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Skier: Jason Arens Photo: Jason Badgley

CMC

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HALO vs ALPHA1

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BULASHOOT

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LOVELAND 21 FD-LDC-SAGA 28 SPONSOR ME? 35 FOLLOW US ON TWITTER! https://twitter.com/insightskiing


Letter From

THE EDITOR

Dear Readers -

This marks our first issue and what will no doubt be the most exciting for us to release. Conceived during the 2009/2010 ski season, InSight Skiing E-Magazine strives to bring a different outlook to the ski media industry. Originating as a blog which was operated purely as a hobby, InSight has evolved. The decision to move forward and launch InSight to the next level came about in June of 2010.

passion

The content found in these pages is motivated by love for the sport and journalistic desire. InSight Skiing is the culmination of many individual efforts; to reach this starting off point has been extremely satisfying and strenous at the same time. This publication represents taking a chance, dedicating our own time, energy, creativity, and money to produce a final product that we hope will be enjoyed by hundreds and thousands of readers.

ART

If you share a passion for skiing than we hope you enjoy the pages ahead of you in this inaugural issue. Our first, and if we have anything to say about it, certainly not our last. I encourage you to aid in our efforts of continuity, feedback is welcomed. Story ideas/leads, article submissions, photographs, suggestions, criticism, let us have it! This magazine is written for the reader.

Integrity

We are... Original, independent, and insightful. JASON D. BADGLEY EDITOR-IN-CHIEF & FOUNDER


P: Toby Clifford | Val D ’ I s ere , Fra n ce

SIMON B LONDEL H E LIX SK IS

BAMBOO STRONG

Liberty uses bamboo in every ski we make. This renewable resource is one of the lightest and strongest natural building materials o n t he p l a n et . V i s i t l i b er t y s kis .co m t o l e a r n m o re a bo ut o u r a w ard w innin g l i n e o f e co -fr i e nd l y s ki s b u il t b am b oo s t ro n g, l i gh t a n d c l ea n .

H E LIX SKIS 135-105-122 LIBERTY. BAMBOO. STRONG. LIGHT. CLEAN. LIBE RT YSK IS.CO M


COLORADO MOUNTAIN COLLEGE How can I get involved in the Ski Industry? What college is close to a ski resort? The Alpine Campus of Colorado Mountain College located in Steamboat Springs, CO is a solution to both of those questions. Steamboat offers some of the lightest powder in North America, and some of the best tree skiing in Colorado. The terrain park offers a superpipe, jumps and rails, while Howelsen Hill across the Yampa River has a nighttime Jib park. Being in such close proximity to the resort gives students a short commute to get their daily ski-fix in. For those that choose to drive from the college to Steamboat Mountain, you can expect the drive to last around ten minutes. If the free bus transit system is more to your taste, you’ll be set back roughly another 10-20 minutes depending on your route.Nestled in the hills above the Yampa Valley, CMC offers an Associate Degree specializing in the Ski industry. Their Resort Management offering is a degree on the hotel/resort operations side of things, taking into consideration both summer and winter activities, hospitality issues, and delves into the food and beverage side of things. Those looking more into the ski retail/manufacturing area of the business would be more interested in the Ski & Snowboard Business degree. Available as both a Degree and as a Certificate; The curriculum is loaded with classes like Ski Tuning and Boot Fitting, giving the ability to repair gear and properly create a custom boot fit for a customer. Retailing and Sales, Snowsports Promotions, Ski Product Design, and many other ski-industry-centric classes provide the student with an in depth look at the inner workings of the industry, as well as prepare them for an entry level job for virtually any company doing ski- and snowboard- related business. Course required credits are heavy on the business side along basic requirements such as English and Public Speaking, while the advised electives fall under accounting principles and economics classes. The real bread-and-butter of this program is the work experience opportunity. While ultimately the responsibility of the student, the outstanding faculty is more than happy to provide guidance and support in finding the right company to intern with or sales representative to learn from. Students have gained work experience with Scott USA, Helly Hansen, Betty Rides, Nordica USA, Marker USA, Liberty Skis, Burton Snowboards, and many others. Michael Martin, an alumni of the program himself, is now the Director. Mike Martin’s relationships with industry professionals has opened up many doors for those looking to intern. Mike has revised and updated the program course list to better meet the demands of the ski industry workplace today, and puts his heart and soul into his lectures and teachings. The Ski & Snowboard Business Program will give you exactly what you put into it. Former students have found positions within the industry as sales representatives, sales and marketing managers, and ski shop managers. The program provides the education and opportunity needed to succeed. As a graduate of the program, I had the chance to gain an insight to the inner workings of the industry. The Ski Business Program allowed me to assist the operation of film festivals, represent companies at sales events, gain on-snow demo experience and learn from the best in the industry. If you don’t mind working your way up from the bottom, possibly tuning skis in cold winter elements, or steaming more articles of clothing than you would like to remember, this program may be exactly what you are looking for. Interested? - visit http://www.coloradomtn.edu/cms/one.aspx?pageId=3628951 for more information


