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A N N UA L REPORT 2 010/2011


Contents 1. GENERAL INFORMATION Vision, Mission and Values

1

Organisational Structure

2

Legislative Mandate

3

Board Chairperson’s Statement

4

Accounting Officer’s Overview

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2. INFORMATION ON PREDETERMINED OBJECTIVES 2.1 Overall Performance

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2.1.1 Summary of Programmes

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2.1.2 Key strategic objective achievements

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2.1.3 Overview of the service delivery environment for 2010/11

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2.1.4 Overview of the organisational environment for 2010/11

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2.1.5 Key policy developments and legislative changes

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2.2 Programme Performance

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Programme 1: Administration

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Programme 2: Planning and Operations

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Programme 3: Business Development

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3. ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS General Financial Review

53

Statement on Corporate Governance

54

Accounting Authority’s Responsibilities and Approval

60

Report of the Audit Committee

61

Report of the Auditor-General

63

Statement of Financial Position as at 31 March 2011

65

Statement of Financial Performance for the year ended 31 March 2011

66

Statement of Changes in Net Assets for the year ended 31 March 2011

67

Cash Flow Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

68

Accounting Policies

69

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements

76

The following supplementary information does not form part of the Annual Financial Statements and is unaudited:

Detailed Statement of Financial Performance

97

Detailed Unspent Conditional Grants and Receipts

98

4. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

99

5. OTHER INFORMATION Acronyms

123

List of contact details

125


1. General information Vision, Mission and Values 1. Vision A quality driven public entity conserving the unique natural heritage resources of the Western Cape for the benefit of all.

2. Mission The establishment of biodiversity conservation as the foundation of a sustainable economy in the Western Cape thereby creating benefits and opportunities for all.

3. Values CapeNature strives to create a work environment that nurtures people and motivates a high level of performance in putting people first through implementing the Batho Pele principles. The following are our core values: Honesty: We conduct our business with honesty, accuracy and without error. Excellence: We espouse a deep sense of responsibility to our work and endeavour to constantly improve it, so that we may give our stakeholders the highest quality of service. We believe that work done excellently gives us dignity, fulfilment, and self worth.

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Fitness of purpose: We strive to ensure that our mission remains relevant to the local, provincial, national and international context of transformation and modernisation of the biodiversity conservation sector.

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Fitness for purpose: We strive to ensure that our strategic responses and resource allocations, including staff appointments, add optimal value in implementing our mandate. Accountability: We ensure financial performance and political accountability in the implementation of our mandate. Equity and access: We strive to ensure that benefits and opportunities accruing from the conservation of biodiversity are equitably shared and that our resources and services are accessible to all; ensuring redress for historically disadvantaged individuals with specific emphasis on women, youth and the disabled; and enabling cultural, traditional and spiritual uses of natural resources on a sustainable basis. Personal responsibility: We, as the custodians of the natural resources essential for human health and well-being; and growth and development in the Western Cape, undertake this responsibility with the highest possible level of personal responsibility. We are committed to measurable targets for individual performance which we pursue through strong professional work ethics, political neutrality and selfless service.


Organisational Structure*

MINISTER FOR LOCAL GOVERNMENT, ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS AND DEVELOPMENT PLANNING: ANTON BREDELL BOARD CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER: LUCILLE MEYER

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER: ALLAN PRESTON

SENIOR FINANCE MANAGERS SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGER ADMINISTRATION MANAGER

EXEC. DIRECTOR: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: NAZEEM JAMIE MANAGER: HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT & UTILISATION MANAGER: CORPORATE MENTORSHIP

EXEC. DIRECTOR: BIODIVERSITY SUPPORT SERVICES: KAS HAMMAN

SENIOR MANAGER: LAW SUPPORT SERVICES PROGRAMME MANAGER: WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT

SENIOR MANAGER: SCIENTIFIC SERVICES

PROGRAMME MANAGER: BIODIVERSITY CRIME UNIT

KNOWLEDGE MANAGER: SCIENTIFIC SERVICES

PROGRAMME MANAGER: FIRE MANAGEMENT

MANAGER: BIODIVERSITY

PROGRAMME MANAGER: PEOPLE & CONSERVATION PROGRAMME MANAGER: YOUTH DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME MANAGER: CONSERVATION STEWARDSHIP PROGRAMME MANAGER: CORRIDORS, BIOSPHERE RESERVES & WORLD HERITAGE SITES

EXEC. DIRECTOR: OPERATIONS: FANIE BEKKER

REGIONAL MANAGER (VACANT)

TECHNICAL ADVISOR (VACANT)

AREA MANAGER: NORTH WEST AREA MANAGER: BREEDEBERG AREA MANAGER: BOLAND AREA MANAGER: CAPE METRO AREA MANAGER: OVERBERG AREA MANAGER: LANGEBERG AREA MANAGER: GARDEN ROUTE AREA MANAGER: KAROO

EXEC. DIRECTOR: BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: SHERAAZ ISMAIL SENIOR MANAGER: TOURISM & MARKETING (VACANT) OFFICER: PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS SENIOR MANAGER: INFORMATION SYSTEMS PROJECT COORDINATOR: TOURISM INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT

MANAGER: OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAMME MANAGER: QUALITY MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME MANAGER: ALIEN VEGETATION MANAGEMENT

PROGRAMME MANAGER: MPA’S, ISLANDS & ESTUARIES

* ORGANISATIONAL DESIGN AS AT 24 OCTOBER 2010

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Legislative Mandate

National Legislation:

CapeNature is the executive arm of the Western Cape Nature Conservation Board (WCNCB), established in terms of the Western Cape Nature Conservation Board Act, 1998 as amended. The mandate and functions of CapeNature are derived from the Western Cape Nature Conservation Board Act. The Act has three general objectives:

• Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (Act No. 108 of 1996) • National Environmental Management Act (Act No. 107 of 1998) • National Environmental Management Biodiversity Act (Act No. 10 of 2004) • National Environmental Management: Protected Areas Act (Act No. 57 of 2003) • Mountain Catchment Areas Act (Act No. 63 of 1970) • National Forests Act (Act No. 84 of 1998) • Conservation of Agricultural Resources Act (Act No. 43 of 1983) • World Heritage Convention Act (Act No. 49 of 1999) • Marine Living Resources Act (Act No. 18 of 1998) • Environment Conservation Act (Act No. 73 of 1989) • National Water Act (Act No. 36 of 1998) • Sea-shore Act (Act No. 21 of 1935) • National Veld and Forest Fire Act (Act No. 101 of 1998) • National Heritage Resources Act (Act No. 25 of 1999 • Sea Birds and Seals Protection Act (Act No. 46 of 1973) • Disaster Management Act (Act No. 57 of 2002)

a) To promote and ensure nature conservation and related matters in the Province; b) To render services and provide facilities for research and training in connection with nature conservation and related matters in the Province; and c) In pursuing the objects set out in paragraphs (a) and (b), to generate income, within the framework of any applicable policy determined by the responsible Minister or the Provincial Cabinet. The following are the key national and provincial statutes relevant to the implementation of the mandate of nature conservation and include all amendments to these acts and ordinances and any regulations promulgated there under. Note that the list below excludes all other relevant legislation to which public entities as employers, implementers of government mandate and managers of public finance are subject. International Conventions, Protocols and Policies:

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

• Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) of Wild Fauna and Flora (1975) • Convention on Biological Diversity (1992) • The Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (1971) • World Heritage Convention concerning the protection of world natural and cultural heritage (1972) • Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (1979) • Southern African Development Community (SADC) Protocol on Wildlife Conservation and Law Enforcement in the Southern African Development Community (1999) • International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Policies and Procedures relating to the protection of species of wild fauna and flora (Species Specialist Groups, Working Groups, etc.)

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Provincial Legislation: • Constitution of the Western Cape Act (Act No. 1 of 1998) • Western Cape Nature Conservation Board Act (Act No. 15 of 1998) • Western Cape Planning and Development Act (Act No. 7 of 1999) • Land Use Planning Ordinance (Ordinance No. 15 of 1985) • Nature Conservation Ordinance (Ordinance No. 19 of 1974). New legislation and potential impacts: The following legislation is either new or pending and it is envisaged that this legalisation will impact on CapeNature. A brief summary of the implications are outlined below in order of threat and impact (highest to lowest): • Threatened or Protected Species Regulations, 2007 • Alien and Invasive Species Regulations, 2009 (still in draft form) • CITES Regulations, 2010 • National Environmental Management: Integrated Coastal Management Act (Act No. 24 of 2008).


Board Members: Back row (left to right): Mr. Eduard Kok, Ms. Francina du Bruyn, Mr. Hoosain Kagee (sitting), Dr. Colin Johnson (Vice-chairperson), Mr. Johan van der Merwe, Mr. Mico Eaton Front row (left to right): Dr. Edmund February, Prof. Aubrey Redlinghuis (Chairperson) Absent: Ms. Nomtha Dilima, Prof. Francois Hanekom

Chairperson’s Report The vision for CapeNature is to be a public entity synonymous with excellence in biodiversity conservation in the Western Cape and to constantly endeavour to pro-actively enhance our impact given our mandate to promote and ensure nature conservation, furnish services and provide facilities for research and training and generate income. Uppermost in this regard should be our commitment to our stakeholders, society and the future of our region and country. This vision includes successfully achieving its strategic goals as set out in the STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE FISCAL YEARS 2009-2014 and operational goals as well as constantly monitoring and assessing the organisation’s Annual Performance Plan and ensuring firm alignment with provincial and national priorities. The vision inter alia also relates to the impact of transformation on the core business of the institution, on the relevance and responsiveness of its research, on the innovations required for income generation and awareness campaigns, and on the socio-economic and developmental challenges confronting our society. It is a vision of an organisation having found a strategic response to the many challenges posed by climate change and the impact of pervasive poverty and economic development on the environment. Our organisation has gone through a very demanding period in 2010 – especially with the audit done by the Auditor-General’s Office, the finalisation of the Annual Report, the accounting and reporting to the Standing Committee on Public Accounts (SCOPA) on its Annual Report and Financial Report. Our CEO and her Executive Team did well under challenging circumstances and needs to be congratulated on:

• Sterling work done during the Auditor-General’s Audit and for the unqualified report; • An excellent Annual Report which provides a substantive and in-depth overview of the wideranging activities of CapeNature; • The launch of the Critical Biodiversity Maps; • The improvement in the performance reporting. The Board also needs to express appreciation and congratulations to the Management Team on the finalisation of the following: • The Fraud Prevention and Detection Policy; • The Report detailing progress on the implementation of Strategic Risk Mitigations; • CapeNature’s Protected Area Expansion Strategy and Implementation Plan, 2010-2015. This is a priority area and the document makes a major contribution to this important area, for now, as well as for the future. The different Board Committees have finalised their work plans which are aligned to the Strategic Plan of the organisation. The underpinning rationale of the work plans is to give structure and direction to the meetings and deliberations of the different Board Committees. It will also be used to assess the performance of the different Committees and inform the annual performance assessment of the Board. The period under review also saw the organisation tackling a number of important institutional processes, which include the Migration Project, the Organisational Redesign Project, improving on internal controls with regard to assets management, IT Governance, expenditure control, the budgeting process, fundraising and supply chain management, and the

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evolving efficiency and effectiveness investigation. The last mentioned investigation is linked to the undercapitalisation of CapeNature and the major challenge of an unfunded mandate as alluded to below. That said, this period also saw a number of highlights. Some of which included the Board’s successful engagement in a very productive induction and orientation programme as well as a training programme on King III. The Chairpersons of the different Committees of the Board also engaged in an in-depth discussion of the outcome of the Performance Review of the Board and the King Readiness Assessment. The nature of the discussions at this meeting once again highlighted and emphasised the important role the Board has to play and perform in terms of carrying out its fiduciary responsibilities and ensuring efficient and effective corporate governance of the organisation. I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the Executive Managers for providing Board members with insights into the different portfolios during the abovementioned meeting. It certainly assisted in enhancing Board members’ understanding of the core business of CapeNature. The training with regard to King III has been fruitful and we have agreed to apply the principles of King III in our corporate governance of CapeNature. While this has been finalised, we still have some institutional challenges that will need a focused and hands-on approach of our executive management team.

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

A major challenge remains the undercapitalisation of CapeNature and what I would refer to as the unfunded mandate. However, we also need to have an understanding of the competing demands on different terrains of our society given its reconstruction. Our strategic planning process will increasingly have to assist in identifying particular strategic thrusts for different years and to ensure alignment with the resource allocation process. Employment Equity will have to receive more strategic and practical attention from our Management, the HR Committee and the Board given concerns raised by the Standing Committee in this regard. It should be emphasized that driving employment equity is not a mechanical process but a moral imperative. The launch of the new International Centre for Education in Marine and Atmospheric Science in Africa is a welcome development that will enhance research collaboration in a field which has to some extent been neglected. The involvement of the DEA&DP in this venture remains a crucial one. A recent visit to Dassen Island highlighted the need for the Conservation Committee and the Board, in my view, to also give 5

more focused attention to the marine component of our mandate and core business. CapeNature received good, much-needed media coverage the past couple of months. I would like to thank our Communication Division and the colleagues who are driving these initiatives. NEWS24 also recently reported on the expansion of protected areas. It seems we have been able to conclude agreements with a substantial number of private landowners and that private land owners are increasingly playing a role in sustaining biodiversity. This year also saw the CEO, Deputy Chairperson and I visiting a number of our reserves. Mr. Preston, our CFO, joined us for the last visit. These visits have been a learning experience and provided us with insights and understanding of what is happening at the coalface of our organisation and the challenges that confront our protected areas. CapeNature is also entering a new phase in its development and history with the appointment of our new CEO. We will shortly be taking leave of our current CEO, Ms. Lucille Meyer. I have been fortunate to share a particular space and time with Ms Meyer as a Board member and later as Board Chairperson and her leaving our organisation will certainly leave a void. Ms Meyer has during her tenure succeeded in establishing a Board-Management partnership that is open, stimulating, productive and characterised by energetic engagement, with trust and mutual appreciation at the forefront. She has succeeded in building the quality of management, and results our institution and the public it serves, require and deserve. She ensured coherence in terms of direction and building cohesion in taking her team and CapeNature forward. The Board and the organisation wish Ms Meyer well in her future endeavours. The Board wishes to express its appreciation to Ms Meyer for the enormous contribution she made to the growth and development of the organisation. The Board also wishes to take the opportunity to welcome and congratulate Ms. Moroka on her appointment as the new CEO of CapeNature. We are looking forward to her stewardship of CapeNature and of unifying the organisation behind its vision, mission and strategic goals and building a strategic and effective partnership between the Board and Management. We wish her well in building CapeNature the best it can be – a principled, values-based organisation with high performance and measurable results that would make a significant contribution to the development of the conservation economy and access to the rich biodiversity of the Western Cape for all its inhabitants.

Aubrey Redlinghuis


Accounting Officer’s Review The 2010/2011 financial year brought its fair share of highlights and impressive achievements with many of the targets in the Annual Performance Plan (APP) being met and some even exceeded. However we also encountered some challenges in a few areas which impacted on our ability to meet some of the targets as indicated in the quantified report which forms an integral part of the Annual Report. On the whole, it is very clear that the institution is on an upward trajectory with respect to its performance and proactive role to continue to protect the province’s precious biodiversity and cultural heritage. The institution building strategy remains the platform on which management sought to strengthen the institution in all its facets. The focus in this financial year centered on improving the internal policy environment, skills development and mentorship, improving the systems in general and enhancing internal and external communication. CapeNature’s Board and Management this year embarked on an ambitious but necessary change management process to set up an Enterprise Resource Planning System (ERPS) which incorporates financial management, Human Resources Management, Permit System and the Call Centre. It is anticipated that all systems will go “Live” in 2011/2012. It has been a very resource intensive process, but salutations need to go to the Chief Financial Officer and many officials at different levels of the institution for really driving the implementation plan.

Some of the key innovations that must be mentioned for this financial year are the Critical Biodiversity Maps and the adoption of the Game Translocation and Utilization Policy – both of which will continue to influence and guide many of our management interventions going forward. The fire season again proved fairly challenging, and it is vital that we continue to strengthen partnerships to ensure that our planning is always proactive, that personnel are properly trained and that we intensify our alien vegetation management and integrated catchment management strategies. I wish to express my appreciation to our Executive Authority, Minister Bredell for his outstanding leadership and support, our Board for their wisdom and courage to tackle difficult issues and for a commitment to strengthen governance at CapeNature and to all our employees for their dedication and hard work often under difficult conditions. The biodiversity sector continues to be underfunded, and this year, the Board made great strides to activate the process to get a fundraiser appointed for CapeNature, but also to continue to lobby for more government funding. Lastly, we continue to recognise that a New Earth begins with all of us! Future generations depend on us, and we may not let them down! The following is a summary of the SCOPA resolution for 2009/2010 and include an update on the progress made in respect of the audit report.

Back (Left to Right): Dr Ernst Baard (Acting Executive Director: Biodiversity), Theo Geldenhuys (DEA&DP, Acting HOD), Nazeem Jamie (Executive Director: Human Resources), Allan Preston (Chief Financial Officer) Middle (Left to Right): Fanie Bekker (Executive Director: Operations), Sheraaz Ismail (Executive Director: Business Development), Manana Moroka (CEO Designate) Front: Lucille Meyer (Chief Executive Officer) Absent: Dr. Kas Hamman (Executive Director: Biodiversity)

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Background / Reference to audit report

Resolution

The Committee is concerned about the lack of progress made with the asset register.

Resolution Basic financial disciplines such as regular asset counts, reconciliations and training of staff should be applied and monitored. Progress A dedicated employee was appointed to manage the fixed assets and a service provider to assist with the barcoding, physical verification and recording of all assets.

The Committee is concerned about the number of material misstatements that had to be corrected on the Annual Financial Statements. Also of concern is that these misstatements were only picked up and corrected during the audit.

Resolution More rigorous internal control is needed to prevent the material misstatements that occurred in this year, which were only identified by audit processes, and to prevent such findings in the future. Progress During 2009-10 CapeNature had to implement the principles of GRAP 23: Revenue from Non-exchange Transactions (Taxes and Transfers) and amended its accounting policy accordingly. This adoption resulted in a change in revenue recognition which also had to be adjusted retrospectively for prior years.

Action needed to be taken to address the problems in the IT department.

Resolution Issues of IT governance, Security Management, User Access Control, IT Service Continuity need to be addressed as per Auditor-General’s recommendations. Progress IT Audit was finalised and most issues were resolved. A new IT policy was drafted and approved by the Board. New standard operating procedures and guidelines were finalised.

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

A service provider was appointed for the drafting and formulation of the Master Systems Plan; this is in progress and will be finalised by the end of August. Due to the issues raised and discussed during the sitting, it became clear that the Audit Committee should also prepare a separate briefing document that will show additional points (similar to the AuditorGeneral’s briefing report), apart from the Audit Report.

Resolution The Committee resolved that the Audit Committee prepare a briefing document as discussed and present it at all future briefing sessions.

The Committee raised a concern around the capacity issues especially in the Internal Audit department.

Resolution The Committee requested that the Internal Audit department be fully capacitated by 2011/12 financial year.

Progress This briefing session is still pending.

Progress The Internal Audit function is outsourced and the capacity issues raised in SCOPA did not refer to shortage of staff, but to the lack of funding (budget) availability. This was addressed when additional funding was received from the DEA&DP. 7


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2. Information On Predetermined Objectives 2.1 Overall Performance Strategic Approach The 2010/2011 Annual Performance Plan (APP) was located firmly within our revised five year strategic plan developed after the 2009 National Elections. This ensured that the strategic goals were aligned with national and provincial priorities and strategic frameworks, including

Provincial Strategic Objective 7. The integration of the planning ensured that CapeNature’s strategic goals and objectives, for the reporting year, were progressive and realistic.

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Strategic Goals

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Strategic Goal 1

Integrated biodiversity management

Goal Statement

Securing priority biodiversity and ecosystem services through integrated biodiversity management enabling appropriate climate change response.

Justification

Biodiversity conservation is the core mandate of CapeNature and the foundation of the economy of the Western Cape. It is essential that biodiversity conservation results in the best possible improvement in the status of biodiversity and ecosystem services on a sustainable basis, responding appropriately to the impacts of climate change.

Links

The conservation of biodiversity and maintenance of ecosystem services is the foundation for sustainable development in the Province. Its conservation and sustainable use will contribute to achieving the national biodiversity conservation targets and provide opportunities for growth and development.

Strategic Goal 2

Development of social capital

Goal Statement

Contributing to the reconstruction and development of social capital.

Justification

CapeNature has a legally mandated role to play in developing an environmental conservation ethic within learners, the youth and the general public of the Province. It has both the relevant core focus and facilities to make a significant impact.

Links

Education, awareness and the acknowledgement of the value of biodiversity is a cornerstone to realising the conservation economy foundation. This is recognised by the NFSD, NBSAP and NBF. The MTSF also envisages the expansion of the National Youth Service Programme over the next five years.


Strategic Goal 3

Growing the conservation economy

Goal Statement

Promoting socio-economic development through the conservation economy.

Justification

CapeNature is committed to enabling increased access to social benefits and local economic development opportunities through strategies that encourage the participation of historically disadvantaged groups. In South Africa, ensuring the implementation of a People and Parks strategy is seen as a priority.

Links

The “green job” as described in the MTSF is directly related to CapeNature’s efforts to develop tourism and hospitality SMMEs and generate economic development opportunities through its management and servicing of its conservation estate. It is also directly related to the national government’s drive to create work opportunities.

Strategic Goal 4

Institutional effectiveness and efficiency

Goal Statement

Ensuring an efficient and effective institution.

Justification

As a relatively young public entity implementing a growing mandate in a context of modernisation and transformation, it will be important to continue to focus on institutional strengthening strategies. Therefore, good corporate governance, institution building, sustainable funding streams, strategic partnerships and efficient administrative support need to result in fitness for purpose.

Links

Improving corporate governance and efficiency in service delivery are key requirements for public entities.

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2.1.1 Summary of Programmes Programme 1: Administration Sub-Programme 1.1: Office of the CEO This sub-programme comprises: • The Office of the Chief Executive Officer; and • The Board Sub-Programme 1.2: Finance and Administration Services This sub-programme comprises: • Finance Management accounting Accounting services Special funded and other project management Systems and loss control • Logistical Services Fleet management Auxiliary services Facility management Registry • Supply Chain Management Contract management Provisioning and procurement Asset management Sub-Programme 1.3: Human Resource Management This sub-programme comprises various components: • Human Resources Practices (Staffing Services; Conditions of Service and Payroll) • Human Resources Utilisation and Development (Performance Management; Human Resource Development (HRD) and Special Programmes) • Human Resources Policies and Planning • Employee Relations (Disputes and Grievances; Misconduct; Collective Bargaining) • Corporate Mentorship Programme Programme 2: Planning and Operations

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Sub-Programme 2.1: Management and Biodiversity Support consist of two main subsections, namely: A) Management – Management interventions of CapeNature’s core business are carried out within the eight Areas in the Western Cape: • • • • • • • •

North West Breedeberg Boland Cape Metro Overberg Langeberg Garden Route Karoo

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These eight areas are also supported by the Occupational Health and Safety Manager and Technical Advisor. B) Biodiversity Support Services include the following components or programmatic areas which focus CapeNature activities strategically. These include: Scientific Services Law Support Services Wildlife Management Support Biodiversity Crime Prevention Fire Management Support Alien Vegetation Management People and Conservation Youth Development and Environmental Awareness Conservation Stewardship Corridors, Biosphere Reserves and World Heritage Sites • Marine Protected Areas, Islands and Estuaries • Quality Management • • • • • • • • • •

Sub-Programme 2.2: Special Projects: Planning and Operations Purpose: The purpose of this programme is to conserve the unique natural heritage of the Western Cape, to build social capital through People and Conservation initiatives, and to promote equitable access to and sustainable use of natural resources in pursuit of the conservation economy. Programme 3: Business Development Sub-Programme 3.1: Tourism, Marketing and Communication comprise the following sections • Tourism • Communication • Marketing • Central Reservation System • Filming • Public Private Partnerships Sub-Programme 3.2: Information Technology and Systems • Grow and implement the Information Technology network and data connection infrastructure (LAN’s, WAN, SAN, Data links) • Indentify and implement appropriate Information Systems (GIS, Fire, E-communication, Reservation, Permit, HR, Finance, Procurement and Administrative Services) • Render professional and prompt support and maintenance service (IT Helpdesk) • Ensure sound IT/IS Governance (Compliance, Security, Backup, Disaster recovery) Sub-Programme 3.3: Special Projects – Business Development Purpose: To develop and maintain unique tourism product offerings that contribute to the sustainability of biodiversity management.


2.1.2 Key strategic objectives achievements Summary of CapeNature Strategic Results and Programme Allocations

STRATEGIC GOAL STATEMENT

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE STATEMENT

1. Securing priority biodiversity and ecosystem services through integrated biodiversity management enabling appropriate climate change response.

1.1 Effective knowledge management informs development and conservation priorities.

KEY MEASURABLE OBJECTIVES GOAL

CURRENT PROGRAMME

1.1.1 To provide biodiversity input into Western Cape Provincial land use planning and decision making.

2: Planning and Operations

1.1.2 To manage biodiversity knowledge to ensure effective conservation management. 1.2 Implementation of the Western Cape Biodiversity Plan and Protected Area Expansion Strategy to secure priority biodiversity.

1.2.1 To ensure rigorous conservation planning in the Western Cape within the national legislative framework.

2: Planning and Operations

1.2.2 To implement measures to ensure resilience and persistence of biodiversity of the Province in the light of anticipated climate changes. 1.2.3 A network of Protected Areas with appropriate status and effectively managed by CapeNature (incorporating terrestrial, freshwater and marine).

1.3 Sustained conservation management in priority catchments maintains ecosystem services.

1.3.1 To ensure the implementation of effective conservation management interventions in the Western Cape.

2: Planning and Operations

1.4 Legal and wildlife support services and biodiversity crime prevention result in the protection and sustainable use of biodiversity.

1.4.1 To enhance biodiversity protection and conservation in areas outside the formal CapeNature Protected Area Network.

2: Planning and Operations

2. Contributing to the reconstruction and development of social capital.

2.1 Facilitate youth and community development through environmental awareness and assist in developing the knowledge, skills, values and commitment necessary to achieve sustainable development.

2.1.1 To provide learners with access to a quality environmental education programme.

2: Planning and Operations

3. Promoting socioeconomic development through the conservation economy.

3.1 Develop and implement strategies to facilitate equitable access to and participation in the conservation economy through a People and Parks Programme.

3.1.1 To provide access to work opportunities through implementation of conservation and tourism management services.

2.1.2 To provide experiential service learning opportunities in the conservation sector.

2: Planning and Operations

3.1.2 To improve access to protected areas for sustainable traditional, cultural and spiritual uses. 3.1.3 To enhance opportunities for stakeholder participation in protected area management. 3.1.4 To capacity.

grow

and

effectively

deploy

volunteer

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STRATEGIC GOAL STATEMENT

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE STATEMENT

4. Ensuring an efficient and effective institution.

4.1 Increased sustainable revenue is attained through enhanced tourism product development and the development of a system for payment of ecosystem services.

KEY MEASURABLE OBJECTIVES GOAL

CURRENT PROGRAMME

4.1.1 Create awareness/market the tourism products 3: Business within our portfolio to domestic and international vis- Development itors, and contributing positively towards sustainable tourism. 4.1.2 To establish partnerships that will improve corporate and social investment into our reserves and by so doing positively impacting on visitor expectations and the livelihoods of local communities. 4.1.3 Develop sustainable tourism products while providing access to both the domestic and international market. 4.1.4 To establish a system for payment for ecosystem services management as a sustainable basis for income 1: Administration in the MTEF allocation.

4.2. Develop policies, systems and processes to support effective service delivery.

4.2.1 Support strategic decision making to ensure good 1: Administration corporate governance. 4.2.2 Ensure all CapeNature’s activities are executed within a framework of sound controls and the highest standards of corporate governance. 4.2.3 To develop and implement an effective and 3: Business efficient communication strategy for all internal and ex- Development ternal stakeholders and role-players. 4.2.4 To implement Information Technology and Systems that are compliant and support the core business of the organisation.

4.3. Institution building enables a supportive working environment.

4.3.1 To provide a professional human resource management support service.

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

2.1.3 Overview of the service delivery environment for 2010/11 The service delivery during the reporting year has been fairly efficient and effective given the stable platform established within the organisation. There has been a systematic approach in this phase of the organisation’s development to adopt a customer focus, increase efficiency and effectiveness, improving service delivery and reducing complexity at all levels of organisation. This systematic approach has been embedded across the organisation and encourages employees to serve all our clients more efficiently with the highest impact, in line with our growing mandate.

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1: Administration

Two key resource considerations include: • Securing the financial resources to implement the new organisational structure, including the restructuring of support services to better service the core business delivery. Emerging from a Board Strategic Session where the Board has adopted the Modernisation Proposal of the Organisational Development Unit of the Department of the Premier with certain recommendations for incorporation into the macro-structure, the CEO and Executive Team have been assigned the responsibility to recommend a phased implementation plan to the Board and to give effect to the new organisational structure. This should include a detailed financial plan taking into account both personnel and operational expenditure.


