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REMODEL ON SANTA YNEZ Creative 2 bedroom 2 bath loft style home. Light and bright with vaulted ceilings, skylights, open Àoor plan, hardwood Àoors, and granite counters in kitchen. Serene backyard and deck area with views from all angles within the home, but wait until you see the fruit trees! $409,000 TIM COLLOM 247-8048

SUNNY MEDITERRANEAN On a fabulous street, this one-of-a-kind home has charming Moorish architectural accents throughout. Quaint front courtyard and pergola on the tiled back patio with surrounding gardens. Remodeled kitchen. 2 bedroom home has been well-cared for by the current long-time owner. $549,900 DAVID KIRRENE

pending

VINTAGE EAST SACRAMENTO 3 bedrooms and 2 full baths. Features include: fresh paint in areas inside and outside, dark ¿nished bamboo Àoors, dual pane windows, inside laundry and central heat and air. The charming front porch, surrounded by camellia bushes, is great for visiting neighbors walking by. Large size backyard. $449,000 TIM COLLOM 247-8048

pending

4 BEDROOM McKINLEY PARK Updated 4 bedroom 2 bath, 2-story home with 1753 sf … an easy walk to McKinley Park! Remodeled kitchen with CaesarStone Quartz countertops, re¿nished hardwood Àoors and stairs and nicely updated bathrooms. Traditional style with living room ¿replace, formal dining and classic feel! $676,000 MONA GERGEN 247-9555

pending

RIVER PARK Spacious 4 bedroom 2½ baths with 2006 upstairs addition featuring large master retreat with balcony and separate of¿ce. Spacious family room, laundry area and half bath all tucked away at back of house. Casual dining with built-ins, updated kitchen. Covered patio and wellmanicured yard. $499,000 STEPHANIE GALLAGHER 342-2288

pending

ADORABLE EAST SACRAMENTO Relax on the front porch of this cute 1920’s cottage and watch the world go by! 2 bedroom home with unique Àoors and sunny remodeled kitchen and breakfast nook. Be sure not to miss the large studio or of¿ce off the garage (a great “man-cave”) with half bath. $425,000 DAVID KIRRENE 531-7495

for current home listings, please visit:

DUNNIGANREALTORS.COM 916.484.2030 916.454.5753 Dunnigan is a different kind of Realtor.

®

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CLASSIC EAST SACRAMENTO 3 bedroom 2 baths, beautiful hardwood Àoors and classic ¿replace in the living room. The kitchen has a quaint breakfast nook and marble counters. Partial basement would make a great wine storage area. Low maintenance backyard with covered patio and built-in seating. A Great Home! $619,000 TIM COLLOM 247-8048

pending

FANTASTIC BUNGALOW Charming, remodeled 3 bedroom 2 bath home has a wonderful Àoor plan with vintage aspects to it (built-in cabinetry around ¿replace, dining room china cabinet). Lovely kitchen with Silestone counters, sunny sitting area, built-in desk and garden window overlooks the large deck and backyard. $510,000 TIM COLLOM 247-8048

pending

COLONIAL VILLAGE Clean and ready to go ... enjoy this 3 bedroom with extensive use of tile in living room, hallway and bath, granite counters, dishwasher and gas stove in kitchen, ¿replace, dual pane windows, central heat and air, covered patio and so much more. $199,000 PATRICK VOGELI 207-4515


Unprecedented Market. We realtors have been known to cheerlead for the market, to stir up hype and excitement. Guilty as charged. But it’s worth noting, right now in East Sacramento, inventory of homes for sale is at an historic low. The market is so hot there just aren’t a lot of available properties. Great for sellers. Challenging for buyers. In these market conditions, it is critical to work with an agent who gets early information and can move fast to get your deal done.

