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EQUALPOWER • SPRING 2018 / ISSUE 3 •

eMagazine for equality and diversity MAKEDONIJA, SLOVENIJA, EVROPA


EQUALPOWER CHIEF-EDITOR EXECUTIVE EDITOR

mag. Natalie C. Postru탑nik Dejan Andonov

EDITOR

Nina Klan훾nik

EDITOR

Danaja Postru탑nik

DESIGN

Gorazd Postru탑nik

ABOUT EQUALPOWER

eMagazin is part of the activities and tools, conducted within the project Equal Power to the Women by Izida Vita, Slovenia in cooperation with Institute of Communication Studies, Macedonia en.izidavita.si, gorazd@izidavita.si Cover photo: Insights d.o.o. Project Equal Power to the Women is partially financed by the Ministry of foreign affairs of Republic of Slovenia Disclaimer: The content of the eMagazine represents the opinions of the authors and is not the official position of the Government of the Republic of Slovenia


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INFOGRAPHICS ON GENDER EQUALITY

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INTERVIEW: CLADIA DE CASTRO CALDEIRINHA - „USE YOUR FULL POTENTIAL AND YOUR WHOLE VOICE"

CLAUDIA DE CASTRO CALDEIRINHA

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THE EUROPEAN WOMEN’S LOBBY (EWL

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WORLDWIDE FACTS ABOUT GENDER INEQUALITY

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BLOGS

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WEB-CONFERENCE „EQUAL POWER TO THE WOMEN. HOW TO ENHANCE CHANGES?“

Maja Lotrič

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Darko Malinovski, ICS student

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BE PASSIONATE AND BELIEVE

W E I V R E T N I

Claudia de Castro Caldeirinha, Founder of Redscope Consulting (Belgium) and Leadership Professor, talks to the editors of #EqualPower Magazine about gender equality and inclusion in the 21st century’s turbulent world. This interview is conducted on the occasion of the launching of her new book Women Leading the Way in Brussels, and having her as a keynote speaker at the 1st International Web Conference in Macedonia on March 29th.

E WAS FOR ME THER ADE ME TM ONE TIP THA T TO BE CHANGE: NO SING MY AFRAID OF U IAL AND FULL POTENT OICE. MY WHOLE V

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Claudia de Castro Caldeirinha, Redscope Consulting, Key-note speaker at the Conference on 29th March Why do you personally engage in the topic gender equality so passionately? I started in international politics; from there I got involved in everything that was supporting peace and democracy building. I started to realize that gender is a key element, if you want to create peace and sustainability in the society. So the next step – working on gender equality – was a necessity. I prepared my master theses on gender identity. I have always been fascinated with what makes us who we are: not only gender (whether you are defined as a woman or a man, LGBT, etc) but also the other layers of identity that define each of us: culture, education, social upbringing, age, religious beliefs, etc. As my career unfolded, I have decided to develop more my work on leadership, as I believe that it is key to help those who take decisions that affect most of us: help them developing more inclusive and conscious leadership styles, a solid vision, a sense of purpose, collective engagement,. value-driven strategies, agility to deal with a world in transformation, and lots of emotional intelligence.

Leadership development and Gender Balance programs for management are my daily “bread and butter” (laughs). My conclusion is that we need gender balanced and inclusive organizations to enhance and prepare our organizations and our societies to the many challenges and threats of the 4th industrial revolution we are living. To successfully thrive in the 21st century, our societies need all the talents, men and women, with their shares of cognitive, social and emotional skills. I am a person who first needs to observe and assess the big picture: what is the context, the needs and the (internal and external) reality of my client? What are the problems they need to solve, as a whole? And what are the specific sub-changes that need to happen, so the systemic change can successfully happen? I don’t believe much actually changes, if you change only one piece of a big “cake”: it can help in the short-term but real change needs more systemic approached. My added value is to put all the pieces together, and work with leaders and teams to jointly find the solutions to their problems, using both cognitive and creative tools and processes.