It is envisaged that once adopted by the Board, this proposal will be submitted to Provincial Treasury via the Department of Environmental Affairs and Development Planning for our Minister’s support. • Funding of the implementation of financial management systems as the accounting function is currently outsourced, and to effect the transition to CapeNature from the service provider will require an investment in various financial management systems. Currently CapeNature also uses a manual purchase order system and this is a challenge with respect to enforcing internal controls, improving service delivery and the timeous provision of monthly and quarterly reports. Appropriate structure, staffing and skills to implement a growing mandate are the overarching resource considerations for the next five years. A Business Case Study for CapeNature has highlighted the mismatch between the mandate and the current capacity. The implementation of a proposed new organisational structure will be motivated through the Executive Authority, however if supported, this is likely to be phased in over the next five years. Given that the implementation will be phased in, CapeNature is committed to strengthen the operational capacity at an implementation level to ensure that there are sufficient resources allocated to address the areas where the pressure is greatest. These have already been identified as being the conservation and biodiversity matters directly linked to our core mandate. The implementation and management of stewardship agreements, a key strategy for expansion of the protected area network on privately-owned land will require specific attention, especially in the context of the implementation of rates policies as a major fiscal incentive. The maintenance of tourism infrastructure still remains a challenge within CapeNature. Despite the Provincial Department of Transport and Public Works securing some funding a large part of the funding is utilised for maintenance of operational infrastructure such as staff housing, office accommodation, stores, reservoirs, electricity provision (generators or solar) etc. with the occasional tourism maintenance project taking place dependant on the availability of funds. The general maintenance needs of CapeNature is always significantly more than the funding allocated by the Department of Transport and Public Works, thus the maintenance schedule consistently needs to be reprioritised. Funding for routine road maintenance continues to be a major challenge with many access and management roads currently in a poor state. These poorly maintained roads impact greatly on CapeNature’s ability to effectively manage the

reserve from a day-to-day operations perspective and also impacts negatively on tourism products and visitor numbers. During the 2011/12 financial year CapeNature will embark on developing User Asset Management Plans (U-AMP’s) for all immovable assets (including roads) and submit this plan to Provincial Treasury for possible funding. During the 2009/10 financial year the IT component was subject to an internal audit by Deloitte. The audit report highlighted 18 areas of concern of which 14 areas were highlighted as unacceptable significant risks. During the 2010/11 financial year 15 of the risk areas were mitigated, the remaining 3 required significant financial allocations in order for it to be addressed as it mainly involved the replacement or upgrading of IT infrastructure, software and networks. CapeNature submitted a detailed proposal to Provincial Treasury and highlighted the significant impact that these risk areas will have if it’s not addressed over the short to medium term. Based on this Provincial Treasury allocated R9 422 000 over a three year period starting from the 2011/12 financial year. Changes in the external funding environment also need to be noted. The conclusion of the Global Environment Facility Conservation and Sustainable Use of Biodiversity Project under the C.A.P.E. Programme has the potential consequence that the significant gains of the project will not be sustained if the capacity created cannot be retained. Further, external funding to drive youth development has not yet been secured for the next Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) period, notwithstanding its prioritisation by national and provincial government. 2.1.4 Overview of the organisational environment for 2010/11 The organisational environment has been fairly stable throughout the reporting year with no strike actions or major human resource disruptions occurring. The movement to an ERP solution has impacted on the changing environment, but has been effectively managed through a corporate change management strategy, providing a clear communication plan and platform to ensure a smooth transition from an outsourced service provider to implement the solution within the new financial year.

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2.1.5 Key policy developments and legislative changes The changes to relevant policies or legislation that have effected the operations of CapeNature during the period under review are as follows: 1. Baboon feeding amendment to Regulations (955/1975). 2. Game Translocation and Utilization Policy for the Western Cape 3. Delegation of (NEM:BA) CITES Regulations Financial impacts: The fees that CapeNature currently charges for CITES permits and annual registrations is higher than the fees listed in CITES Regulations. If CapeNature is required to charge the new (lower) fee it will have notable financial impact on the income forecast figures for the 2011/2012 financial year.

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Staffing impacts: The NEMA suite of legislation and concomitant Regulations may only be implemented, administered, policed and enforced by an officer appointed as an Environmental Management Inspectors (EMI) in terms of sections 31B or 31C of the NEMA. In the CITES Regulations only an “enforcement officer” (an EMI, as defined) can perform certain duties (i.e. permit cancellation and export endorsement), the inspection of shipments and enforcement (including the issuing of fines). CapeNature currently only has two employees appointed as EMIs. All staff involved in conservation services, enforcement and certain programme managers will ultimately have to successfully complete

15

the EMI course (which is a three-week full time course at R14 000 per person) and be appointed as an EMI. Once staff have been appointed as EMIs a number of new inspections and reports will have to be performed. Enforcement impacts: The CITES Regulations, offences and penalties section, allow enforcement authorities to levy much higher penalties (fines) than what is allowed in terms of our Ordinance. For example, the CITES Regulations allow for fines as high as R10 million (the maximum fine listed in our Ordinance is R100 000). 4. National Veld and Forest Fire Act (Act No. 101 of 1998) All Veld fires within the country are regulated by the National Veld and Forest Fire Act (Act No. 101 of 1998). This Act places the responsibility for Fire Management squarely and exclusively on the landowner, (which includes land tenants or Managers) of land. Chapter 2 of the Act allows for the registration of Fire Protection Associations (FPA’s) which places certain powers and rights on landowners to enable them to manage fire effectively in joint association with other landowners. CapeNature is therefore compelled in terms of Chapter 2 of the Act to join any FPA that is established along its borders. Registered FPA’s collect fees from members, which they use to manage fires within the jurisdiction of the FPA. Fees are based on the respective areas that are protected and are fixed on a per hectare basis.The payment of these fees is becoming an increasing liability for CapeNature as more and more FPA’s are becoming established in the Province.


2.2 Programme Performance

Sub-Programme 1.1: Office of the CEO

The activities of CapeNature are organised in the following programmes:

Purpose: The Office of the CEO is primarily responsible for the execution of the core mandate, responsibility and function of the Western Cape Nature Conservation Board, on behalf of the Accounting Authority.

Programme 1: Administration Programme 2: Planning and Operations Programme 3: Business Development

Programme 1: Administration Purpose: To ensure that good corporate governance is achieved and that efficient and effective services are delivered to the organisation with regards to finances and corporate services and all aspects of human resource management.

This is accomplished through the provision of strategic leadership, focus and direction in support of realising its vision, mission, strategic goals and objectives and ensuring adequate support to the Accounting Authority to enable it to fulfill its mandate. Strategic Objectives: 4.2. Develop effective policies, systems and processes to support the core business and enhance service delivery.

Service Delivery Objectives and Indicators:

Sub-programme 1.1: Office of the CEO Strategic Objective

4.2. Develop effective policies, systems and processes to support the core business and enhance service delivery.

Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target

Reason for Variance

Target

Actual

Number of Board meetings versus planned annual schedule (n).

One Board meeting and one Board Committee meeting per quarter for six Board Committees.

One Board meeting and one Board Committee meeting per Board Committee held per quarter.

Not Applicable.

Percentage of targets set in the Annual Performance Plan versus completed (%).

100% of all targets set in the Annual Performance plan completed.

The average percentage of targets met in the Annual Performance Plan was 69%.

Capacity and financial challenges impacted on the ability to realise all targets.

Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between DEA&DP and CapeNature.

Signed Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between DEA&DP and CapeNature.

The Co-operation Agreement has been finalised in Quarter 4 but will only be signed in the first quarter of the new financial year.

The Co-operation Agreement has been finalised and will be signed in April 2011.

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The average percentage of targets met

agreed that a co-operative agreement would be more appropriate than an Memorandum of Understanding. The Co-operation Agreement was finalised and will be signed in April 2011.

Each Executive Director, together with their respective components, assessed each target in the Annual Performance Plan to evaluate the average percentage of the target achieved. Where a target was met, it was assigned 100% completion. Where a target was not met the average percentage towards completion was assigned, based on the progress made towards the final completion of the set target. For qualitative performance indicators, the activities set in the Annual Performance Plan, as reported on in the quarterly report, was used to evaluate this progress. It must be stated, however, that this evaluation was subjective. Quantitative performance indicators were measured against actual achievement.

Sub-Programme 1.2: Finance and Administration Services Purpose: The Finance and Administration Services sub-programme is responsible for effective preparation and implementation of a financial plan and budget for the organisation and the judicious application and control of public funds. These include ensuring that accurate financial records are kept and that financial procedures and controls are being adhered to for proper, effective and efficient use and accountability of resources as required by the Public Service Act, 1994 and the Public Finance Management Act, Act No.1 of 1999.

The average of the percentages for all targets in the Annual Performance Plan, as assigned above, was calculated at 69%.

Strategic Objectives: 4.2. Develop effective policies, systems and processes to support the core business and enhance service delivery.

Memorandum of Understanding between DEA&DP and CapeNature On the advice provided by Provincial Legal Services to the CapeNature DEA&DP Liasion Committee, it was Service Delivery Objectives and Indicators:

Sub-programme 1.2: Finance and Administration Services Strategic Objective

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

4.2. Develop effective policies, systems and processes to support the core business and enhance service delivery.

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Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target

Reason for Variance

Target

Actual

Unqualified AuditorGeneral’s Report with a reduction in audit queries.

Unqualified AuditorGeneral’s Report with a reduction in audit queries.

Unqualified Audit Report. When a comparison was conducted between the 2008/2009 and the 2009/2010 audit reports, there were no material audit findings in the 2009/2010 Auditor General’s report, which translates into a 100% reduction in audit queries.

Not Applicable.

Audits conducted according to internal audit coverage plan (%).

100% of audits conducted.

71% of audits conducted according to internal audit coverage plan.

Delays in the audits of fixed assets and the operational reviews of two reserves.

Administration developed.

Administration developed.

The Administration manual is currently being edited for approval at the end April 2011.

Due to the priority focus on the ERP system this detracted capacity to finalise this document.

manual

manual


Sub-programme 1.2: Finance and Administration Services (continued) Strategic Objective

Measure/Indicator

Debtors/Creditors over 120 days reduced (%).

Actual Performance Against Target Target

Actual

Debtors/Creditors over 120 days reduced by 100%.

Debtors above 120 days (amounting to R700 186) represents a 65% reduction compared to March 2010.

Reason for Variance

The collecting of rent and services due from private tenants poses a challenge as we are dealing with communities that cannot afford the payments.

Creditors – the number of suppliers not paid within 30 days have reduced from 42 to 40; a 5% reduction. The amount due to suppliers not paid within 30 days has reduced from R683 958 to R371 629; a reduction of 46%. Implementation of the web-enabled purchase order system.

Implementation of the web-enabled purchase order system.

The system was not implemented due to challenges experienced in the bidding process. However, as a prerequisite to the implementation process, the software was procured on 31 March 2011.

Due to the modernisation process, the tender process only started at the end of quarter three. Implementation of a system normally takes a minimum of three months.

Established fully functional in-house financial management system.

Established fully functional in-house financial management system.

The system was not implemented due to challenges experienced in the bidding process. However, as a prerequisite to the implementation process, the software was procured on 31 March 2011.

Due to the modernisation process, the tender process only started at the end of quarter three. Implementation of a system normally takes a minimum of three months.

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Unqualified Auditor-General’s Report with a reduction in audit queries Internal audits conducted assisted in the delivery of an unqualified audit report that ensures the organisation operates on good governance principles. Audits conducted according to internal audit coverage plan The entity could only undertake the fixed asset and operational reviews at the end of March 2011. The asset register was rebuilt, resulting in a full asset count and verification process. The internal audits conducted assisted management to improve its control environment. Administration Manual The administration manual has been developed and submitted in draft format to the Chief Financial Officer. It will be approved and implemented in the first quarter of the new financial year. The compilation of the administration manual will standardise processes which will assist staff in providing effective service delivery. Debtors and Creditors Reduced The reduction in debtors over 120 days is challenging as there are mainly poor communities living on reserves which impacts the entity’s ability to collect this debt. It remains a challenge to receive invoices timeously from suppliers and therefore the marginal decline in creditor days. Implementation of the web-enabled purchase order system The installation of the in-house financial management system only commenced at the end of quarter two due to the modernisation process. The tender process was concluded at the end of February 2011 after the board approved the successful service provider. The system will be implemented during the second quarter of the 2011/12 financial year.

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Sub-Programme 1.3: Human Resource Management Purpose: Human Resource Management is responsible for developing a culture that unleashes human potential by creating an enabling environment for people development through strategic corporate initiatives that focus on coaching and mentoring, ongoing performance management and proactive workforce practices such as succession planning, recruitment and selection, and sound employee relations. Strategic Objectives: 4.2. Develop effective policies, systems and processes to support the core business and enhance service delivery.

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Sub-programme 1.3: Human Resource Management Strategic Objective

Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target Target

4.3 Institution building enables a supportive working environment.

An approved Institution Building Strategy and Plan.

Institution Building Strategy milestones met.

Actual Four Institution Building communiquĂŠs were circulated in the organisation. One Institution Building Ambassadors workshop was held. No formal Monitoring and Evaluation of the Institution Building Strategy as a whole was conducted.

Employment Equity Plan implemented.

Employment Equity Plan milestones met.

Reason for Variance

The following Employment Equity milestones were achieved: 1) Review of Human Resources employment policies for the integration of employment equity, with draft recommendations for amendments;

Staff availability and other organisational priorities resulted in planned training, meetings and workshops not taking place.

Re-prioritisation of vacant posts prevented the achievement of employment equity numerical goals and targets set.

2) Update of all employee demographic data through facilitated completion of Employment Equity Act 1 forms; and 3) Employment Equity related training for all regional committees. Reviewed CapeNature’s organisational structure and address pay parity issues.

Organisational structure and pay parity partially addressed.

The following were costed and finalised for implementation as at 30 March 2011: Implementation of Resolution 3 of 2009 of the Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council. Agreement on a revised salary structure for employees on salary levels 1 - 12 not covered by an Occupation Specific Dispensation. (Total financial implication R64 837) Implementation of Phase 2 job evaluation (Programme Managers and Communications Manager).

The two month delay in the commencement of the organisational redesign process resulted in this deliverable only being partially completed. The need to reprioritise critical needs in respect of the recommended new organisational structure was an unplanned intervention causing further delays.

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Sub-programme 1.3: Human Resource Management (continued) Strategic Objective

Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target Target

Reason for Variance

Actual

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Financial Implication = R1 145 549. Critical vacancies prioritised at 30 March 2011 = R5 357 496.

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Performance contracts completed versus total number of employees (%).

Performance contracts completed for 100% of employees.

Performance contracts completed for 0% of employees.

Timeous generation of performance contracts was impacted upon by the delay in finalisation of the Service Level Agreement with the service provider and the re-design of the Annual Plan of Operations data capture process on the Performance Management System.

Performance appraisals completed versus total number of employees (%).

Performance appraisals completed for 100% of employees.

Performance appraisals completed for 0% of employees.

The absence of signed performance contracts resulted in no performance appraisals being conducted.

An approved retention, succession planning and talent management strategy developed.

Implementation of rewards foundation.

This target reached.

not

The Reward Foundation Strategy was not implemented due to the delay in completion of the performance contracting and performance appraisal processes.

Percentage of Workplace Skills Plan targets met (%).

100% of Workplace Skills Plan targets met.

50% of Workplace Skills Plan targets met.

Insufficient resources to implement planned training interventions. Over ambitious targets set in relation to existing resources.

Number of new corporate mentorship agreements in place (n).

30 mentorship agreements in place.

20 mentorship ments in place.

Staff movement of mentors and mentees due to dismissals, resignations and retirement and timeous sourcing of external mentors impacted on implementation and conclusion of agreements.

was

agree-


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In a bid to enhance an organisational culture of development, one of the main objectives of the Human Resources Department was the institution building strategy. Focussed and increased efforts enhanced growth and development for people, processes and biodiversity conservation. Initiatives were aimed at creating high impact in the areas of pay parity, people and organisational development and simultaneously embedded a platform to engage, embrace and entrench a performance culture. Institution Building Strategy Institution building interventions across the organisation were planned to further embed the striving for service excellence and a culture of accountability and good corporate governance. Staff availability and organisational priorities impacted on these interventions as not all planned meetings, training and workshops took place. Institution Building strategy milestones were achieved through strengthening the organisation’s governance and policy environment with the review and approval of various strategies and policies. Employment Equity

CapeNature Annual Report Annual 2010/11Report CapeNature

Functioning Employment Equity Committees and the implementation of affirmative action measures as part of the approved Employment Equity Plan laid the foundation for a successful and positive compliance audit by the Department of Labour in June 2010 and February 2011. Achievement of milestones as set in the Employment Equity Plan for 2010 – 2014 was substantially boosted by the strengthening of the policy framework through the revision of the Recruitment and Selection and the Training and Development policies to ensure the integration of employment equity into organisational policy and practices. Not all of the six Regional and one Corporate Employment Equity and Training Committees were able to meet as planned during this reporting period due to staff availability and conflicting operational and organisational priorities. Staff serving on these committees are still required to contribute towards the achievement of operational targets. Despite this challenge, greater awareness and understanding of employment equity as a strategic transformation imperative across the organisation has been achieved. These committees, which are representative of all employees across all occupational categories, serve as a critical link to provide information and feedback to and from all employees. Pay Parity Improvement in conditions of service of staff was achieved through the implementation of pay parity and job evaluation recommendations with a financial implication of R1 145 549. This included the implementation of Resolution 3 of 2009 of the Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council which proposed a revised salary structure for employees on 23


salary levels 1 – 12 not covered by the Occupation Specific Dispensation (OSD) with a financial implication of R 64 837. The creation of 31 Senior Field Ranger posts has contributed to the creation of a career and development path for Field Rangers. Performance Contracts and Appraisals The generation of performance contracts was delayed by the finalisation of the Service Level Agreement with the service provider of the web-based Performance Management System as well as the re-design of the Annual Plan of Operations data capture process on the system. The re-design of the data capture process on the system has enabled greater alignment to organisational goals and ultimately the measurement of performance. The performance contracts completed as reported in Quarter 1 was for 2009/2010. This was used as a means of testing the electronic Performance Management System and the enhancements affected by the re-design process mentioned above. The absence of Performance Contracts due to delays in the data capture process resulted in no performance appraisals being conducted for 2010/2011. Performance appraisal training was conducted to prepare and capacitate staff on the completion of performance assessments in order to further contribute to the embedding of the performance management system and culture. An approved retention, succession planning and talent management strategy developed Delays in the development and capture of performance contracts on the web-based Performance Management System impacted on the implementation of the Rewards Foundation Strategy. The progress made to date however has created the platform for the review and implementation of a Rewards Foundation Strategy that is integrated into an overall Human Resource strategy. Workplace Skills Targets sets for the implementation of the Workplace Skills Plan were not met due to insufficient financial resources to implement planned training interventions. Finalistion of the annual budget has a direct impact on the organisation’s ability to deliver on planned interventions as the budgeting process is only finalised after the skills development planning processes are concluded. A result of this is that any amendments made to the budget have a direct impact on the achievement of the targets committed to in the Annual Performance Plan. The urgency of the need to address training needs across the organisation also resulted in over ambitious targets being set in relation to existing resources.

Mentorship Staff movement of mentors and mentees due to dismissals, resignations and unplanned retirement impacted on the achievement of the target of 30 mentorship agreements. The difficulty in sourcing external mentors also impacted on securing mentorship pairings. This was due to severe workloads of the proposed mentors and the subsequent postponement of concluding formal agreements. Two successful mentorship training sessions were hosted for all mentors and mentees in the organisation. This has contributed positively to the organisational culture with regards to learning, growth and development.

Programme 2: Planning and Operations Purpose: The aim of this programme is to realise strategic biodiversity management and planning objectives on and off protected areas in pursuance of expanding the conservation economy of the Western Cape. Sub-Programme 2.1: Management and Biodiversity Support Purpose: To develop and apply effective knowledge management systems to identify and inform sustainable conservation management and priorities, to expand the protected area network, to facilitate effective wildlife management and crime prevention, youth and community development including environmental awareness and equitable access linked to enhanced participation in the environmental economy. Strategic Objectives: 1.1 Effective knowledge management informs development and conservation priorities. 1.2 Implementation of the Western Cape Biodiversity Plan and Protected Area Expansion Strategy (PAES) secures priority biodiversity. 1.4 Legal and wildlife support services and biodiversity crime prevention results in the protection and sustainable use of biodiversity. 2.1 Facilitate youth and community development through environmental awareness and assist in developing the knowledge, skills, values, and commitment necessary to achieve sustainable development 3.1 Develop and implement strategies to facilitate equitable access to and participation in the conservation economy through a People and Parks Programme. 4.1 Increased sustainable revenue is attained through enhanced tourism product development and the development of a system for payment of ecosystem services. 4.2 Develop effective policies, systems and processes to support the core business and enhance service delivery.

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Service Delivery Objectives and Indicators per objective:

Sub-programme 2.1: Management and Biodiversity Support Strategic Objective

Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target Target

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

1.1. Effective knowledge management informs development and conservation priorities.

Actual

Total number of comments submitted on land-use forward planning (n) and the percentage of comments submitted versus requests received (%).

700 comments provided on Environmental Impact Assessments, other land-use applications and land-use forward planning requests (Spatial Development Frameworks or Integrated Development Plans or provincial requests). 100% applications responded to versus received.

A total of 624 comments on land-use forward planning and one Spatial Development Frameworks or Integrated Development Plan were submitted. This represents a response rate of 100%.

The number of applications, and the moratorium placed on mining and prospecting applications may have led to fewer than the expected number of applications being processed.

Number of biodiversity knowledge management systems updated (n).

Four biodiversity knowledge management systems up to date.

Four biodiversity knowledge management systems up to date. A total of 7127 records were added to the State of Biodiversity database, received and processed 34 complete fire reports and the Land-use and Metadata databases are up to date.

Not Applicable.

Number of new biodiversity management systems developed (n).

Develop one new biodiversity knowledge management database: Land-use database.

The Land-use database is functional at Jonkershoek and George offices but is not yet centralised or web-based.

Not Applicable.

During the reporting period, Scientific Services provided specialist scientific decision support towards sound conservation management in the Western Cape. This took the form of inputs into conservation policy development, undertaking biodiversity research and monitoring, promoting and facilitating knowledge management, maintenance and installation of biodiversity information systems and providing specialist input into land-use planning and decisionmaking. Land-use forward planning A total of 624 responses to development applications were provided by the land-use advice unit. The level of input provided is still less than ideal due to the

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Reason for Variance

limited capacity available to spend on researching and evaluating each application. Comments were provided on one forward-planning initiative namely the Winelands Spatial Development Framework. Two vital training interventions took place to enhance knowledge and skills of case officers at DEA&DP and CapeNature (Conservation Services and field staff) that have to deal with conservation action and development on the ground. Although this represents an amount which is slightly less than the target, the number of applications the unit responds to is primarily driven by the number of applications received/made. The moratorium placed on mining and prospecting applications may have led to fewer than the expected number of applications.


Knowledge management systems updated The CapeNature Biodiversity Database, Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Database, Fire Database and Land-use Database were maintained. The Invasive Alien Plant mapping on reserves was finalised and CapeNature now has updated information on the levels of invasive alien plant infestations in its nature reserves. A total of 7 127 biodiversity records have

Once again, a highly successful annual GIS installation of 152 desktop and laptop computers and training of 41 staff on the use of GIS was conducted during the year. This is to ensure that conservation managers and their field staff, as well as conservation services staff, scientists, technicians and managers are well-equipped and trained to use this appropriate and highly effective conservation decision support tool.

Veld Age Map

been added to the biodiversity database resulting in a more complete biological record for protected areas. The 34 fire records added to the fire database have ensured that a complete veld age analysis of the entire region could be generated. This analysis is the major informant of fire ecological management during the fire season. (See veld age map above).

New knowledge management systems developed The Land-use Database was developed and collects data from all Land-use Advice staff but has not yet been migrated to a web-based application due to the delay in filling the Database Developer position.

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Sub-programme 2.1: Management and Biodiversity Support (continued) Strategic Objective

Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target Target

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

1.2. Implementation of the Western Cape Biodiversity Plan and Protected Area Expansion Strategy (PAES) secures priority biodiversity.

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Reason for Variance

Actual

Number of new policy instrument milestones met (n).

Update Provincial Conservation Plan with current data and produce a final plan.

Draft compilation of Fine scale plans, Biodiversity Sector Plans, CapeNature’s Integrated Biodiversity Layer, Conservation Action Priority Map and Western Cape Protected Area Expansion Strategy has been completed but the final Updated Provincial Conservation Plan is not yet finalised or available for distribution.

The lack of a dedicated and full-time Conservation Planner prevented the development of a single, consistent conservation plan for the entire province.  In its place is a draft biodiversity framework.

Number of Biodiversity Corridors refined (n).

One Biodiversity Corridor refined using relevant spatial products.

One (Gouritz) Biodiversity Corridor refined.

Not Applicable.

Existing policy instruments reviewed/ amended (n).

Finalise the Corridor Policy and compile an implementation strategy.

The Corridor Policy was not finalised however the draft has been completed and will be finalised in the new financial year.

The timing of project funding delayed the appointment of consultants which resulted in the Corridor Policy and implementation policy not being finalised.

Number of new stewardship sites established and the number of sites maintained (n).

14 new stewardship sites established.

The total of 14 new stewardship sites was not attained.

The variance was due to an under capacitated Law Component within CapeNature. This resulted in a delay in the legal processing of contracts. This has however now been remedied by the Stewardship Programme having sourced donor funding to place an additional post inside of the Law Component for three years to deal exclusively with Stewardship Contracts.

Number of protected area management plans completed and implemented (n).

Six terrestrial protected area management plans completed, aligned with the Protected Areas Act and implemented.

Four new Biodiversity Agreements were signed as well as three new Contract Nature Reserves, bringing the total to seven.

No protected area management plans were completed.

Emphasis has been placed on developing integrated management planningprocesses,which facilitate the monitoring of the organisation’s progress towards achieving outputs through the strategic implementation


Sub-programme 2.1: Management and Biodiversity Support (continued) Strategic Objective

Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target Target

Reason for Variance

Actual frameworks in Protected Area Management Plans, through conducting standardised Objective Setting and Prioritisation sessions. In addition, the focus has been on ensuring that the organisation is compliant with Legislation.

The development of landscape level conservation initiatives through biodiversity corridors, world heritage sites, biosphere reserve programmes and stewardship sites is a priority as it is key in creating connectivity in fragmented landscapes. This initiative focuses on linking formally protected areas with areas of high biodiversity value, which are not formally conserved. A number of partnerships are required if this programme is to function optimally. Provincial Conservation Plan A major achievement in this regard includes the finalisation of biodiversity sector plans and associated handbooks for the Matzikama, Cederberg, Saldanha Bay, Bergrivier, Witzenberg, Breede Valley, Langeberg, Hessequa and Mossel Bay Municipalities. These sector plans will now find their way into local municipal and provincial land-use forward planning and decisionmaking and will contribute significantly towards a sustainable environment and resilience against expected climate change. The lack of a dedicated full-time Conservation Planner prevented the development of a single, consistent conservation plan for the entire province; however a draft biodiversity framework has been completed. Biodiversity Corridors refined The Gouritz Corridor was refined. The close down for the Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Development grant was a priority. Two MoUs have been reviewed namely the Eden to Addo Corridor and the draft agreement between the different government departments regarding the Sandveld. Two funding proposals were submitted, one is a joint initiative with Table Mountain Fund to further implement the Sandveld Core Corridor within the Greater Cederberg Biodiversity Corridor. The other was completed and submitted to DEA for the Global Environmental Facility grant.

Corridor Policy The appointment of a consultant to undertake the Corridor Policy development work was delayed due to a lack of funding (revision of project proposal). This resulted in the shift of the majority of the deliverables to later in the financial year. The completion of the Corridor Policy and Implementation Strategy is important as it will provide guidance in terms of the role that landscape corridors play in conserving larger tracts of land. It will provide the opportunity to create connectivity in fragmented landscapes in line with National Outcome 10 and Provincial Strategic Objective 7 Policy Priority 4. The Policy and Implementation Strategy will also guide the role that corridors can play as a climate change adaptation strategy to support livelihoods in agricultural landscapes. Stewardship Biodiversity Stewardship is the practice of effectively managing biodiversity outside the existing statemanaged Protected Area system. This is achieved by placing the responsibility in the hands of the private landowners to conserve biodiversity on their own land through a variety of contractual agreements. Entrenching Biodiversity Stewardship as a core strategy is vital due to the fact that 80% of conservation-worthy biodiversity is located on private land in the Western Cape. Biodiversity Stewardship is widely regarded as one of the most cost-effective and feasible mechanisms for protecting important natural systems across the world. CapeNature’s investment in Biodiversity Stewardship is of paramount importance as the return on this investment will be exponential in the long term. This remains a non-negotiable option for CapeNature given its limited resources and the alternative of exorbitant land costs.

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A total of seven stewardship sites were concluded. Three of these sites are Nature Reserves contributing 1 484.43 hectares to the Protected Area Network. The other four sites are Biodiversity Agreements contributing 150.04 hectares towards the improved management of the conservation landscape. The total hectares concluded are thus 1 634.47 hectares. A further 33 Conservation Area Agreements were concluded. These agreements do not have formal conservation status but contribute to the improved ecological management of the landscape. Audits were conducted by Conservation Services staff on the existing 57 Stewardship sites. A further objective of the Stewardship Programme was the completion and submission to the DEA of the CapeNature Protected Area Expansion Strategy (PAES). The Strategy provides for the establishment of additional protected areas in the most threatened and under-conserved habitats in the Western Cape. This was successfully completed in-house without having to appoint consultants as previously planned, which resulted in a product that provides an excellent grasp of operating mechanisms and capacity constraints. The PAES aligned to the concepts and goals of the 2008 National Protected Area Expansion Strategy (NPAES) but identified a few different spatial priorities. All identified sites were ideal anchor locations for future consolidation of priority clusters, or contributed to consolidation of existing priority sites. Every site was identified to provide for ecological persistence and most are part of broader climate change adaptation corridors. Crucially, for the first time, sites account for the unpredictable nature of achieving protected area targets in a privately-owned landscape and are explicitly chosen so that even if no further adjacent sites can be protected, every individual site still represents an excellent investment in biodiversity conservation. As part of the PAES the Conservation Action Priority map for the Province was updated and a five year spatial plan extracted of the top priority sites for expansion in the Province. This year CapeNature, along with its partners, managed to start work on two key areas identified in the PAES, namely:

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Riverlands – Pella – Bokbaai A lowland corridor, incorporating the Mamre Hills, was selected for the high number of local endemics and threatened plant species. The corridor is anchored by Pella and Riverlands Nature Reserves, both managed by CapeNature. The ability to initiate expansion work in this area is a major achievement as there was no additional capacity to start negotiations in the area or provide

29

extension services. The City of Cape Town partnership with the Wilderness Foundation provided negotiators. CapeNature committed to maintain these sites, while WWF-SA and the Cape West Coast Biosphere Reserve joined the partnership to ensure expansion in this area became a reality. Rûens Silcrete Hills – De Hoop Vlei The Rûens, located north west of De Hoop Nature Reserve, hosts the largest intact piece of lowland Eastern Rûens Shale Renosterveld, a critically endangered veld type. The node has been identified as one of WWF/Table Mountain Fund’s core climate change corridors and is part of the CapeNature Protected Area Expansion and Stewardship plan. The compilation of a business plan between the partners outlines how the land will be conserved through land acquisition and stewardship. Negotiations are currently underway with landowners to purchase the biggest core, set to become part of the De Hoop Nature Reserve. This expansion is only possible due to partnerships. Protected Area Management Plans Management authorities, assigned by the Minister of Environmental Affairs and Development Planning in terms of section 38 of the National Environmental Management: Protected Areas Act, 2003 are required, in terms of section 39, to submit a management plan to the Minister for approval within 12 months of the assignment. The purpose of a management plan, in this Act, is to guide the development and management of the protected area (park or reserve) in such a way that it meets the “desired state” of the area. As all development in, and management of, a protected area is dependant on the capacity of the management authority to do so, the management plan must show and be clear on what resources are required for each part of the plan. In terms of section 41 (2) of the Act, a management plan must contain at least: • the terms and conditions of any applicable biodiversity management plan; • a coordinated policy framework; • such planning measures, controls and performance criteria as may be prescribed; • a programme for the implementation of the plan and its costing; • procedures for public participation by the owner (if applicable), any local community or other interested party; appropriate, the implementation of • where community based natural resource management; • a zoning of the area, indicating what activities may take place in different sections of the area, and the conservation objectives of those sections.