916.247.8048

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TimCollom.com

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RICH CAZNEAUX PENDING

OPTIONS! OPTIONS! OPTIONS! A 38th Street opportunity is Ànally here! This original 2992 sq/ft, impeccably maintained duplex not only offers a myriad of options on its own but also features a SEPARATE IN-LAW QUARTERS. Most will be looking at taking advantage of converting this hard to Ànd 2992 sqft. into a beautiful SINGLE FAMILY home while some may choose to live in one of the extremely spacious 2 bedroom/1 bath units and rent out the other for an additional income stream. With the combination of rare sqft., impressive lot size (.18 of acre) and sought after street-- any option will be a winner! $1,050,000

IT’S ALL IN THE DETAILS IN THIS RECENT FULL REMODEL! This complete remodel has an open Áoor plan that gives it an open and airy feeling. The onyx counters in the kitchen have LED lighting and beautifully tiled backsplash. Onyx counters in the bathroom are accented with gorgeous tiled Áoors and details of copper edging. The master suite boasts a unique glass shower enclosure and granite counter while the master bedroom has french doors that open to a balcony overlooking the backyard garden. $739,950

PENDING

ADORABLE HOME BY EAST PORTAL PARK! ORIGINAL OLD WORLD CHARM!

Adorable 3 Bed/1 Bath, 1325 sq/ft close to East Portal Park and walking distance to restaurants and shopping. Features include hardwood Áoors, Àreplace in the living room, separate dining room, recessed lighting and dual pane windows. It also features a 2 car garage which is hard to Ànd in the area.The quaint private backyard bungalow with Vermont Castings gas stove looks out onto the covered brick patio and lush yard with fruit trees. $439,950

Original old world charm in this classic Tudor! Adorable 3 Bedroom/2.5 Bath, 2560 sq/ft on a desirable street in East Sac. The charm is in the details - tiled entryway with arched closet, vaulted ceilings with crown moulding, several original built-ins, hardwood Áoors and leaded glass windows.Very spacious family room that leads out to the backyard. Wonderful entertaining space in back with covered porch and stone details. $785,000

CHARMING EAST SAC TUDOR! Charm abounds in this adorable East Sac Tudor on one of the most desirable tree-lined streets. This 2 Bed/1 Bath, 1044 sq/ft home has a fully remodeled garage with bedroom, full bath and laundry room + some garage storage space. $549,950

BRE#01447558

Rich@EastSac.com

www.EastSac.com

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Another reason to have the right living trust: Your daughter-in-law, Lucy • She has at least three personal shoppers on speed dial. • Her poodle owns more designer clothing than you do. • She suggests “upgrades” to your home each time she visits. • She thinks you can buy happiness – and she measures it in karats. • She likes to be seen at the trendiest night clubs in town; your son prefers to stay home with the kids. What if your estate ended up in her control? Call me for a free consultation and learn how you can plan for the “Lucy” in your life. Or visit www.wyattlegal.com.

law office of brian d.wyatt ,PC

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trusts & estates probate special needs planning

3406 American River Drive Suite B Sacramento, CA 95864 273-9040


Thanks to Yelp reviews...

Yes, thanks to Yelp reviews! Over the course of these last few years, Yelp has really helped us to get better. (Also check out our Google reviews)!

$69 preseason tune-up and duct inspection call 916-454-4600 At A and P Heating and Cooling Inc., we WELCOME criticism! It only helps us to stay close at working hard at our commitment to get better. As a customer service business we value that input, for without it, we would never really know. With this said, We made some very big changes in the last year! The owner, Todd Baltzey, knew things needed to and had to change if he wanted to continue to be successful in this area.“Within the last year, nearly 90% of the team members have been replaced including the management team. We brought on better and more highly educated / qualified personnel who are long time HVAC veterans. We needed this staff to service the unique homes and the wonderful families in this area. By making these changes last year, we have grown a bit over 30%. It has been a hard but great change for us” said Todd. Our motto at A and P Heating and Cooling Inc., is “Standard of Excellence” This is what our customers, since 1963, have known us to passionately strive for. Give us a call to schedule a time for your cooling tune up at 916-454-4600 and experience the difference in what a heating and cooling contractor who is committed to excellence feels like. We are so sure of our services that we state: If we tune up your air conditioner this spring season and it fails to work on that Àrst hot day of the year, we will fully refund you the cost of the tune up you have paid and give you an entire year for free! As always, we offer a free second opinion if you feel you got misleading or wrong information from another HVAC contractor.

CALL US TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE 866-955-3505 • ANPHEATING.COM 251 Opportunity St. #B Sacramento, CA 95838

Up to $2150 OFF* in discounts, rebates and tax credits. Available for complete heating and air conditioning systems.

