lap by lap and the German rookie suffered a crash out of sixth place putting a premature end to his race.


Stefan: “First of all we must check the data to understand what happened. I took a very

good start from the 8th place but it was pretty tough out there because of the wet and slippery surface. But I could lap with a good pace and constant speed but after some laps I had to change the map because we had too much engine break. Since that moment something changed and the engine was pushing me in the corner entries and I did not know what was going on. After that I was back to the standard engine brake but it was too much in those difficult conditions and started to be slower. In the heavy rain I was more careful but suddenly when I lost the rear and crashed out. I do not think it was completely my fault and I feel sorry for me and the Team�.


BEHIND THE SCENES


Paddock People pay tribute to SIC with a walk till Turn 11 placing a permanent plaque for Marco – 2 or 4 wheels the MotoGP rider have fun only with the speed battling in a kart race – Who’s the most shocked in the picture? Rossi or the Japanese lady? Make your choice photo: Milagro 73 OCT - NOV 2012


Nice car Dovi but there’s no space for your daughter pram: unlucky! – Palms and scooters: what a weird combination – Apparently Rossi took his cousins from Tavullia to Malaysia

photo: Milagro


75 OCT - NOV 2012


TRACK KEY NOTE


TRACK KEY NOTE

SEPANG KENNY ROBERTS JR.

CIRCUIT INFO LENGTH: 5.548 M. / 3,447 MILES WIDTH: 25M LEFT CORNERS: 5 RIGHT CORNERS: 10 LONGEST STRAIGHT: 920 M. / 0,572 MILES CONSTRUCTED: 1998

text: Nelly Pluto-Prondzynska

Kenny Roberts Junior remains the only son of a former world champion to have emulated his father in lifting a world crown. Not only that, but he was well known in the paddock as a rider who wasn’t afraid to take a challenge. If we have to tell the truth, Kenny had just two great seasons in premier class - in 1999 and the following year. By 1999 he already had six years of racing in GP under his belt. But that year he debuted with Suzuki in such amazing style – winning the first round of the season! It was not only his first race on that bike, but also his first ever round at new circuit Sepang. In the later part of the season the lack of consistency was to have a defining impact on his fight for the world championship, a battle Roberts Jr. lost against Alex Criville.

But 2000 was Kenny’s year. Despite a disappointing sixth-place finish in the opening race in South Africa, he improved quickly, winning the next trial in Kuala Lumpur. Three other victories and five podiums followed, enough to clinch the world title with a round to spare. And 12 years ago, at the Motegi circuit in Japan, the American was the happiest guy in the world, becoming 500cc world champion for the first time! Unfortunately, the following years weren’t as successful for the number 10 as he would have hoped. After collaborating with Suzuki, he returned to his father’s team, but couldn’t replicate the success. Certainly, in the case of Kenny Roberts Jr, while he does owe something to his father, it is obvious that he wouldn’t have got to where he has without a talent and determination all of his own. That said, if your dad is triple 500cc world champion, you grow up in motorcycle paddocks. It was maybe fitting then that his final podium came in his dad’s team, in Portugal in 2006. After six rounds of the 2007 season, and with only a best finish of 13rd place to show, the Californian decided to end his time in racing, nevertheless leaving behind a special family legacy that would be discussed in years to come. 77 OCT - NOV 2012

Specifically built for speed and exciting racing, the Sepang International Circuit in Malaysia is one of the world’s best. The 2,300 acre complex which also houses a hotel, shopping centre, golf course and other sports facilities cost around £50m to construct and was built in just 14 months, holding its first Grand Prix in April 1999 and setting the standard for race circuits worldwide. With four slow corners following two long straights and ten medium to highspeed corners, the wide track is particularly favourable to overtaking manoeuvres and plenty of open throttle. One of the longest laps in MotoGP is made all the more gruelling for riders by intense heat and humidity. Sepang is located around 50km south of Kuala Lumpur city.


N

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M I T

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www.progrip.it progrip.it

CONTROL YOUR RIDE


WORLD’S BEST HANDGRIPS

. . .