Over the past year, emphasis has been placed on developing integrated management planning processes. These facilitate the monitoring of the organisation’s progress towards achieving outputs through the strategic implementation frameworks in Protected Area Management Plans. This was achieved by conducting standardised Objective Setting and Prioritisation sessions. In addition, the focus has been on ensuring that the organisation is compliant with Legislation, in terms of the NEMA, NEM: BA and NEM: PAA, through the development and dissemination of applicable processes. This has resulted in a solid foundation to ensure progress on completing protected area management plans in the 2011/2012 financial year. Marine Protected Areas, Islands and Estuaries CapeNature have been managing Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and Off Shore Islands that are located in close proximity to our terrestrial nature reserves for the last twenty years. Originally, this was an unfunded management mandate, delegated down from Marine and Coastal Management (MCM) now Oceans and Coast (O&C) DEA. It is however only recently that CapeNature received funding to manage these areas from O&C. Formal contracts have now been signed with O&C to implement specific management interventions. The mission of this programme is to contribute to the effective conservation of national marine, island and estuary priorities, according to our mandate and provide ecosystem goods and services, while ensuring no nett loss of biodiversity through continual improvement of management effectiveness, legal protection, research, appropriate sustainable utilisation, awareness and capacity in association with partners. A highlight was the appointment of a dedicated programme manager to ensure a well-structured and focused programme. Existing contracts with DEA Oceans and Coasts were evaluated and funding for MPAs, Islands and Estuaries were all increased. This increase in funding will facilitate increased capacity (staff and equipment) required to deliver on the contractual agreements.

30


Sub-programme 2.1: Management and Biodiversity Support (continued) Strategic Objective

Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target Target

1.4 Legal and wildlife support services and biodiversity crime prevention results in the protection and sustainable use of biodiversity.

Number of biodiversity crime cases where the verdict is guilty (n).

Reason for Variance

Actual

Four biodiversity crime cases CapeNature is involved in are finalised with a 100% success rate.

17 Ordinance cases registered; 11 under investigation or in the court process and six finalised. Eight Marine Living Resources Act cases registered and pending. 21 Ordinance J534s issued and 12 paid. One Provincial Notice J534 issued, but withdrawn. 38 Marine Living Resources Act J534s issued and 12 paid. Two National Forest Act J534 issued and pending.

Not Applicable.

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Five court cases took place with a total of 15 days spent in court. Two of these cases were finalised. The remaining three cases are pending due to court dates being postponed to dates in the new financial year. Number of awareness raising interventions regarding the application of a holistic approach to damage-causing wildlife (n).

Conduct ten awareness raising interventions regarding applying a holistic approach to damagecausing wildlife.

Eight awareness raising interventions regarding the application of a holistic approach to damagecausing wildlife were conducted.

Not all awareness initiatives could be conducted due to the strategic priority shift in focus on determining the effectiveness of lethal control methods versus nonlethal methods of managing damage causing animals.

Number of biodiversity permits issued and percentage applications processed versus received (n).

4 000 biodiversity administration permit applications received and 100% processed.

4 270 biodiversity administration permit applications received and 100% processed.

Not Applicable.

Biodiversity Crime Cases Environmental crime remains an enormous threat to biodiversity and CapeNature’s Biodiversity Crime Unit’s main objective was to decrease ecological crime. One target was the finalisation of cases with a 100% success rate. During the period under review, the Biodiversity Crime Unit was directly responsible for the registration of five 31

criminal cases. Two have successfully been concluded in court and the remaining three cases are in process. One case in particular, involving the illegal possession of 15 rhinoceros horns with a total weight of 38.14kg and a street value of R2 860 500, has been investigated. Two individuals involved are well known role-players in the illegal rhino horn trade in South Africa and closer examination into the origin of the rhino horns have shown links to previous poaching cases.


with organised agriculture (Agri Western Cape) on the sustainable management of damage causing animals in line with our holistic principles. The Minister of Environmental Affairs and Development Planning has called on CapeNature to establish a Task Team to investigate the effectiveness of lethal control methods versus non-lethal methods of managing damage causing animals. This task team has been established, a meeting has been held and the ground work to collect the required information for the Minister’s report has begun. The report must be finalised by end October 2011. Due to this shift in focus, not all planned awareness raising initiatives took place.

Left: Paul Gildenhuys: Programme Manager: BCU Right: Mr. Anton Bredell: Minister of Environmental Affairs and Development Planning

Of the remaining nine criminal cases registered in terms of the Nature Conservation Ordinance, the Biodiversity Crime Unit has to some extent been involved in the investigation of four cases. These cases formed part of capacity-building opportunities for the Area staff involved. CapeNature personnel, for contraventions of the Marine Living Resources Act and its associated regulations, have registered an additional eight cases. Efforts by the DEA National office have filtered down to the Western Cape with SAPS Organised Crime Units being tasked to investigate all biodiversity cases. This decision ensured that BCU had access to experienced investigators and State Prosecutors (most often advocates from the National Prosecuting Authority. This resulted in an increase in the effectiveness and efficiency of biodiversity investigations. Spearheaded by the Department of Priority Crime Investigations (Hawks) and Interpol, Operation Ramp is an international initiative aimed at investigating the scale of reptile trade. The BCU and Conservation Services personnel from various areas accompanied the Hawks and Interpol on various investigative inspections. Awareness raising interventions regarding the application of a holistic approach to damagecausing wildlife Human activity continues to threaten the world’s wildlife. The pressures of development, commercial exploitation, illegal trade in fauna and flora, sport and a growing human population, negatively impact on the wildlife of the Western Cape. The Protocol for the Management of Damage Causing Animals was drafted through regular meetings with Agri Western Cape before the final draft was circulated for comment within the industry. The Draft National Norms and Standards on Damage Causing Animals was compiled based on the National Norms and Standards which needed to be finalised to ensure alignment to the National document. This included compiling a protocol

Game Translocation and Utilization Policy for the Western Cape The Game Translocation and Utilization Policy for the Western Cape was finalised through negotiations with interested and effected parties via the Game Forum. The Policy was signed on 24 January 2011 by the Board and an Implementation Plan was drafted. The Policy and draft Implementation Plan was presented to the Game Forum and to Conservation Services through the Conservation Services Forum within CapeNature. Biodiversity permits issued Law Support Services offer legal advice to all departments and programmes within CapeNature. This includes protecting the interests of the organisation as well as assisting external stakeholders in meeting legal needs in terms of permit applications and issuing ordinance permits. The target of issuing 4 000 ordinance permits was exceeded by 270 permits. An amendment to the Regulations regarding the feeding of baboons was approved and Gazetted in December 2010, rendering it an offence to feed baboons on/in any built up area or public space in the entire Western Cape Province. The consultative process preceding the drafting of the annual sport hunting notice for the Western Cape Province was completed and the hunting notice was published in the Provincial Gazette earlier than in preceding years. The Nationally required CITES Annual Report and Hunting Industry Report was submitted accurately and timeously to the DEA. A 48-hour turn-around period for the processing of game applications, related to the five common species in the Western Cape Province, was implemented. For the 2010 game season 78 game applications were successfully processed within the required timeframe. Internal capacity building took place, capacitating newly appointed conservation services staff on legislation and the permitting system. 32


Sub-programme 2.1: Management and Biodiversity Support (continued) Strategic Objective

2.1. Facilitate youth and community development through environmental awareness and assist in developing the knowledge, skills, values, and commitment necessary to achieve sustainable development.

Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target

Reason for Variance

Target

Actual

Number of learners provided with environmental education opportunities (n).

20 000 learners provided with environmental education opportunities.

22 003 learners provided with environmental education opportunities.

Not Applicable.

Number of National Youth Service Programmes (NYSP) (n).

Two NYSPs run according to plan (subject to funding).

Target was not met due to lack of allocated funds. All funding efforts (two) for NYSP to date were unsuccessful.

Target was not met due to lack of allocated funds. All funding efforts (two) for NYSP to date were unsuccessful.

Number of National Youth Service Programme (NYSP) participants versus planned (n).

A total of 48 YSP participants. (subject to funding).

Target was not met due to lack of allocated funds. All funding efforts (two) for NYSP to date were unsuccessful.

Target was not met due to lack of allocated funds. All funding efforts (two) for NYSP to date were unsuccessful.

Percentage of NYSP graduates securing jobs in conservation within the first year of leaving the programme (%).

80% of NYSP graduates secure jobs in conservation within the first year of leaving the programme.

81% of the 2008/2009 NYSP graduates secured jobs in conservation within the first year of leaving the programme.

Not Applicable.

The strategic objective of the Youth Development Programme is to facilitate youth and community development through environmental awareness raising initiatives. This includes assisting in developing the knowledge, skills, values and commitment necessary to achieve sustainable development.

Environmental education Operational staff in the different areas implemented a host of environmental education (EE) interventions ranging from environmental day celebrations to formal EE programmes on reserves. A total of 22 003 learners were provided with EE during 98 excursions. Of these, a total of 6 814 learners were granted access to CapeNature nature reserves for EE purposes, the remainder took place off-reserve.

Environmental education provided to the youth

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Sum of Ages 0-13

Sum of Ages 14-18

Sum of Ages 18-25

Sum of Total

Boland

1 273

1 566

157

2 996

BreedeBerg

3 294

42

77

3 413

Cape Metro

709

151

16

876

Garden Route

3 679

391

40

4 110

Karoo

2 645

233

54

2 932

Langeberg

2 050

2 432

118

4 600

564

488

192

1 244

1 389

284

159

1 832

15 603

5 587

813

22 003

North West Overberg Grand Total 33


National Youth Services Programme A lack of sufficient operational funding was again the single biggest challenge that seriously hampered the implementation of any high impact youth development projects. The National Youth Service Programme in conservation could not be implemented in two centres as forecasted in the Annual Performance Plan. This was as a result of the lack of an operational budget and the lack of success in securing donor funding for this capacity building programme. Funding proposals were submitted to DEA&DP and Department of Social Development. Other Youth Development and Awareness Initiatives LEAD teacher programme: The aim of this teacher’s conference was to offer a unique opportunity for teachers and other stakeholders to engage in environmental issues such as invasive alien plant management, water-related issues, climate change mitigation and adaption, biodiversity and integrated waste management, in an environment that is conducive to learning. A total of 130 teachers participated in the National Teachers’ Conference and the aims and objectives of the Conference were met by focusing on a holistic approach in dealing with environmental issues that impact our environment. Pilot EE course: Two staff members successfully completed the pilot EE Lead teacher short course at Stellenbosch University and both received certificates and achieved excellent results. 3 year MoU with Outward Bound: A MoU with Outward Bound South Africa was extended for a further three years. This agreement is for the implementation of programmes, within CapeNature reserves, that contribute to developing leadership, environmental literacy and awareness and promotes the principles of sustainable livelihoods. Provincial Youth Safety Ambassadors Programme: The overarching goal of this new initiative is to unlock the leadership potential of youth in the province. The aim and purpose is to identify youth with leadership potential among learners going into grade 10. Grade 10 – 12 youths from around the province were invited to embark on a three year developmental programme which strives to develop excellence in leadership.

34


Sub-programme 2.1: Management and Biodiversity Support (continued) Strategic Objective

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

3.1. Develop and implement strategies to facilitate equitable access to and participation in the conservation economy through a People and Parks Programme.

35

Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target

Reason for Variance

Target

Actual

Number of person days work created through a range of projects (n).

A total of 262 500 person days work created per year.

200 453 person days work created.

Targets set in the APP are based on draft Annual Plan of Operations these differ from the final approved APOs. For certain contracts work is completed in a shorter timeframe than planned and this will impact on the final person days worked.

Number of job opportunities created (n).

Created 2 625 job opportunities through the implementation of a range of projects.

2 005 job opportunities created through the implementation of a range of projects.

Job opportunities according to the EPWP definition is calculated based on person days therefore is impacted on as referred to above.

Number of persons accessing CapeNature protected areas for cultural, traditional, spiritual, and sustainable harvesting activities (n).

Provide access to protected areas for 1 750 individuals for cultural, traditional, spiritual and sustainable harvesting activities.

Provided access to 944 individuals for cultural, traditional, spiritual and sustainable harvesting activities.

Despite numerous interventions this target was not met.

Number of Protected Area Advisory Committees established (n).

12 new Advisory Committees established.

Three new committees were established during the year.

The delay in the development of sound processes regarding Protected Area Management Plans has resulted in a delay in the establishment of PAAC as these are interrelated.

Number of hours (n).

8 500 volunteer hours worked per annum.

14 658 volunteer hours were worked.

This overachievement may be contributed to factors such as heightened awareness of the contribution volunteers can make, significant contributions of partner volunteer organisations, long term individual volunteers that contribution towards reserve management and improved reporting of volunteer activities throughout the organisation.

volunteer


Sustainable conservation cannot happen without the involvement of local communities. In order to ensure sustainability, communities need to experience the socio-economic benefits of conservation. Job creation, access to protected areas, implementation of the People and Parks Programme are the objectives set out for the reporting period. Person days A total of 200 453 person days work was provided within the organisation, a shortfall of 62 047. Setting targets for person days in the Annual Performance Plan remains a challenge as these targets are set prior to the approval of budgets which impact on the Annual Plan of Operations (including person days). Work scheduled can also be affected by natural causes. Examples include fires burning areas where alien vegetation clearing, firebreaks or block-burns were planned. This

impacts negatively on the person days work planned. Where possible, alternative contracts are generated, which may not produce the same number of person days as planned. Capacity building interventions have taken place to assist staff to improve the calculation of specific norms to complete a planned task. This will improve the accuracy of planning person days required to complete a task. Work opportunities created A total of 2 005 job opportunities were created through the implementation of a range of projects through various programmes and initiatives within the organisation. This is calculated using the Expanded Public Works Programme prescribed method of calculation (person days divided by 100).

Person Days Type of Project

Total Person Days

EPWP

Percentage of Total Persondays

Number of Females

Number of Youth <35 yrs

171 159

85

3 808

6 788

Livelihood

11 885

6

111

215

Services

17 408

9

244

260

200 453

100

4 163

7 263

Grand Total

Access provided A total of 944 people accessed CapeNatureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s protected areas for spiritual, traditional and sustainable harvesting activities.

Access to protected areas for consumptive and non-consumptive purposes Cultural

Number of people in 2009/2010

Number of people in 2010/2011 44

322

Spiritual

315

460

Sustainable Harvesting

400

95

0

67

759

944

Traditional Total

36


Information sessions were held with various stakeholders and CapeNature staff to ensure better understanding of access opportunities to protected areas. These sessions were held in the Gouritz Initiative (May 2010), Overberg Area (October 2010) and Greater Cederberg Biodiversity Corridor (February 2011). Despite these interventions, CapeNature was unable to meet this target. A MoU between CapeNature and Nyabingi Herbal Council was signed in June 2010 regarding access to Jonkershoek Nature Reserve for spiritual purposes.

A total of 14 658 volunteer hours were worked. This overachievement may be due to the following factors: awareness of the contribution 1. Heightened volunteers 2. Significant contributions of partner volunteer organisations such as Volunteer Wildfire Services. 3. Long term individual volunteers that contribution towards reserve management. 4. Better reporting of volunteer activities throughout the organisation. 5. Conservative estimate of volunteer hours worked when target was set.

Protected Area Advisory Committees Three Protected Area Advisory Committees were established for the following Nature reserves: Vrolijkheid, Riverlands and Geelkrans (including Stillbaai MPA). The development of Protected Area management plans needs to be aligned with the NEM:PAA, which requires stakeholder involvement during the preparation phase. Processes to support this, as well as inter-organisational engagement, have been poorly developed and implemented. These processes are necessary to guide and equip organisational liaison officers with a collective statement of intent with which to engage stakeholders to enable the establishment of Protected Area Advisory Committees. Volunteer hours

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

The main objective of the Volunteer Programme is to develop and implement strategies to facilitate the improved participation and access of civil society, by means of a structured voluntary work programme in conservation and related activities of CapeNature. This is achieved by increasing the number of volunteer hours worked in priority conservation activities, thereby strengthening our capacity to fulfill CapeNatureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biodiversity conservation mandate.

37

People and Parks CapeNature pursued and increased efforts to ensure the implementation of the People and Parks Programme, a DEA national initiative established to ensure compliance to Protected Areas Act (Act No. 57 of 2003). This initiative is aimed at promoting sustainable utilisation of protected areas for the benefit of people in a manner which would conserve the ecological character of such areas and promote participation of local communities in the management of protected areas. A number of meetings/conferences sought to engage the community in the management and enjoyment of natural resources. Staff and community representatives participated in three National People and Parks meetings in Pretoria in May, July, August 2010 and March 2011. Another important event was the participation of the Western Cape People and Parks Steering Committee members at the National People and Parks Conference held in Kwazulu-Natal in August 2010. The Programme held three Provincial People and Parks meetings in July, September 2010 and March 2011. The new Provincial People and Parks Steering Committee was elected in July 2010 with three additional areas (Langeberg, Overberg and Breedeberg) coming on board.

Photo credit: Andrew Hagen (VWS)


Sub-programme 2.1: Management and Biodiversity Support (continued) Strategic Objective

Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target Target

4.1. Increased sustainable revenue is attained through enhanced tourism product development and the development of a system for payment of ecosystem services.

The Business Case regarding payment for ecosystem services is developed.

Actual

Develop a Business Case regarding the payment for ecosystem services.

Business case for the payment of ecosystem

Reason for Variance

Due to the fact that CapeNature relied on national processes (which were outside our control) to create the enabling environment for the development of a Business Case regarding payment for ecosystem serves, this output was not fully realised.

Due to the fact that CapeNature relied on national processes (which were outside our control) to create the enabling environment for the development of a Business Case regarding payment for ecosystem serves, this output was not fully realised.

for the Western Cape. Formal discussions were held with Dr. Marais, a Resource Economist from Working for Water regarding international models which may be relevant to the Western Cape. It was decided, in a Strategic Planning session with DEA&DP, to work closely with Objective 7 Working Group (which also deals with water matters relating to National Outcome 10), dealing with water management to address the principle of payment for watershed services.

The business case for the payment of ecosystem services was not realised. Due to the extensive nature of publications in this regard, it was decided to request specific information regarding relevant South African examples which did consider international case studies as a point of departure (they include international literature studies). A sub-committee of the Western Cape Water Reconciliation Study Steering Committee was established to ensure that relevant expertise is mobilised to assist with the process.

A presentation was made to the Western Cape Water Reconciliation Study Steering Committee on a proposal regarding the current National Water Pricing Strategy, with specific emphasis on watershed management and the payment for watershed services (ecosystem services).

Based on discussions with WWF-SA and Table Mountain Fund, it was decided to participate in a national workshop rather than arranging a specific intervention

Sub-programme 2.1: Management and Biodiversity Support (continued) Strategic Objective

Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target Target

4.2. Develop effective policies, systems and processes to support the core business and enhance service delivery.

Number of sites where OHS Worksite Analysis completed (n).

Implement OHS Management Control system.

Four Areas have OHS Worksite Analysis completed.

OHS Management Control System implemented.

Reason for Variance

Actual Target not met.

Capacity constraints have hampered the process.

OHS Management Control System was partially implemented and is currently being rolled out across the organisation.

In order to fully implement the OHS Management Control System a sound platform first had to be developed and implemented, this included appointments of OHS representatives, capacity building and the establishment of OHS committees.

38


Sub-programme 2.1: Management and Biodiversity Support (continued) Strategic Objective

Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target Target

Actual

Percentage of key risks addressed versus identified (%).

50% of key risks addressed.

Ten HIRA were conducted.

Percentage of annual targets set in the Biodiversity Monitoring System (BMS) is met (%).

80% of annual targets set in the Biodiversity Monitoring System are met.

The average percentage of targets met in the Biodiversity Monitoring System was 74%.

Capacity and financial challenges impacted on the ability to realise all targets.

Increasing positive trend in Management Effectiveness Tracking Tool for South Africa (METTSA) scores from previ-

Every CapeNature managed protected area will indicate an upward trend in METT-SA score from previous reports.

No Management Effectiveness Tracking Tool for South Africa (METTSA) assessments took place during this report-

Due to the refinement of the METT-SA tool by DEA it was decided to wait for the updated tool.

Seven worksite inspections were conducted.

ous reporting period.

Capacity and financial challenges impacted on the ability to realise all targets.

ing period. This has been rescheduled for the first quarter of the new financial year.

Worksite Analysis Conducted

Key Risks Addressed

Capacity constraints have hampered the process of conducting the remaining worksite analyses. The appointment of two OHS Officers will enable this process to be resumed and completed.

The percentage risks addressed could not be calculated due to recording systems not being in place. Reporting on quarterly activities are as follows:

OHS Management Control System Implementation OHS Management Control System implementation commenced with ensuring accountability of OHS Role-players (Area Managers, Worksite Managers and OHS Reps) in all Areas through the designation and formalisation of all statutory OHS appointments to ensure compliance with current OHS legislation. A process of capacity building to transfer necessary OHS skills to the OHS Role-players (end-users of the OHS Management Control System) has been initiated. Seven components received Incident Investigation Training and six areas received accredited OHS Rep training.

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Reason for Variance

The OHS Management Control System modules (focusing on Risk Management and Emergency Preparedness and Response) are in the process of being implemented by the OHS Officers. This is achieved through the implementation of a phased process to ensure consistency of application across all CapeNature worksites, and ultimately achieve consistency of compliance with the provisions of the Occupational Health and Safety Act (Act No. 85 of 1993, as amended) and the Regulations which fall within the ambit of this Act. 39

Formal HIRA: A total of ten HIRA were conducted by OHS Officers in consultation with groups to identify key risks. These include hazards identified as posing significant risks and potentially high impact risks. Remedial action plans are compiled which can be generically applied across other worksites with similar risks. Designated persons have been assigned responsibility for implementation of the recommended remedial action plans. OHS Officers will continuously monitor implementation. The success of this HIRA process is often hampered by the availability of full worksite consultative group (e.g. seasonal work activities: fire-fighting). The HIRA processes are ongoing which will allow for review of certain hazards identified. Monthly Worksite Inspections: OHS Reps have been mandated to conduct monthly Worksite Inspections and to submit these reports on a monthly basis to the OHS Worksite Committee for discussion and resolution. Matters which are not resolved at OHS Worksite Committee Level are escalated to the OHS Area Committees for review, and failing resolution at this level, are then escalated to the OHS Corporate Committee.


Biodiversity Monitoring System At a CapeNature DEA&DP Liasion Meeting held on 13 May 2010 it was confirmed that the Biodiversity Monitoring System (BMS) as a reporting system was redundant and that all future reporting will be conducted through the mainstream monitoring and evaluation systems of DEA&DP and CapeNature. The 2009/2010 BMS report was submitted to DEA&DP. This year saw the effective roll-out and active engagement of the BMS at operational level. This was achieved through active engagement at regional meetings on a quarterly basis, with facilitated reporting at area level, through the Ecological Coordinators. The submission of the collated quarterly reporting, within each Area, enabled the successful submissions of various organisational reporting requirements. Management Effectiveness Tracking Tool – South Africa (METT-SA) METT-SA assessments were not conducted due to revision of the tool by DEA. CapeNature actively participated in this process. The previous annual report stated that although METT-SA was designed to track progress at individual management unit level, rather than report on collective performance at organisational level, analyses of the assessment results found that (1) communication, (2) management planning, and (3) effective research and monitoring were commonly represented throughout the assessment results to indicate that strategic attention was required. Much has been achieved in developing corrective actions to address improvements in Management Effectiveness at reserve level in preparation for the assessments scheduled for the 2011/2012 reporting period. These actions included: • Addressing the issues around the averaging of the scores for reporting to MINTECH (Ministerial Technical Committee) by the Executive Director of Operations. • Addressing the discrepancies in the interpretation of the METT-SA questionnaires. • Implementation of strategic management planning sessions with standardised objective setting and prioritisation to support the development of Protected Area Management Plans. 40


Sub-Programme 2.2: Special Projects: Planning and Operations

sustainable use of natural resources in pursuit of the conservation economy.

Purpose: The purpose of this programme is to conserve the unique natural heritage of the Western Cape, to build social capital through people and conservation initiatives, and to promote equitable access to and

Strategic Objectives: 1.3. Sustained conservation management in priority catchments maintains ecosystem services.

Service Delivery Objectives and Indicators per objective:

Sub-programme 2.2: Special Projects: Planning and Operations Strategic Objective

Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target Target

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

1.3 Sustained conservation management in priority catchments maintains ecosystem services.

41

Number of initial and follow-up hectares cleared (n).

Reason for Variance

Actual The target in the APP is set before the final approved budget and annual plan of operations are received from the funder DWA.

Number of hectares cleared according to approved Working for Water Annual Plan of Operations. Initial cleared: 40 000 hectares. Follow-up cleared: 98 000 hectares.

24 130 hectares initial alien vegetation removed.

Alien vegetation removed from priority areas after fire versus planned (%).

317 hectares of invasive alien plants removed from priority areas after fire.

976 hectares alien plants removed.

Not applicable.

Firebreaks (km).

completed

667 kilometres of firebreaks completed.

549 kilometres firebreaks maintained

Not applicable.

Number of block-burns (n).

11 planned block-burns completed.

Six block-burns completed.

The window period to conduct block burns (controlled) is dictated by climatic factors and the availability of partners to conduct the block burns.

Number of wildfires suppressed (n).

Number of wild-fires suppressed as required.

80 wildfires suppressed.

Not applicable.

Roads maintained (km).

227 kilometres of roads maintained.

204 kilometres roads and jeep tracks completed.

The target in the APP is set before the final approved budget and annual plan of operations

Number of fire and invasive alien plant awareness programmes conducted in communities (n).

Fire and Invasive Alien Plant Awareness Programmes conducted in 18 communities.

16 Fire and Invasive Alien Plant Awareness Programmes conducted.

Due to other strategic priorities this target could not be met.

113 506 hectares follow-up alien vegetation removed.


Sub-programme 2.2: Special Projects: Planning and Operations (continued) Strategic Objective

Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target Target

Reason for Variance

Actual

Number of individuals trained in fire-fighting (n).

116 individuals trained in fire-fighting Crew boss, fire boss and Incident Command.

64 individuals trained in fire-fighting.

The shortfall was due to the limited period to train staff, limited to winter months as staff cannot be away on training during fire season and the timeous procurement of accredited service providers.

Number of MoUs signed regarding fire management (n).

Three MoUs signed regarding fire-fighting.

Four MOUs were signed regarding fire-fighting. Three contracts with Aerial fire-fighting Service Providers have been negotiated in association with various partners. The Annual Working on Fire CapeNature Partnership agreement was re-negotiated and signed.

Not applicable.

Revised Fire Fighting Policy and guideline document.

Complete annual revision of Fire Fighting Policy and guidelines document.

The document has been signed off by executive as some nor amendments need to be effected.

Not applicable.

Number of initial and follow up hectares cleared CapeNature is an implementing agent for the Working for Water (WfW) Programme, Department of Water Affairs (DWA), who provides funds for the clearing of alien plants in CapeNature Protected Areas and by so doing provides job opportunities to local communities. The target set in the 2010/2011 Annual Performance Plan (APP) for alien plants cleared, included 40 000

not the mistill

hectares initial and 98 000 hectares follow-up. These figures were calculated from the draft Annual Plan of Operations (APO) submitted to Working for Water, in January 2010. CapeNature is required to submit the final 2010/2011 APP in January 2010 but the final approved budget and Annual Plan of Operations were only received from DWA at the end of March 2010, after the final submission of the APP.

Alien Vegetation cleared

Targets 2010/11

Outcome 10 Target

Funded Target (Original)

Funded Target (Revised)

Actual hectares Cleared

Initial Hectares

40 000

20 050

26 081

24 130

Follow-up Hectares

98 000

76 547

102 698

113 506

42


The target for follow-up hectares alien vegetation cleared was 98 000 hectares compared to a total of 102 698 hectares approved by DWA. A total of 113 506 hectares were cleared. This target was exceeded due to an additional allocation of R3 million being received in October 2010. The target for initial alien vegetation clearing was 40 000 hectares and 26 081 hectares was approved. A total of 24 130 hectares were cleared. The reason for this target not being met was due to the target in the APP being set before the final approved budget and annual plan of operation from the funder DWA. Invasive alien plants removed from priority areas after fire A total of 976 hectares of alien clearing took place in areas after fire with Integrated Catchment Earmarked Allocation funding. Firebreaks completed A target of 667 km of firebreak preparation was projected and 549 km completed therefore 82% of the target was met. One of the management areas could not procure a suitably experienced service provider. An experienced service provider was sourced from another management Area and the contract will be completed in the new financial year. Block-burns completed Only six of the planned 11 block-burns were completed. The reasons for not reaching the targets are numerous but could to some degree be assigned to any, or even all of the following:

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

â&#x20AC;˘ The huge number of fires delayed the activation of the planned block-burns as the area burnt and duration of these fires impacted on resource availability. The window period to conduct controlled burns is dictated by climatic factors and the availability of partners to conduct the controlled burns. â&#x20AC;˘ Only five of the proposed Fire Protection Areas (FPA) has thus far been registered. Once all FPAs are registered in terms of the Veld and Forest Fire Act the responsibility for Fire Management is shared amongst all landowners.