6 Ski & Snowboard Business

Career & Technical Degrees and Certificates Associate of Applied Science: Ski and Snowboard Business As the snow-sports industry has grown, so has the need for technically trained professionals with strong leadership, management, and communication skills. The Ski & Snowboard Business program was designed with help from Billy Kidd, former Olympic medalist and World Cup champion. Kidd and others who are deeply involved in today’s snow-sports industry developed the program to offer careers in specialized retail and wholesale businesses which supply ski and snowboarding clothing and equipment. Snow-sports related careers include retailing, manufacturing, marketing and sales. Additionally, Colorado Mountain College and Western State College have signed an agreement that allows students in the Ski and Snowboard Business degree to complete a Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration in Marketing. Please consult with your advisor about requirements for this option.

Students must demonstrate college-level proficiency in reading, writing, and mathematics as prerequisites for courses within this degree. Skills in these areas may affect the sequence in which you can enroll and may also extend the time required to complete this program. For more details, please see the Academic Placement and Testing section. Graduates of the program will receive an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Ski & Snowboard Business. Your advisor will help you develop a schedule that meets your academic needs.

SKB 117 SKB 118 SKB 130 SKB 140 SKB 210 SKB 216 SKB 220 SKB 229

Ski & Snowboard Retailing and Sales Snow Sports Promotions Accelerated Boot Fitting Accelerated Ski & Board Tuning Ski & Board Product Design Ski & Snowboard Marketing and Media Snow Sports Retail & Wholesale Integrated Portfolio & Capstone

3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 22

ACC 121 ACC 122 BUS 216 ECO 201 ECO 202 HOS 215 MGD 102

Principles of Accounting I Principles of Accounting II Legal Environment of Business Principles of Macroeconomics Principles of Microeconomics Training and Development Introduction to Multimedia

www.coloradomtn.edu/advising

Minimum Contact Hours Required

! State Guaranteed Transfer Course

60 1012.5-1155

Certificate: Ski & Snowboard Shop Technician These certificates

provide the student an opportunity to gain the skills necessary to find entry level employment in a retail ski and snowboard shop. This curriculum includes many of the courses included in the Associate of Applied Science degree in Ski and Snowboard Business and credits may be applied toward that degree. Students must demonstrate acceptable proficiency levels in reading, writing, and mathematics as prerequisites for courses within this program. Skills in these areas may affect the sequence in which you can enroll and may also extend the time required to complete this program. For more details, please see the Academic Placement and Testing section.

The Ski and Snowboard Certificates are offered at the Alpine Campus. See the Course Description section for more information on Ski and Snowboard Business courses. Certificate I - Retail and Repair Shop Technician I ____________ SKB 110 Introduction to Boot Fitting ____________ SKB 120 Introduction to Ski & Board Repair & Tuning ____________ SKB 210 Ski & Board Product Design ____________ SKB 220 Snow Sports Retail & Wholesale Minimum Credit Hours Required Minimum Contact Hours Required

Certificate II ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________

Retail and Repair Shop Technician II SKB 111 Boot Ftting II SKB 118 Snowsports Promotions SKB 121 Ski & Board Repair & Tuning II SKB 187 Work Experience

Minimum Credit Hours Required Minimum Contact Hours Required

Advised Electives (17 credits) ___________ " ___________ " ___________ " ___________ ! ___________ ! ____________ ____________

Minimum Credit Hours Required

2 2 3 3 10

172.5

1 1 2 3 7 225

4 4 3 3 3 3 3

" Applies to CMC AA|AS Degree

09-10 Colorado Mountain College Catalog 115.

Programs: Career & Technical

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

Program Requirements (22 credits) ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________

1 3-6 5 3 3-17

Your advisor will help you develop a schedule that meets your needs.