T FI

PR

CONTROL YOUR LIFE

R G O

! P I


GREAT LIFE STORIES

LIFE IS A RACE LET’S GET INSPIRED BY

text & photo: Red Bull Content Pool

AS THE MAN TO FALL FROM SPACE, FELIX BAUMGARTNER WAS UNDERSTANDABLY THE CENTRAL FIGURE IN THIS YEAR’S RED BULL STRATOS MISSION. BUT THE AUSTRIAN EXTREME ATHLETE WAS COUNTING ON THE EXPERIENCE AND EXPERTISE OF AN AEROSPACE LEGEND TO HELP HIM REACH THE EDGE

R

OSWELL, New Mexico (United States) – On 29 August 1960, Joe Kittinger appeared on the cover of LIFE, the central focus of one of the most iconic and unforgettable images in the history of the famous US magazine. The US Air Force officer is seen wearing an early space suit as he plunges towards the Earth, away from the camera, with a sea of clouds far below. It was at the height of the space race between the United States and the Soviet Union, and Kittinger’s courageous journey was front page news around the world. As a result, the image has been scorched into the collective memories of hundreds of millions of people across America. Nearly 52 years later, Kittinger has been an instrumental figure in one of the major news stories of 2012, aiding the team that supported Austria’s Felix Baumgartner in his attempt to jump from an even higher altitude and reach supersonic speed during freefall. Kittinger, who also served as a fighter pilot for

the United States Air Force in the Korean and Vietnam wars, worked as an advisor to the socalled Red Bull Stratos mission. He was well placed to do so. He nearly reached the speed of sound during his own jump in 1960 and was keen to help Baumgartner break through that barrier in an attempt that brought global awe. Five decades after his famous descent, Kittinger remains one of the most famous names in US aviation. His participation in Project Excelsior secured his place in history as he completed the highest, fastest and longest duration skydive the world had ever seen. A decorated combat fighter pilot, he also flew 483 missions as a Squadron Commander as America’s war with Vietnam raged on. It came at a cost too. In 1972, just before the end of his third tour of duty, he was shot down and spent 11 months in a prisoner of war camp in the Vietnamese capital of Hanoi.


For his jumps in the Excelsior and Project Manhigh programs, Kittinger was twice awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, while American president Dwight Eisenhower also honoured him with the Harmon Trophy for outstanding accomplishment in aeronautics. Also among Kittinger’s honors are two silver stars, two purple hearts, two bronze stars with ‘V’ device (for valor in combat) and 24 air medals. He also was named a National Aeronautics Association Elder Statesman of Aviation and awarded a Lifetime Achievement in Aviation trophy from the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. He was made an Honorary US Army Golden Knight and is enshrined with the highest honour in the National Aviation Hall of Fame, as well as sitting in the US Ballooning Hall of Fame and the National Skydiving Museum Hall of Fame. He has logged more than 16,800 hours of flying time and flown over 93 different types of aircraft. Using this limitless expertise, Kittinger, now 83, advised the Red Bull Stratos team on technical

aspects of Baumgartner’s attempt and acted as a personal mentor to his 43-year-old heir. Despite their four decade age gap, the two developed a mutual admiration and a close friendship during their time working together on the project. Kittinger said he was glad to be helping Baumgartner break his own record - a freefall from 31,333 metres (102,800 feet). As he figures: “Records are made to be broken. It’s human nature to go faster, higher, lower, deeper or whatever. It’s a challenge and Felix was well prepared for that. And it’s a goal. “Our job was to get him up there safely and get him back down - and to collect as much data as we could. We all had a lot of fun. The whole world shared in this great adventure.” Red Bull Stratos succeeded in breaking four records that had existed for more than 50 years; the highest manned balloon flight, the highest skydive, the first person to break the speed of sound during freefall, and the longest freefall time. The team later shared its innovations and fin-


dings with the scientific community around the world – and it’s this which could yet prove the mission’s biggest success. Kittinger’s Excelsior III mission helped advance research that has led to improvements in safety for people in near space environments, as well as improvements in space suit development. The Red Bull Stratos team aims to achieve advancements in medical science and has already contributed to the understanding of survival in space, building on the accomplishments of Kittinger five decades ago. “We spent a year-and-a-half training and preparing for it,” said Kittinger, an amiable, approachable man who appears to be at least a decade younger than his 83 years. “When it came to the time to go, I was ready. I was headed back down towards a friendly Earth. “It’s extremely hostile up there and the further you fall, the friendlier the Earth seems. I was close to supersonic; Felix was supersonic. The additional miles higher he was gave him the lack of [air] density that allowed him to go faster than we could on my jump.”

In the LIFE cover story, the magazine wrote: “Nineteen miles above New Mexico, Captain Joseph Kittinger stepped from a balloon gondola to set a new free-fall record and a mighty testimonial to human endurance. As he started his drop at 200 feet per second, an automatic camera on the gondola made the spectacular picture on the cover.” Kittinger, who retired from the Air Force in 1978, remained active in ballooning and has become a legendary figure within the sport. He set a gas balloon world distance record for the AA06 size class of 3,221.23 kilometres in 1983 and completed the first solo crossing of the Atlantic Ocean in the 3,000 cubic metre Balloon of Peace in 1984. A legend of his trade, he says he would love to have jumped again. Only half in jest he says he would have been ready to go if Baumgartner had been forced to pull out in October. “I was his back-up,” he says, too straight-faced for comfort. “If something happened to Felix, I would have been ready to go!”