43

â&#x20AC;˘ The Veld and Forest Fire Act allows for the ignition of controlled burns as a protective measure to manage fuel loads and reduce the risk associated with uncontrolled wild veld fires. District Municipalities under the auspices of the Municipality Structures Act take overall responsibility for all veld fires within the District Municipality, which includes all CapeNatures Reserves. The District Municipality Fire Brigade Services operate within the confines of the National Fire Brigade Services Act, which in turn has a more conservative approach to managing fires which is very often in conflict with the National Veld and Forest Fire Act. Trying to conduct controlled burns within the restrictions of both Acts can often delay procedures until the weather is no longer favourable for a controlled burn. Number of wildfires suppressed 80 Wildfires were suppressed. The Boland is renowned for forming the epicentre of the Fynbos Biome where botanists have recorded the highest levels of endemism and diversity for the entire biome. Veld age distribution is currently heavily skewed towards young veld with roughly 90% of the region is younger than four years old. This is the single most critical threat facing the Boland as the negative impact extends beyond biodiversity. Biophysical processes such as the provision of a sustainable flow of high quality water were also affected and the spread of fires has simultaneously stimulated the spread of alien woody plant species such as Hakea, Pinus and Acacia species. A fire in the Boland Mountains recently burnt in excess of 35 000 hectares, which is a record for the region. This was followed a short while later by another fire in the Kogelberg which burnt an additional 20 000 hectares. Large fires also burnt in the Cederberg and Langeberg Mountain Catchment Areas and by comparison, the Fire Management Data Base shows that in the last 15 years, the average fire size has more than doubled.

Photo credit: Andrew Hagen (VWS)


Fire statistics for 2010 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2011 season

Area burnt

No of fires

Area burnt (ha)

250000.0000 200000.0000 150000.0000 100000.0000 50000.0000

2000_11

2000_10

2000_09

2000_08

2000_07

2000_06

2000_05

2000_04

2000_03

2000_02

2000_01

1999_2000

0.0000

Fire seasons

Road maintenance 204 kilometres maintained.

roads

and

jeep

tracks

were

Number of fire and invasive alien plant awareness programmes conducted in communities Pasella, an informative magazine programme aired on SABC, saw CapeNature presenting a showcase on the environmental and recreational value of the Theewaterskloof Dam. The programme highlighted

the benefits of keeping the catchment clear of invasive plants in order to obtain clear running streams needed to sustain livelihoods. However due to other strategic priorities this target could not be met. Number of individuals trained in fire-fighting 64 Individuals were trained in fire management. The shortfall was due to the limited window of opportunity available to train staff (limited to winter months) as staff cannot be away on training during fire season as well as the timeous procurement of accredited service providers.

Fire training provided Training Course

Number of People Trained

FireWise training

22

Crew boss (refresher)* training

12

Crew boss training

11

Basic fire line training

13

Incident Command System training Total

6 64

* This training is the Crew Boss Course condensed into a shorter time frame due to staff having previously completed this training.

44


Number of MoUs signed regarding fire management A total of four MoUs were signed. (i) MoU with Working on Fire (WoF): This partnership enters its sixth year, it remains the strongest partnership in the Western Cape, managing 8 of 15 bases in the province. Partnerships were further entrenched when, at a recent national preparedness and safety audit conducted by WoF, one of the CapeNature bases, Kammanassie, scored the highest in the province. In addition to the top base, five CapeNature bases ranked in the top 10 out of 120 in South Africa. (ii) MoU between CapeNature and four partners in the Southern Cape for aerial fire-fighting services. (iii) MoU between CapeNature and the Overberg and Overstrand Municipalities for the provision of aerial fire-fighting services in the Overberg, (iv) MoU between CapeNature and the Fire Fighting Association (Pty) Ltd for the provision of aerial fire-fighting services in the Boland and West Coast Areas. Revised Fire Fighting Policy and guideline document Version six of the Fire Management Policy Guidelines document was reviewed and submitted for comment to the Executive. Amendments to six of the 11 chapters were made and updated, with a focus on the management of CapeNature fixed assets and the establishment of FireWise Communities. Other highlights include: (i) Volunteer Wild Fire Services The completion of a Volunteer Wild Fire Services (VWS) Centre at Jonkershoek has added a capacity of 30 well trained and equipped, individual fire-fighters. This new complement managed to competently assist in CapeNature’s wild fires during the reporting year. It is expected that this partnership will grow as CapeNature and VWS members embark on FireWise communities’ programmes in the Jonkershoek Valley. The VWS branch is expected to grow to at least 60 members and there are currently 120 members in the main branch at Newlands (SANParks).

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

(ii) Fire Protection Associations (FPAs) Fire Protection Associations (FPAs) are slowly becoming more active as the Western Cape umbrella FPA plans to register as a Section 21 company. The recently registered Southern Cape FPA is the largest in the Province along with Greater Cederberg and West Coast. These developments signal an increased compliance by landowners and Local Authorities with the National Veld and Forest Fire Act, which goes a long way towards making the management of veld fires a collective effort, and not a single authority’s responsibility.

45


Programme 3: Business Development

and credible CapeNature brand by ensuring effective and efficient communication and marketing to both internal and external stakeholders.

Purpose: To increase CapeNatureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s revenue through marketing and management of the organisationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tourism products.

Strategic Objectives: 4.1 Increased sustainable revenue is attained through enhanced tourism product development and the development of a system for payment of ecosystem services.

Sub-Programme 3.1: Tourism, Marketing and Communication Purpose: To develop and maintain unique tourism product offerings that contribute to the sustainability of biodiversity management and to establish a positive

Service Delivery Objectives and Indicators per objective:

Sub-programme 3.1: Tourism, Marketing and Communication Strategic Objective

Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target Target

4.1 Increased sustainable revenue is attained through enhanced tourism product development and the development of a system for payment of ecosystem services.

Reason for Variance

Actual

Percentage increase in tourism income generated (%).

Positive trend in tourism income generated (5%).

The percentage increase

Percentage increase in visitor numbers (%).

Increase visitor numbers by 5% per annum.

The target was underachieved by 36% for the financial year. * Please note this does not factor in Wildcard entrances and event participants.

Not applicable.

in tourism income generated is 6%. A total of R14 474 701.

Wildcard implementing agent was placed under curatorship resulting in a hostile relationship between implementing agent and partners.

Participated in eight tradeshows and activated 16 tourism promotions. Number of interpretation updated (n).

Improve interpretation signage on four reserves.

Four interpretation interventions completed for Groot Winterhoek, Gamkaberg, Robberg and De Hoop.

Not applicable.

Number of reserves supported with regards to signage (n).

Address signage maintenance requirements of five nature reserves.

A total number of 35 reserves were supported with signage in all regions.

Not applicable.

Number of Public Private Partnerships concluded (n).

Conclude one Public-Private Partnership.

No Public-Private Partnerships concluded.

Approval from DEA pending.

46


Sub-programme 3.1: Tourism, Marketing and Communication (continued) Strategic Objective

Measure/Indicator

Amount of income generated from Public Private Partnerships (R).

Number of new Public Private Partnerships opportunities identified (n).

Actual Performance Against Target Target

Actual

R450 000 Income generated from Public Private Partnerships.

R240 000 income generated from Public Private Partnership. The target for this financial year was incorrectly stated in the annual performance plan and deviated from the PPP contract. The target as per the PPP contract was R240 000.

Identify one new Public Private Partnership.

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

Number of staff newsletter (n)

Ten staff newsletters.

A total of ten internal staff newsletters were distributed to all CapeNature staff.

Not applicable.

Number of media releases (n)

Dispatch 48 media releases.

48 media releases were drafted and circulated to media.

Not applicable.

Number of radio broadcasts (n)

Ensure 48 radio broadcasts.

A total of 1 202 adverts and public service announcements were flighted during the year on five community radio stations.

Not applicable.

Number of new communication tools developed (n).

Develop ten new communication tools for conservation.

A total of 18 new communication tools were developed for conservation awareness efforts.

Not applicable.

Increasing tourism income and visitor numbers The main objective of the marketing unit was to generate tourism income for this period. This included the implementation of a targeted Marketing Plan, which focused on retaining existing clients, acquiring new clients and creating brand awareness for all visitors. The Marketing Team won another award in the category of Best Stand Design and Presentation at the annual Cape Outdoor Adventure Expo. This is the biggest outdoor show in the Western Cape and hosts approximately 200 exhibitors and attracts more than 20 000 visitors. Earlier in the year the team won an award in the category Activities and Adventure at the Bleed Holiday Show in Gauteng. 47

One new Public Private Partnership opportunity identified at Kogelberg.

Reason for Variance

SanParks, the lead Wildcard partner, terminated the agreement with the Wildcard implementing agent (Infinity) since the company was under curatorship and placed the Wildcard Programme at risk. This resulted in a hostile relationship between Infinity and the rest of the Wildcard partners which deteriorated to such an extent that there is legal action pending between Infinity and SanParks. SanParks has appointed a new implementing agent for the Wildcard programme. Joint awareness and marketing campaigns with Cape Town Routes Unlimited (CTRU) A successful â&#x20AC;&#x153;Access to the Capeâ&#x20AC;? campaign hosted in September 2010 in partnership with Cape Town Routes Unlimited and the Department of Economic


Development and Tourism enabled CapeNature to facilitate tourism and conservation programmes for 480 scholars in four Nature Reserves across the Western Cape.

Record of Decision from DEA. As the key funder of the project, DEA have requested a revision of the business plan which clearly separates public from private sector funding. This was completed and DEA approval is pending.

Interpretation and signage The reserve signage and interpretation initiatives were facilitated to increase the brand awareness of CapeNature. These initiatives informed and educated visitors to our nature reserves. The communication unit designed, developed and manufactured 386 signs for 35 reserves. The reason for over achievement was due to the focus which was placed on indemnity and safety signage to increase the safety of visitors. Public Private Partnerships (PPP) The Sonkem site within the Kogelberg Nature Reserve has been identified as a potential PPP site and a feasibility study has been initiated to investigate the financial and environmental viability of developing PPP tourism product on this site. The Whale Trail II project has received Treasury III Approval and contract negotiations were concluded with the private party. The project received a positive

Media and radio broadcasts The media interventions of the communication unit included 48 media releases distributed to key journalists and publications to ensure exposure for CapeNature in communities, as well as popular media. The community radio campaign focussing on five community radio stations in key targeted areas provided adverts, public service announcements and interviews. Subjects such as alien vegetation management, environmental awareness, biodiversity crime and compliance and fire awareness were covered. CapeNature was able to leverage more exposure through the long term relationships with the community radio stations, as well as the key success of the hosting of a joint competition to raise fire awareness among school learners through Whale Coast FM and Valley FM, in partnership with the DEA&DP and Disaster Management.

Sub-programme 3.2: Information Technology and Systems Strategic Objective

4.2. Develop effective policies, systems and processes to support the core business and enhance service delivery.

Measure/Indicator

Number of new Storage Area Networks (SAN) and Local Area Networks (LAN) implemented (n).

Actual Performance Against Target Target

Actual

One new Storage Area Network (SAN) at Head Office and six new regional Local Area Networks (LAN) implemented.

Project was placed on hold and is subject to the implementation of the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) project and the completion of a Master Systems Plan.

Reason for Variance

Project was placed on hold and is subject to the implementation of the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) project and the completion of a Master Systems Plan.

Implemented 10 Local Area Networks (LAN). Number of new Information Systems implemented (n).

One new Non-SAN dependant IS: Central Reservation System (CRS) implemented. Two SAN dependant IS: Accounting System and Procurement System implemented.

No new Information Systems implemented as this forms part of the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) project that will be implemented in the new financial year.

Systems implemented as this forms part of the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) project that will be implemented in the new financial year.

48


Sub-programme 3.2: Information Technology and Systems (continued) Strategic Objective

Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target Target

Actual

Number of Information System expansions (n).

E-Communication and Biodiversity Permit System.

Three Information System expansions completed.

Not applicable.

Establish second IT support hub at George.

Establish second IT support hub at George helpdesk.

Establishment of the IT support hub is dependant on the outcome of the organisational development report.

Establishment of the IT support hub is dependant on the outcome of the organisational development report.

Sub-Programme 3.2: Information Technology and Systems Purpose: To provide an integrated support service with regards to Information Technology and Systems, IT infrastructure and architectural development which enables the organisation to deliver on its organisational objectives. Strategic Objectives: 4.2. Develop effective policies, systems and processes to support the core business and enhance service delivery. Service Delivery Objectives and Indicators per objective: In the year under review, the IS/IT Department managed to escalate the importance of IT governance. An Internal IT audit highlighted areas requiring priority attention, dependent on budget availability. Top Management have prioritised and secured additional funding for implementation. Number of new Storage Area Networks (SAN) and Local Area Networks (LAN) implemented

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

The Local Area Networks at Grootvadersbosch, Kogelberg, Limietberg, Walker Bay, Waterval, Swartberg Reserve Offices, the West Coast and Breede River Regional Offices and the Potberg Educational Centre have been upgraded. Huge IT and logistical challenges were experienced due to the merge with Head Office and the South West Regional Office in August 2010. These challenges were overcome and IT infrastructure was expanded successfully and implemented with minimum disruption to staff. New Information Systems implemented The implementation of the Storage Area Network and Local Area Networks was postponed due to each ERP

49

Reason for Variance

solution requiring specific hardware and software. It is envisaged that during the first year of implementation of the ERP solution, the system will be hosted externally giving CapeNature sufficient time to procure the necessary hardware and software requirements and to build the necessary staff capacity to manage the ERP solution efficiently. Information System expansions A web-enabled biodiversity permit system is being implemented in the regions, which allows staff to verify data, query permit status, view history and print reports at any given time on any permit holder, species or location. The roll out and implementation of the Tourism Reservation System to four regional offices, is a major achievement. This allows regional finance staff to capture tourism batches for the respective reserves. Establish second IT support hub at George The appointment of IT/IS capacity in George to service the Gouritz and Breede River Regions was postponed due to the Organsational Development review. This review has informed the structure of this component. Approval on the structure is pending.

Sub-Programme 3.3: Special Projects â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Business Development Purpose: To develop and maintain unique tourism product offerings that contribute to the sustainability of biodiversity management and to establish a positive and credible CapeNature brand by ensuring effective and efficient communication and marketing to both internal and external stakeholders. Strategic Objectives: 4.1. Increased sustainable revenue is attained through enhanced tourism product development and the development of a system for payment of ecosystem services.


Service Delivery Objectives and Indicators per objective:

Sub-programme 3.3: Special projects – Business Development Strategic Objective

Measure/Indicator

Actual Performance Against Target Target

4.1. Increased sustainable revenue is attained through enhanced tourism product development and the development of a system for payment of ecosystem services.

Number of new tourism products established (n).

Actual

Two new tourism products.

CapeNature strives to deliver the highest standards, offering quality tourism products to both domestic and foreign tourists. Focus was placed on developing and implementing a range of new and upgraded tourism products, aligned to the CapeNature Strategic Tourism Plan. Number of new tourism products established On 1 June 2010 the new Gamkaberg Eco-lodges were officially launched to members of the public. To date, the new lodges have received an overwhelming positive response. This is a clear indication of CapeNature’s ability to deliver a world class and quality tourism product. The Limietberg Nature Reserve (Tweede Tol) received six new private campsites which provide campers with a “private experience” compared to conventional campsite arrangements. Each campsite is fully cordoned off with its own built-in braai, scullery, toilet, ablution facility and demarcated parking area. This was a pilot project and will certainly be rolled-out to other reserves, based on its success.

Reason for Variance

Two new tourism products launched at Gamkaberg Eco Lodges and the Limietberg Tweede Tol Private Campsite. Upgrades were completed on seven nature reserves. Two CDFs were completed.

Not applicable.

Number of Upgrades at Reserves Upgrades and refurbishments occurred at the following reserves: Keurbooms River, Grootwinterhoek, Cederberg, Marloth, Swartberg, Hottentots Holland and Anysberg. Upgrades and refurbishments included paving, hiking trail maintenance, building alterations, introducing jungle-gyms at selected reserves, replacement of activity equipment (canoes, mountain bikes, paddle boats), replacing furniture, fittings and fixtures etc. Number of CDF’s completed The Conservation Development Framework (CDF) planning for the Cederberg as well as Matjiesrivier has been completed. The zonation process is intended to provide the best possible development and zoning decisions within protected areas. Through this process, the less sensitive sites on CapeNature reserves for tourism infrastructure development were identified. Zonation will be incorporated into reserve management’s plan to inform conservators of what activities or development may occur in a specific zone on the reserve.

50


51


3. Annual Financial Statements General Financial Review

53

Statement on Corporate Governance

54

Accounting Authorityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Responsibilities and Approval

60

Report of the Audit Committee

61

Report of the Auditor-General

63

Statement of Financial Position as at 31 March 2011

65

Statement of Financial Performance for the year ended 31 March 2011

66

Statement of Changes in Net Assets for the year ended 31 March 2011

67

Cash Flow Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

68

Accounting Policies

69

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements

76

The following supplementary information does not form part of the annual financial statements and is unaudited:

Detailed Statement of Financial Performance

97

Detailed Unspent Conditional Grants and Receipts

98

52


General Financial Review The financial position of the business and activities of CapeNature is clearly reflected in the attached annual financial statement. There were no major changes in the nature of the business. The organisation reported a surplus of R571,086 (2010: deficit of R9.6 million). Revenue increased by 21.2 percent primarily from government grants when compared with the previous year. The additional funds have been earmarked for employee related expenses (OSD). The increase of 7.1 percent in operating costs is mainly attributed to the significant increase in utility and Government Garage tariffs. Additionally, consulting and contractor services increased due to the fires raging towards the end of the financial year coupled with variations in special projects. The increase of 12.4 percent in employee costs is directly related to the pay parity and improvement of conditions of services.

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

The entity needs additional funding in the medium to long term to fulfill its mandate. There are challenges around its unfunded mandate. Currently the entity has sufficient resources to function in the foreseeable future, but it can only do so at current levels of delivery.

53


Statement on Corporate Governance Compliance The Western Cape Nature Conservation Board endorses the principles as set out in the Protocol on Corporate Governance, and where applicable the King Report on Corporate Governance for South Africa 2009 (King III) and have endeavoured to comply with the principles incorporated in the Code of Corporate Practices and Conduct. The Western Cape Nature Conservation Board has a formalised system of Corporate Governance as set out below. Governing Bodies Board of Directors The Western Cape Nature Conservation Board has a unitary board structure that is made up of non-executive directors who are appointed by the Minister of Local Government, Environmental Affairs & Development Planning in the Western Cape. The Board meets at least once a quarter. Executive Directors are appointed to run the organisation on a day-to-day basis. The framework for payment of Board members’ remuneration is approved by the Minister of Local Government, Environmental Affairs & Development Planning in the Western Cape. Board members of The Western Cape Nature Conservation Board attend an induction programme which is organised by the Executive. The Board has appointed six committees to assist in carrying out its responsibilities. Board Committees All committees carry out responsibilities on behalf of the Board and members are appointed to provide expertise on matters pertaining to that committee’s mandate. Board Audit Committee The Board Audit Committee consists of non-executive Board members and independent members. The chairperson is appointed by the committee and is an independent member. The authority of the committee is detailed in an Audit Charter which is reviewed and approved annually by the Board. The report of the Board Audit Committee is included in the annual financial statements and sets out the responsibilities covered by this committee. Board Finance Committee The Board Finance Committee consists of nonexecutive Board members and is chaired by a nonexecutive member who is appointed by the Board. The Committee reviews financial reports and cash flow projections, oversees financial governance issues and recommends financial policies for approval to the Board.

Board Human Resources and Remuneration Committee The Board Human Resources and Remuneration Committee consists of non-executive Board members and is chaired by a non-executive member who is appointed by the Board. The committee reviews and recommends annual staff remuneration increases, terms and conditions of employment, the payment of incentives and bonuses, general fringe benefits, remuneration policies and appointment of executive staff. Board Business Development Committee The Board Business Development Committee consists of non-executive Board members and is chaired by a non-executive member who is appointed by the Board. The committee reviews and recommends the Board’s Tourism and Marketing Strategies, new product development and explores further avenues for fundraising. Board Conservation Committee The Board Conservation Committee consists of nonexecutive Board members and is chaired by a nonexecutive member who is appointed by the Board. The committee considers reports on technical matters for advice to the Board, assists with strategic planning of the biodiversity portfolio and further provides a supervisory function to Executive Directors on conservation issues. Board Risk Committee The Board Risk Committee consists of non-executive members and an independent member. The chairperson is appointed by the Board and is an independent member. The authority of the committee is detailed in a Risk Charter which is reviewed and approved annually by the Board. Chief Executive Officer and Executive Directors The Chief Executive Officer is appointed by the Board in consultation with the Minister of Local Government, Environmental Affairs and Development Planning. The Executive Directors are appointed by the Board. Both the Chief Executive Officer and Executive Directors are involved in the day-to-day business activities of the organisation and are responsible for ensuring that decisions, strategies and objectives of the Board are implemented in accordance with the approved corporate plan and budget. Materiality and Significant Framework A Board-approved Materiality and Significant Framework is in place. Its purpose is to regulate disclosure of material facts to the Minister of Local Government, Environmental Affairs and Development Planning in the Western Cape, disclosures in the Board Annual Financial Statements and approval from the Minister of Local Government, Environmental Affairs and Development in the Western Cape for participation in certain transactions. 54


Internal Audit

Non Financial Information

The internal audit function is performed by an appointed Audit Company which is headed by a Chief Internal Auditor who is accountable to the Board Audit Committee.

Employment Equity

The Internal Audit functions in terms of an Internal Audit Charter that is approved by the Board. The Charter defines the purpose, authority and responsibility of the internal audit function. Internal Audit carries out its work in terms of a work plan which is based on the risk profile of the Board and which is approved annually by the Board Audit Committee. The Internal Auditors have full access Chairperson of the Board Audit Committee.

to

the

Management Reporting Comprehensive management reporting disciplines are in place. These include the annual preparation of a corporate performance plan and budget which is approved by the Board and the Minister of Local Government, Environmental Affairs & Development Planning in the Western Cape. Monthly results are reported to management, and quarterly results to the Board, Finance and Board Audit Committees, Provincial Treasury and Department of Environmental Affairs and Development Planning in the Western Cape and Funders of Special Projects. Code of Ethics The Board has a code of ethics which requires employees and the Board Members to observe high ethical standards to ensure that business practices are conducted in a manner which is beyond reproach.

The Western Cape Nature Conservation Board has achieved an overall black representation of 77%. Targets to improve the representation of designated individuals on all job categories and levels have been set in the Employment Equity Plan (2009-2014). This criteria will be applied as a target for all new appointments and promotions within the organisation. The process is monitored on an ongoing basis and is evaluated regularly by the Board Human Resources and Remuneration Committee. Going forward, this target will be further reviewed and refined. Black Economic Empowerment The Board is committed to the achievement of the objectives laid out in the Government’s Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (BBBEE) strategy. The Board has policies and procedures in place which address preferential procurement practices which support black economic empowerment. Corporate Social Investment The Board has a corporate social investment programme in place which sees the Board becoming involved in the community through support, financial or in kind, of deserving causes, organisations, institutions or projects. The Board supports socially constructive projects. Projects with long-term multiplier effect are given preference. Worker Participation A process has been activated where employees of the Board will participate in discussions on staff welfare and policy formulation through the employee consultative forum.

Information on the Members and Executive Directors of the Board The Board Members and Directorate of the Board during the accounting period were as follows:

APPOINTMENT PERIOD

END OF TERM / RESIGNATION

Conservationist & Botanist

20/05/2005 - 31/05/2010

EOT - 31/05/2010

Adv M Mdludlu

Legal specialist

20/05/2005 - 31/05/2010

EOT - 31/05/2010

Mr E Jefthas

Agri Business

20/05/2005 - 31/05/2010

EOT - 31/05/2010

Prof S Gool

Financial & education specialist

14/04/2008 – 28/02/2013

RES - 26/05/2010

Mr H Kagee

Lawyer

26/10/2006 – 31/10/2011

Ms N Dilima

Community Upliftment Projects

26/10/2006 – 31/10/2011

Mr J van der Merwe

Legal specialist

14/04/2008 – 28/02/2013

Geography Education specialist

01/04/2009 – 31/03/2014

Botanist & Zoologist

01/04/2009 – 31/03/2014

BOARD MEMBER Mr M Botha

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

– Chairperson until 31 January 2010

Prof A Redlinghuis - Chairperson from 01 February 2010 Dr C Johnson

55

EXPERIENCE


Information on the members and executive directors of the board (continued)

BOARD MEMBER

EXPERIENCE

APPOINTMENT PERIOD

Ms F du Bruyn

HR Specialist and Coach

01/04/2010 – 31/03/2015

Dr E February

Botanist

01/04/2010 – 31/03/2015

Mr M Eaton

Strategic Planning & Marketing

20/09/2010 – 30/09/2015

END OF TERM / RESIGNATION

Communication Mr E Kok

Chartered Accountant

20/09/2010 – 30/09/2015

with expertise in General Management, Board procedures & Governance as well as Financial matters & Strategic Planning

EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS 1

Ms L Meyer - CEO

EXPERIENCE

APPOINTMENT/ END OF TERM

BA, M.Ed, MBA More than 21 years general management and human resource management experience.

2

M S. J. Bekker – Executive Director:

B.Sc. Forestry, B.Sc (Hons.) Cum Laude & M.Sc Socio-

Operations

Ecology Forest and Natural Scientist and Socio-Ecologist with more than 28 years experience in conservation & biodiversity management

3

Dr K Hamman – Executive Director:

Ph.D. Natural Sciences

Biodiversity

Natural and fresh water scientist with more than 31 years in conservation & biodiversity management

Mr S Ismail – Executive Director:

B-Admin and B-Tech in Tourism Management Cum Laude.

Business Development

Twelve years experience in Tourism Development.

5

Mr Allan Preston - CFO

B Com and MDP. Seventeen years experience in Finance.

6

Mr N Jamie – Executive Director:

HDE

Human Resource

More than 16 years experience in the Human Resource

4

01 May 2010

Management sphere

BOARD SECRETARY Ms L Wallace-Malyon

EXPERIENCE

RESIGNATION

Qualification in Legal Secretarial Studies More than 15 years experience as a Personal Assistant to CEO’s in various sectors, including Administration Management experience. 

56


RECORD OF ATTENDANCE BY BOARD MEMBERS AT CAPENATURE ORDINARY BOARD AND BOARD COMMITTEE MEETINGS FOR THE PERIOD UNDER REVIEW 01 APRIL 2010 TO 31 MARCH 2011 LEGEND *

Attendance

N/Q

Not Quorate therefore unable to call a meeting

@

Absence with apology

SAB

Sabbatical Period

RES

Resigned

EOT

End of Term

N/M

Not a member at the date of the meeting

Board Meetings MEMBER

23/04/10

30/07/2010

25/10/2010

24/01/2011

M Botha

*

EOT

EOT

EOT

M Mdludlu

*

EOT

EOT

EOT

E Jefthas

*

EOT

EOT

EOT

S Gool

*

RES

RES

RES

H Kagee

*

*

*

*

N Dilima

*

@

@

*

J van der Merwe

*

*

*

*

C Johnson

*

*

*

@

A Redlinghuis

*

*

*

*

F du Bruyn

*

*

*

*

E February

@

*

*

@

M Eaton

N/M

N/M

*

*

E Kok

N/M

N/M

*

*

Board Audit Committee Meetings

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

MEMBER

26/05/2010

27/07/2010

08/11/2010

11/02/2011

J Jarvis

*

*

*

*

J Fairbairn

*

*

*

*

P Slack

@

@

*

*

H Kagee

*

*

*

*

A Redlinghuis

*

*

@

@

F du Bruyn

N/M

*

*

*

S Gool

RES

RES

RES

RES

E Kok

N/M

N/M

*

*

57


LEGEND *

Attendance

N/Q

Not Quorate therefore unable to call a meeting

@

Absence with apology

SAB

Sabbatical Period

RES

Resigned

EOT

End of Term

N/M

Not a member at the date of the meeting

Board Finance Committee Meetings MEMBER

26/05/2010

27/07/2010

25/10/2010

11/02/2011

H Kagee

*

*

*

*

F du Bruyn

N/M

*

*

*

M Mdludlu

*

EOT

EOT

EOT

M Botha

*

EOT

EOT

EOT

S Gool

RES

RES

RES

RES

E Kok

N/M

N/M

N/M

*

Board Human Resources and Remuneration Committee Meetings MEMBER

12/05/2010

11/08/2010

22/11/2010

16/03/2011

M Mdludlu

*

EOT

EOT

EOT

N Dilima

*

*

*

@

A Redlinghuis

*

*

@

@

C Johnson

*

*

*

*

F du Bruyn

*

*

*

*

Board Business Development Committee Meetings MEMBER

24/05/2010

11/08/2010

19/11/2010

24/02/2011

M Botha

*

EOT

EOT

EOT

E Jefthas

*

EOT

EOT

EOT

M Mdludlu

*

EOT

EOT

EOT

J van der Merwe

*

*

*

*

A Redlinghuis

*

*

*

@

I du Bruyn

*

*

*

*

E February

*

@

*

@

M Eaton

N/M

N/M

*

*

58


LEGEND *

Attendance

N/Q

Not Quorate therefore unable to call a meeting

@

Absence with apology

SAB

Sabbatical Period

RES

Resigned

EOT

End of Term

N/M

Not a member at the date of the meeting

Board Conservation Committee Meetings MEMBER

09/06/2010

24/08/2010

10/11/2010

24/02/2011

M Botha

EOT

EOT

EOT

EOT

M Mdludlu

EOT

EOT

EOT

EOT

E Jefthas

EOT

EOT

EOT

EOT

J van der Merwe

*

*

*

*

N Dilima

*

@

@

@

C Johnson

*

*

*

*

E February

@

*

*

@

M Eaton

N/M

N/M

*

*

Board Risk Committee Meetings MEMBER

09/06/2010

22/11/2010

18/02/2011

P Slack

*

*

*

*

H Kagee

*

@

*

*

A Redlinghuis

*

*

@

*

C Johnson

*

@

*

*

Board EXCO Committee Meetings MEMBER

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

17/09/2010

08/06/2010

Board SPECIAL Meetings MEMBER

26/05/2010

M Botha

EOT

M Botha

*

M Mdludlu

EOT

M Mdludlu

*

E Jefthas

EOT

E Jefthas

*

H Kagee

*

S Gool

A Redlinghuis

*

H Kagee

*

C Johnson

*

A Redlinghuis

*

N Dilima

*

C Johnson

*

J van der Merwe

*

N Dilima

*

RES

F du Bruyn

N/M

J van der Merwe

*

E February

N/M

F du Bruyn

*

S Gool

N/M

E February

*

P Slack

@

59


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Accounting Authority’s Responsibilities and Approval The Board (Accounting Authority) is required by the Public Finance Management Act (Act No. 1 of 1999), to maintain adequate accounting records and is responsible for the content and integrity of the Annual Financial Statements and related financial information included in this report. It is the responsibility of the Board to ensure that the Annual Financial Statements fairly present the state of affairs of the entity as at the end of the financial year and the results of its operations and cash flows for the period then ended. The external auditors are engaged to express an independent opinion on the Annual Financial Statements and was given unrestricted access to all financial records and related data. The Annual Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with Standards of Generally Recognised Accounting Practice (GRAP). The Annual Financial Statements are based upon appropriate accounting policies consistently applied and supported by reasonable and prudent judgements and estimates. The Board acknowledges that it is ultimately responsible for the system of internal financial control established by the entity and place considerable importance on maintaining a strong control environment. To enable the Board to meet these responsibilities, the accounting authority sets standards and implements systems of internal control aimed at reducing the risk of error in a cost effective manner. These standards include the proper delegation of responsibilities within a clearly defined framework, effective accounting procedures and adequate segregation of duties to ensure an acceptable level of risk. These controls are monitored throughout the entity and all employees are required to maintain the highest ethical standards in ensuring the entity’s business is conducted in a manner that in all reasonable circumstances is above reproach. The focus of risk management in the entity is on identifying, assessing, managing and monitoring all known forms of risk across the entity. While operating risk cannot be fully eliminated, the entity endeavours to minimise it by ensuring that appropriate infrastructure, controls, systems and ethical behaviour are applied and managed within predetermined procedures and constraints.