A/C Tune Up & System Inspection Special* $69. Additional $15 off for those that can show us your A&P Heating & Cooling magnet. (Call our of¿ce to get a magnet if you don’t have one)

*Not to be combined with any other offer. Rebates still apply and are subject to the utility district. Offer ends April 30th.

License #877831

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COVER ARTIST Carolina Galleran White Buffalo Gallery will be exhibiting the art of Carolina Galleran through May 2. Shown on cover is “Undulation, Disintegration.” An opening reception on Second Saturday April 12 runs 5 to 8 p.m. The gallery is located at 3671 J St. in East Sac.

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PUBLISHER Cecily Hastings publisher@insidepublications.com 3104 O St. #120, Sac. CA 95816 (Mail Only) EDITOR PRODUCTION DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY AD COORDINATOR DISTRIBUTION ACCOUNTING EDITORIAL POLICY

VOL. 21 • ISSUE 3

Marybeth Bizjak mbbizjak@aol.com M.J. McFarland Cindy Fuller Linda Smolek, Aniko Kiezel Michele Mazzera, Julie Foster Lauren Hastings Jim Hastings, Daniel Nardinelli, Adrienne Kerins 916-443-5087 Commentary reflects the views of the writers and does not necessarily reflect those of Inside Publications. Inside Publications is delivered for free to more than 65,000 households in Sacramento. Printing and distribution costs are paid entirely by advertising revenue. We spotlight selected advertisers, but all other stories are determined solely by our editorial staff and are not influenced by advertising. No portion may be reproduced mechanically or electronically without written permission of the publisher. All ad designs & editorial—©

SUBMISSIONS Submit cover art to publisher@insidepublications.com SUBSCRIPTIONS Submit editorial contributions to mbbizjak@aol.com Subscriptions at $25 per year guarantees 3rd class mailing. Pay online at insidepublications.com or send check with name & address of recipient and specify publication edition.

VISIT INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM CONTACT OUR ADVERTISING TEAM Ad deadline is the 10th of the month.

Jessica Laskey NEW ACCOUNTS

(646) 477-8560 JL@insidepublications.com

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Duffy Kelly 224-1604 dk@insidepublications.com

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Publisher's Desk East Sac Life Volunteer Profile Inside City Hall Local Heroes Shoptalk Meet Your Neighbor See Spot Charm Inside Downtown Helping Vets The Mayor's Race Sports Authority Building Our Future Spirit Matters City Beat Parent Tales Home Insight Farm To Fork Getting There Garden Jabber Doing Good Science In The Neighborhood Artist Spotlight River City Previews Restaurant Insider

Ann Tracy 798-2136 at@insidepublications.com


G N I D N E P

1449 47th Street - 3bed/2bath Come Make This HOME! $698,000 Elise and Polly 916.715.0213

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1656 48th Street - 3bed/3bath Have ave It All With This Fully Remodeled East Sac Bungalow $570,000 $570 000 Elise and Polly 916 916.715.0213 715 0213

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East Sac home inventory is at a record low.

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Powering on for Science INSPIRING NEW CENTER COULD BE BUILT OUT BY END OF THE DECADE

be built. The local architectural firm Dreyfuss & Blackford designed the project. Powerhouse Science Center will replace The Discovery Museum, a science and space center on Auburn Boulevard. The plan is for the old museum to close a few months before the new center opens. The staff will move over to run the new center.

BY CECILY HASTINGS PUBLISHER’S DESK

The center is designed not just for schoolchildren but for learners of all ages.

H

arry Laswell is a man on a mission. As the recently appointed executive director of Powerhouse Science Center, he has the tall task of raising $5 million by the end of the summer. This is the last bit of funding needed to start construction on the $40 million center this fall. “The science center is the only new project in town—not under construction now—that can be open by the end of the decade,” said Laswell in a recent interview. A retired venture capitalist, Laswell headed up a recruitment effort to find a new director for the center last year. The board concluded he was the perfect man for the job. “I obviously enjoy a challenge,” he said. “This immediate effort will finally set into motion the process to get built what has been in the planning stages for more than a decade.” The 50,000-square-foot facility will be built on the site of the historic PG&E power station off I-5 and Richards Boulevard, adjacent to the contemporary water intake structure projecting out onto the Sacramento