left: Colonel Joe Kittinger on 16 Aug. 1960 and today right: Felix Baumgartner makes record-breaking skydive from space


US Airforce Colonel Joe Kittinger embraces Felix Baumgartner


AUSTRALIA


RACE HIGHLIGHTS

HOME

SWEET HOME

text: Elisa Pavan - photo: Milagro

ANOTHER DOMINANT PERFORMANCE FROM THE AUSSIE. CASEY STONER DELIVERS THE RESULTS EVERYONE WAS HOPING FOR WHILE JORGE LORENZO WRAPS UP ANOTHER MOTOGP TITLE. BUT THE TITLE FOR THE BEST BATTLES OF THE RACE GOES TO DOVIZIOSO, BAUTISTA AND STEFAN BRADL


BRADL SEVENTH FASTEST AT SUNNY PHILLIP ISLAND GP DAY ONE

P

hillip Island, 26th October: among the riders, the spectacular Phillip Island circuit is one of the most appreciated on the MotoGP calendar but it is also famous for offering inclement weather conditions but in today’s opening day of the “Island GP” Stefan Bradl and his colleagues were greet by sunny skies with the German posting the 7th lap time of the day (1’31.702). Bradl has successful records at the ocean track and made the most from his Honda machine today but was not satisfied about his performance missing some confidence in the fast turns.


Stefan: “It was a quite tough day for us and was expecting a better feeling on this race track.

Basically I have not enough confidence although we tried different adjustments especially in the fast corners. In the corners exit I am struggling to keep the bike in balance and it’s tough to avoid the rear pumping; the surface is very bumpy here and it makes the problem even worse. In these conditions I can not be faster as I would like and we must analyze the data finding a quick solution for a better set up which will give me the chance to lap faster than this�.


BRADL GETS 5th SPOT ON THE GRID

AHEAD AUSSIE GP P

hillip Island, 27th October: the second day of track action at the Island circuit began under cloudy skies with cooler temperatures compared to yesterday’s springtime weather with LCR Honda’s racer Stefan Bradl lining up in fifth place (1’30.798) ahead tomorrow’s 27-lap race.

The 22-year-old was down to eight in this morning third free session but was back to his competitive form for the 60-minute qualifying session which saw the German strongly making his way into top-5.

Stefan: “We are very happy today because we did not expect the fifth place in qualifying

after yesterday’s issues with the bike set up. I was struggling to much with bike confidence but we made some chassis adjustments finding a good solution for the afternoon session. After that I was finally back into my standard form lapping with more confidence and more average speed. Let’s see what is going on tomorrow but we are more prepared right now considering the particular layout of this track”.


BRADL TAKES 6th PLACE AFTER A THRILLING BATTLE AT THE ISLAND GP

P

hillip Island, 28th October: fast and flowing Phillip Island track was sunny and packed today for the last local hero Casey Stoner’s home GP who confirmed his dominance winning the 27lap race whilst the LCR Honda’s racer Stefan Bradl was again a strong performer finishing 6th. In his first visit to the ocean circuit on a MotoGP machine, the German had vastly improved from Friday’s practices gaining more confidence aboard his RC213V and starting a close battle with Dovizioso and Bautista for the 4th place till the last corner. Now Bradl is holding the 8th place in the world standing with 135 points.


Stefan: “Off course we are all happy because we did not expect such a close fight for the 4th place today after the difficult first day of practices we had here. It’s a shame that we lost the 4th place because I was on hard tyre today and had a small advantage on my competitors so I thought I could take it. But the other guys had other advantages on me so we were plus or minus on the same level but in the last lap I was stopped by Bautista and Dovi passed me. I am not the one who usually lost the battle but I am quite happy anyway because we showed our pace once again and want to thank the Team for their excellent job this weekend�.


BEHIND THE SCENES


Who’s that? Crutchlow or Diabolik? – Unforgettable 2012 Australian GP for Stoner and his family : last chance to see the Aussie talent on a MotoGP bike – Lorenzo can not believe it: he is the world champion! But please Tino do not shoot him! photo: Milagro 97 OCT - NOV 2012