The Board is of the opinion, based on the information and explanations given by management, that the system of internal control provides reasonable assurance that the financial records may be relied on for the preparation of the Annual Financial Statements. However, any system of internal financial control can provide only reasonable, and not absolute, assurance against material misstatement. The Board has reviewed the entity’s cash flow forecast for the year to 31 March 2011 and, in the light of this review and the current financial position, it is satisfied that the entity has or has access to adequate resources to continue in operational existence for the foreseeable future. The entity is wholly dependent on the Western Cape Department of Environmental Affairs and Development Planning for continued funding of operations. The Annual Financial Statements are prepared on the basis that the entity is a going concern and that the Western Cape Department of Environmental Affairs and Development Planning has neither the intention nor the need to liquidate or curtail materially the scale of the entity. The external auditors are responsible for independently reviewing and reporting on the entity’s Annual Financial Statements. The Annual Financial Statements have been examined by the entity’s external auditors and their report is presented on page 63. The Annual Financial Statements set out on pages 65 to 98, which have been prepared on the going concern basis, were approved by the accounting authority on 31 May 2011 and were signed on its behalf by:

Manana Moroka Chief Executive Officer

60


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Report of the Audit Committee The Audit Committee is pleased to present its report for the financial year ended 31 March 2011.

design was shown to be deficient. Follow-ups indicated that Management had applied themselves diligently to implementing corrective actions.

Appointment of Audit Committee Initiatives pursued by the Board and Executive Management, specifically the Migration Project, is being effectively monitored.

CapeNature is served by an Audit Committee appointed by the CapeNature Conservation Board. Since July 2005, the Committee has reported annually on the effectiveness of Internal Control and commented on the Audited Financial Statements as required by its formal Charter.

Disciplinary action has been taken in those instances where governance had been eroded by non-compliance to policies and procedures and/or abuse of authority. The Audit Committee concurs with the findings of the Auditor-General as per their Management Report, Western Cape Nature Conservation Board T/A CapeNature, dated 31 March 2011, Part B, paragraph 35.

Audit Committee Responsibilities The Audit Committee carries out its responsibilities in terms of Section 11 (8) of the Western Cape Conservation Board (Act No. 15 of 1998) and

Independent Members

Appointed

J Fairbairn

July 2005

4

31 March 2013

J A Jarvis

July 2005

4

31 March 2013

P Slack

July 2009

2

31 January 2012

Board Members

Appointed

End of term/ Resignation

No. of Meetings

H Kagee

2006

4

31 October 2011

I du Bruyn

2010

3

31 March 2015

E Kok

2010

2

30 September 2015

S Gool

2008

0

26 May 2010

Section 77 of the Public Finance Management Act (Act No. 1 of 1999) as amended by Act 20 of 1999 and Treasury Regulations 27.1.7 and 27.1.10 (b) & (c) and in terms of its formal Charter .

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

End of term/ Resignation

No. of Meetings

Evaluation of the Annual Financial Statements

Committee Members and Attendance

The Audit Committee has reviewed and discussed with the Auditor-General, PricewaterhouseCoopers and the Chief Financial Officer, the Audited Annual Financial Statements included in CapeNatureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annual Report.

Committee members are required to attend at least four Committee meetings each year, in terms of the revised Charter. During the year to 31 March 2011, members attended as follows:

The Committee concurs and accepts the Audit Opinion of the Auditor-General and is of the opinion that the Audited Financial Statements be accepted and read together with the Report of the Auditor-General.

All meetings were held in quorum with apologies for absence.

Signed on behalf of the Audit Committee

The Effectiveness of Internal Control A revised 3-year risk based Internal Audit Plan has been in operation for the financial year under consideration. The reviews completed communicated significant control breakdowns to the Board and Executive Management. Recommendations made have restored the control environment where the control 61

JJ FAIRBAIRN Chairperson CapeNature Audit Committee


62


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

REPORT OF THE AUDITOR-GENERAL TO THE WESTERN CAPE PROVINCIAL PARLIAMENT ON THE WESTERN CAPE NATURE CONSERVATION BOARD REPORT ON FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Introduction 1. I have audited the accompanying financial statements of the Western Cape Nature Conservation Board, which comprise the statement of financial position as at 31 March 2011, and the statement of financial performance, statement of changes in net assets and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, and a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information, as set out on pages 65 to 96. Accounting authority’s responsibility for the financial statements 2. The accounting authority is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with the South African Standards of Generally Recognised Accounting Practise (SA Standards of GRAP) and in the manner required by the Public Finance Management Act of South Africa, 1999 (Act No. 1 of 1999) (PFMA) and section 11(2)(b) of the Western Cape Conservation Board Act, 1998 (Act No. 15 of 1998) and for such internal control as management determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditor-General’s Responsibility 3. As required by section 188 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (Act No. 108 of 1996) and section 4 of the Public Audit Act of South Africa, 2004 (Act No. 25 of 2004) (PAA) and section 11 (3) of the Western Cape Nature Conservation Board Act, 1998 my responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on my audit.

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

4. I conducted my audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing and General Notice 1111 of 2010 issued in Government Gazette 33872 of 15 December 2010. Those standards require that I comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from misstatement. 5. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessments of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or

63

error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. 6. I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my audit opinion. Opinion 7. In my opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Western Cape Nature Conservation Board as at 31 March 2011 and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with SA Standards of GRAP and in the manner required by the PFMA. Emphasis of matters 8. I draw attention to the matters below. My opinion is not modified in respect of these matters: Significant uncertainties 9. With reference to the note 26 of the financial statements, the entity is involved in four legal disputes regarding various environmental incidents, which are disclosed as litigations and claims with no reliable monetary values. The ultimate outcome of these four cases cannot presently be determined and no provision for any liability that may result has been made in the financial statements for these matters. Material under spending of budget 10. With reference to note 35 of the financial statements, the entity under spent its capital budget of R17 641 768 for the financial year by R10 600 352 (60%) (2009-10: R2 869 811 or 28.5%). This under spending mainly affected the implementation and finalisation of special projects. Additional matter 11. I draw attention to the matter below. My opinion is not modified in respect of this matter.


Unaudited supplementary schedules 12. The supplementary information set out on pages 97 to 98 of the financial statements does not form part of the financial statements and is presented as additional information. I have not audited these schedules and accordingly do not express an opinion thereon. REPORT ON OTHER LEGAL AND REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS 13. In accordance with the PAA and in terms of General Notice 1111 of 2010, issued in Government Gazette 33872 of 15 December 2010, I include below my findings on the annual performance report as set out on pages 16-50 and material non-compliance with laws and regulations applicable to the public entity. Predetermined objectives 14. There were no material findings on the annual performance report. Compliance with laws and regulations 15. There where no findings concerning material noncompliance with laws and regulations applicable to the public entity. INTERNAL CONTROL 16. In accordance with the PAA and in terms of General Notice 1111 of 2010, issued in Government Gazette 33872 of 15 December 2010, I considered internal control relevant to my audit, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of internal control. There are no significant deficiencies in internal control that resulted in qualification of the auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opinion on the financial statements or findings on predetermined objectives or material non-compliance with laws and regulations. OTHER REPORTS Investigations 17. Three investigations were conducted during the year relating to alleged fraudulent activities in two cases as well as the transgression of the supply chain management directives. All three investigations were dealt with by the entity under the applicable human resource policies and appropriate disciplinary action was taken.

Cape Town 31 July 2011

64


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Statement of Financial Position as at 31 March 2011

Figures in Rand

Note(s)

2011

Restated 2010

Assets Current Assts Inventories Trade and other receivables Cash and cash equivalents

9 10 11

2,136,856 3,069,253 56,825,219 62,031,328

1,821,431 8,350,883 52,889,947 63,062,261

5 6

41,877,591 326,333 42,203,924 104,235,252

30,496,391 662,168 31,158,559 94,220,820

Current Liabilities Finance lease obligation Trade and other payables Unspent conditional grants and receipts

14 16 15

173,187 33,385,492 17,650,153 51,208,832

134,320 31,094,046 17,894,755 49,123,121

Non-Current Liabilities Finance lease obligation Retirement benefit obligation Unspent conditional grants and receipts

14 8 15

25,445 3,782,000 13,733,503 17,540,948 68,749,780 35,485,472

36,579 3,746,000 15,664,965 19,447,544 68,570,665 25,650,155

12 13

21,325,319 1 14,160,152 35,485,472

12,061,088 1 13,589,066 25,650,155

Non-Current Assets Property, plant and equipment Intangible assets Total Assets Liabilities

Total Liabilities Net Assets

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Net Assets Reserves Revaluation reserve Capitalisation reserve Accumulated surplus Total Net Assets

65


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Statement of Financial Performance for the year ended 31 March 2011

Figures in Rand Revenue Other income Opertating expenses Employee costs Operating deficit Investment revenue Finance costs Surplus (deficit) for the year

Note(s) 18

20 22 23

2011 215,703,585 10,712 (109,192,898) (108,889,168) (2,367,769) 2,941,489 (2,634) 571,086

Restated 2010 184,618,753 (101,979,944) (96,891,170) (14,252,361) 4,793,218 (135,801) (9,594,944)

66


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Statement of Changes in Net Assets for the year ended 31 March 2011

Figures in Rand

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Opening balance as previously reported Adjustments Prior year adjustments Balance at 01 April 2009 as restated Changes in net assets Surplus for the year Total changes Opening balance as previously reported Adjustments Prior year adjustments Balance at 01 April 2010 as restated Changes in net assets Revaluations Net income (losses) recognised directly in net assets Surplus for the year Total recognised income and expenses for the year Total changes Balance at 31 March 2011 Note(s)

67

Revaluation reserve

Western Cape Nature Conservation Fund

Total reserves

Accumulated surplus

Total net assests

12,061,088

1

12,061,089

17,655,453

29,716,542

-

-

-

5,528,557

5,528,557

12,061,088

1

12,061,089

23,184,010

35,245,099

-

-

-

(9,594,944) (9,594,944)

(9,594,944) (9,594,944)

12,061,088

1

12,061,089

14,249,183

26,310,272

-

-

-

(660,117)

(660,117)

12,061,088

1

12,061,089

13,589,066

25,650,155

9,264,231

-

9,264,231

-

9,264,231

9,264,231 -

-

9,264,231 -

571,086

9,264,231 571,086

9,264,231 9,264,231 21,325,319 12

1 13

9,264,231 9,264,231 21,325,319

571,086 571,086 14,160,152

9,835,317 9,835,317 35,485,472


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Cash Flow Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Figures in Rand

Note(s)

2011

Restated 2010

Cash flows from operating activities Receipts Grants, project funds and tourism revenue Interest income

Payments Suppliers Finance costs Net cash flows from operating activities

24

223,161,279 2,941,489 226,102,768

192,126,583 4,793,218 196,919,801

(215,161,891) (2,634) (215,164,525) 10,938,243

(191,884,981) (135,801) (192,020,782) 4,899,019

(6,979,634) (61,782) 10,712 (7,030,704)

(6,528,124) (675,480) (7,203,604)

27,733

15,278

3,935,272 52,889,947 56,825,219

(2,289,307) 55,179,254 52,889,947

Cash flows from investing activities Purchase of property, plant and equipment Purchase of intangible assets Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment Net cash flows from investing activities

5 6

Cash flows from financing activities Finance lease payments Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the year Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the year

11

68


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Accounting Policies 1. Presentation of Annual Financial Statements The Annual Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with the effective Standards of Generally Recognised Accounting Practice (GRAP) including any interpretations, guidelines and directives issued by the Accounting Standards Board. These Annual Financial Statements have been prepared on an accrual basis of accounting and are in accordance with historical cost convention unless specified otherwise. They are presented in South African Rand. A summary of the significant accounting policies, which have been consistently applied, are disclosed below. These accounting policies are consistent with the previous reporting period. 1.1 Significant judgements and sources of estimation uncertainty In preparing the annual financial statements, management is required to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts represented in the Annual Financial Statements and related disclosures. Use of available information and the application of judgement is inherent in the formation of estimates. Actual results in the future could differ from these estimates which may be material to the Annual Financial Statements. Significant judgements include: Trade receivables The entity assesses its trade receivables for impairment at the end of each reporting period. In determining whether an impairment loss should be recorded in surplus or deficit, the surplus makes judgements as to whether there is observable data indicating a measurable decrease in the estimated future cash flows from a financial asset. Fair value estimation

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

The carrying value less impairment provision of trade receivables and payables are assumed to approximate their fair values. Post retirement benefits The present value of the post retirement obligation depends on a number of factors that are determined on an actuarial basis using a number of assumptions. The assumptions used in determining the net cost (income) include the discount rate. Any changes in these assumptions will impact on the carrying amount of post retirement obligations.

69

Allowance for doubtful debts On debtors an impairment loss is recognised in surplus and deficit when there is objective evidence that it is impaired. The impairment is measured as the difference between the debtorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the effective interest rate, computed at initial recognition. 1.2 Biological assets Transitional provision According to the transitional provision, the entity is not required to recognise or measure biological assets and/or agricultural produce for reporting periods beginning on or after a date within three years following the date of initial adoption of the Standard of GRAP on Agriculture. National Treasury granted an exemption within a directive in 2009. The exemption from applying the measurement requirements of the Standard of GRAP on Agriculture implies that any associated presentation and disclosure requirements need not be complied with for biological assets and/or agricultural produce not measured in accordance with the requirements of the Standard of GRAP on Agriculture. 1.3 Property, plant and equipment Property, plant and equipment are tangible non-current assets (including infrastructure assets) that are held for use in the production or supply of goods or services, rental to others, or for administrative purposes, and are expected to be used during more than one period. The cost of an item of property, plant and equipment is recognised as an asset when: â&#x20AC;˘ it is probable that future economic benefits or service potential associated with the item will flow to the entity; and â&#x20AC;˘ the cost of the item can be measured reliably. Property, plant measured at cost.

and

equipment

is

initially

The cost of an item of property, plant and equipment is the purchase price and other costs attributable to bring the asset to the location and condition necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner intended by management. Trade discounts and rebates are deducted in arriving at the cost. Where an asset is acquired at no cost, or for a nominal cost, its cost is its fair value as at date of acquisition. Costs include costs incurred initially to acquire or construct an item of property, plant and equipment and costs incurred subsequently to add to, replace


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Accounting Policies 1.3 Property, plant and equipment (continued) part of, or service it. If a replacement cost is recognised in the carrying amount of an item of property, plant and equipment, the carrying amount of the replaced part is derecognised. The initial estimate of the costs of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located is also included in the cost of property, plant and equipment, where the entity is obligated to incur such expenditure, and where the obligation arises as a result of acquiring the asset or using it for purposes other than the production of inventories. Recognition of costs in the carrying amount of an item of property, plant and equipment ceases when the item is in the location and condition necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner intended by management. Property, plant and equipment is carried at cost less accumulated depreciation and any impairment losses. Property, plant and equipment is carried at cost less accumulated depreciation and any impairment losses except for land and buildings which are carried at revalued amount being the fair value at the date of revaluation less any subsequent accumulated depreciation and subsequent accumulated impairment losses. Revaluations are made with sufficient regularity such that the carrying amount does not differ materially from that which would be determined using fair value at the end of the reporting period. When an item of land and buildings is revalued, any accumulated depreciation at the date of the revaluation is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the net amount restated to the revalued amount of the asset. Any increase in an asset’s carrying amount, as a result of a revaluation, is credited directly to a revalutation surplus. The increase is recognised in surplus or deficit to the extent that it reverses a revaluation decrease of the same asset previously recognised in surplus or deficit. Any decrease in an asset’s carrying amount, as a result of a revaluation, is recognised in surplus or deficit in the current period. The decrease is debited directly to a revaluation surplus to the extent of any credit balance existing in the revaluation surplus in respect of that asset. The revaluation surplus in equity related to a specific item of property, plant and equipment is transferred

directly to retained earnings when the asset is derecognised. Any decrease in an asset’s carrying amount, as a result of a revaluation, is recognised in surplus or deficit in the current period. The decrease is debited directly to a revaluation surplus to the extent of any credit balance existing in the revaluation surplus in respect of that asset. Property, plant and equipment are depreciated on the straight line basis over their expected useful lives to their estimated residual value. Property, plant and equipment is carried at cost less accumulated depreciation and any impairment losses. Property, plant and equipment is carried at revalued amount, being the fair value at the date of revaluation less any subsequent accumulated depreciation and subsequent accumulated impairment losses. Revaluations are made with sufficient regularity such that the carrying amount does not differ materially from that which would be determined using fair value at the end of the reporting period. Any increase in asset’s carrying amount, as a result of a revaluation, is credited directly to a revaluation surplus. The increase is recognised in surplus or deficit to the extent that it reverses a revaluation decrease of the same asset previously recognised in surplus or deficit. Any decrease in an asset’s carrying amount, as a result of a revaluation, is recognised in surplus or deficit in the current period. The decrease is debited in other comprehensive income to the extent of any credit balance existing in the revaluation surplus in respect of that asset. The useful lives of items of property, plant and equipment have been assessed as follows: Item

Average useful life

Land Buildings Plant, machinery and tools Furniture and equipment IT equipment Communication equipment Boats and vehicles

indefinite 50 years 2–6 years 2–6 years 2–3 years 2 years 4–6 years

The residual value, and the useful life and depreciation method of each asset are reviewed at the end of each reporting date. If the expectations differ from previous estimates, the change is accounted for as a change in accounting estimate. 70


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Accounting Policies 1.3 Property, plant and equipment (continued) Each part of an item of property, plant and equipment with a cost that is significant in relation to the total cost of the item is depreciated separately. The depreciation charge for each period is recognised in surplus or deficit unless it is included in the carrying amount of another asset. Items of property, plant and equipment are derecognised when the asset is disposed of or when there are no further economic benefits or service potential expected from the use of the asset. The gain or loss arising from the derecognition of an item of property, plant and equipment is included in surplus or deficit when the item is derecognised. The gain or loss arising from the derecognition of an item of property, plant and equipment is determined as the difference between the net disposal proceeds, if any, and the carrying amount of the item. 1.4 Intangible assets An asset is identified as an intangible asset when it: • is capable of being separated or divided from an entity and sold, transferred, licensed, rented or exchanged, either individually or together with a related contract, assets or liability; or • arises from contractual rights or other legal rights, regardless whether those rights are transferable or separate from the entity or from other rights and obligations. An intangible asset is recognised when: • it is probable that the expected future economic benefits or service potential that are attributable to the asset will flow to the entity; and • the cost or fair value of the asset can be measured reliably. Intangible assets are initially recognised at cost.

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

An intangible asset acquired at no or nominal cost, the cost shall be its fair value as at the date of acquisition. Intangible assets are carried at cost less any accumulated amortisation and any impairment losses. The amortisation period and the amortisation method for intangible assets are reviewed at each reporting date.

71

Amortisation is provided to write down the intangible assets, on a straight line basis, to their residual values as follows: Item

Useful life

Computer software

2 years

1.5 Financial instruments Classification The entity classifies financial assets and financial liabilities into the following categories: • Loans and receivables • Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost Initial recognition and measurement Financial instruments are recognised initially when the entity becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instruments. The entity classifies financial instruments, or their component parts, on initial recognition as a financial asset, a financial liability or an equity instrument in accordance with the substance of the contractual arrangement. Financial instruments are measured initially at fair value, except for equity investments for which a fair value is not determinable, which are measured at cost and are classified as available-for-sale financial assets. For financial instruments which are not at fair value through surplus or deficit, transaction costs are included in the initial measurement of the instrument. Subsequent measurement Loans and receivables are subsequently measured at amortised cost, using the effective interest method, less accumulated impairment losses. Financial liabilities at amortised cost are subsequently measured at amortised cost, using the effective interest method. Impairment of financial assets At each end of the reporting period the entity assesses all financial assets, other than those at fair value through surplus or deficit, to determine whether there is objective evidence that a financial asset or group of financial assets has been impaired. For amounts due to the entity, significant financial difficulties of the debtor, probability that the debtor will enter bankruptcy and default of payments are all considered indicators of impairment.


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Accounting Policies 1.5 Financial instruments (continued)

1.7 Leases

Where financial assets are impaired through use of an allowance account, the amount of the loss is recognised in surplus or deficit within operating expenses. When such assets are written off, the write off is made against the relevant allowance account. Subsequent recoveries of amounts previously written off are credited against operating expenses.

A lease is classified as a finance lease if it transfers substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership. A lease is classified as an operating lease if it does not transfer substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership.

Trade and other receivables Trade receivables are measured at initial recognition at fair value, and are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest rate method. Appropriate allowances for estimated irrecoverable amounts are recognised in surplus or deficit when there is objective evidence that the asset is impaired. Significant financial difficulties of the debtor, probability that the debtor will enter bankruptcy or financial reorganisation, and default or delinquency in payments are considered indicators that the trade receivable is impaired. The allowance recognised is measured as the difference between the assetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the effective interest rate computed at initial recognition. The carrying amount of the asset is reduced through the use of an allowance account, and the amount of the deficit is recognised in surplus or deficit within operating expenses. When a trade receivable is uncollectable, it is written off against the allowance account for trade receivables. Subsequent recoveries of amounts previously written off are credited against operating expenses in surplus or deficit. Trade and other receivables are classified as loans and receivables. Trade and other payables Trade payables are initially measured at fair value, and are subsequently measured at amortised cost, using the effective interest rate method. Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash on hand and demand deposits, and other short-term highly liquid investments that are readily convertible to a known amount of cash and are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value. These are initially and subsequently recorded at fair value. 1.6 Taxation Tax expenses No provision has been made for SA Income Taxation, as the Board is exempt from income taxation in terms of S 10 (1) (cA) (i) of the Income Tax Act, 1962.

Finance leases â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lessee Finance leases are recognised as assets and liabilities in the statement of financial position at amounts equal to the fair value of the leased property or, if lower, the present value of the minimum lease payments. The corresponding liability to the lessor is included in the statement of financial position as a finance lease obligation. Minimum lease payments are apportioned between the finance charge and reduction of the outstanding liability. The finance charge is allocated to each period during the lease term so as to produce a constant periodic rate of on the remaining balance of the liability. Operating leases â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lessee Operating lease payments are recognised as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term. The difference between the amounts recognised as an expense and the contractual payments are recognised as an operating lease asset or liability. 1.8 Inventories Inventories are initially measured at cost except where inventories are acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, then their costs are their fair value as at the date of acquisition. Subsequently inventories are measured lower of cost and net realisable value.

at

the

The cost of fuel and chemicals are determined on the first-in, first-out (FIFO) basis, while uniform stores and other consumables are carried forward at average cost. Ivory stocks are not capitalised as there is no legal trading market. Confiscated Ivory stocks are safeguarded by the Board. 1.9 Impairment of cash-generating assets Identification When the carrying amount of a cash-generating asset exceeds its recoverable amount, it is impaired. The entity assesses at each reporting date whether there is any indication that a cash-generating asset may be impaired. If any such indication exists, the entity estimates the recoverable amount of the asset.

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Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Accounting Policies 1.10 Impairment of non-cash-generating assets Identification When the carrying amount of a non-cash-generating asset exceeds its recoverable service amount, it is impaired. The entity assesses at each reporting date whether there is any indication that a non-cash-generating asset may be impaired. If any such indication exists, the entity estimates the recoverable service amount of the asset. 1.11 Western Cape Nature Conservation Fund In terms of S18 read with S13 (5) and (6) of the Western Cape Nature Conservation Board Act 15 of 1998, a Fund shall be established which will be credited with any unexpended portion of the Board’s revenue at year-end. 1.12 Employee benefits Short-term employee benefits The cost of short-term employee benefits, (those payable within 12 months after the service is rendered, such as paid vacation leave and sick leave, bonuses, and non-monetary benefits such as medical care), are recognised in the period in which the service is rendered and are not discounted. The expected cost of compensated absences is recognised as an expense as the employees render services that increase their entitlement or, in the case of non-accumulating absences, when the absence occurs. The expected cost of surplus sharing and bonus payments is recognised as an expense when there is a legal or constructive obligation to make such payments as a result of past performance. Defined contribution plans

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Payments to defined contribution retirement benefit plans are charged as an expense as they fall due. Payments made to industry-managed (or state plans) retirement benefit schemes are dealt with as defined contribution plans where the entity’s obligation under the schemes is equivalent to those arising in a defined contribution retirement benefit plan. Defined benefit plans For defined benefit plans the cost of providing the benefits is determined using the projected credit method. Actuarial valuations are conducted on an annual basis by independent actuaries separately for each plan. 73

Consideration is given to any event that could impact the funds up to end of the reporting period where the interim valuation is performed at an earlier date. Past service costs are recognised immediately to the extent that the benefits are already vested, and are otherwise amortised on a straight line basis over the average period until the amended benefits become vested. To the extent that, at the beginning of the financial period, any cumulative unrecognised actuarial gain or loss exceeds ten percent of the greater of the present value of the projected benefit obligation and the fair value of the plan assets (the corridor), that portion is recognised in surplus or deficit over the expected average remaining service lives of participating employees. Actuarial gains or losses within the corridor are not recognised. Gains or losses on the curtailment or settlement of a defined benefit plan is recognised when the entity is demonstrably committed to curtailment or settlement. When it is virtually certain that another party will reimburse some or all of the expenditure required to settle a defined benefit obligation, the right to reimbursement is recognised as a separate asset. The asset is measured at fair value. In all other respects, the asset is treated in the same way as plan assets. In surplus or deficit, the expense relating to a defined benefit plan is presented as the net of the amount recognised for a reimbursement. The amount recognised in the statement of financial position represents the present value of the defined benefit obligation as adjusted for unrecognised actuarial gains and losses and unrecognised past service costs, and reduces by the fair value of plan assets. Any asset is limited to unrecognised actuarial losses and past service costs, plus the present value of available refunds and reduction in future contributions to the plan. 1.13 Provisions and contingencies Provisions are recognised when: • the entity has a present obligation as a result of a past event; • it is probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits or service potential will be required to settle the obligation; and • a reliable estimate can be made of the obligation. The amount of a provision is the best estimate of the expenditure expected to be required to settle the present obligation at the reporting date.


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Accounting Policies 1.13 Provisions and contingencies (continued) Where some or all of the expenditure required to settle a provision is expected to be reimbursed by another party, the reimbursement is recognised when, and only when, it is virtually certain that reimbursement will be received if the entity settles the obligation. The reimbursement is treated as a separate asset. The amount recognised for the reimbursement does not exceed the amount of the provision. Provisions are not recognised for future operating deficits. Contingent assets and contingent liabilities are not recognised. Contingencies are disclosed in note 26. 1.14 Revenue from exchange transactions Revenue is the gross inflow of economic benefits or service potential during the reporting period when those inflows result in an increase in net assets, other than increases relating to contributions from owners. An exchange transaction is one in which the entity receives assets or services, or has liabilities extinguished, and directly gives approximately equal value (primarily in the form of goods, services or use of assets) to the other party in exchange. Fair value is the amount for which an asset could be exchanged, or a liability settled, between knowledgeable, willing parties in an arm’s length transaction. Measurement

Rendering of services When the outcome of a transaction involving the rendering of services can be estimated reliably, revenue associated with the transaction is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of the transaction at the reporting date. The outcome of a transaction can be estimated reliably when all the following conditions are satisfied: • the amount of revenue can be measured reliably; • it is probable that the economic benefits or service potential associated with the transaction will flow to the entity; • the stage of completion of the transaction at the reporting date can be measured reliably; and • the costs incurred for the transaction and the costs to complete the transaction can be measured reliably. Interest and royalties Revenue arising from the use by others of entity assets yielding interest and royalties is recognised when: • It is probable that the economic benefits or service potential associated with the transaction will flow to the entity, and • The amount of the revenue can be measured reliably. Interest is recognised, in surplus or deficit, using the effective interest rate method. Royalties are recognised as they are earned in accordance with the substance of the relevant agreements.

Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable, net of trade discounts and volume rebates.

Service fees included in the price of the product are recognised as revenue over the period during which the service is performed.