You and Corinna Hörst have just published the book Women Leading the Way in Brussels (John Harper Publishing, 2017). What led you to it and what are your main findings? For too many years, women leaders have been invisible. Working in this field, I became aware that one of the key reasons women were not as determined to get into decision-making positions was the lack of powerful role models. At some stage, American women started to publish and that started to fill in a huge vacuum. But still, a big part of what was in their books was not applying to “us, Europeans”. That was out perception and the perception of many of my students, networks, etc. With Corinna, we had the privilege to regularly work and interact with many great women leaders, to hear their stories and benefit from their wisdom. So at some stage we decided that we were going for it… We wanted to show the diversity of leadership styles to overcome the typical pigeon-holing of women as being “one type” of leader. The logical choice was to focus the book on Brussels – it is the multicultural and multinational “capital of the EU” and it happens to be the city where we are based and work from.  Next step was to find inspirational women leaders in the different sections (like EU institutions, in business sectors – multinational, SMEs, social entrepreneurs; then nongovernmental sector: NGOs, think thanks …) trying to have also diversity in terms of their different countries/regions of origin.

We interviewed 14 women and they are all fabulous – we could have interviewed many more but our Publisher made us stop, at some stage... I have learnt a lot in this process, and so did Corinna. For me there was one tip that made me change: Not to be afraid of using my full potential and my whole voice. When we speak up powerfully, we still tend to be criticized not only by men but also by women. We observe this every day, from the latest US elections to our small daily actions. Women have been socialized for millennia to be nice, submissive and invisible: be a small mouse, don’t step out too much, be nice, don’t be “loud”, don’t dare. Right? Well, none of those 14 women actually accepted this. They didn’t accept to be reduced to less than what they can be. They dare, take risks, speak up – sometimes they succeeded, sometimes they had to cope with big “failures” that made them grow even more and be more resilient. These women inspired me to my best to use my potential and my voice to do what I believe are the right things to do, to fight for my values and to contribute however I can to make this world a better place.

Can you give some pieces of advice on dos and don’ts for women, who aspire to be leaders? There are so many. For starters, creating a gender balanced world is not a “women’s issue” only – it is for men and women to responsibly make those changes, starting at home with dual career/dual care-taker roles. We all –men and women- have huge blind spots, so many conscious and unconscious biases.

If you wish some little tips for your women readers, I could highlight the following: - Do not allow the opinion/judgment of others to stop you. It is not others who decide for you or know what is the best for you. Not even the one(s) we love. - Very important: find a partner that REALLY supports you, your dreams, your career and – when time comes - equally shares the domestic/family chores. Don’t marry a dinosaur. - Define what success means to you. It is something different for each of us. We don’t have equal aspirations – what is the change you wish to do in the world? How can your talents be used for the common good? What would the bravest version of yourself look like? - Focus on what you are good at. Improve your “weaknesses” but don’t let them define you or make you loose self-esteem. Build on your strengths! Are there any differences in “how it is to be a woman leader” in “West-Europe” vs. developing countries (like Macedonia)? The context of women varies from country to country, region to region, as you can read in UN, OECD and EU reports and studies. For example, in Iceland and Sweden, there is a long tradition of policies to protect and promote gender equality – like work-family balance, parental leave, etc - that we still don’t have in most Southern European countries. |  06

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Yet, all countries have still something in common: they are not yet using the talents and potential of their women, i.e. 51% of the EU citizens – and that is a massive waste of resources that can no longer be tolerated. Some countries have implemented gender quotas for corporate leadership and political bodies, others are investing in gender budgeting, others are truly not doing much… Overall, I think that societies have become more aware about the importance of gender equality; they are putting more pressure on decision makers to support changes. Let’s not forget that 60% of the university graduates in the EU are women – these women have a strong voice and lots of talent that should not be wasted, for the sake of the investment made (by their families and countries) and for the sake of the future of their countries which needs all the innovation and diversity of skills they can get. That is probably different in some Eastern European countries, but again Poland is so different from Latvia, Hungary so different from Macedonia… It’s too difficult to generalise. What I can say is that I have frequently noticed this so called “machomen attitude” when I worked in the region. I am sorry to see there are still only few women in key political positions, low number of CEOs, few women leading media … But you know what? That is not so different from several Western European countries.