Bye Bye MotoGP fans! I had fun on my home track but my wife and my adorable daughter are waiting for me – Concentrated Stefan, frustrated Nicky, happy Casey: different personalities sharing the same passion – uncatchable Lorenzo: he is the winner of 2012 title

photo: Milagro


TRACK KEY NOTE


TRACK KEY NOTE

PHILLIP ISLAND WAYNE GARDNER text: Nelly Pluto-Prondzynska

Wayne Gardner rode in the 500cc class during one of the toughest decades ever in Grand Prix, competing against the likes of Rainey, Doohan, Schwantz, Mamola, Spencer and Lawson. Yet, overall, he was better than them in 18 races, and stood on the podium 52 times. But the Australian rider’s crowning glories were the two victories on home soil, at the Phillip Island circuit: the two unforgettable afternoons coming in 1989 and 1990. On the first occasion, the ‘Wollongong Whiz’, as he was known – he was born in Wollongong, New South Wales in 1959 – was fighting wheel-towheel with three rivals. “Wayne wanted it more than any of us today. There was no way we were going to beat him,” said Rainey after the race,

who lost the battle with Gardner for the latter’s first ever victory at Phillip Island. Even more amazing was the Australia race one year later. It had been a difficult year for Gardner with only one win, and, during the race, he was battling not only with his rivals, but also with a broken wrist! A daring move at the end of the straight and a smooth final two laps were the key for his second home win. As with many Australian riders, Wayne began his career in dirt-track, later stepping into road racing. Right the way from his debut in 1983 in 500cc, he remained loyal to Honda. Just one year after breaking through, and in Swedish GP, he finished on top of the podium for the first time. In 1986, in Spain, he scored his first win. In 1988, he couldn’t fight to defend the title – a season that was wrecked by injuries, including broken legs, ribs and feet. Those ailments also hindered Wayne’s riding in the next three years. “I wanted to go out on a winner, so that British GP victory was one of the most special wins of my whole career,” said Gardner of his 1992 win at Donington Park. Fittingly, he announced his retirement at the end of that season.

101 OCT - NOV 2012

CIRCUIT INFO LENGTH: 4.448 M. / 2,764 MILES WIDTH: 13M LEFT CORNERS: 7 RIGHT CORNERS: 5 LONGEST STRAIGHT: 900 M. / 0,559 MILES CONSTRUCTED: 1956 MODIFIED: 1988

Phillip Island, the selfstyled home of Australian motorsport, is steeped in motor racing tradition, with the first car races having been held there on public roads in the 1920s. The first motorcycle races took place in 1931 and a permanent track was built in 1956. The circuit fell into disrepair during the late 70s and early 80s until it was bought in 1985 and given a AUS $5m facelift. MotoGP returned in 1989 and 1990 before becoming a regular fixture once more from 1997 onwards. The Phillip Island circuit is blessed with breathtaking scenery and beautiful ocean views and, as one of the fastest, most fluid, tracks on the calendar, it continues to provide some of the most spectacular racing in the MotoGP season.


text & photo: Gigi Soldano

GIGI SOLDANO IS ONE OF THE MOST RESPECTED MOTOGP PHOTOGRAPHERS IN THE WORLD. TOGETHER WITH A BUNCH OF FRIENDS, PASSIONATE RIDERS AND THREE CRAZY ITALIAN COMEDIANS, HE EMBARKED ON ONE OF THOSE JOURNEYS THAT CAN DEEPLY CHANGE YOUR LIFE FROM NORWAY TO KENYA, HERE’S HOW IT ALL STARTED…


Our trip starts in the Svalbard Isle’s gelid valleys, an archipelago in the Arctic Sea, constituting the northernmost part of Norway. It will lead us to Kisii, a town in the Nyanza region of southwestern Kenya, Africa. From the freezing ice packs of those stark northern lands, down to the breathtaking Kenyan plateau. These pictures of mine are here to tell you the first part of the story. One of those life-changing experiences on two wheels. We went through all this like true riders, riders with both heart and spirit open and ready for those who really need some help. It’s been a long time since me and my friends Aldo Drudi, Sergio Sgrilli, Paolo Cevoli, Marco Silvestri, Toni Merendino and Danilo Vivan started talking about this project. We had already been to both the Republic of Tunisia and Tanzania with the same purposes, but this was going to be our ‘final act’. Every time we set out with a new goal – and this time the aim of the game consisted of going as far northern as we could (we chose this amazing archipelago in the middle of the Arctic Ocean) in order to pick up the purest ice splinters ever and deliver them to those populations in need in Kenya. Ice is, after all, a symbol for water: the most precious good and primary need for Africa. We were ready to adapt to every ground we had to travel on, but still, it’s been surreal, absolutely. Our motorbikes first turned into snowmobiles and dog sleds - mushing on an immense expanse of snow. Driving with 12 Siberian huskies it is something you have to practise a lot in order to master. It is not like driving off-road, it’s way more wearing and you really have to be fit if you want to ride all day through the ice and snow. The best advice I was given is never to rush, because it isn’t easy to stop those cute pets. They