Sale of goods

1.15 Revenue from non-exchange transactions

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when all the following conditions have been satisfied: • the entity has transferred to the purchaser the significant risks and rewards of ownership of the goods; • the entity retains neither continuing managerial involvement to the degree usually associated with ownership nor effective control over the goods sold; • the amount of revenue can be measured reliably; • it is probable that the economic benefits or service potential associated with the transaction will flow to the entity; and • the costs incurred or to be incurred in respect of the transaction can be measured reliably.

Revenue comprises gross inflows of economic benefits or service potential received and receivable by an entity, which represents an increase in net assets, other than increases relating to contributions from owners. Conditions on transferred assets are stipulations that specify that the future economic benefits or service potential embodied in the asset is required to be consumed by the recipient as specified or future economic benefits or service potential must be returned to the transferor. Control of an asset arises when the entity can use or otherwise benefit from the asset in pursuit of its objectives and can exclude or otherwise regulate the access of others to that benefit. 74


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Accounting Policies 1.15 Revenue from non-exchange transactions (continued)

1.17 Irregular, fruitless and wasteful expenditure

Non-exchange transactions are transactions that are not exchange transactions. In a non-exchange transaction, an entity either receives value from another entity without directly giving approximately equal value in exchange, or gives value to another entity without directly receiving approximately equal value in exchange.

Irregular expenditure is expenditure other than unauthorised expenditure, incurred in contravention of or that is not in accordance with a requirement of any applicable legislation, including:

Restrictions on transferred assets are stipulations that limit or direct the purposes for which a transferred asset may be used, but do not specify that future economic benefits or service potential is required to be returned to the transferor if not deployed as specified. Stipulations on transferred assets are terms in laws or regulation, or a binding arrangement, imposed upon the use of a transferred asset by entities external to the reporting entity. Recognition An inflow of resources from a non-exchange transaction recognised as an asset is recognised as revenue, except to the extent that a liability is also recognised in respect of the same inflow. As the entity satisfies a present obligation recognised as a liability in respect of an inflow of resources from a non-exchange transaction recognised as an asset, it reduces the carrying amount of the liability recognised and recognises an amount of revenue equal to that reduction. Measurement

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Revenue from a non-exchange transaction is measured at the amount of the increase in net assets recognised by the entity. When, as a result of a non-exchange transaction, the entity recognises an asset, it also recognises revenue equivalent to the amount of the asset measured at its fair value as at the date of acquisition, unless it is also required to recognise a liability. Where a liability is required to be recognised it will be measured as the best estimate of the amount required to settle the obligation at the reporting date, and the amount of the increase in net assets, if any, recognised as revenue. When a liability is subsequently reduced, because the taxable event occurs or a condition is satisfied, the amount of the reduction in the liability is recognised as revenue. 1.16 Comparative figures Where necessary, comparative figures have been reclassified to conform to changes in presentation in the current year.

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(a) this Act; or (b) the State Tender Board Act, 1968 (Act No. 86 of 1968), or any regulations made in terms of the Act; or (c) any provincial legislation providing for procurement procedures in that provincial government. Fruitless expenditure means expenditure which was made in vain and would have been avoided had reasonable care been exercised. All expenditure relating to fruitless and wasteful expenditure is recognised as an expense in the statement of financial performance in the year that the expenditure was incurred. The expenditure is classified in accordance with the nature of the expense, and where recovered, it is subsequently accounted for as revenue in the statement of financial performance. 1.18 Budget information Entities are typically subject to budgetary limits in the form of appropriations or budget authorisations (or equivalent), which is given effect through authorising legislation, appropriation or similar. General purpose financial reporting by entities shall provide information on whether resources were obtained and used in accordance with the legally adopted budget. The annual financial statements and the budget are not on the same basis of accounting therefore a reconciliation between the statement of financial performance and the budget have been included in the annual financial statements. Refer to note 34. 2. Changes in accounting policy The annual financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Standards of Generally Recognised Accounting Practice on a basis consistent with the prior year except for the adoption of the following new or revised standards. 23: Revenue from Non-exchange â&#x20AC;˘ GRAP Transactions â&#x20AC;˘ GRAP 24: Presentation of Budget Information in the Financial Statements â&#x20AC;˘ IGRAP 1: Interpretation of GRAP: Applying the Probability Test on Initial Recognition of Exchange Revenue


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements 2. Changes in accounting policy (continued) • GRAP 21: Impairment of non-cash-generating assets • GRAP 26: Impairment of cash-generating assets The adoption of the above GRAP standards do not differ or result in material differences in items presented and disclosed in the annual financial statements. The implementation of the GRAP standards have resulted in changes in certain terminology used in the annual financial statements. They are consistent in all material aspects with accounting policies of previous years, except otherwise stated. 3. New standards and interpretations 3.1 Standards and interpretations effective and adopted in the current year In the current year, the entity has adopted the following standards and interpretations that are effective for the current financial year and that are relevant to its operations: GRAP 23: Revenue from Non-exchange Transactions Revenue from non-exchange transactions arises when an entity receives value from another entity without directly giving approximately equal value in exchange. An asset acquired through a non-exchange transaction shall initially be measured at its fair value as at the date of acquisition. This revenue will be measured at the amount of increase in net assets recognised by the entity. An inflow of resources from a non-exchange transaction recognised as an asset shall be recognised as revenue, except to the extent that a liability is recognised for the same inflow. As an entity satisfies a present obligation recognised as a liability in respect of an inflow of resources from a non-exchange transaction recognised as an asset, it will reduce the carrying amount of the liability recognised as recognise an amount equal to that reduction. The entity has adopted the standard for the first time in the 2011 annual financial statements. The impact of the standard is not material. GRAP 24: Presentation of Budget Information in the Financial Statements Subject to the requirements of paragraph .19, an entity shall present a comparison of the budget amounts for which it is held publicly accountable and actual amounts either as a separate additional financial statement or as additional budget columns in the financial statements currently presented in accordance with Standards of

GRAP. The comparison of budget and actual amounts shall present separately for each level of legislative oversight: • the approved and final budget amounts; • the actual amounts on a comparable basis; and • by way of note disclosure, an explanation of material differences between the budget for which the entity is held publicly accountable and actual amounts, unless such explanation is included in other public documents issued in conjunction with the financial statements, and a cross reference to those documents is made in the notes. Where an entity prepares its budget and annual financial statements on a comparable basis, it includes the comparison as an additional column in the primary annual financial statements. Where the budget and annual financial statements are not prepared on a comparable basis, a separate statement is prepared called the ‘Statement of Comparison of Budget and Actual Amounts’. This statement compares the budget amounts with the amounts in the annual financial statements adjusted to be comparable to the budget. A comparable basis means that the budget and annual financial statements: • are prepared using the same basis of accounting i.e. either cash or accrual; • include the same activities and entities; • use the same classification system; and • are prepared for the same period. The entity has adopted the standard for the first time in the 2011 annual financial statements. The impact of the standard is not material. IGRAP 1: Interpretation of GRAP: Applying the Probability Test on Initial Recognition of Exchange Revenue An entity assesses the probability of each transaction on an individual basis when it occurs. Entities shall not assess the probability on an overall level based on the payment history of recipients of the service in general when the probability of revenue is assessed at initial recognition. The full amount of revenue will be recognised at initial recognition. Assessing impairment is an event that takes place subsequently to initial recognition. Such impairment is an expense. Revenue is not reduced by this expense. The entity has adopted the interpretation for the first time in the 2011 annual financial statements. The impact of the interpretation is not material. 76


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements 3.1 Standards and interpretations effective and adopted in the current year (continued) GRAP 21: Impairment of non-cash- generating assets Non-cash-generating assets are assets other than cash-generating assets. When the carrying amount of a non-cash-generating asset exceeds its recoverable service amount, it is impaired. An entity assesses at each reporting date whether there is any indication that a non-cash-generating asset may be impaired. If any such indication exists, an entity estimates the recoverable service amount of the asset. The present value of the remaining service potential of a non-cash-generating asset is determined using one of the following approaches: • Depreciated replacement cost approach • Restoration cost approach • Service units approach If the recoverable service amount of a non-cashgenerating asset is less than its carrying amount, the carrying amount of the asset is reduced to its recoverable service amount. This reduction is an impairment loss. An impairment loss is recognised immediately in surplus or deficit. Any impairment loss of a revalued non-cash-generating asset is treated as a revaluation decrease. An entity assess at each reporting date whether there is any indication that an impairment loss recognised in prior periods for a non-cash-generating asset may no longer exist or may have decreased. If any such indication exists, an entity estimates the recoverable service amount of that asset.

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

A reversal of an impairment loss for a non-cashgenerating asset is recognised immediately in surplus or deficit. Any reversal of an impairment loss of a revalued non-cash-generating asset is treated as a revaluation increase. The entity has adopted the standard for the first time in the 2011 Annual Financial Statements. The impact of the standard is not material. GRAP 26: Impairment of cash-generating assets Cash-generating assets are those assets held by an entity with the primary objective of generating a commercial return. When an asset is deployed in a manner consistent with that adopted by a profitorientated entity, it generates a commercial return. 77

When the carrying amount of a cash-generating asset exceeds its recoverable amount, it is impaired. An entity assesses at each reporting date whether there is any indication that a cash-generating asset may be impaired. If any such indication exists, an entity estimates the recoverable amount of the asset. When estimating the value in use of an asset, an entity estimates the future cash inflows and outflows to be derived from continuing use of the asset and from its ultimate disposal and an entity applies the appropriate discount rate to those future cash flows. If the recoverable amount of a cash-generating asset is less than its carrying amount, the carrying amount of the asset is reduced to its recoverable amount. This reduction is an impairment loss. An impairment loss is recognised immediately in surplus or deficit. Any impairment loss of a revalued cash-generating asset is treated as a revaluation decrease. If there is any indication that an asset may be impaired, the recoverable amount is estimated for the individual asset. If it is not possible to estimate the recoverable amount of the individual asset, an entity determines the recoverable amount of the cash-generating unit to which the asset belongs (the asset’s cash-generating unit). If an active market exists for the output produced by an asset or group of assets, that asset or group of assets is identified as a cash-generating unit, even if some or all of the output is used internally. If the cash inflows generated by any asset or cash-generating unit are affected by internal transfer pricing, an entity use management’s best estimate of future price(s) that could be achieved in arm’s length transactions in estimating: • the future cash inflows used to determine the asset’s or cash-generating unit’s value in use; and • the future cash outflows used to determine the value in use of any other assets or cash-generating units that are affected by the internal transfer pricing. Cash-generating units are identified consistently from period to period for the same asset or types of assets, unless a change is justified. An impairment loss is recognised for a cash-generating unit if the recoverable amount of the unit is less than the carrying amount of the unit. The impairment is allocated to reduce the carrying amount of the cashgenerating assets of the unit on a pro-rata basis, based on the carrying amount of each asset in the unit. These reductions in carrying amounts are treated as impairment losses on individual assets. Where a non-cash-generating asset contributes to a cash-generating unit, a proportion of the carrying


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements 3.1 Standards and interpretations effective and adopted in the current year (continued) amount of that non-cash-generating asset is allocated to the carrying amount of the cash-generating unit prior to estimation of the recoverable amount of the cash-generating unit.

• •

An entity assess at each reporting date whether there is any indication that an impairment loss recognised in prior periods for a cash-generating asset may no longer exist or may have decreased. If any such indication exists, an entity estimates the recoverable amount of that asset. A reversal of an impairment loss for a cash-generating asset is recognised immediately in surplus or deficit. Any reversal of an impairment loss of a revalued cashgenerating asset is treated as a revaluation increase. The entity has adopted the standard for the first time in the 2011 Annual Financial Statements.

The impact of the standard is not material. 3.2 Standards and interpretations issued, but not yet effective

The entity has not applied the following standards and interpretations, which have been published and are mandatory for the entity’s accounting periods beginning on or after 01 April 2011 or later periods:

GRAP 25: Employee benefits

The objective of GRAP 25 is to prescribe the accounting and disclosure for employee benefits. The Standard requires an entity to recognise: • a liability when an employee has provided service in exchange for employee benefits to be paid in the future; and • an expense when an entity consumes the economic benefits or service potential arising from service provided by an employee in exchange for employee benefits. GRAP 25 must be applied by an employer in accounting for all employee benefits, except share based payment transactions. GRAP 25 defines, amongst others, the following: • Employee benefits as all forms of consideration given by an entity in exchange for service rendered by employees; • Defined contribution plans as post-employment benefit plans under which an entity pays fixed contributions into a separate entity (a fund) and will have no legal or constructive obligation to pay further contributions if the fund does not

hold sufficient assets to pay all employee benefits relating to employee service in the current and prior periods; Defined benefit plans as post-employment benefit plans other than defined contribution plans; Multi-employer plans as defined contribution plans (other than state plans and composite social security programmes) or defined benefit plans (other than state plans) that: - pool the assets contributed by various entities that are not under common control; and - use those assets to provide benefits to employees of more than one entity, on the basis that contribution and benefit levels are determined without regard to the identity of the entity that employs the employees concerned; Other long-term employee benefits as employee benefits (other than post-employment benefits and termination benefits) that are not due to be settled within twelve months after the end of the period in which the employees render the related service; Post-employment benefits as employee benefits (other than termination benefits) which are payable after the completion of employment; Post-employment benefit plans as formal or informal arrangements under which an entity provides postemployment benefits for one or more employees. Short-term employee benefits as employee benefits (other than termination benefits) that are due to be settled within twelve months after the end of the period in which the employees render the related service; State plans as plans other than composite social security programmes established by legislation which operate as if they are multi-employer plans for all entities in economic categories laid down in legislation; Termination benefits as employee benefits payable as a result of either: - an entity’s decision to terminate an employee’s employment before the normal retirement date; or - an employee’s decision to accept voluntary redundancy in exchange for those benefits; Vested employee benefits as employee benefits that are not conditional on future employment.

The standard states the recognition, measurement and disclosure requirements of: • Short-term employee benefits; - All short-term employee benefits; - Short-term compensated absences; - Bonus, incentive and performance related payments; • Post-employment benefits: defined contribution plans; • Other long-term employee benefits; • Termination benefits. 78


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements 3.2 Standards and interpretations issued, but not yet effective (continued) The standard states Post-employment benefits: distinction between defined contribution plans and defined benefit plans: • Multi-employer plans; • Defined benefit plans where the participating entities are under common control; • State plans; • Composite social security programmes; • Insured benefits. The standard states, for Post-employment benefits: defined benefit plans, the following requirements: • • • • • • •

Recognition and measurement; Presentation; Disclosure; Accounting for the constructive obligation; Statement of financial position; Asset recognition ceiling; Asset recognition ceiling: When a minimum funding requirement may give rise to a liability; • Statement of financial performance. The standard prescribes recognition and measurement for: • Present value of defined benefit obligations and current service cost: - Actuarial valuation method; - Attributing benefits to periods of service; - Actuarial assumptions; - Actuarial assumptions: discount rate; - Actuarial assumptions: salaries, benefits and medical costs; - Actuarial gains and losses; - Past service cost. • Plan assets: - Fair value of plan assets; - Reimbursements; - Return on plan assets.

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

The standard also deals with entity combinations and curtailments and settlements. It is unlikely that the standard will have a material impact on the entity’s annual financial statements. GRAP 104: Financial Instruments The standard prescribes recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure requirements for financial instruments. Financial instruments are defined as

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those contracts that results in a financial asset in one entity and a financial liability or residual interest in another entity. A key distinguishing factor between financial assets and financial liabilities and other assets and liabilities, is that they are settled in cash or by exchanging financial instruments rather than through the provision of goods or services. One of the key considerations in initially recognising financial instruments is the distinction, by the issuers of those instruments, between financial assets, financial liabilities and residual interests. Financial assets and financial liabilities are distinguished from residual interests because they involve a contractual right or obligation to receive or pay cash or another financial instrument. Residual interests entitle an entity to a portion of another entity’s net assets in the event of liquidation and, to dividends or similar distributions paid at management’s discretion. In determining whether a financial instrument is a financial asset, financial liability or a residual interest, an entity considers the substance of the contract and not just the legal form. Where a single instrument contains both a liability and a residual interest component, the issuer allocates the instrument into its component parts. The issuer recognises the liability component at its fair value and recognises the residual interest as the difference between the carrying amount of the instrument and the fair value of the liability component. No gain or loss is recognised by separating the instrument into its component parts. Financial assets and financial liabilities are initially recognised at fair value. Where an entity subsequently measures financial assets and financial liabilities at amortised cost or cost, transactions costs are included in the cost of the asset or liability. The transaction price usually equals the fair value at initial recognition, except in certain circumstances, for example, where interest free credit is granted or where credit is granted at a below market rate of interest. Concessionary loans are loans either received by or granted to another entity on concessionary terms, e.g. at low interest rates and flexible repayment terms. On initial recognition, the fair value of a concessionary loan is the present value of the agreed contractual cash flows, discounted using a market related rate of interest for a similar transaction. The difference between the proceeds either received or


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements 3.2 Standards and interpretations issued, but not yet effective (continued) paid and the present value of the contractual cash flows is accounted for as non-exchange revenue by the recipient of a concessionary loan in accordance with Standard of GRAP on Revenue from Non-exchange Revenue Transactions (Taxes and Transfers), and using the Framework for the Preparation and Presentation of Financial Statements (usually as an expense) by the grantor of the loan. Financial assets and financial liabilities are subsequently measured either at fair value or, amortised cost or cost. An entity measures a financial instrument at fair value if it is: • a derivative; • a combined instrument designated at fair value, i.e. an instrument that includes a derivative and a nonderivative host contract; • held-for-trading; • a non-derivative instrument with fixed or determinable payments that is designated at initial recognition to be measured at fair value; • an investment in a residual interest for which fair value can be measured reliably; and • other instruments that do not meet the definition of financial instruments at amortised cost or cost. Derivatives are measured at fair value. Combined instruments that include a derivative and nonderivative host contract are accounted for as follows: • Where an embedded derivative is included in a host contract which is a financial instrument within the scope of this Standard, an entity can designate the entire contract to be measured at fair value or, it can account for the host contract and embedded derivative separately using GRAP 104. An entity is however required to measure the entire instrument at fair value if the fair value of the derivative cannot be measured reliably. • Where the host contract is not a financial instrument within the scope of this Standard, the host contract and embedded derivative are accounted for separately using GRAP 104 and the relevant Standard of GRAP. Financial assets and financial liabilities that are nonderivative instruments with fixed or determinable payments, for example deposits with banks, receivables and payables, are measured at amortised cost. At initial recognition, an entity can however designate such an instrument to be measured at fair value.

An entity can only measure investments in residual interests at cost where the fair value of the interest cannot be determined reliably. Once an entity has classified a financial asset or a financial liability either at fair value or amortised cost or cost, it is only allowed to reclassify such instruments in limited instances. An entity derecognises a financial asset, or the specifically identified cash flows of an asset, when: • the cash flows from the asset expire, are settled or waived; • significant risks and rewards are transferred to another party; or • despite having retained significant risks and rewards, an entity has transferred control of the asset to another entity. An entity derecognises a financial liability when the obligation is extinguished. Exchanges of debt instruments between a borrower and a lender are treated as the extinguishment of an existing liability and the recognition of a new financial liability. Where an entity modifies the term of an existing financial liability, it is also treated as the extinguishment of an existing liability and the recognition of a new liability. An entity cannot offset financial assets and financial liabilities in the statement of financial position unless a legal right of set-off exists, and the parties intend to settle on a net basis. GRAP 104 requires extensive disclosures on the significance of financial instruments for an entity’s statement of financial position and statement of financial performance, as well as the nature and extent of the risks that an entity is exposed to as a result of its annual financial statements. Some disclosures, for example the disclosure of fair values for instruments measured at amortised cost or cost and the preparation of a sensitivity analysis, are encouraged rather than required. GRAP 104 does not prescribe principles for hedge accounting. An entity is permitted to apply hedge accounting, as long as the principles in IAS 39 are applied. It is unlikely that the amendment will have a material impact on the entity’s Annual Financial Statements.

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Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements 4. Biological assets Non-financial information CapeNature’s biological assets include wildlife, fauna and flora and are not recognised in the Statement of Financial Performance. Fair value cannot be attached to these assets as they constantly change as dictated by natural processes like climate, fire, disease, predation etc. which impacts directly on the rate of population growth and mortality. Some animal species also migrate from and to Nature Reserves (insects, birds, reptiles and even game species which escape). CapeNature’s statutory responsibility is the conservation of the Western Cape’s biodiversity, hence the holding of such assets. 5. Property, plant and equipment 2011 Cost/ Valuation Land Buildings Plant, machinery and tools Furniture equipment IT equipment Boats and Vehicles Infrastructure development Communication equipment Total

Accumulated depreciation

13,920,000 8,435,015 (388,765) 2,503,311 (834,617) 17,333,204 (5,906,348) 5,368,869 (2,994,357) 2,983,166 (889,232) 2,141,977 463,556 (258,188) 53,149,098 (11,271,507)

2010 Carrying value

Cost/ Valuation

Accumulated depreciation

Carrying value

13,920,000 8,046,250 1,668,694 11,426,856 2,374,512 2,093,934 2,141,977 205,368 41,877,591

5,897,900 7,038,755 1,866,345 11,892,990 4,550,705 2,738,681 2,408,874 463,556 36,902,806

(245,302) (433,701) (3,630,440) (1,552,160) (463,031) (81,781) (6,406,415)

5,897,900 6,793,453 1,432,644 8,262,550 2,998,545 2,320,650 2,408,874 381,775 30,496,391

Transfers

Reavaluations

Depreciation

Total

Reconciliation of property, plant and equipment - 2011 Opening balance Land Buildings Plant, machinery and tools Furniture equipment IT equipment Boats and Vehicles Infrastructure development Communication equipment

5,897,900 6,793,453 1,432,644 8,262,550 2,998,545 2,320,650 2,408,874 381,775 30,496,391

Additions 636,967 5,325,084 818,098 199,485 6,979,634

154,129 112,768 (266,897) -

8,022,100 1,242,131 9,264,231

(143,463) (400,917) (2,273,546) (1,442,131) (426,201) (176,407) (4,862,665)

13,920,000 8,046,250 1,668,694 11,426,856 2,374,512 2,093,934 2,141,977 205,368 41,877,591

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Reconciliation of property, plant and equipment - 2010 Restated opening balance Land Buildings Plant, machinery and tools Furniture equipment IT equipment Boats and Vehicles Infrastructure development Communication equipment

81

5,897,900 6,854,113 1,192,095 7,567,405 2,938,631 1,296,866 2,182,060 283,850 28,212,920

Additions

82,803 604,569 2,671,706 1,358,729 1,419,347 226,814 164,156 6,528,124

Disposals

(4,436) (14,850) (12,156) (4,718) (36,160)

Restated Depreciation

Total

(143,463) (359,584) (1,961,711) (1,286,659) (390,845) (66,231) (4,208,493)

5,897,900 6,793,453 1,432,644 8,262,550 2,998,545 2,320,650 2,408,874 381,775 30,496,391


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements Figures in Rand

2011

2010

5. Property, plant and equipment (continued) Revaluations The effective date of the revaluations was 31 March 2011. Revaluations were performed by the following independent valuers: 1) Marina Stadler, Professional Associated Valuer, a member of the South African Institute of Valuers in Southern Africa (Head Office) 2) Gerhard van Wyk, Seeff Properties, a member of the Estate Agency Affairs Board (Breederiver Cluster) 3) Anton W. Roodt (ACIS, AIBS, FICB (SA), MIVSA) of Anton Roodt and Associates, Professional Valuer (Breederiver Cluster) 4) Kacie Kimber (CEA) of Kacie Kimber Estates, a member of the Estate Agency Affairs Board (Head Office) 5) Mr I Langehoven of Oudtshoorn Eiendomme, a member of the Estate Agency Affairs Board (Gouritz Cluster) The above valuers are not connected to the entity. Land and building are revalued every 2 years. The valuation was performed using the cost method of valuation, by determining the cost which must be incurred to replace the subject property and checking it with comparable sales, which included value forming and value indicating sales. The assumptions were based on current market conditions. The carrying value of the revalued assets under the cost model would have been: Land Buildings

5,879,900 6,804,119

5,897,900 6,793,453

CapeNature rents a range of vehicles from the Government Motor Transport department. At 31 March 2011, CapeNature rented 153 (2010: 145) vehicles. This arrangement is disclosed in note 27 (related parties).

6. Intangible assets 2011

Computer software

Cost/ Valuation

Accumulated amortisation

890,583

(564,250)

2010 Carrying value

Cost/ Valuation

Accumulated amortisation

Carrying value

831,228

(169,060)

662,168

Opening balance

Additions

Amortisation

Total

662,168

61,782

(397,617)

326,333

Restated opening balance

Additions

Disposals

Restated Amortisation

Total

83,694

675,480

(6,538)

(90,468)

662,168

326,333

Reconciliation of intangible assets - 2011

Computer software

Reconciliation of intangible assets - 2010

Computer software

82


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements 7. Financial assets by category The accounting policies for financial instruments have been applied to the line of items below:

2011 Trade and other receivables Cash and cash equivalents

2010 Trade and other receivables Cash and cash equivalents

Loans and receivables 2,979,870 56,825,219 59,805,089

Loans and receivables 8,260,524 52,889,947 61,150,471

Total

2,979,870 56,825,219 59,805,089

Total

8,260,524 52,889,947 61,150,471

8. Retirement benefits Defined benefit plan Post retirement medical aid plan The Board provides post-employment healthcare benefits to retired employees who were previously employed by the Department of Environmental Affairs. The entitlement to these benefits is based on the employee remaining in service up to retirement age and the completion of a minimum service period. The expected costs of these benefits are accrued over the period of employment. The provision relates to the subsidies payable by the Board in respect of retired or deceased employees and their dependants. During the current year the estimated figures were obtained and based on the assumptions from the last actuarial valuation that was performed on 31 March 2011. Management considers the assumptions used in the valuation as fairly presented.

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

The liability has been determined by considering the contribution subsidies that will be paid by the Board after retirement for current employees, and actual contribution subsidies for the current pensioner members.

Movements for the year

2011

2010

Opening balance Net (income)/expense recognised in the statement of financial performance

3,746,000 36,000

3,540,000 206,000

3,782,000

3,746,000

83


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements Figures in Rand

2011

2010

8. Retirement benefits (continued) Net (income)/expense recognised in the statement of financial performance Current service cost Interest cost Release of balance sheet provision Less: Contribution paid on behalf of the Board

57,000 317,000 (102,000) (236,000) 36,000

57,000 299,000 (150,000) 206,000

Key assumption used Assumptions used on last valuation on 31 March 2011. A discount rate of 9.2% per year has been used to place a present value on future subsidy payments. (This is an increase from 8.5% per year that applied as at 31 March 2009). The rate used is consistent with the R186 bond at the time of performing the valuation. This is consistent with IAS19 which states that the discount rate used should reflect the yields on long term government bonds. An expected long-term increase in the medical subsidy payments of 0% per year has been used. This stems from the assumption that the maximum subsidy payment of R1014 per month will remain fixed in Rand terms for the lifetime of the employees and pensioners. (The assumption that applied as at 31 March 2009 was that medical subsidy payments would increase at a rate of 0% per year). 90% of the employee members are assumed to be married at retirement (or on death-inservice) with no dependant children. The normal retirement age is assumed to be 65. This is consistent with the previous valuation. For pensioner members, actual data was used for spouses and child dependants. We have assumed a 4 year difference between spousesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ages, with the female being younger. This is consistent with the previous valuation. All employees are assumed to continue their medical scheme membership after retirement. Discount rates used Number of members included as active members Number of members included as pensioners

9.20% 54 19

8.50% 60 15

Defined contribution plan Pension benefits The entityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contribution to the Government Employees Pension Fund, for former Department of Environmental Affairs employees, is charged to the statement of financial performance in the year to which it relates. This fund is governed by the Government Employees Pension Act 1996, with benefits that are calculated according to prescribed formulae. The remaining staff members are responsible for their own retirement benefit planning. The Government Pension Fund is a defined Benefit Plan but the organisation treats the contributions made as a defined Contribution Plan as it is under no obligation to cover any unfunded benefits. It is the policy of the entity to provide retirement benefits to employees who were previously employed by the Department of Environmental Affairs. As at March 2011, the entity employed 557 staff. Of this, 169 are members of the Government Employees Pension Fund. The remaining 388 staff members are responsible for their own retirement benefit planning. This fund is governed by the Government Employees Pension Act, 1996.

The total economic entity contribution to such schemes

3,170,147

2,931,984

84


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements Figures in Rand

2011

2010

1,279,974 62,970 793,912 2,136,856

348,640 43,982 928,809 500,000 1,821,431

9. Inventories Uniforms and other merchandise Fuel Chemical Stores Livestock

Ivory and other confiscated stocks are not capitalised as there is no legal trading market. The Board had 7,719 kg (2010: 5,182 kg) of confiscated ivory and other in stock at 31 March 2011. Livestock consists of 1067 crocodile hatchlings that were seized and confiscated in 2010. The livestock was capitalised and subsequently sold during 2011. 10. Trade and other receivables Trade debtors Employee costs in advance from non-exchange transactions Prepaid expenses Trade debtors from non-exchange transactions

1,320,156 74,709 14,674 1,659,714 3,069,253

876,032 76,054 14,305 7,384,492 8,350,883

The ageing of trade and other receivables at the reporting date The ageing of amounts is as follows: Current 30 days 60 days 90 days plus

1,809,223 320,618 456,883 690,195

6,652,997 25,287 171,553 2,069,794

(568,748) 244,004 117,078 (207,666)

(470,151) (388,638) 290,041 (568,748)

138,910 56,686,309 56,825,219

138,400 52,751,547 52,889,947

12,061,088 9,264,231 21,325,319

12,061,088 12,061,088

Reconciliation of provision for impairment of trade and other receivables Opening balance (Provision)/reversal for impairment Amounts written off as uncollectable

11. Cash and cash equivalents

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Cash and cash equivalents consists of: Cash on hand Bank balances

12. Revaluation reserve Opening balance Revaluation during the year

Increases in the carrying amount arising on the revaluation of land and buildings.