The Discovery Museum receives 80,000 visitors a year, most of them schoolchildren. Laswell expects 250,000 people to visit Powerhouse annually. PUBLISHER page 14

Harry Laswell at the future site for the Powerhouse Science Center

River near its confluence with the American. The first phase of the project will give the historic building a new entrance pavilion. It could be completed in late 2017. The second phase involves constructing a new parking structure. In the third phase, the Earth & Space Science Center will

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A ‘Parkway Father’ LOCAL VOLUNTEER HONORED FOR WILDERNESS WORK

BY RACHEL MATUSKEY EAST SACRAMENTO LIFE

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n Feb. 26, Frank Cirill was inducted into the California Parks and Recreation Society District II Hall of Honor, Legacy category. This prestigious award has been given to only a handful of individuals meeting the Legacy category criteria, which includes significant leadership-level contributions toward historic, multigenerational projects or programs that affect the leisure lifestyles of the region’s citizens. Cirill was recognized for his work protecting the wilderness and habitats of the American River Parkway, helping ward off actions and developments that would have irrevocably changed the area’s landscape. In a nomination statement, colleagues called Cirill “a Parkway father who has given decades of his life to caring and fighting for Sacramento’s treasured lower American River and Parkway ... to preserve for everyone what he experienced with such exuberance and joy.” A luncheon was held in Cirill’s honor. His longtime friends Will

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Frank Cirill and Charlie Willard at the award ceremony. Cirill was recognized for his work protecting the American River Parkway.

Kempton, executive director of the California Transportation Commission, and Charlie Willard, retired grant administrator with the California Department of Parks and Recreation, presented the award. The luncheon’s program noted that “Frank often told his children, ‘There are two types of people in this world: people who make things happen and people who wait for things to happen. Don’t ever wait.’”

GET INTO THE GARDEN On Wednesday, April 20, Caleb Greenwood Elementary School will host an open garden from 4 to 5:30 p.m. This community event will feature a tour of the Schoolyard Habitat Garden, a California native plant garden funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The native garden, planted and mulched last year by students, teachers and parent volunteers, covers more than 6,000 square feet and includes three

habitats: a grassland, a woodland and a butterfly garden, where students and teachers observe wildlife. Students will take guests on a sensory tour that will include the school’s annual vegetable beds, built in the 1990s, and the newly installed rain barrels. According to garden coordinator Anna Symkowick-Rose, the school’s garden program involves students from kindergarten through third grade in cleaning, planting, watering


and harvesting the beds. “My favorite part of teaching in the garden is when a student tells me they’ve tried a vegetable for the first time and they like it,” says SymkowickRose. “Parents often share with me that their children ask for a certain vegetable after they’ve had it in the garden.” Sacramento County Master Gardeners will be available at the open garden to answer questions about native plants and water-wise gardening. Caleb Greenwood is at 5457 Carlson Drive.

CODING CLUB Beginning Thursday, April 21, McKinley Library will offer a series of eight coding classes for young people interested in making their own digital animation or video games. The classes, recommended for children ages 9 to 16, will use Google CS First to teach the basics of animated video and game creation. The first session’s topic is Introduction to Storytelling. The class starts at 3:30 p.m.

McKinley Library is at 601 Alhambra Blvd.

JOG-A-THON AT LUBIN On Friday, April 8, David Lubin Elementary School will host its 11th annual Jog-a-thon. This event promotes healthy lifestyle practices and helps support Lubin’s many enrichment programs, including the school’s art program, the David Lubin After School Academy, and various field trips. In past years, the Jog-aThon has raised more than $10,000 in pledges. This year’s event has received support from local sponsors, including Trattoria Bohemia, Chocolate Fish, Eyes on J Optometry and Councilmember Jeff Harris. Prizes have been donated by the Sacramento River Cats, Sacramento Republic Football Club and Dragon Fire Martial Arts. Sponsor names and logos will be printed on T-shirts worn by more than 600 students, staff and parents participating in the event. For more information, or to contribute

On Friday, April 8, David Lubin Elementary School will host its 11th annual Jog-a-thon

as a sponsor, email Sarah Phillips at sarahbethphillips@hotmail.com.