seem to be possessed! Our expedition moved from Longyearbyen, a town on the on the 78° parallel - the largest settlement and administrative centre of Svalbard, Norway. Excited and highly motivated, together with some local expert guides, we reached Tempelfjorden, on the Spitsbergen island (the largest island of the Svalbard archipelago). Words can’t describe the vastness of that land of snow surrounded by high and frightful icebergs. (Have you ever seen the true colour of ice? It’s blue!) In constant fear of being attached by polar bears wandering around in search for food after hibernation, we reach the Longyearbyen glacier. Once we secured our dogs and sleds, we climbed down into a magnificent underground cave which was surrounded by amazing ice stalactites, and handpicked our symbolic block of ice. Our joy was immense. The mystery, the calm, the beauty and the charm of the light at geographic pole did the rest. It was truly a spiritual and unique experience. Months later, with a new expedition, the same team will reach Kisii at a height of 1,500m on the beautiful plateaus of Kenya, where the agricultural project ‘Farm for Hope’ nurses and rises orphan kids and delivers the water picked up in Norway. Another 1,400km later, from Nairobi to Lake Victoria, the visit takes in the Bonyaiguba DOC Primary school in the district of Nyamira and Project Wofak by Intersos in Nairobi, where HIV-positive men, women and kids need your help too.

“In constant fear of being attached by polar bears wandering around in search for food after hibernation, we reach the Longyearbyen glacier”

If you want to go as north as we’ve been, here are the coordinates: Latitude 78° 13’ 6.92”N Longitude 15° 38’ 55.50”


Moving the first steps on Svalbard Isle, Norway


Taking a break near the glacier in Longyearbyen, Norway


On our way to Tempelfjorden, on the Spitsbergen island


Photographer Andrew Wheeler


THE RACING SPIRIT IN ONE SHOT

It all began in the career counselor’s office at Beechen Cliff Boys School, in 1973. “So Andrew, what do you want to when you leave school?” the grizzled counselor asked. “I want to be a racing driver. In Formula 1,” I answered. There was a long pause. Then: “Hmm, yes. What do you really want to do when you leave school? Of course, I never became a racing driver, Formula 1 or otherwise. But the dream of working in motorsports has always stayed with me. In 2002, with the advent of digital I picked up a camera and launched my career, first as an equine photographer. Emily, my wife and I had a horse and were around horses all the time. After a few years, during a particularly bad winter here in Northern California when typically the equine photography business grinds to a halt, I went and watched motorcycle testing at Laguna Seca, which is very close to my home. I was bitten. I then transitioned into motorsports, first cars, then the American National series, the AMA, through World Superbike and now MotoGP. My goal is to always capture the atmosphere of the event, not just a close up shot, but everything that is part of a race weekend, weather, fans, location, and create an image that someone can “climb into” and feel like they’re there. To this day, if I see a horse in a field, I’ll always stop and try a take a photo though.


RACE HIGHLIGHTS

WHAT A MESS


VALENCIA

text: Elisa Pavan - photo: Milagro

DANI PEDROSA TAKES VICTORY IN A DRAMATIC RACE MARRED WITH AWKWARD CONDITIONS AND CRASHES. IN HIS SECOND WILDCARD ENTRY NAKASUGA TAKES THE PODIUM WHILE WORLD CHAMPION JORGE LORENZO WALKS AWAY UNHURT AFTER BEING HIGHSIDED OFF HIS BIKE


SLIPPERY WHEN WET

RAIN HITS HARD ON OPENING DAY

V

alencia, 9th November: the 2012 MotoGP World Championship concludes this weekend with the traditional season finale in Valencia at Ricardo Tormo circuit with poor rain and cloudy skies marking the first day of track action for Stefan Bradl and his premier class colleagues. On this morning rain-hit track the German riding the RC213V set the 11th lap time chasing the best adjustments of his Honda machinery but awkward track conditions affected the second practice with the majority of the riders sitting out the 45-minute session including Bradl.


Stefan: “Actually it was not a very productive day for us because in this morning first outing

the surface was wet and very slippery because of the new tarmac and it took me a while to get the right confidence on the bike. After some laps I was capable to ride as I normally do finding a good speed and a good rhythm. Unfortunately this afternoon the track conditions were pretty bad and I preferred to sit out the whole session but I am not worried about the situation because I know that our potential is higher than our actual position�.


BRADL 5th FASTEST AT 2012

LAST QUALIFYING IN VALENCIA

V

alencia, 10th November: last 2012 qualifying session was held today in dry conditions at Ricardo Tormo circuit with LCR racer Stefan Bradl strongly qualifying 5th (1’31.757) ahead tomorrow’s 30-lap ultimate race of the season. Mixed conditions welcomed the premier class riders

in the final free practice this morning after yesterday’s unfruitful opening day but the surface conditions gradually improved for the 60-minute afternoon session with the German rookie finally working on his RCV set up chasing rear improvements which could make the difference in his last performance of the year.