85


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements Figures in Rand

2011

2010

13. Western Cape Nature Conservation Fund (Fund) In terms of S18 read with S13 (5) and (6) of the Western Cape Nature Conservation Board Act 15 of 1998, a Fund shall be established which will be credited with any unexpended portion of the Boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s revenue at year end. 14. Finance lease obligation Minimum lease payments due - within one year - in second to fifth year inclusive Present value of minimum lease payments Non-current liabilities Current liabilities

173,187 25,445 198,632

134,320 36,579 170,899

25,445 173,187 198,632

36,579 134,320 170,899

The entity leases cell phones on fixed term contracts. The leases were classified as finance leases because all the risks and rewards of ownership have sustantially been transferred to the entity. The average term of these cellphone contracts is two years. 15. Unspent conditional grants and receipts Movement during the year Balance at the beginning of the year Additions during the year Income recognition during the year Repaid to funders

Non-current liabilities Current liabilities

33,559,720 59,941,541 (62,070,266) (47,339) 31,383,656

31,568,211 56,541,660 (53,627,967) (922,184) 33,559,720

13,733,503 17,650,153 31,383,656

15,664,965 17,894,755 33,559,720

The unspent conditional grants and receipts represents amounts previously received from government grants and private funders that will be utilised in the future against the respective special projects. 16. Trade and other payables Trade payables Income received in advance Employment leave entitlement from non-exchange transactions 13th cheque cash portion from non-exchange transactions Sundry payables Trade payables from non-exchange transactions

14,039,001 4,797,842 5,093,261 1,014,379 1,653,409 6,787,600 33,385,492

13,188,026 4,635,043 8,437,437 1,161,612 342 3,671,586 31,094,046

Income received in advance represents accommodation and trail deposits. Sundry payables mainly consist of SARS payables that represents taxes collected as agents on behalf of SARS and includes employee tax and UIF contributions.

86


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements Figures in Rand

2011

2010

17. Financial liabilities by category The accounting policies for financial instruments have been applied to the line items below:

2011

Financial

Total

liabilities at amortised cost

Trade and other payables Finance lease liability

28,587,650 198,632 28,786,282

Financial 2010

28,587,650 198,632 28,786,282

Total

liabilities at amortised cost

Trade and other payables Finance lease liability

26,459,003 170,899 26,629,902

26,459,003 170,899 26,629,902

18. Revenue Tourism Property rights and licenses Grants, donations and project funds Department of Water Affairs (Working for Water) Monetary government grants received Other income

15,408,887 2,082,603 18,882,062 19,793,326 152,572,755 6,963,952 215,703,585

14,399,142 2,201,918 17,334,823 18,103,825 125,906,932 6,672,113 184,618,753

15,408,887 2,082,603 6,963,952 24,455,442

14,399,142 2,201,918 6,672,113 23,273,173

18,882,062 19,793,326 152,572,755 191,248,143

17,334,823 18,103,825 125,906,932 161,345,580

106,637,000 5,661,000 47,763,000 160,061,000 (49,699,255) 110,361,745

90,446,000 42,826,000 133,272,000 (35,004,374) 98,267,626

The amount included in revenue arising from exchanges of goods or services are as follows: Tourism Property rights and licenses Other income

The amount included in revenue arising from non-exchange transactions is as follows:

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Grants, donations and project funds Department of Water Affairs (Working for Water) Monetary government grants received

Monetary government grants received Operating grant Additional allocation â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Operating grant Conditional grants Total grants received Less: Portion of conditional grant deferred

87


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements Figures in Rand

2011

2010

19. Public contributions and donations Conditions still to be met â&#x20AC;&#x201C; remain liabilities (see note 15) Provide explanations of conditions still to be met and other relevant information 20. Operating surplus/(deficit) Operating deficit for the year is stated after accounting for the following: Profit/(Loss) on sale of non-current assets Amortisation on intangible assets Depreciation on property, plant and equipment Employee costs Audit fees - External Inventory purchases Consulting and professional fees Contractor costs Operating lease - Government Vehicles

10,712 397,617 4,862,665 108,889,168 1,156,622 8,038,732 20,349,580 26,215,270 5,512,114

(42,698) 90,468 4,208,492 96,891,170 1,169,846 8,113,257 16,327,892 23,071,566 5,102,851

105,312,587 370,434 3,170,147 36,000 108,889,168

92,210,100 1,543,086 2,931,984 206,000 96,689,170

2,941,489

4,793,218

2,634

135,801

571,086

(9,594,944)

5,260,282 (10,712) 36,000 -

4,298,960 42,698 206,000 (292,237)

(315,425) 5,281,630 2,291,446 (2,176,064) 10,938,243

(494,417) 7,636,312 1,105,038 1,991,609 4,899,019

21. Employee related costs Salaries and wages Leave pay provision charge Post-employment pension benefits Post-retirement medical benefit

22. Investment revenue Interest revenue Bank interest 23. Finance cost Interest charged 24. Cash generated from operations Surplus/(deficit) Adjustments for: Depreciation and amortisation (Loss)/gain on sale of assets and liabilities Movements in retirement benefit assets and liabilities Movements in provisions Changes in working capital: Inventories Trade and other receivables Trade and other payables Unspent conditional grants and receipts

88


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements Figures in Rand

2011

2010

25. Commitments Authorised capital expenditure Already contracted for but not provided for • Developments

10,881,415

11,886,100

498,449 319,207 15,000 832,656

2,020,457 770,410 22,500 2,843,367

The following capital commitments will be financed through operating cash flows. 2011 Supply and implement an ERP system (SAP all-in-one solution). 2010 Kogelberg Development (Ouderbosch timber cabin). Operating leases – as lessee (expense) Minimum lease payments due - within one year - in second to fifth year inclusive - later than five years

Photocopy machine leases are negotiated for an average of five years and rentals are fixed for the duration of the lease term. Additional fees are payable based on the number of photocopies made during the year. The lease agreement between U-RAD Technologies CC and CapeNature for the Software Library subscription fees for the central reservation system and the permit suite represent an extended contract for a period of twelve months commencing on 1 April 2010 and expiring on 31 March 2011. Various properties in the Ladysmith district owned by WWF are utilised by CapeNature at R 7,500 per year until 31 May 2018 with an option to renew for a further 9 years 11 months. Operating leases – as lessee (Government Garage Vehicles) Minimum lease payments due - within one year - in second to fifth year inclusive - later than five years

5,696,705 12,713,519 2,317,388 20,727,612

5,273,824 11,306,845 985,003 17,565,672

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

26. Contingencies The contingencies represent claim submission amounts. These values are in the process of assessment and do not represent actual future payments. Contingent liabilities Nel JJ vs CapeNature Groenewald G vs CapeNature Mountain to Ocean vs CapeNature Cape Sawmills vs CapeNature P Hugo vs CapeNature Heyman JJ vs CapeNature

89

80,000 9,355,000 11,100,000 100,000

100,000 80,000 9,355,000 11,100,000 1,845,839 -


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements Figures in Rand

2011

2010

26. Contingencies (continued) The case of Nel JJ vs CapeNature is in respect of the loss of livestock due to wild animals. The case of Groenewald G vs CapeNature is in respect of fire damage in Jonkershoek. A letter of intent from Mountain to Ocean vs CapeNature is in respect of fire damage in Jonkershoek. A letter of intent from Sawmills vs CapeNature is in respect of fire damage in Jonkershoek. The case of P Hugo vs CapeNature is in respect of fire damage in Slanghoek Mountain Range. The case of Heyman JJ vs CapeNature is in respect of a personal injury. Litigation and claims with no reliable monetary estimated values. The case of Schroder HP vs CapeNature is in respect of fire damage in Jonkershoek. The case of Smit Janse van Rensburg vs CapeNature is in respect of flood damages. The case of Algeria vs CapeNature is in respect of fire claims and possible biodiversity. The case of Lourensford Estate vs CapeNature is in respect of fire damage in Jonkershoek. Contingent assets CapeNature vs Stellenbosch Municipality CapeNature vs Grootwinterhoek CapeNature vs JB Gerber

706,557 633,241 291,671

706,557 633,241 291,671

The case of CapeNature vs Stellenbosch Municipality is in respect of damages arising from a fire in an informal settlement in Franschhoek. The cases of CapeNature vs Grootwinterhoek and JB Gerber are in respect of damages arising from fire claims which started on Misgund farm and Poplar Grove farm respectively.

90


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements Figures in Rand

2011

2010

27. Related parties CapeNature is a Schedule 3C state controlled public entity resorting under the responsibility of the Western Cape Department of Environmental Affairs and Development Planning. In the ordinary course of business, the Board enters into various sales and purchase transactions on an armâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s length basis at market rates with other state controlled entities. Office rentals CapeNature has no obligation towards office rental expenses as the responsibility lies with the Department of Transport and Public Works for the settlement of these payments. Land rentals There are ten agreements on land owned by WWF and managed by CapeNature for conservation purposes. GMT Vehicles CapeNature entered into a Service Level Agreement with the Government Motor Transport division of the Provincial Department of Transport and Public Works for the supply of motor vehicles. The nature of this arrangement is on the basis of a rental agreement. An obligation at year end for the Government Motor Transport division of the Provincial Department of Transport and Public Works amounts to R3,929,995 (2010: R4,976,634). A daily and kilometre tariff is charged based on usage of the vehicles. The daily tariff is treated as operating leases that amount to R5,512,114 (2010: R5,102,851) and the kilometre tariff is expensed to the amount of R6,763,029 (2010: R7,374,575). CapeNature derives significant benefit from this agreement as the tariffs are not market-related. Department of Water Affairs Projects

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

CapeNature executes certain projects on behalf of DWA based on a cost recovery plus 7.5% management fees basis. In addition DWA donates certain chemicals to CapeNature which are recorded as donations.

91


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements Figures in Rand

2011

2010

28. Prior period errors Deferred revenue During the period under review a number of special projects come to an end and were closed off. These projects were operated by the Board and funded by external parties. During the review of these projects, prior year errors regarding the accounting treatment were identified. All prior year errors identified relate to reporting periods between 2004 and 2007. The deferred revenue was not previously released, to ensure that income was matched to expenditure incurred, to the statement of financial performance in the same period amounting to the understatement of accumulated surplus (grants donations and project funds) of R2,544,959. During the year ending 31 March 2009, two donated boats were incorrectly classified to special projects, instead of the board cost centres, as a capital acquisition. This resulted in the overstatement of the accumulated surplus (grants, donations and project funds) through the release of deferred revenue to the statement of financial performance amounting to R545,132. Trade and other receivables (Accrued Income) The special projects for Cape Action Plan for People and Environment (CAPE projects) and other projects came to an end and these projects were closed off. At 31 March 2010 accrued income was incorrectly raised and the income was released against the special projects. This resulted in the overstatement of deferred revenue released to the statement of financial performance for CAPE and other projects amounting to R1,130,067 and R45,742 respectively. Property, plant and equipment and Intangible assets During 2011, the entity embarked on a project to revalue and take-on the property, plant and equipment and intangible assets onto the fixed asset register to ensure that all assets are recorded. This resulted in the understatement of property, plant and equipment, cost of R3,868,955, accumulated depreciation of R7,013,375 and intangible assets, cost of R1,130,941, accumulated amortisation of R841,881. The correction of the error(s) results in adjustments as follows: Decrease in deferred revenue Decrease in property, plant and equipment - cost Decrease in property, plant and equipment - accumulated depreciation Decrease in intangible assets - cost Decrease in intangible assets - accumulated amortisation Decrease in trade and other receivables (accrued income) Decrease in trade and other payables (accrued expenses) Opening accumulated surplus

Statement of financial performance Decrease in revenue (grants, donations and project funds) Decrease in operating expenses Increase in depreciation on property, plant and equipment Decrease in amortisation on intangible assets

-

1,999,827 (3,868,655) 7,013,375 (1,130,941) 841,881 (1,175,809) 1,188,762 (5,528,557) (660,117)

-

1,175,809 (1,376,436) 1,282,900 (422,156) 660,117

92


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements 29. Risk management Financial risk management The entityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities expose it to a variety of financial risks: market risk (including currency risk, fair value interest rate risk, cash flow interest rate risk and price risk), credit risk and liquidity risk. Liquidity risk The entityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s risk to liquidity is a result of the funds available to cover future commitments. The entity manages liquidity risk through an ongoing review of future commitments and credit facilities. Cash is managed prudently by keeping sufficient cash in bank accounts. Cash is received from Government funding and several project funders. This cash is managed on behalf of the funders, and separate bank accounts are held for funders money as and when required. At 31 March 2011 Trade and other payables Finance lease liability At 31 March 2010

Less than 1 year 28,587,650 173,187 Less than 1 year

Trade and other payables Finance lease liability

Between 1 and 2 years

Between 2 and 5 years

25,445 Between 1 and 2 years

26,459,003 134,320

Over 5 years -

Between 2 and 5 years

36,579

Over 5 years

-

-

Interest rate risk The Board has interest-bearing assets and the income and operating cash flows are substantially dependent on the changes in the market interest rates. The interest-bearing assets consist of short term investments with floating interest rates that expose the Board to cash flow interest rate risks. The interest rate used is based on the Prime rate. At 31 March 2011, if interest rates on currency denominated investments had been 1% higher/lower with all other variables held constant, the surplus for the year would have been R548,576 (2010:R540,749) lower/higher, mainly as a result of higher/lower interest expense on floating rate investments. Credit risk Credit risk consists mainly of cash deposits, cash equivalents, derivative financial instruments and trade debtors. The entity only deposits cash with major banks with high quality credit standing and limits exposure to any one counterparty. Trade receivables comprise a widespread customer base. Management evaluated credit risk relating to customers on an ongoing basis. If customers are independently rated, these ratings are used. Otherwise, if there is no independent rating, risk control assesses the credit quality of the customer, taking into account its financial position, past experience and other factors. Individual risk limits are set based on internal or external ratings in accordance with limits set by the board. The utilisation of credit limits is regularly monitored. Sales to retail customers are settled in cash or using major credit cards. Credit guarantee insurance is purchased when deemed appropriate. Financial assets exposed to credit risk at year end were as follows:

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Financial instrument Trade and onther receivables Cash and cash equivalents

93

2011 2,979,870 56,825,219

2010 8,260,524 52,889,947


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements Figures in Rand

2011

2010

30. Going concern The annual financial statements have been prepared on the basis of accounting policies applicable to a going concern. This basis presumes that funds will be available to finance future operations and that the realisation of assets and settlement of liabilities, contingent obligations and commitments will occur in the ordinary course of business. 31. Events after the reporting date The Board is not aware of any matters or circumstances arising since the end of the financial year which significantly affect the financial position of the board or the results of operations. 32. Other material matters World Cup expenditure In line with National Treasury instructions, no World Cup tickets or other similar World Cup related expenditure were incurred during the current and prior financial years. 33. Irregular, fruitless and wasteful expenditure During the year under review the board incurred fruitless/irregular expenditure amounting to:

2,634

135,801

2011 An amount of R2,634 relates to interest paid on late payments. The main cause of these late payments is the invoice amounts exceeding the debit order limits for Eskom and Telkom amounting to R2,429. The remaining amount of R205 relates to invoices not regularly received from municipalities. 2010 An amount of R134,711 relates to a return of earnings to the Compensation Commisioner. The law prescribes that Assessment Fees are paid timeously, failing which they are entitled to impose penalties. However, without the correct 2009 Notice of Assessment in hand a payment could not be made until this was corrected and previous payments were reflected on the statement. With this delay, the penalties were imposed, and interest accrued which had to be paid to avoid any further penalties and interest. A formal request has been submitted to the Compensation Commissioner for a refund of this interest/penalties. Subsequently this was refunded, in full, during the 2011 year end. An amount of R1,090 relates to interest paid on late payments. The main cause of these late payments is the invoice amounts exceeding the debit order limits for Eskom and Telkom. The balances on these accounts are paid in the following month.

94


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements Figures in Rand

2011

2010

34. Reconciliation between budget and statement of financial performance CapeNature has elected to use the exemption under Directive 5 by the ASB to disclose this reconciliation between budget and actual. The main reason being that the Department of Environmental Affairs budget for funding to CapeNature on a cash basis, whereas the organisation budget on an accrual basis. Reconciliation of budget surplus/deficit with the surplus/deficit in the statement of financial performance: Net surplus/(deficit) per the statement of financial performance Adjusted for: Revenue, other income and investment interest (Over) and Under recovery Monetary Government Grants Grants, donations and project funds Department of Water Affairs (Working for Water) Tourism Property rights and licenses Other income Investment income Operating expenditure and finance cost Over and (Under) incurred Employee benefits Administrative expenditure Transport and travel Stores and livestock Professional and special services Surplus/(Deficit) on disposal of assets Net surplus per approved budget

571,086

(9,594,944)

7,488,245 27,270,570 (13,416,507) (36,501) 699,745 (1,607,049) 2,774,511

7,365,068 5,161,561 (8,996,943) 3,404,494 50,593 (585,862) 1,455,782

(1,976,206) 1,937,473 831,716 (2,655,922) (4,228,681) (10,712) 17,641,768

4,773,101 5,585,651 1,000,877 807,527 (396,188) 42,698 10,073,415

17,641,768

10,073,415

(6,979,634) (61,782) 10,600,352

(6,528,124) (675,480) 2,869,811

35. Actual capital expenditure versus budgeted capital expenditure Reconciliation of actual capital expenditure versus budgeted expenditure:

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Budgeted capital expenditure Actual capital expenditure Property, plant and equipment Intangible assets Unspent capital expenditure

95


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Notes to the Annual Financial Statements 2011

Figures in Rand

2010

36. Executive Management and Board Membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; emoluments The following persons are employed by the Western Cape Nature Conservation Board in their respective executive capacities during the financial year: Executive Management emoluments Meyer L - Chief Executive Officer Bekker SJ - Executive Director: Operations Hamman KCD - Executive Director: Biodiversity Madlala L - Executive Director: Finance & Shared Services* (Resignation date: 28/02/2010) Preston A - Chief Financial Officer* (Appointment date: 01/05/2010) Jamie MN - Executive Director: Human Resources Ismail S - Executive Director: Business Development

1,064,924 957,505 789,981 689,197 744,309 744,309 4,990,225

985,386 884,796 730,969 756,269 680,530 677,379 4,715,329

* Not for the full year The above mentioned persons are employed by the Western Cape Nature Conservation Board in their respective executive capacities during the financial year. The Board operates a remuneration system based on the total cost to company principle. As such, all contributions to medical aid and pension funds are borne by the employee out of this package. No performance bonus or incentive scheme is in place and no such payments were made to the above individuals. Ms L. Meyer resigned from the post as CEO effectively on 31/05/2011. Ms Manana Moroka was appointed to the position on 01/05/2011 with full responsibility taken over on 01/06/2011.

Board Members emoluments (Non-executive) Botha M (End of term: 31/05/2010) Pandy Y (End of term: 30/06/2009) Mdludlu M (End of term: 31/05/2010) Jefthas EJ (End of term: 31/05/2010) Dilima N Kagee H Gool S (Resigned: 26/06/2010) Van der Merwe J Redlinghuis AC Dr Johnson C Kok EJ (Appointed: 20/09/2010) February E (Appointed: 01/04/2010) Eaton N (Appointed: 20/09/2010) Du Bruyn FE (Appointed: 01/04/2010) Fesi F (Resigned: 04/2008) Bayat MS (Resigned: 07/2007)

Remuneration

14,013 1,248 18,056 10,415 20,042 74,894 3,662 38,512 85,869 65,828 17,660 12,362 10,596 35,320 408,477

Reimbursive Expenses 2,661 1,516 2,138 889 6,574 3,418 67,275 1,381 3,016 7,044 95,912

Total 2011 16,674 1,248 19,572 12,553 20,931 74,894 3,662 45,086 89,287 133,103 19,041 12,362 13,612 42,364 504,389

Total 2010 55,263 16,477 57,673 37,366 30,094 37,684 20,692 44,595 33,842 56,997 1,428 2,544 394,655

96


Western Cape Nature Conservation Board

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Unaudited Detailed Statement of Financial Performance Figures in Rand

Board

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Revenue Monetary Government Grants Grants, donations and project funds Board funding special projects Board Management fee of Special project Working for Water Programme - DWA Project income - DWA Management fees Tourism - Accommodation - Entrance fees, hiking and activities - Wild Card sales - Eco & CRS Unallocated - Filming rights - PPP Business Income Property Rights and Licences - Licenses - Property Rights - Sea Shore - Concession fees Other income - Bad debts recovered - Fines - Management Fees - Services rendered - Concession fees - Income recoveries (Fire Claims) - Other income Total Revenue Finance Income Total Revenue including Finance Income

DWA

Total

2011

Actual

Budget

Variance

160,061,000 48,332,184

7,488,245 27,270,570

20,428,797 20,428,797 20,501,369 20,501,369

125,906,932 20,087,161 1,419,245 (2,1752,339) 19,460,943 18,103,825 1,357,118 14,399,142 4,887,468 7,680,400 1,006,824 564,110 260,340 2,201,918 879,815 908,740 413,363 5,314,995 2,050 196,290 2,841,747 1,043,899 64,710 181,743 984,556 186,037,997 4,793,218 190,831,215

7,908,979 7,908,979 15,372,387 5,198,773 8,040,621 906,000 676,993 550,000 2,782,348 1,205,425 1,119,921 457,002 3,824,743 500,000 692,000 2,632,743 238,281,641 5,716,000 243,997,641

(13,416,507) (19,793,326) 6,376,819 (36,501) 320,937 (508,476) (141,768) (77,194) 370,000 699,745 358,382 313,759 27,604 (1,607,049) (400) 289,700 (2,202,503) (798,652) (65,319) (34,447) 1,204,572 22,563,406 2,744,511 25,337,917

90,563,073 86,442,566 4,120,507 18,420,150 3,223,946 3,069,610 2,483 561,197 2,178,745 1,122,614 1,695,458 (239,093) 12,404 5,260,282 1,532,504 15,312,467 6,763,030 5,512,114 201,202 843,865 288,011 1,704,245 3,741,275 2,198,332 585,637 5,411 30,361 921,534 14,613,538 6,978,481 5,595,563 1,335,597 703,897

2,705,097 2,598,204 106,893 51,321 18,798 57 22,953 7,977 1,536 414,945 413,219 850 876 426,316 15,713 78,752 331,851 17,036,553 302,249 15,311,008 1,423,296

15,620,998 13,683,560 1,937,438 3,344,186 408,758 689,819 94 25,365 171,959 1,096,424 4,945 987 14,649 931,186 8,835,762 2,667,123 4,230,255 840,433 255,054 842,897 3,871,141 3,079,453 434,160 6,599 202,152 148,777 25,322,078 232,674 14,451,768 9,568,665 1,068,971

108,889,168 102,724,330 6,164,838 21,815,659 3,651,502 3,759,429 2,634 586,562 2,373,657 2,227,015 1,700,403 (239,093) 13,391 14,649 5,260,284 2,465,226 24,563,174 9,843,372 5,512,114 4,431,457 1,685,148 543,941 2,547,142 8,038,732 5,293,498 1,098,549 12,010 564,364 1,070,311 56,972,169 7,211,155 20,349,580 26,215,270 3,196,164

96,891,170 89,589,630 7,301,540 23,037,296 3,668,159 3,700,466 135,803 278,275 2,617,010 2,846,053 1,443,118 388,639 13 51,731 1,419,245 4,298,960 2,189,824 23,733,767 7,374,576 5,102,851 6,661,240 1,726,027 566,773 2,302,300 8,113,257 6,028,150 1,357,264 31,405 645,885 50,553 51,360,311 7,412,098 16,327,892 23,071,566 4,548,755

110,714,932 107,069,155 3,645,777 19,863,537 4,001,040 5,484,560 5,215 126,290 2,491,951 2,552,421 1,718,701 3,483,359 23,731,458 14,678,859 2,881,388 2,089,639 673,371 3,408,201 10,694,654 8,435,380 1,409,818 31,856 762,247 55,353 61,351,292 6,283,608 19,773,149 29,661,262 5,633,273

1,825,764 4,344,825 (2,519,061) (1,952,122) 349,538 1,725,131 2,581 (460,272) 118,294 325,406 18,298 239,093 (13,391) (14,649) (5,260,284) 1,018,133 (831,716) 4,835,487 (1,550,069) 404,491 129,430 861,059 2,655,922 3,141,882 311,269 19,846 197,883 (1,014,958) 4,379,123 (927,547) (576,431) 3,445,992 2,437,109

-

-

(2,179,552) -

(2,179,552) -

(2,752,339) -

-

-

(10,712)

-

-

(10,712)

42,698

-

10,712

142,639,791

20,634,232

226,355,873

(132,863)

218,088,636 571,086

200,426,160

(4,248,354)

54,814,613 4,952,305

(9,594,944)

17,641,768

8,267,237 17,070,682

Expenditure Employee benefits - Personnel Costs - Variable Personnel Costs Administrative Expenditure - Communication Costs - Advertising & Marketing - Finance Costs - Bank Cost & Other Charges - Rentals & Leases - Repairs & Maintenance - Municipal Services - Bad Debts - Losses - Board Funding - DWA Disallowances - Board Funding - Special Projects - Depreciation - Other Transport & Travel - Government Garage (Kilometer tarrif) - Government Garage (operating lease - Daily tarrif) - Transport - Staff Travel - S&T - Staff Km Claims Stores & Livestock - Stores -Uniforms & Protective Clothing - Fire Prevention Costs - Chemicals - Livestock Costs Professional & Special Services - Audit & Accounting Fees - Consulting & Professional Fees - Contractor Costs - Training Costs Board Management fee of Special project Impairment on property, plant and equipment

97

2010

Budget/

31 March

152,572,755 21,061,614 14,649 (2,179,552) 21,325,486 19,793,326 1,532,160 15,408,888 4,877,836 8,549,097 1,047,768 754,187 180,000 2,082,603 847,043 806,162 429,398 5,431,792 400 210,300 2,202,503 1,490,652 65,319 34,447 1,428,171 215,718,235 2,941,489 218,659,724

896,689 (635,471) 1,532,160 15,408,888 4,877,836 8,594,097 1,047,768 754,187 180,000 2,083,703 847,043 807,262 429,398 5,426,535 400 210,300 2,202,503 1,487,953 65,319 34,447 1,425,613 135,959,891 2,431,546 138,391,437

Surplus/(Deficit) for the year

Total

Restated 31 March

41,793,721 19,624,000 14,649 (2,179,552) (1,100) (1,100) 5,257 2,699 2,558 59,256,975 509,943 59,766,918

72,572

Total expenses

2011

Projects

110,779,034 1,365,042

Surplus/(Deficit) on disposal of assets

31 March

Special


98

FUNDER

Classification on Unaudited Unspent Conditional Grants and Receipts Contracts to be completed within the next financial year Contracts to be completed more that one year from now Total Unaudited Unspent Conditional Grants and Receipts

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY (GEF) Grant Implemented by International Bank for Reconstruction and Development WWF SA SANBI Conservation International DEADP (Funding for Capital Projects) Department of Environmental Services: Branch Oceans & Coasts Dept of Environmental Affairs & Tourism Dept of Social Development Dept of Social Services & Poverty Alleviation Marine & Coastal Management Municipality Hessequa Overstrand Municipality Municipality West Coast Other

Figures in Rand

14,649 14,649

15,824,806 4,791,435 304,848 952,886 2,062,829 201,197 43,537 830 1,868,400 31,383,657

() 319,398 1,119,090 106,661 3,787,741

31,383,657

(3,357,875) (1,071,974) (149,423) (54,072) (191,894) (4,952,305)

(52,548) (750) (10,434) (5,936) (57,399)

Book Balance as at Month End

33,559,720

(47,339) (47,339)

-

Project Expenses covered by the Board

13,733,504

(43,067,787) (1,141,941) (200,371) (3,173) (1,758,523) (206,375) (80,000) (5,539,603) (57,097,053)

Paid to Funder

Funds released to I/S for Capital Projects

17,894,755

98,260 265,397 20,052 44,074 10,000 57,394 545,216

(1,151,117) (662,611) (2,924,274) (207,536) (153,744)

Project Expenses Incurred

17,650,153

48,422,553 911,984 3,488,000 100,000 (82,525) 3,335,042 59,360,769

12,480,724 6,739,952 634,590 1,577,423 227,572 126,062 80,830 4,407,709 33,559,720

11,567 38,473 -

Interest and other income

15,664,965

271,157 610,748 2,303,809 -

Funds Received

1,002,083 372,011 1,711,516 319,737 3,879,511

Restated Deferred Revenue

Unaudited Unspent Conditional Grants and Receipts

Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 31 March 2011

Western Cape Nature Conservation Board


Part 4: human resource management 4.1. EXPENDITURE CapeNature utilises the VIP system to manage the Human Resources of the organisation, while Government department uses Persal. The figures from the VIP system would be different to the figures reflected in a Persal system, as the Persal system reports are drawn on a cash basis and CapeNatureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial reports are drawn on an accrual basis. In the case of Government departments, both Persal reports - and their financials are reporting on a cash basis, enabling them to provide the required reports. Income and expenses for the current financial year that is received or paid in the following financial year, still need to be recorded in the current financial year. The rest of the figures are reflected in the detailed statement of the financial performance in the Annual Report. Based on the above, all the relevant information and tables required are not reflected in this Annual Report. This is due to the fact that the system in use is not able to produce these reports. Table 4.1.1: Salaries, Overtime, Home Owners Allowance and Medical Assistance by programme 2010/11

Programme

Amount

Home Owners Allowance

Overtime

Salaries Salaries as a % of personnel cost

Amount

Overtime as a % of personnel cost

Amount

Medical Assistance

HOA as a % of

Amount

personnel cost

Medical Assistance as a % of personnel cost

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

Programme 1

R 20 166 519

0

R 52 087

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

Programme 2

R 76 314 417

0

R 2 752 302

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

Programme 3

R 6 092 952

0

R 84 303

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

R 102 573 888

0

R 2 888 692

0

0

0

0

0

Total

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

The columns with N/A information are due to CapeNature offering Total Cost of Employment (TOCE) and does not have the other elements as part of personnel costs.