DAY OF THE CHILDREN If you’re in the mood for a thrill, celebrate Dia de los Ninos at McKinley Library on Friday, April

8. Magical Moonshine Theatre will present the puppet show “The Carnival Mask,” a Mexican folktale in English and Spanish that tells the story of townspeople, robbers and heroes in a Mexican village. This EAST SAC LIFE page 14

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PUBLISHER FROM page 11 At Powerhouse, exhibits, galleries and demonstrations will focus on the themes of nature discovery, water as life, sustainable building and energizing our future. There will be room for traveling exhibits. The center is designed not just for schoolchildren but for learners of all ages. There are plans for a planetarium and a high-tech Challenger Learning Center. Archeology programming will be offered, along with movies, laser shows and astronomy programs. There will be a cafe with outdoor seating. “Our core mission is to light the spark with children in STEM: science, technology, engineering and math,” said Laswell. “With 20 percent of all new job offerings STEM-related, this experience is critical to the education of our future workforces. Most of those who study science in college report their interest began with an experience as a child. “Many of our huge civic discussions and decisions involve complex science issues. Consider the Delta tunnels, GMOs and NASA and it is easy to see why we must help educate the public in science.” His personal experiences with science as a child still drive Laswell. “I was lucky to have the spark set off in me as child when a new science museum opened in my hometown,” he said. “It positively affected my entire career. This is my way to help give a future to the next generation of young scientists.” The center will employ 50 people, making it a serious economic generator. Laswell explained the numerous other benefits to Sacramento if the center gets built according to plan. “This center will be of the caliber of experience that the Crocker Museum and the California State Railroad Museum provide,” he said. “It will also be a beautiful special-event venue. And it will be another wonderful attraction to help market Sacramento to visitors and conventions and round out the tourism experience.”

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Come on, Sacramento. Let’s get this exciting project finally done! People who are interested in donating to Powerhouse Science Center or serving on the board can contact Harry Laswell at 8083942. For more information, go to powerhousesciencecenter.org

MORE ON THE COMMUNITY CENTER THEATER My column last month presented incorrect information on the recommendations of the mayor’s task force on the future of the Community Center Theater. We regret the error. The following information correctly describes the situation. The task force recommended that the city build a new theater. But funding sources still remain an enormous hurdle under this plan. The group also rejected a plan to refurbish rather than replace. The task force also rejected numerous alternate sites, citing the “ideal” location of the existing theater. The refurbishment plan, supported by some committee members, calls for dramatically upgrading the building’s exterior, expanding the lobby and adding dozens of restrooms. New seating would be installed, and the venue’s acoustics would be significantly overhauled, employing state-of-the-art technology. The backstage area would be revamped with the addition of more dressing rooms, and technical capabilities upgraded to accommodate production demands into the future. Despite the committee’s recommendation, it now appears that city staff, under the direction of the Mayor Kevin Johnson, is turning its attention to renovation plans in the coming months. The shift has been a bitter disappointment for arts groups that have had their sights set on a sparkling performing arts palace to host Broadway plays, the symphony, opera and ballet. Task force member Rob Turner agreed with the committee’s

recommendation. This month, we asked task force member Dennis Mangers to present his view on the future of the theater.

REFURBISHMENT IS BEST OPTION Like Rob Turner, I served on the mayor’s task force exploring the possibility of building a new performance arts theater. Unlike Mr. Turner, I served on the financial committee. By the end of the yearlong process, we could find no path to raising the money to build a new facility. A number of us came to see the proposed new sites as deeply flawed, so I turned my attention to transforming the existing Community Center Theater.

Let’s move to reimagine an old friend into an iconic structure. Phoenix has a performing arts theater designed by the same architect as ours. The two buildings look like twins. Phoenix renovated its facility and attached it elegantly to its neighboring convention center. Now Phoenix plans to retrofit its theater with the latest acoustic technology. Architects and contractors told the city that its theater had “good bones” and did not have to be abandoned to achieve a dramatically different interior and exterior. The same is true of our theater. We have the potential for a similar transformation at less than one-third of the cost of a new theater. Let’s move to reimagine an old friend into an iconic structure in a signature location and avoid the mounting costs of continued delay. Dennis Mangers is a former assemblymember and longtime arts advocate. Cecily Hastings can be reached at publisher@insidepublications.com n

EAST SAC LIFE FROM page 13 family-friendly, interactive show will give the audience the opportunity to go behind the scenes and help make the puppet magic happen. Showtime is 3:30 p.m. McKinley Library is at 601 Alhambra Blvd.