General Education & Business Requirements (21 credits) BUS 115 Introduction to Business BUS 217 Business Communications & Report Writing BUS 226 Business Statistics CIS 118 Introduction to PC Applications ENG 121 English Composition I COM115 Public Speaking Advised General Education Elective

SKB 105 History of Skiing SKB 187 Work Experience Foreign Language Advised General Education Elective Advised Elective (SKB, HOS, GCM, OUT, SAO)

Graduates of the program will receive a Certificate of Occupational Proficiency in Ski and Snowboard Retail and Repair Technician I or II.

The Ski & Snowboard Business Degree is offered at Alpine Campus. See the Master Course Listing for more information about Ski & Snowboard Business courses. ___________ " ___________ " ___________ " ___________ " ___________ ! ___________ " ____________

____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________


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Resort Spotlight will feature a different resort in each issue, identifying the factors that make that resort enjoyable to visit, who the driving forces are at the resort, and a summary of events you can expect to see.

For the Inaugural issue the choice to spotlight Loveland Ski Area was an easy one to make, the mountain is often the first in the country to open its lifts, hosts a multitude of events, and has great off-piste terrain.

The day after a snowfall you will most likely have an easier time finding both fresh turns and a free parking space than at Vail or Beaver Creek, not to mention a shorter drive from the Denver/Boulder area or Summit County.

Most importantly, Loveland is synonymous with FUN.


22 Often highlighted for being the first resort to open in Colorado, Loveland also hosts some of the liveliest and well-planned competitions I have witnessed. During the Nordica Ace of Spades Rail Jam held in the fall of 2009, the competency of everyone involved in the competition was extremely impressive. At event registration all necessary information was readily visible as well as available on copy paper for competitors to take with them on the hill. During the event park crew kept on top of the features constantly raking out ruts that developed while the marketing staff and Nordica reps created a truly fun atmosphere for all ages. There was no confusion as to what features were being judged, an endless supply of Monster Energy, and great jams to ski to. Athletes of all levels were in attendance, from a soon to be WSI Superpipe Champion to the younger aspiring skiers whose age hasn’t hit the double digits, it was clearly evident that everyone had enjoyed their day at Loveland. Bruce Ruff ripping a turn in waist deep powder on a beautiful day at Loveland - Photo by Dustin Schaefer


The success of this competition is a direct reflection on the dedication presented by the staff at Loveland. A great example would be Dustin Schaefer, the New Media/Group Sales Coordinator. From season start to end, Dustin gives his all as the voice of Loveland in all realms of Social Media. Where Dustin is the voice, Duncan Maxwell would have to be the hand directly responsible for all the park events that occur at Loveland. From opening day and the early season jams, to the mountains signature “Tall Tees and Tacos” competition, Duncan, the Events & Promotions Coordinator dedicates a large amount of time to these events and is extremely passionate about them. The resort realizes that the competitions mean a significant amount to the participants, and they have gotten better every year. Next time you see either of these guys on the hill, be sure to give them some props for their efforts. Loveland stays on point when advertising their events with never over-promising or under-delivering, unlike a nearby competitor. This other resort held a competition the same day as Tall Tees and Tacos, and even advertised on the radio that skis among other items as AvailaBle prizes, mAnY of which were mysteriously absent from the awards ceremony. In contrast, participants of the Tall Tees and Tacos competition were presented with a t-shirt, free Wahoo’s Fish Tacos, and Mountain Dew after paying the registration fee. Did I forget to mention there was over $10,000 in prizes awarded at Loveland’s Tall Tees and Tacos that day? Loveland competitions are quickly becoming the obvious choice for those looking to test their skills and have fun at the same time.

Did you know Loveland averaged over 400 Inches of snow a season over the past five years? Highest snowfall in one month in the past five years? 89 Inches, and it happened twice in December, once in 05-06, and once in 08-09. S: Walter Wood - P:Dustin Schaefer

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It may

not have the most extensive trail network, or the biggest park in the region, but you can rest assured that after spending a day skiing at Loveland, you will leave hungry for more. Dustin Schaefer was kind enough to let me pick his brain concerning Loveland Ski Area and the upcoming season. Dustin handles all social marketing for the resort as well as shoot all video and photos. – What does the 2010/2011 season hold in store for Loveland? Loveland is hoping to be the first ski area in North America to open for the second consecutive season. We’re currently loading up our event calendar with more live music, rail jams/freeride events and a ton of other fun events for skiers and riders of all ages. What is the biggest difference between amateur events at Loveland, being a smaller independently run resort, compared to ones that are held at larger resorts? Our main focus with our amateur events is to make sure every skier/ rider leaves the mountain saying “Wow! That was a fun comp!” Some riders have told me they feel intimidated and sometimes scared to enter other mountain comps. At our park events it’s not about coming in first, second or third…It’s all about throwing down, high fives and having fun! Our events have been the stepping-stone for many big riders such as Keri Herman, Duncan Adams and Walter Wood.