99


4.2. EMPLOYMENT AND VACANCIES The following tables summarise the number of posts on the establishment, the number of employees, the vacancy rate, and whether there are any staff that are additional to the establishment. This information is presented in terms of three key variables: - programme (Table 4.2.1) and salary band (Table 4.2.2). The vacancy rate reflects the percentage of posts that are not filled as per the approved post establishment. Table 4.2.1: Employment and vacancies by programme as at 31 March 2011 Number of posts

Number of posts filled

Programme Funded

Vacancy Rate

Number of posts filled additional to the establishment

Unfunded A

B

C

D

Programme 1

86

19

86

0

0

Programme 2

399

63

399

0

0

Programme 3

34

3

34

0

0

519

85

519

0

0

Total

100


Table 4.2.2: Employment and vacancies by salary bands as at 31 March 2011 Number of posts Salary band

Number of posts filled

Vacancy Rate

Number of posts filled additional to the establishment

Funded

Unfunded

A

B

C

D

E

Lower skilled (Levels 1-2)

61

12

61

0

0

Skilled (Levels 3-5)

205

24

205

0

0

Highly skilled production (Levels 6-8)

116

27

116

0

0

Highly skilled supervision (Levels 9-12)

130

22

130

0

0

Senior management

7

0

7

0

0

519

85

519

0

0

(Levels 13-16)

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Total

101


4.3. JOB EVALUATION The Public Service Regulations, 1999 introduced job evaluation as a way of ensuring that work of equal value is remunerated equally. Within a nationally determined framework, executing authorities may evaluate or reevaluate any job in his or her organisation. In terms of the Regulations all vacancies on salary levels 9 and higher must be evaluated before they are filled. This was complemented by a decision by the Minister for the Public Service and Administration that all SMS jobs must be evaluated before 31 December 2002. The following table (Table 4.3.1) summarises the number of jobs that were evaluated during the year under review. The table also provides statistics on the number of posts that were upgraded or downgraded. Table 4.3.1: Job Evaluation 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Salary band

Number of posts

Number of Jobs Evaluated

% of posts evaluated by Salary Bands

Post Upgraded Number

Post Downgraded

% of posts evaluated

Number

% of posts evaluated

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

73

1

1.36

1

100

0

0

229

3

1.31

1

33.33

0

0

Highly skilled production (Levels 6-8)

143

7

4.90

3

42.85

1

14.92

Highly skilled supervision (Levels 9-12)

151

12

7.94

11

91.66

0

0

Senior Management Service Band A

6

0

0

0

0

0

0

Senior Management Service Band B

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

Senior Management Service Band C

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

604

23

15.51

16

69.56

1

14.29

Lower skilled (Levels 1-2) Skilled (Levels 3-5)

Total

102


The following table provides a summary of the number of employees whose salary positions were upgraded due to their posts being upgraded. The number of employees might differ from the number of posts upgraded since not all employees are automatically absorbed into the new posts and some of the posts upgraded could also be vacant. Table 4.3.2: Profile of employees whose salary positions were upgraded due to their posts being upgraded 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Beneficiaries

African

Asian

Coloured

White

Total

Female

2

0

3

8

13

Male

2

0

7

20

29

Total

4

0

10

28

42

Employees with a disability

0

0

0

0

3

Table 4.3.3: Profile of employees whose salary level exceed the grade determined by job evaluation 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 (in terms of PSR 1.V.C.3)

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Total Number of employees whose salaries exceeded the grades determined by job evaluation in 2010/2011

103

None


4.4. EMPLOYMENT CHANGES Turnover rates provide an indication of trends in the employment profile of the department. The following tables provide a summary of turnover rates by salary band (Table 4.4.1) and by critical occupations (Table 4.4.2). Table 4.4.1: Annual turnover rates by salary band 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Salary band

Number of Appointments employees per into the band as on department 1 April 2010

Transfers into the department

Terminations out of the department

Transfers out of the department

Turnover rate

A

B

C

D

E

F

Lower skilled (Levels 1-2)

61

25

N/A

4

N/A

6.56

Skilled (Levels 3-5)

205

10

N/A

5

N/A

2.44

Highly skilled production (Levels 6-8)

116

14

N/A

6

N/A

0

130

15

N/A

8

N/A

6.15

Senior Management Service Band A

5

1

N/A

0

N/A

0

Senior Management Service Band B

1

0

N/A

0

N/A

0

Senior Management Service Band C

1

0

N/A

0

N/A

0

Senior Management Service Band D

0

0

N/A

0

N/A

0

Total

519

65

N/A

23

N/A

4.43

Highly skilled supervision (Levels 9-12)

104


Table 4.4.2: Reasons why staff is leaving the employ of the department, 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Termination Type

Number

% of total terminations

A

B

1

0.19

Resignation

14

2.69

Expiry of contract

55

10.59

Dismissal – operational changes

0

0

Dismissal – misconduct

5

0.96

Dismissal – inefficiency

0

0

Discharged due to ill-health

1

0.19

Retirement

2

0.38

Transfers to other Public Service Departments

0

0

Other (Please specify)

0

0

78

15%

Death

Total

2.89%

Total number of employees who left as a % of the total employment

Table 4.4.3: Granting of employee initiated severance packages by salary band 1 April to 31 March 2011 Total Number of employees initiated severance package in 2010/2011

None

Table 4.4.4: Reasons why staff is resigning from the Public Service 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Resignation Reasons

Relocation overseas Better prospects Other (reason not mentioned)

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Total

105

Number

% of total resignations

A

B

2

0.39

12

2.31

0

0

14

2.70%


Table 4.4.5: Different age groups of staff who resigned from the Public Service 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Number

% of total resignations

A

B

Ages <19

0

0

Ages 20 to 24

0

0

Ages 25 to 29

7

1.35

Ages 30 to 34

3

0.58

Ages 35 to 39

1

0.19

Ages 40 to 44

2

0.39

Ages 45 to 49

1

0.19

14

2.70%

Age group

Total Table 4.4.6: Promotions by salary band 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Salary Band

Employees as at 1 April 2010

Notch Promotions Salary bands Progressions promotions to another progressions to another as a % of notch within a as a % of salary level employees by salary level employees by salary salary band

OSDs

OSDs as a % of Employee Salary Band

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

Lower skilled (Levels 1-2)

61

0

0

0

0

0

0

Skilled (Levels 3-5)

205

1

0.48

0

0

0

0

Highly skilled production (Levels 6-8)

116

2

1.72

0

0

8

6.89

Highly skilled supervision (Levels 9-12)

129

7

5.42

0

0

22

17.05

Senior Management (Levels 13-16)

8

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

519

10

1.93%

0

0

30

5.78%

106


4.5. EMPLOYMENT EQUITY The following table provides a summary of the total worforce profile per occupational levels. Temporary employees provide the total of workers employed for three consecutive months or less. The tables in this section are based on the formats prescribed by the Employment Equity Act (Act No. 55 of 1998). Table 4.5.1: Total number of employees (including employees with disabilities) in each of the following occupational bands as at 31 March 2011 Occupational Levels

Female

Foreign Nationals

Total

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

Top management (Levels 15-16)

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

Senior management (Level 13-14)

0

3

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management (Levels 9-12)

6

22

0

49

7

17

1

29

0

0

131

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents (Levels 6-8)

13

27

1

12

11

28

0

24

0

0

116

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making (Levels 3-5)

17

123

0

2

9

44

0

10

0

0

205

5

42

0

1

3

10

0

0

0

0

61

41

217

1

66

30

100

1

63

0

0

519

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

41

217

1

66

30

100

1

63

0

0

519

Unskilled and defined decision making (Levels 1-2) Total Permanent Temporary employees Grand Total

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Male

107


Table 4.5.2: Total number of employees (with disabilities only) in each of the following occupational bands as at 31 March 2011 Occupational Levels

Male

Female

Foreign Nationals

Total

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

Top management (Levels 15-16)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Senior management (Level 13-14)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management (Levels 9-12)

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

2

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents (Levels 6-8)

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

2

0

0

3

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making (Levels 3-5)

0

2

0

1

0

3

0

0

0

0

6

Unskilled and defined decision making (Levels 1-2)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total Permanent

0

2

0

2

0

5

0

2

0

0

11

Temporary employees

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Grand Total

0

2

0

2

0

5

0

2

0

0

11

108


Table 4.5.3: Recruitment 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Occupational Levels

Male

Female

Foreign Nationals

Total

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

Top management (Levels 15-16)

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

Senior management (Level 13-14)

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

2

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management (Levels 9-12)

0

4

0

4

0

2

0

3

0

0

13

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents (Levels 6-8)

1

1

2

1

4

3

0

2

0

0

14

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making (Levels 3-5)

2

3

0

0

2

3

0

0

0

0

10

Unskilled and defined decision making (Levels 1-2)

1

20

0

0

1

3

0

0

0

0

25

Total Permanent

4

30

2

5

7

12

0

5

0

0

65

Temporary employees

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Grand Total

4

30

2

5

7

12

0

5

0

0

65

Table 4.5.4: Promotions 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Occupational Levels

Male

Female

Foreign Nationals

Total

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

Top management (Levels 15-16)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Senior management (Level 13-14)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management (Levels 9-12)

0

1

0

1

0

2

0

3

0

0

7

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents (Levels 6-8)

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

2

109


Table 4.5.5: Promotions 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 (continued) Occupational Levels

Male

Female

Foreign Nationals

Total

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making (Levels 3-5)

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

Unskilled and defined decision making (Levels 1-2)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total Permanent

0

3

0

1

0

3

0

3

0

0

10

Temporary employees

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Grand Total

0

3

0

1

0

3

0

3

0

0

10

Table 4.5.6: Terminations 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Occupational Levels

Male

Female

Foreign Nationals

Total

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

Top management (Levels 15-16)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Senior management (Level 13-14)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management (Levels 9-12)

0

2

0

2

2

1

0

1

0

0

8

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents (Levels 6-8)

1

2

0

0

0

1

0

2

0

0

6

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making (Levels 3-5)

2

1

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

5

Unskilled and defined decision making (Levels 1-2)

0

2

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

4

Total Permanent

3

7

0

3

3

4

0

3

0

0

23

Temporary employees

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Grand Total

3

6

0

3

4

4

0

3

0

0

23

110


Table 4.5.7: Disciplinary actions 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Disciplinary Actions Total

Male

Disciplinary Actions

Female

Foreign Nationals

Total

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

9

10

0

1

2

6

0

0

0

0

28

4.6 SIGNING OF PERFORMANCE AGREEMENTS BY SMS MEMBERS Table 4.6.1: Signing of Performance Agreements by SMS Members as at 30 September 2010 SMS Level

Number of funded SMS posts per level

Number of SMS members per level

Number of signed Performance Agreements per level

Signed Performance Agreements as % of SMS members per level

Number of SMS who received Performance Bonuses

A

B

C

D

E

Director General/ Head of Department

0

0

0

0

0

Salary level 16, but not HOD

0

0

0

0

0

Salary Level 15

1

1

1

0

0

Salary Level 14

1

1

1

0

0

SalaryLevel 13

4

4

4

0

0

Total

6

6

6

0

0

Table 4.6.2: Disciplinary steps taken against SMS Members for not having concluded Performance Agreements on 30 September 2010

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Disciplinary steps taken against SMS Members for not having concluded Performance Agreements

111

None


Table 4.6.3: Reasons for not having concluded Performance Agreements with all SMS on 30 September 2010 Reason for not concluding Performance Agreements

None

4.7 FILLING OF SMS POSTS Table 4.7.1: SMS posts information as at 31 March 2011 SMS Level

Number of funded SMS posts per level

Number of SMS members per level

% of SMS posts filled per level

Number of SMS posts vacant per level

% of SMS posts vacant per level

A

B

C

D

E

Director General/ Head of Department

0

0

0

0

0

Salary level 16, but not HOD

0

0

0

0

0

Salary Level 15

1

1

100

0

0

Salary Level 14

1

1

100

0

0

Salary Level 13

4

4

100

0

0

Total

6

6

100

0

0

Table 4.7.2: SMS posts information as at 30 September 2010 SMS Level

Number of funded SMS posts per level

Number of SMS members per level

% of SMS posts filled per level

Number of SMS posts vacant per level

% of SMS posts vacant per level

A

B

C

D

E

Director General/ Head of Department

0

0

0

0

0

Salary level 16, but not HOD

0

0

0

0

0

Salary Level 15

1

1

100

0

0

Salary Level 14

1

1

100

0

0

4

4

100

0

0

6

6

100

0

0

SalaryLevel 13 Total

112


4.8. LEAVE UTILISATION FOR THE PERIOD 1 JANUARY 2010 TO 31 DECEMBER 2010 The Public Service Commission identified the need for careful monitoring of sick leave within the public service. The following tables provide an indication of the use of sick leave (Table 4.8.1) and disability leave (Table 4.8.2). Table 4.8.1: Sick leave 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2010 Salary Band

Total days

% days with medical certification

Number of Employees using sick leave

% of total employees using sick leave

Average days per employee

Estimated Cost (Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122;000)

Lower skilled (Levels 1-2)

283

17.66%

72

14.48

3.93

R 84 457

Skilled (Levels 3-5)

892

35.63%

180

36.21

4.95

R 18 666

Highly skilled production (Levels 6-8)

470

42.50%

110

22.13

4.27

R 355 866

Highly skilled supervision (Levels 9-12)

488

31.62%

128

25.75

3.82

R 665 323

6

16.67%

7

1.41

0.85

R 19 461

2 139

144.08%

497

100

17.82

R 1 143 773

Senior management (Levels 13-16) Total

Table 4.8.2: Incapacity leave (temporary and permanent) 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Salary Band

Total days

% days with medical certification

Number of Employees using sick leave

% of total employees using sick leave

Average days per employee

Estimated Cost (Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122;000)

A

B

C

D

E

F

Lower skilled (Levels 1-2)

0

0

0

0

0

N/A

Skilled (Levels 3-5)

5

100%

1

17

5

N/A

Highly skilled production (Levels 6-8)

26

100%

1

17

26

N/A

Highly skilled supervision (Levels 9-12)

89

100%

3

50

30

N/A

Senior management (Levels 13-16)

14

100%

1

17

14

N/A

134

100%

6

101 17%

75 26

N/A

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Total

113


114


Table 4.8.3: Annual Leave 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Salary Band

Total days taken

Average per employee

Lower skilled (Levels 1-2)

1 066.25

17.48

Skilled (Levels 3-5)

4766

23.25

Highly skilled production (Levels 6-8)

2386

20.56

Highly skilled supervision (Levels 9-12)

2 672.43

20.55

Senior management (Levels 13-16)

148.50

21.20

Total

11 038

103

Table 4.8.4: Capped leave 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2011 Salary Band

Average capped No of employees Total capped leave leave per as at 31 December available as at 31 employee as at 31 2010 December 2010 December 2010

Total days of capped leave taken

Average number of days taken per employee

Lower skilled (Levels 1-2)

882.32

27.57

0

0

0

Skilled (Levels 3-5)

2 879.08

44.98

0

0

0

Highly skilled production (Levels 6-8)

274.14

24.92

61.95

3

185.85

Highly skilled supervision (Levels 9-12)

2 212.50

69.14

56.54

9

508.88

Senior management (Levels 13-16)

277.43

138.72

111.43

2

222.86

Total

6 525

305.33

66

14

918 222.86

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Note: Approval was received to pay out capped leave to reduce the liability to CapeNature, resulting in the high number of capped leave days taken.

115


The following table summarises payments made to employees as a result of leave that was not taken. Table 4.8.5: Leave payouts 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Reason

Total Amount

Number of Employees

Average payment per employee

Leave pay outs for 2010/11 due to non-utilisation of leave for the previous cycle

0

0

0

Capped leave pay outs on termination of service for 2010/11

0

0

0

Current leave pay outs on termination of service for 2010/11

R 345, 548

86

R4,018

Total

R 345, 548

86

R4,018

4.9. HIV AND AIDS & HEALTH PROMOTION PROGRAMMES Table 4.9.1: Steps taken to reduce the risk of occupational exposure 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Units/categories of employees identified to be at high risk of contracting HIV & related diseases (if any)

None

116


Table 4.9.2: Details of Health Promotion and HIV and AIDS Programmes 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Question

Yes

1. Has the department designated a member of the SMS to implement the provisions contained in Part VI E of Chapter 1 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001? If so, provide her/his name and position.

No

Details, if yes

2. Does the department have a dedicated unit or has it designated specific staff members to promote the health and well being of your employees? If so, indicate the number of employees who are involved in this task and the annual budget that is available for this purpose.

1 employee No annual dedicated budget provided for.

3. Has the department introduced an Employee Assistance or Health Promotion Programme for your employees? If so, indicate the key elements/services of this Programme.

Professional counselling service for employees in crisis.

4. Has the department established (a) committee(s) as contemplated in Part VI E.5 (e) of Chapter 1 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001? If so, please provide the names of the members of the committee and the stakeholder(s) that they represent. 5. Has the department reviewed its employment policies and practices to ensure that these do not unfairly discriminate against employees on the basis of their HIV status? If so, list the employment policies/practices so reviewed.

Recruitment and Selection Policy & Training and Development Policy

6. Has the department introduced measures to protect HIVpositive employees or those perceived to be HIV-positive from discrimination? If so, list the key elements of these measures.

7. Does the department encourage its employees to undergo Voluntary Counselling and Testing? If so, list the results that you have you achieved.

8. Has the department developed measures/indicators to monitor & evaluate the impact of its health promotion programme? If so, list these measures/indicators.

4.10. LABOUR RELATIONS The following collective agreements were entered into with trade unions within the department. Table 4.10.1: Collective agreements 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Total collective agreements

117

None


The following table summarises the outcome of disciplinary hearings conducted within the department for the year under review. Table 4.10.2: Misconduct and disciplinary hearings finalised 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Outcomes of disciplinary hearings

Number

% of total

Correctional counselling

0

0

Verbal warning

0

0

Written warning

10

35

Final written warning

8

29

Suspension without pay

2

7

Fine

0

0

Demotion

0

0

Dismissal/desertion

8

29

Not guilty

0

0

Case withdrawn

0

0

28

100

Total

Table 4.10.3: Types of misconduct addressed at disciplinary hearings 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Type of misconduct

Number

% of total

Insubordination

4

14

Unauthorised absenteeism

7

25

Poor quality of work

2

7

Dishonesty/Fraud

6

21

Substance abuse

1

4

Mismanagement/Unauthorised use of company vehicle

6

21

Derogatory Comments

1

4

Non adherence of the Health & Safety Act

1

4

28

100

Total

118


Table 4.10.4: Grievances lodged 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Grievances lodged Number of grievances resolved Number of grievances not resolved Total number of grievances lodged

Number

% of total

33

100

0

0

33

100

Table 4.10.5: Disputes lodged with Councils 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Disputes lodged with Councils

Number

% of total

Number of disputes upheld

0

0

Number of disputes dismissed

4

100

Total number of disputes lodged

4

100

Table 4.10.6: Precautionary suspensions 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Precautionary suspensions Number of people suspended Number of people whose suspension exceeded 30 days Average number of days suspended

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Cost of suspensions

119

Number 4 (2 without pay) 2 90.5 R 270 973


4.11. SKILLS DEVELOPMENT This section highlights the efforts of the department with regard to skills development. The tables reflect the training needs as at the beginning of the period under review, and the actual training provided. Table 4.11.1: Training needs identified 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Occupational Categories

Gender

Number of employees as at 1 April 2010

Training needs identified at start of reporting period Learnerships

Skills Programmes & other short courses

Other forms of training

Total

Female

42

0

38

0

38

Male

79

0

65

0

65

Female

7

0

2

0

2

Male

2

0

1

0

1

Female

32

0

24

0

24

Male

54

0

114

0

114

Female

86

0

56

0

56

Male

16

0

12

0

12

Service and sales workers

Female

10

0

24

0

24

Male

96

0

135

0

135

Skilled agriculture and fishery workers

Female

0

0

0

0

0

Male

0

0

0

0

0

Craft and related trades workers

Female

0

0

0

0

0

Male

0

0

0

0

0

Plant and machine operators and assemblers

Female

0

0

0

0

0

Male

0

0

0

0

0

Elementary occupations

Female

35

0

45

0

45

Male

98

0

185

0

185

Female

212

0

189

0

189

Male

345

0

512

0

512

557

0

701

0

701

Female

7

0

0

0

0

Male

4

0

0

0

0

Legislators, senior officials and managers Professionals Technicians and associate professionals Clerks

Sub Total Total Employees with disabilities

Note: The above table identifies training interventions identified at the beginning of the reporting period under review.

120


Table 4.11.2: Training provided 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 Occupational Categories

Legislators, senior officials and managers Professionals Technicians and associate professionals

Gender

Number of employees as at 31 March 2011

Training needs identified at start of reporting period Learnerships

Skills Programmes & other short courses

Other forms of training

Total

Female

42

0

46

40

86

Male

79

0

61

130

191

Female

7

0

1

0

1

Male

2

0

0

0

0

Female

32

0

23

55

78

Male

53

0

75

82

157

Female

85

0

31

43

74

Male

16

0

10

1

11

Service and sales workers

Female

10

0

16

2

18

Male

96

0

136

48

184

Skilled agriculture and fishery workers

Female

0

0

0

0

0

Male

0

0

0

0

0

Craft and related trades workers

Female

0

0

0

0

0

Male

0

0

0

0

0

Plant and machine operators and assemblers

Female

0

0

0

0

0

Male

0

0

0

0

0

Elementary occupations

Female

18

0

53

3

56

Male

79

0

161

21

182

Clerks

Sub Total

Female

194

0

170

143

313

Male

325

0

443

282

725

519

0

613

425

1038

Female

7

0

2

0

2

Male

4

0

9

0

9

Total Employees with disabilities

Note: The above table identifies training interventions identified at the beginning of the reporting period under review.

4.12. INJURY ON DUTY Table 4.12.1: Injury on duty 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Nature of injury on duty

Number

% of total

Required basic medical attention only

9

100

Temporary (Total) Disablement

0

0

Permanent Disablement

0

0

Fatal

0

0

Total

9

100

121


122


4. OTHER INFORMATION Acronyms APO APP BA BCSD BCU BMS BU C.A.P.E. CAS CBA CEO CITES CMA CNR CPPP CTRU DAFF DCAS DEA DEAT DEA&DP DPLG DPW DST DWA DWAF EAP EIA EoI EPWP ERPS FETWater FIETA FPA GIS GMO GRAP Ha HR HRD IS IT IUCN Km LAN LED M&E MCAs MCS MCM MEC MoA MoU MTEC MTEF MTO MTSF NEM:BA NEM:PAA

123

Annual Plan of Operation Annual Performance Plan Biodiversity Agreement Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Development Biodiversity Crime Unit Biodiversity Monitoring System Business Unit Cape Action for People and the Environment Crime Administration System Critical Biodiversity Areas Chief Executive Officer Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species Catchment Management Agency Cape Nature Reserves Community Public Private Partnerships Cape Town Routes Unlimited Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport Department of Environmental Affairs Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism Department of Environmental Affairs and Development Planning Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (previously Provincial and Local Government) Department of Public Works Department of Science and Technology Department of Water Affairs Department of Water Affairs and Forestry Environmental Assessment Practitioner Environmental Impact Assessment Expression of Interest Expanded Public Works Programme Enterprise Resource Planning System Framework Programme for Research Education and Training in Water Forestry Industry Education and Training Authority Fire Protection Association Geographical Information System Genetically Modified Organism Generally Recognised Accounting Practice Hectare Human Resources Human Resource Development Information Systems Information Technology International Union for the Conservation of Nature Kilometre Local Area Network Local Economic Development Monitoring and Evaluation Mountain Catchment Areas Management Control System Marine and Coastal Management Member of Executive Council Memorandum of Agreement Memorandum of Understanding Medium Term Expenditure Committee Medium Term Expenditure Framework Mountain to Ocean Medium Term Strategic Framework National Environmental Management Act: Biodiversity Act National Environmental Management Act: Protected Areas Act


NEMA NBF NBSAP NFSD NGO NPAES NQF NYSP O&C OHS OHSA PA PAAC PAE PAES PES PGWC PMP PPP PSDF RoD SADC SAEON SALGA SAN SANBI SANParks SCM SCOPA SDIP SETA SHE SKEP SMME SOB ToR VWS VCA WAN WCED WCNCB WfW WIMS WMA WoF WWF WWF-SA YSP

National Environmental Management Act National Biodiversity Framework National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan National Framework for Sustainable Development Non Governmental Organisation National Protected Area Expansion Strategy National Qualifications Framework National Youth Service Programme Ocean and Coasts Occupational Healthy and Safety Occupational Healthy and Safety Act Protected Area Protected Area Advisory Committee Protected Area Expansion Protected Area Expansion Strategy Payment for Ecosystem Services Provincial Government of the Western Cape Project Management Plan Public Private Partnership Provincial Spatial Development Framework Record of Decision Southern African Development Community South African Environmental Observation Node South African Local Government Association Storage Area Network South African National Biodiversity Institute South African National Parks Supply Chain Management Standing Committee on Public Accounts Sustainable Development Implementation Plan Sector Educational Training Authority Safety, Health and Environment Succulent Karoo Ecosystem Programme Small Medium Micro Enterprises State of Biodiversity Terms of Reference Volunteer Wildfire Services Voluntary Conservation Areas Wide Area Network Western Cape Education Department Western Cape Nature Conservation Board Working for Water Water Information Management System Water Management Area Working on Fire World Wide Fund for Nature World Wide Fund for Nature â&#x20AC;&#x201C; South Africa Youth Services Programme

124


List of contact details SECTOR

NAME

TEL NO.

CELLPHONE

E-MAIL

EXECUTIVES Chief Executive Officer Executive Director: Biodiversity Executive Director: Business Development Chief Finance Officer Executive Director: Operations Executive Director:Human Resource

Manana Moroka Kas Hamman Sheraaz Ismail Allan Preston Vacant Nazeem Jamie

(021) (021) (021) (021)

483 483 483 483

0001 0003 0004 0005

082 082 082 082

307 572 808 798

9205 7205 0961 9143

mmoroka@capenature.co.za khamman@capenature.co.za sismail@capenature.co.za apreston@capenature.co.za

(021) 483 0006

082 882 2311

njamie@capenature.co.za

Fulaphi Khoza Sandy Floris Lindsay Stevens Nolundi Puzi Deon Hignett Ernst Baard Phyllis Gouws

(021) (021) (021) (021) (021) (021) (021)

082 082 082 082 n/a 082 n/a

fkhoza@capenature.co.za sfloris@capenature.co.za lstevens@capenature.co.za npuzi@capenature.co.za dhignett@capenature.co.za ebaard@capenature.co.za pgouws@capenature.co.za

Chamilla Thebus

(021) 483 0049

079 495 0333

cthebus@capenature.co.za

Rowena Vaughan

(021) 483 0060

079 514 4914

rvaughan@capenature.co.za

Desiree English Arno Scheepers Marietjie Engelbrecht Lucinda Witten

(021) (021) (021) (021)

082 082 082 082

denglish@capenature.co.za arno@capenature.co.za mengelbrecht@capenature.co.za lwitten@capenature.co.za

Willfred Williams Mahbobah Jacobs

(021) 483 0074 (021) 483 0072

082 827 7462 n/a

wwilliams@capenature.co.za majacobs@capenature.co.za

Melikhaya Pantsi Jaco Van Deventer

(021) 483 0167 (022) 931 2900

082 452 3524 082 455 5569

mpantsi@capenature.co.za jvdeventer@capenature.co.za

Paul Gildenhuys Trevor Farr Kerry Purnell

(021) 866 8012 (021) 866 1012 (021) 850 5266

082 551 8312 082 4509913 079 879 4194

pgilden@kingsley.ca.za tfarr@mweb.co.za kpurnell@capenature.co.za

Chris Martens

(028) 314 0173 (028) 314 0185

082 496 3445

cmartens@capenature.co.za

Jenifer Gouza Gail Cleaver-Christie

(022) 931 2900 (021) 866 8036

082 312 7058 082 377 2040

jgouza@capenature.co.za gail@capenature.co.za

Ben Van Staden Zane Erasmus Pierre de Villiers

(021) 483 0171 (044) 873 0261 (021) 866 8023

079 503 6424 082 414 6344 083 236 2924

bvanstaden@capenature.co.za wze@netactive.co.za estuaries@capenature.co.za

Elbe Cloete Dian Dreyer Mandisa Mdala Tierck Hoekstra Mbulelo Jacobs Morris Floris Ivan Donian Hennie Africa

(022) (021) (021) (028) (044) (023) (044) (028)

082 082 082 082 082 082 082 082

ecloete@capenature.co.za ddreyer@capenature.co.za mmdala@capenature.co.za tierck@capenature.co.za mjacobs@capenature.co.za mfloris@capenature.co.za idonian@mweb.co.za hafrica@capenature.co.za

MANAGERS Senior Finance Manager Senior Finance Manager Supply Chain Manager Administration Manager Senior Manager Law Support Senior Manager Scientific Services Human Resource Manager: Payroll Human Resource Manager: Recruitment and Selection Human Resource Manager: Capacity Building Human Resource Manager: HRD & Utilisation Senior Manager: Information Technology Communications Manager Marketing Manager Project Co-Odinator: Infrastructure Development Business Development: PPP Officer

483 483 483 483 483 866 483

483 483 483 483

0018 0017 0027 0032 0118 8001 0048

0059 0095 0077 0076

798 798 417 767

9078 9143 5619 5585

414 0424

058 442 814 556

9205 3170 3559 9720

PROGRAMME MANAGERS Programme Manager: People and Conservation Programme Programme Manager: WildLife Programme Manager: Biodiversity Crime Unit Programme Manager: Youth Development Programme Manager: Stewardship Programme Manager: Mentorship and Coaching

CapeNature Annual Report 2010/11

Programme Manager: Corridors,Biosphere reserves & world heritage sites Programme Manager: Quality Management Programme Manager: Alien Vegetation Management Programme Manager: Fire Management Programme Manager: Marine Protected Areas, Islands and Estuaries AREA MANAGERS Area Area Area Area Area Area Area Area

Manager: Manager: Manager: Manager: Manager: Manager: Manager: Manager:

North West Boland Cape Metro Overberg Garden Route Breedeberg Karoo Langeberg

125

931 850 483 316 802 231 802 361

3244 5260 0150 3338 5314 1170 5321 3338

455 823 784 496 802 455 376 557

5992 7415 1752 2447 5314 5574 2162 5823



Cape Nature Annual Report