ESIA GENERAL MEETING East Sacramento Improvement Association will hold its general membership meeting on Wednesday, April 20, in Clunie Community Center’s Alhambra Room. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. Board president Paul Noble will open the meeting and introduce the guest speakers. John Leachman of StoneBridge Properties will present an update on the demolition of Sutter Memorial Hospital and the plans for new homes. Alan Hersh, a partner with Downtown Railyards Venture, will outline the plans for development of the downtown railyards. Ryan Loofbourrow, CEO of Sacramento Steps Forward, will describe the progress made in connecting the homeless with services. Councilmember Jeff Harris will present an overview of recent events in Council District 3. This is an open meeting. All interested East Sacramento residents are encouraged to attend. Clunie Community Center is at 601 Alhambra Blvd.

TEAM WILL CHARITY FUNDRAISER On Saturday, April 23, River Life Covenant Church will host a movienight fundraiser benefiting Team Will, a cycling team committed to raising public awareness and funds for childhood cancer research and family resources through cycling activities and events. The theme of the evening is bikes and cycling, and the featured film will be “Premium Rush,” rated PG-13. The event was organized by McClatchy High School student Madeline Widman as her senior EAST SAC LIFE page 17


OUR MISSION: Established in 1996 by members of the local business community, the mission of the East Sacramento Chamber of Commerce is to promote East Sacramento businesses, whose merchants are dedicated to maintaining the neighborhood values that make East Sacramento an attractive place to live and conduct business.

CELEBRATING 20 YEARS!

Off to a Tremendous Start in 2016 Whether our members have attended a luncheon or evening mixer, their enthusiasm to network, grow their businesses and make our Chamber stronger is paying off. We want to extend a special thank you to our members Fitness Rangers and Formoli’s Bistro for being such gracious hosts for our January and February MIXERS. Both gatherings were well-attended and enjoyed by all! Membership includes invitations to these fun neighborhood get-togethers each month. Welcome our NEW CHAMBER MEMBERS: Soiree Party & Events, Alex Amaro Real Estate and Marc Foster Creative Check out our NEW WEBSITE by visiting eastsacchamber.org to ďŹ nd all our upcoming events, proďŹ les on members, a list of beneďŹ ts, and much more. Additionally, our TASTE OF EAST SACRAMENTO Committee is busy planning this year’s event. If you’ve never been, you’ll want to mark your calendars now for Sat., July 30 from 6-10pm. This is our biggest event of the year and the committee has great plans! We’ll continue to work to make our Chamber THE BEST EVER!

Formoli’s Bistro owners Aimal Formoli and Suzanne Ricci hosted our February Mixer

BECOME AN EAST SAC CHAMBER MEMBER! Memberships start at less than $15 a month and include a listing in our Insider’s Guide distributed to 15,000 East Sac homes.

NEXT LUNCHEON: Meet the Mayoral Candidates! Wed. Apr. 13 at Noon %RE3DHVH 86%DQN Treasurer

Clunie Community Center RSVP by email to Lauren Hastings

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ALL ARE WELCOME!

VISIT EASTSACCHAMBER.ORG AND JOIN ONLINE /DXUHQ+DVWLQJV([HF'LUHFWRU‡‡ODXUHQ#HDVWVDFFKDPEHURUJ‡0DLO5HFHLYLQJ26WUHHW6DFUDPHQWR&$

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Floorplans and renderings are artist’s conception and may contain options that are not standard on all models. Evergreen Communities, Inc. reserves the right to make changes to these floorplans, specifications, dimensions and elevations without prior notice. Stated dimensions and square footage are approximate and should not be used as representation of the home’s precise or actual size. Map is not to scale. Evergreen Communities, Inc. reserves the right to withdraw any offer at any time.