The race to open first in Colorado between Loveland and A-basin is legendary; do you have any insight into who will win this year? Where did the summer go?! Our snowmaking team sets a high standard for opening day. We open with a 1,000 foot vertical run with top to bottom side to side coverage and a minimum packed base of 18 inches. We always set up an opening day mini park for the jibbers. Whats in your quiver? Skis, bindings, boots? Outerear, goggles? Scott Dozer 175/Marker Jester/Salomon SPK Pro/Orage/Scott poles & goggles/ Bern helmets/Hestra gloves. Favorite place to ski outside of Loveland? Alyeska! My family has a house five minutes from the lift line. That mountain rocks my world. What park events can we expect to see at Loveland for 2010/11? Will Tall-Tees & Tacos be bigger and better this year? If so, how? We’re looking at doing a few rail jams and the two Tall T’s & Tacos slopestyle events. We’re not going to tweak the Tall T’s & Tacos event too much. It’s been a great success for many years (originally Vert Alert). Our park crew is always working hard to change features up and keep the takeoffs and landings looking good. Look for more creativity from our park crew this coming season. I’m always trying to recruit more girl skiers and snowboarders for our events…So guys, tell your moms, sisters, girlfriends and wives to come out and throw down at our Loveland park events!

P:Dustin Schaefer

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26 P:Dustin Schaefer

How did Tall-Tees & Tacos come about? The catchy name, fun atmosphere, etc...? The Loveland Marketing Team came up with this after a few brainstorming sessions (no beer was consumed). We wanted to come up with a theme that would be cleaver and fun for our riders and sponsors. 20 bucks got you your entry fee, a sweet Loveland Tall T, lunch from Wahoo’s Fish Taco and oodles of Mountain Dew….Not to mention our sponsors threw down more than $10,000 in prizes. You can’t go wrong with our Tall T’s & Tacos events. Is there any chance of Loveland working with ski media/ video/manufacturers to create an end of season/post season park shoot? This is our goal for the upcoming season. Loveland would make an amazing place for an end of year edit/park shoot. We have more snow that time of year than any other place, the backdrop is gorgeous…It would be money. I just have to convince the big guys it’s the direction I would love to see the mountain go. To be continued….

efer -

S: Du

cha stin S

vid P: Da

y

Gidle

A big thanks goes out to Dustin Schaefer, Duncan Maxwell and John Sellers of Loveland for making this article possible. - JB S: Nick

Martini

- P:Dus

tin Scha

efer


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Whats in a name? First: first - [furst] – adjective

1. being before all others with respect to time, order, rank, importance, etc., used as the ordinal number of one: the first edition; the first vice president.

Drop: drop - [drop] - noun, verb, dropped or dropt, drop·ping. 1. a small quantity of liquid that falls or is produced in a more or less spherical mass; a liquid globule. 2. the quantity of liquid contained in such a globule. 3. a very small quantity of liquid: I'll have a little more tea, just a drop. 4. a minute quantity of anything: not even a drop of mercy. 5.Usually, drops. a. liquid medicine given in a dose or form of globules from a medicine dropper. b. a solution for dilating the pupils of the eyes, administered to the eyes in globules by a medicine dropper. 6. a limited amount of an alcoholic beverage: He occasionally takes a drop after dinner. 7. an act or instance of dropping; fall; descent. 8. the distance or depth to which anything drops: a ten-foot drop to the ground. 9. a steep slope: a short drop to the lake. 10. a decline in amount, degree, quality, value, etc.: a drop in prices.

Undersleeve 31” 25.5”

XL

XLT

M

Lethal Descent

31

26”

26” 23.5”

23.5”

L

28.5”

27.5”

L

SAGA

XL

23”

23”

M

L

First Drop

XL

XLT


32 Waterproof Ratings:

SAGA - 20k

LDC - 20k

First Drop - 20k

Pant Outseam 49.25”

49”

46.75”

47”

45.6”

44.25” 41.25”

L

XL

XLT

Lethal Descent

M

42”

L

SAGA

XL

L

XL

First Drop

Whats in a name? SAGA: sa·ga - [sah-guh] – noun

1. a medieval Icelandic or Norse prose narrative of achievements and events in the history of a personage, family, etc. 2. any narrative or legend of heroic exploits. 3. Also called saga novel. a form of the novel in which the members or generations of a family or social group are chronicled in a long and leisurely narrative.