What would be your key suggestions to developing and building more genderinclusive organization?

management, pipeline, etc), that need to be regularly assessed and eventually (re)adapted.

The most important is to have a serious engagement from the top leadership – without that it will probably not work. Top leaders need to truly understand the many advantages of gender balance for their own business/institution (and for that there are lots of studies they can read: Catalyst, Harvard Business Review, Mercer, etc). Then they need to make it part of the big long-term strategy, dedicate the budget and time to design the change programs tailored to their organisations/institutions. They normally do better with the help of professional external consultants who truly understand these processes.

Your final thoughts on the topic?

The rest is the same as with all change management programs: you make an audit of the specific reality/situation, jointly decide the overall strategy, define objectives, design the plan, etc, etc. This is a process that can not be done with a few workshops, some mentoring and empty words. It is process that needs to be as seriously developed as any other strategic objective that is key for the organization - and is always work in progress, needs checks and balances mechanisms, monitoring, re-assessments, etc. It normally includes individual and group activities, training, coaching sessions, designing HR procedures (recruitment, promotion, talent

There is so much to be done to build equal, sustainable societies, countries and world. There is too much waste of talent and too much suffering derived from inequality, bad decisions, lack of sustainable leadership, greed and abuse of power. Women and men deserve better than this and I don't think it is a chance that the countries with more Gender Balance at all levels are those where people are more happy (Denmark, Iceland, etc). I would like to stress that is is fundamental to support each other in this process – only collectively we will make real change. This means women supporting/sponsoring other women, but also value-driven men and women jointly creating new synergies and moving towards more democratic and happier societies. How can our readers reach you? Through my Facebook or Linkedin: Claudia de Castro Caldeirinha. In Twitter @ClaudiadeCast13 or through my email info@redscope-consulting.com. And of course at the web conference on March 29th “live” at 2pm. Looking forward!

Author: mag. Natalie C. Postružnik Photo: Margrit Coppé

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E X P L O R E

The European Women’s Lobby | B A R C E L O N A E D I T I O N (EWL)

The European Women’s Lobby (EWL) brings together the women’s movement in Europe to influence the general public and European Institutions in support of women’s human rights and equality between women and men. It is the largest European umbrella network of women’s associations representing a total of more than 2000 organisations in all EU Member States and Candidate Countries, as well as 19 European-wide organisations representing the diversity of women and girls in Europe. EWL envisions a society in which women’s contribution to all aspects of life is recognised, rewarded and celebrated - in leadership, in care and in production; all women have self-confidence, freedom of choice, and protection from violence and exploitation; and no woman or girl is left behind. EWL’s 6 core values are Equality between women and men, Diversity, Peace, Dignity, Justice, Respect. More about EWL

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Worldwide facts about gender inequality According to the latest index ofEglobal X P L gender O R E gaps, | B we A Rwill C Eexpect L O N an A average E D I T of I O170 N years for gender equality globally. South Asia is supposed to eliminate the gender gap in 46 years, Western Europe in 61 years, Latin America in 72 years, and sub-Saharan Africa in 79 years. Given the slow progress over the last decade, the gender gap in North America has been offset for another 158 years. Regard to money earnings, the gender gap has decreased by only 2% in the last ten years, and has recently been shifted in a negative direction. The income of women today is on the same level as in 2008, after the peak of 2013. Women worldwide take on more unpaid work like caregiving and household chores. On average, worldwide, men only do 34% of the unpaid work that women do. Research shows that this gender imbalance starts at a young age, with girls spending 30% more of their time on unpaid work than boys do. The WEF (The World Economic Forum) reports that women’s average earnings are almost half those of men. The average global earned income for women was estimated at $10,778 and the average men’s income was about $19,873. When it comes to opening a bank account, men again outnumber women. 63% of men worldwide have bank accounts, while only 56% of women do. Source: Forbes EQUALPOWER