Stefan: “It was another good qualifying for us because since the beginning we have been

very competitive. The situation out there was a bit tricky because we only lapped on soft tyres and after a couple of laps the rear started to drop and the grip was not enough. So our biggest problem right now remains the rear because it’s not stable in the corner entries and we are now working on the electronic to solve the problem for the race. If the track conditions will remain the same like today we can be very strong but if it’s going to be wet it will be a big gamble for everybody”.


BRADL TAKES THE BEST ROOKIE OF THE YEAR

HONOUR DESPITE THE CRASH IN VALENCIA

V

alencia, 11th November: the ultimate round of 2012 season at Ricardo Tormo circuit was marred with awkward conditions and crashes as the 30-lap race was declared wet by Race Direction despite a near dry line having formed, and only a couple of riders including Stefan Bradl chose the slick tyres, with all others on the hard wets. Bradl started his final race as a MotoGP rookie from the middle of the second row and amid the frantic happenings he was running third but lost control of his bike in Turn 5 and crashed out on lap 10. Although this unfortunate last race, the 22-year-old German has not come worse than ninth in any race he finished this year. That record has made him the runaway winner of Rookie of the Year honours (8th place overall with 135 points).

Stefan: “First of all we had very tricky conditions today as almost everybody was on wet

tyres because the dry line was less than 10cm and we decided to go on slicks because we wanted to avoid a bike chance which could cost us a lot of time. At the end we made the right choice and want to the thank the Team for their support because it’s not easy for a rider to decide when the surface is so slippery. I was on a good pace since the beginning and was lapping third when I crashed out. The rider in front of me was slower and I wanted to overtake him quickly but in turn 5 I was a bit too aggressive and lost the control of the bike. I should have waited a bit longer to make the move and I feel bad for the Team because I lost the chance to fight for the podium. However I feel happy today because I will be awarded as the Best Rookie of the Year and this is simply great. This first year in the premier class was incredible for me and must thank Lucio and his Team because at the beginning I was a bit worried but now I know this is like a family”.


BEHIND THE SCENES


Stefan appreciates the hot bunny in his garage – Lorenzo bought a guitar to sing: we are the champions‌. - Yamaha found a unique way to promote their website: very sexy!

photo: Milagro 123 OCT - NOV 2012


Nakasuga on Yamaha achieves his first MotoGP podium whilst Stoner is going fishing – Last race for Rossi on his Ducati – Bradl signed for Honda in 2014: well done – Lucio meets the future riders of MotoGP championship: how cute!

photo: Milagro


125 OCT - NOV 2012


TRACK KEY NOTE


TRACK KEY NOTE

RICARDO TORMO TROY BAYLISS

CIRCUIT INFO LENGTH: 4.005 M. / 2,489 MILES WIDTH: 12M LEFT CORNERS: 9 RIGHT CORNERS: 5 LONGEST STRAIGHT: 876 M. / 0,544 MILES CONSTRUCTED: 1999

text: Nelly Pluto-Prondzynska

Troy Bayliss is one of the greatest motorcycle riders in the world. Unlike many of his rivals, he began road racing when he was 23, winning the first race he entered, no less. If you want evidence as to where passion and talent can take you – even with a late start – then look no further than Bayliss. However, during his three-year MotoGP career the Australian rider was never as competitive as many had hoped. He won only once, but his performance on that day is the stuff of legends. At the end of the 2006 season, during the Valencia round, everybody focused only on two riders: Nicky Hayden and Valentino Rossi, who were fighting for the title right until the very end. But at the same time,

Bayliss came back to MotoGP, entering as a replacement rider for the injured Sete Gibernau. Bayliss kept a low profile prior to the event, but in qualifying he scored second place, just behind Rossi. Nobody could predict what was to occur that Sunday… the Australian completely dominated the race and scored his first (and last!) victory in MotoGP. After spending some time racing in Oz, in 1999, Bayliss won the British Superbikes title. One year later he started the season in AMA Superbike in the US, but was then called to replace Carl Fogarty in the World Superbike challenge. Thanks to this, he began his incredibly successful career in WSBK and, just one year later, in 2001, ‘Baylisstic’ claimed his first title in that series. A year later he failed to defend the title after some of the closest, hardest-fought racing in recent memory, with Colin Edwards. The years 2006 and 2008 saw him again as a world champion in WSBK. The stats alone do the talking: he won 52 races and is triple world champion in the series. ‘Baylisstic’ decided to retire at the top of motorcycle racing after winning the third title in World Superbike four years ago. 127 OCT - NOV 2012

The Circuito de la Comunitat Valenciana was completed in 1999 and held rounds of the MotoGP and Spanish Motorcycle Championships in the same year. The Cheste track has several layouts, running anti-clockwise with varying lengths. MotoGP events are held on a 4km track comprising of five right handed corners, eight left handers and a 650m straight. Although the track is regarded as quite small, the pit complex contains 48 garages whilst the stadium style grandstands can seat up to 150,000 spectators. The circuit layout which allows all parts of the circuit to be seen from any stand helps to create a unique atmosphere enjoyed by Spanish and international riders alike and as the last race of the season there is always a party feeling to the Grand Prix, which was voted best GP of 2005 by IRTA.