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EAST SAC LIFE FROM page 14 project. Widman was diagnosed with a cancerlike disease at age 10. Last year, at 17, she biked from East Sac to Knoxville, Tenn., with the group’s first-ever Junior Riders. The team’s next long-distance trip will take place in July, when they will ride from San Francisco to New Jersey in 10 days. (Widman won’t be riding this time— instead, she’s opted to join River Life’s mission project in Guatemala.) Doors open at 7 p.m.; the movie begins at 7:30 p.m. A $3 suggested donation includes a movie ticket and refreshments. Guests can also participate in the Cards for Kids

River Life Covenant Church will host a movie-night fundraiser benefiting Team Will

program, enter a raffle and hear from guest speakers.

The film will be shown outdoors, so warm clothing is recommended. Guests are encouraged to bring their

own chairs. Tickets may be purchased at the door or reserved in advance EAST SAC LIFE page 19

The Sacramento Police officer assigned to this sector presents this map each month at the East Sac Chamber of Commerce luncheon. Note: code 459 is Burglary.

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EAST SAC LIFE FROM page 17 by emailing madelamber306@gmail. com. River Life is at 4401 A St. All proceeds go to Team Will to help fund the July ride. To learn more about the group, visit teamwillcharity.org.

FOOD + FILM = FUN Sacramento Food Film Festival returns this month with a menu of mouth watering events. On Thursday, April 7, the festival starts with a premiere night at the Turn Verein, featuring small bites from local chefs, accompanied by a showing of the short-film contest winners. General admission is $35, and the “VIPea” ticket is $45. The premiere runs from 6 to 9 p.m. On Friday, April 8, Selland’s Market-Cafe brings the Family Movie Night and Dinner back to Clunie Community Center. The event will pair the movie “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2” with a dinner of spaghetti, salad, French bread and a cookie provided by Selland’s chefs Ravin Patel and Randall Selland. This event is fun for all ages. Dinner will be served from 6 to 7 p.m., with the movie following. Tickets are $25 for adults,$15 for children over 2. Children 2 and younger may attend for free if they do not require seating. For more information on these and other festival events, and to purchase tickets, go to foodliteracycenter.org. Sacramento Food Film Festival benefits California Food Literacy Center. Headquartered in Sacramento, the center works to help people understand the impact of their food choices on their health, their

community and the environment. Many of its programs are focused on youth and families. The goal of the film festival is to facilitate a community dialogue around food literacy and options for enacting positive changes in the food system.

JUDAH GALA, NOLA-STYLE Let the good times roll at Theodore Judah Elementary School’s seventh annual Fundraising Gala, happening Saturday, April 30, from 6 to 11 p.m. This year’s theme is Mardi Gras. The gala returns to the Turn Verein for an evening of food, drink, entertainment and silent and live auctions. Appetizers will be provided by Marvin Maldonado of Federalist Public House. Dinner will be provided by Rick Mahan of The Waterboy and OneSpeed. Enjoy a delicious meal, live music and the company of friends and neighbors, all in support of Judah’s “educating the whole child” philosophy.

The gala is Judah’s largest fundraiser and the funding source for several supplemental student programs. The gala is Judah’s largest fundraiser and the funding source for several supplemental student

programs, including Science Alive, Arts Alive and Music Alive. These weekly programs, held during school hours, inspire students to create, innovate, explore and think critically about the world around them. Tickets are $50 before April 1, $60 on or after April 1. To purchase tickets, visit theodorejudahpta.org. This year’s major sponsors are KMG Mortgage and Courtney Way, Realtor with Keller Williams. To become a gala sponsor, or to donate an item for auction, contact Sarah Wallace at sarahtjpta@gmail.com or 215-1474.

CONTEST FOR BEST DROUGHT-TOLERANT LANDSCAPE Kit Carson International Baccalaureate Candidate School’s Design and Technology Class is holding its second annual design contest to find the best droughttolerant front yards in Sacramento. “Last year’s winners pioneered innovative landscaping designs that represent a rising tide of drought-tolerant beauty throughout Sacramento,” said Jed Larsen, who teaches the class. The contest, called Beauty Without Water, honors pioneering Sacramento residents who have responded to the drought with landscaping creativity and ingenuity. “By replacing grass yards with landscapes that showcase drought-resistant plants, scenic bark/ rocks and other inspired features, these residents have found a way to beat the drought without sacrificing beauty,” Larsen added.

To enter the competition, send up to four photos of your front yard, plus a short written description, to JedLarsen@scusd.edu. The deadline for submission is Sept. 1. The winners will be featured in an upcoming issue of Inside Publications.