Извор: Forbes

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BLOGS NAVDIHNI.ME

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Kathy Bloomgarden

BUILDING A GENDERINCLUSIVE WORKPLACE

The wave of high-profile sexual harassment cases that began with revelations from Hollywood is having a profound impact on far less glamorous work environments. Just as major film studios have been forced to take action against abuse, a similar revolution – powered by the #MeToo movement of women speaking out – is sweeping workplaces everywhere.

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ENDING SEXUAL HARASSMENT AND ABUSE AT THE UN

Mark Lowcock and William Lacy Swing

Around the world, brave women (and some men) have been breaking the silence surrounding sexual harassment and abuse committed by those in positions of power. Their courage is paving the way for others to speak out about their own experiences.

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WEB-CONFERENCE „EQUAL POWER TO THE WOMEN. HOW TO ENHANCE CHANGES?“ EQUALPOWER

E X P L O R E

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B A R C E L O N A

E D I T I O N


29 March 2018, 13:00-16:30, online (conference is partially financed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Republic of Slovenia and is free of charge) 13:15-13:20 “The whys and whats of the Conference” mag. Natalie C. Postružnik, Institute Izida Vita, Slovenia 13:20-13:30 Official Opening by the Embassy of the Republic of Slovenia, H. E. Ambassador prof. dr. Milan Jazbec PART 1: We break borders, we boost benefits. Moderator: Dejan Andonov, Institute of Communication Studies KEYNOTE SPEAKERS 13:30-14:45 “Women`s voice in decision-making process” Mila Carovska Minister of Labor and Social Policy of the Republic of Macedonia 13:45-14:00 “Facts and figures: How can gender equality improve results in an organization?” mag. Sonja Šmuc General Manager of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Slovenia 14:00-14:15 “Changes in Europe, changes for women: What can I do?” Claudia de Castro Caldeirinha Founder and Executive Director of Redscope Consulting, Belgium | 12

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PART 2: We measure. We manifest. We mean business.

14:15-14:25 “What prevents women to reach highest governing positions?” Gzime Fejzi Women’s Business Group at the Economic Chamber of North-West Macedonia 14:25-14:35 “Female managers: How to balance buisness and family” Danica Ličanin Blaževska Owner of Reptil Markets, Macedonia 14:35-14:45 “The activities and measures for inclusion: What can I do?” Marta Turk Mentor for entrepreneurial talents and stars, Slovenia 14:45-15:00 Q&A Session

Register now. For free. Be the change you want to see.

PART 3: We care. We commit. We change. 15:00-15:15 “Strategy for Women Entrepreneurship in Republic of Macedonia” Valentina Disoska President of Association of Business Women – Macedonia 15:15-15:30 “From Ideation to Managing” Gabriela Kostovska Bogoevska Director of YES Incubator, Macedonia 15:30-15:45 “State Support for Lunching Business” Biljana Jovanovska Director of Employment Agency of the Republic of Macedonia 15:45-16:00 “How to Access EU Funds" Ilija Vučkov President of ILUMINE Centre for EU Funds, Macedonia 16:00-16:15 Q&A Session 16:15-16:30 “Guidelines on Gender Equality: take part, be part, create the change you want to see” mag. Natalie C. Postružnik, Institute Izida Vita, Slovenia. | 13

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EQUALPOWER • SPRING 2018 / ISSUE 3 •

eMagazine for equality and diversity MACEDONIA, SLOVENIA, EUROPE

Profile for Insights d.o.o.

Equalpower eMagazine 2018 3. issue English  

The premise for the project is the gender balance. The problem, which exists in the European countries and in partnering country Macedonia (...

Equalpower eMagazine 2018 3. issue English  

The premise for the project is the gender balance. The problem, which exists in the European countries and in partnering country Macedonia (...

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