DRIVE RESPONSIBLY

ONLINE INSURANCE

presents

LUCIo CeCChINeLLo Former Rider - MotoGP Team Manager

A GIFT OF SAFETY FOR CHRISTMAS!

In the last few days I have been thinking about those moments when you’re in a race and giving 100%, with your heart beating to the max, adrenaline pumping through your body and with less than a tenth of a second to the rider behind who is waiting for the slightest mistake from you to get past... the race never seems to end! However now each year passes by so quickly that I hardly even notice it... the days go by and birthdays are celebrated one after the other and all my relatives always say to me... “Lucio, Lucio, many happy returns”, “Lucio, Lucio, we hope you have a year full of happiness and health”, “Lucio, Lucio, wishing you the best and above all, that you’re always well...” and, just between us, in less than half a tenth of a second I touch “downstairs” ...!

FEATURING

But if we reflect for a moment with objectivity, my relatives are right... looking at real life you just have to read a newspaper or catch the news on the web; every day something happens to those who, like me, are least expecting it. Personally I think you have to live every day with optimism in everything you do, but always paying attention as much as possible because, as I learned the hard way on the track, just a small distraction can ruin your fairing and your leathers at best, or worse, end up with a trip to the hospital! Driving our cars in traffic, in all weather conditions and with any type of road condition (and I must add in any physical condition too) is now definitely one of the riskier activites that we all do every day and bearing in mind the newspaper stories and the statistical data, we can not underestimate it. Do we want to minimise the risks like the riders do? Then it’s a matter of preparation, concentration, healthy lifestyle and... equipment. What do I mean by equipment? Everything that can help improve our SAFETY! Specifically, I mean things like making sure the seat of our car is correctly adjusted so that the brake levers, throttle, steering wheel are all under our full control; fastening the seat belt and making sure it is correctly tensioned without being twisted through the reel or across our bodies; ensuring that the views out of the front and rear windshields, the side


DRIVE RESPONSIBLY

windows and door mirrors are optimal; and that the lights are on, our phone is switched to handsfree or, failing this, having the headset already installed and ready to use; having a pair of sunglasses always at hand, and so on... But guys... now that I think about it ... we’re going so fast that soon it will be Christmas! So instead of the usual things why don’t we give something that will protect the ones we love, why not give something that can improve their safety, even though it may seem like only a small thing (it could well be a crucial thing in the end) Ideas? Here you go: a safe driving course for your better half, a hands-free kit for mobile phones, a number-plate kit with rear sensor, an ice scraper for the windows, a

chamois cloth for cleaning the mirrors, an freeze-free screen wash, a portable breathalyser, a TomTom which is useful not only for directions but I suggest you can also use it in case of fog as an extra means of knowing the road ahead. I’ll give you another, but promise not to laugh... I was wondering how women managed to keep proper control of the brake, clutch and accelerator whilst wearing highheels, so one day I asked a friend let me try to drive while wearing her stilettoes…! Dear friends, here is another idea, please treat your partner to a nice pair of flat shoes that can be kept under the seat and, for heaven’s sake, insist that she wears them when driving!

129 OCT - NOV 2012

Lucio Cecchinello


LIFESTYLE & EVENTS

T

he Peter Pan Club is one of the brightest stars in Riccione’s legendary nightlife and one of the most famous in all of Italy. Located in the stunning Riviera di Rimini up on the hills, the club hosts the best DJs in the world, providing at the same time some of finest house music. Gorgeous beaches, celebrated clubs, hot girls, delicious food and a love of motorsport are Riccione’s defining features. Thus, the Mecca of Italian clubbing was the per-

fect location for LCR Honda’s unmissable party on Friday night during the San Marino GP weekend. VIP guests, Lucio, Stefan and the crew members all in attendance at the super party held in the country that gave birth to two-wheel champions such as Capirossi, Melandri, Dovizioso, Simoncelli and many more. The home of Italian entertainment, fun and vacation hosts the second sure to be legendary party of the LCR Honda Team. Head on over, if partying is your thing…


THE MECCA OF THE ITALIAN ENTERTAINMENT, FUN AND VACATIONS HOSTS THE SECOND INIMITABLE PARTY OF LCR HONDA TEAM: IF YOU WANNA PARTY JUST COME OVER! text: Elisa Pavan - photo: Nolette Lionel