SPONSOR ME? Searching for sponsorship? Read these tips to help your efforts

1. Be sure you’re going through the correct channels – Inquiring about sponsorship on a company’s facebook page will get you nowhere. Asking “Do you guys sponsor anyone?” is not a first impression that will aid your cause. Spend a few minutes to peruse their website, looking for a sponsorship point of contact or a page dedicated to the topic that explains what do to. Oh, and the obvious answer to the question above is ‘if they have any sponsored athletes, yes’. 2. Sell yourself A company wants to know how you will market and ultimately sell their product. So the real question is, “Why you?” – What do you bring to the table that others cannot? Everyone can be seen skiing on the product, or tell people they ride up the lift with about the product. Compare your edits and pictures to others, does your video mostly contain footage that can be found in the majority of videos posted online? Is there something about you that stands out? Competitions, travel, blogs, other sponsors, coverage in your local media (newspapers, resort photos, etc…), your ability to supply news/blog worthy video and photos, etc… Really spend some time composing an answer to this. 06


3. Compose a coherent sponsorship inquiry & resume Spellcheck, spellcheck, spellcheck! A poorly written email and resume is not what a TM or Rep wants to see. Remember, you will be representing their brand if they choose to sponsor you, so represent yourself well!

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4. Evaluate the possibility – Evaluate the company, consider how long they have been around, their size, how many athletes they currently have, etc‌ Typically smaller companies cannot provide a high-level of sponsorship, and are limited to the amount of athletes they can afford. A sponsorship from a small company can very likely be 1 of their products for the entire season, with a chance to pro-form more. This being said, they can present a great opportunity to grow with them. Larger companies can be harder to impress, are subject to budget cuts out of the marketing/team managers control, and it can be tougher to climb the ranks to receive more support. Although with large companies, a larger amount of support can follow. 5. Be Realistic – The majority of sponsorship requests are denied. That is the brutally honest truth of the matter. Many companies are great about responding to your email, however many you will never hear a word back from. Do not let this discourage you! Keep working at it, if skiing is what you love and you keep training, your chances for sponsorship will only increase.


Other Pointers

SPONSOR ME?

6. Online forums – Looking for feedback on your skiing? Threads titled “Am I good enough to get sponsored?” will not bring the most constructive of comments. Instead of focusing on an end result of sponsorship, taking the direction of improving your skiing would be much more beneficial. Put together an edit consisting of video clips of you skiing and performing tricks that you want to improve on. Create a thread asking for advice, identifying exactly what you are looking for help on. 7. Avoid Contact Overload – Whether contacting sales reps or companies directly via their sponsorship email address/application process, smothering them is not advised. Inquiring and/or applying for sponsorship is fine, but be careful not to overdo it, alienating a brand/rep is the last thing you want to do. 8. Taking the summer off – Utilize off-season time to train. Not being able to go to Windells or Woodward is no excuse not to train. On the flip side, if you can make it to a summer camp, that week alone is insufficient. Either way, work out; a stronger skier is a better skier. Injuries occur less often, you have more control over your muscles while performing tricks. With more endurance you will be able to hike rails in the fall longer, equaling more on-snow practice, getting you closer to perfection.

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Q&A Erik Jorgensen - Bula Marketing Manager What is the most common mistake sponsorship applicants make? The most common mistake for athletes looking to get sponsored that I see is that they are making it hard on the TM. if you have photos attach them in a pdf so everyone on any computer can open them. Make sure your video links are working and correct. Make it easy for us to review your footage and photos, we get tons of requests that have nothing attached. What do you look for in an athlete? I look for someone with the same personality as the brand and someone who is passionate about what they are doing. Being available and accountable can go a long ways as well. What gets your attention? I like to see athletes who have something unique to offer, cool shots, funny video clips, rad photos, hobo beards, dream catchers.

Interested in Advertising? contact us! - insightskiing@gmail.com


PHOTOS STORIES EVENTS TRIPS REVIEWS PRESS RELEASE Insight is accepting content submissions! If you have a sweet photo, story, gear review, etc.. send it our way! We are also looking for Press Releases, Events to add to our calendar, and team trip recaps. Starting a new company? Let us know about it! Email us at - insightskiing@gmail.com

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an e-zine for skiers

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