WATCH AND GET INSPIRED www.inspire-lcr.com/seasidesummernight


The Mugello LCR Party took place at the amazing location of the Villanova Castle where riders, journalists, reporters, fans and supporters joined the Team in one of the most charm event of the season. Angel Nieto and Franco Uncini (former riders) were among the special guests. Red Bull Street Dancers performed some very attractive and acrobatic shows during the night impressing the guests. 133 OCT - NOV 2012


BraDL taKeS 2012 rooKIe oF the Year aWarD text: Elisa Pavan - photo: Mirco Lazzari and Giorgio Neyroz

The curtain closed on the 2012 MotoGP season in the middle of November after the ultimate round in Valencia with the FIM Awards Ceremony held at the Auditori Mar Rojo de L’Oceanogràfic in the Ciutat de les Arts i les Ciencies. Dorna Sports CEO Mr Carmelo Ezpeleta and FIM President Mr Vito Ippolito were joined on stage by a number of important guests to present numerous awards throughout the course of the evening. It was Yamaha Factor y Racing rider Lorenzo who took centre stage as he collected his award, along with Moto2 World Champion Marc Márquez and Moto3 World Champion Sandro Cortese.

Other prizes awarded included the Rookie of the Year trophy (which this year has been designed and produced by the Sepang International Circuit in memory of Marco Simoncelli) - that went to LCR Honda’s racer Stefan Bradl. The 22-yearold German didn’t finished outside the top nine in any race in his debut year in the premier class, winning admirers and plaudits with his high motivation and quick adaption to the RCV machine. The season’s high point came with a stunning fourth-place finish at Mugello GP. Stefan: “When I joined the LCR Team at the beginning of the season I was a bit worried because all the guys around me were extre-


mely professional and very serious. As time progressed we started to get to know each other and now I can say this is like a second family for me. They look after me and they have done an excellent job helping me familiarise myself with the bike and the new categor y. “Lucio is a hard worker and the way he runs his team is impressive. Honestly, I was not expecting to be awarded as the best rookie of this class, and the title makes me very happy and very satisfied, because I think everybody in the team did a great job this season. Nonetheless, I must thank Lucio and the whole crew for their efforts and I am looking forward to being on track with all of them next year.�


2012 MotoGP World Champion Jorge Lorenzo

139 OCT - NOV 2012


On stage Andrea Iannone, Pol Espargaro and Marc Marquez waving at the audience. LCR Team celebrates Stefan. Jorge Lorenzo receives 2012 FIM Personality of the Year Honour. Marco Simoncelli’s girlfriend Kate gives Stefan Bradl the specially designed 2012 Rookie of the Year award in the living memory of Marco. Luis Salom, Maverick Viùales and Sandro Cortese posing for the press.


Team LCR is extremely grateful to all the friends and brands involved in our projects. With your hard work, support and passion, you keep on making us bigger as a MotoGP team. Your efforts also helped us in giving birth to an amazing magazine, we’ll be forever thankful. Life is a race, let’s get inspired. We keep on running!

141 OCT - NOV 2012


INSPIRE

CREDITS

Editor In Chief eNrICo BarBIerI enrico.barbieri@lcr.mc

LCR Honda Team Principal LUCIo CeCChINeLLo cecchinello@lcr.mc

Art Director Emanuele Vallorani graphic@lcr.mc

Production Coordinator Errico Gasperoni graphic@lcr.mc

Contributors Elisa Pavan, Massimo Visconti, Nelly Pluto-Prondzynska Special Contributors Shaun Curran, Gigi Soldano Photography Milagro, Marco Guidetti, Mirco Lazzari, Davide Esposito, Andrew Wheeler, James Pipino, Nolette Lionel, Carolyn Chon & Julian Oh for Redd Bullets Publisher Steve Burgess

steve.burgess@clearsightpartners.com

Published by Clearsightpartners Ltd 121 Longmead Drive Sidcup - Kent DA14 4NY www.lcrhonda.com

Š 2012 Clearsightpartners Ltd and LCR - x racing s.a.m. All rights reserved


Valentino’s lesson #2 BATTLAX S20: how to enjoy authentic racing emotions on any road.

The new Bridgestone BATTLAX S20 is engineered to give you the great performance of a MotoGP tyre, wherever you want. Its pattern, designed for extreme comfort in any conditions, guarantees you great stability. The innovative 3LC compound of the BATTLAX S20 warms up quickly, for immediate, extreme performances. The same experience as MotoGP Champions.

Bridgestone Europe NV/SA Kleine Kloosterstraat 10 1932 Zaventem, Belgium

www.bridgestone.eu


more info at:

hondajet.honda.com

INSPIRE OCT - NOV 2012  

INSPIRE Magazine