The contest is open to Sacramento residents in Inside Publication’s readership areas. The contest is open to Sacramento residents in Inside Publication’s readership areas, which include East Sacramento, Land Park, Curtis Park, Midtown, the Pocket, Greenhaven, Arden and Carmichael. Kit Carson is in East Sacramento. For more information, go to kitcarson. scusd.edu.

MARKET WATCH If you’re looking for fresh produce, you may have to look a little further this year, as the East Sac Farmers Market will not reopen for the 2016 season. According to Councilmember Jeff Harris’s office, the market had struggled financially for some time, in part due to insufficient patronage. Hoping to counteract this, operators began moving toward a boutique-fair model, which was less popular among neighbors, and which Harris did not EAST SAC LIFE page 20

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TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THEODOREJUDAHPTA.ORG

Let the good times roll! AT Theodore Judah Elementary’s

seventh annual gala MUSIC & DANCING • LIVE & SILENT AUCTIONS • BEER & WINE DINNER from RICK MAHAN (Waterboy, OneSpeed) APPETIZERS from MARVIN MALDONADO (Federalist Public House)

Saturday, April 30, 2016 • 6 - 11 PM Turn Verein • 3349 J St. THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS! EAST SAC LIFE FROM page 19 support. Until an operator is found who can present a viable business model, the market will not return. For now, the year-round Saturday Midtown and Sunday Southside markets remain relatively convenient options. Other seasonal markets will open as usual beginning May 1.

BOCKBIERFEST Already missing Beer Week? Have no fear, Bockbierfest is here! The Turn Verein will host this popular annual event celebrating Bavarian Bockbier with two days of German music, dancing, food and an abundance of bock-style beers. Admission is $20. Food and drink tickets are $2. The festival runs from 6 to 11:30 p.m. on Friday, April 1, and 3 to 11:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 2. To learn about the event’s history and to purchase tickets, visit sacramentoturnverein.com.

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RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURE EXHIBIT XHIBIT On Saturday, April 9, the Central Valley Chapter of the American Institute of Architects will host an open office, featuring several local architectural firms that specialize in residential architecture. The firms d will display their work and architects will be available to answer questions in a ng casual setting. Amid surging interest in home building m and remodeling, this forum gives homeowners a chancee to learn how an architect works with a client on a at residential project and what steps to take to prepare forr n the design and construction process. Anyone considering embarking on a residential design project is invited to attend this event, to learn the value an architect can add.

There is no entrance fee. The event will take place at 1400 S St., Suite 100, from 2 to 5 p.m. For more details, visit aiacv.org.

LOCAL BUSINESSES HONORED The Sacramento Metro Chamber honored three East Sac residents at its 121st annual dinner and business awards on Jan. 29. Patrick Mulvaney, owner of Mulvaney’s B&L restaurant, was named volunteer of the year. Since moving to California in 1993, Mulvaney Patrick Mulvaney, owner of Mulvaney’s B&L restaurant has been in a leader in Sacramento’s farm-to-fork movement, championing of the year. Run by partners Lucy Eidam Crocker and Scot Crocker, the local chefs and farmers. In 2014, full-service communications company Mulvaney was a fo focuses on branding, public outreach a and marketing. The Crockers are a active in the community and have b been received more than 260 awards fo for creativity and effectiveness. Scot C Crocker is a columnist for Inside P Publications.

BOOK A GENEALOGIST B

er Eidam Crock Scot and Lucy

guest chef at James Beard House in New York City. Communications company Crocker & Crocker was named small business

Are you interested in researching y your family’s history? McKinley L Library’s volunteer genealogist, B Bernard Marks, can help. Book a free 4 45-minute consultation with Marks o on a second or fourth Thursday, eevery hour on the hour, from noon to 3 p.m. This month’s openings are on April 14 and 28 at noon, 1 p.m., 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. To make an appointment, visit the library. Walk-in appointments are also w welcome if time permits. McKinley Library is at 601 Alhambra Blvd. Rachel Matuskey can be reached at insideeastsac@gmail.com n


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Anita Clevenger IN RETIREMENT, THIS GARDENER BLOSSOMED

T plants were recovered from The n neglected and abandoned sites like p pioneer cemeteries, old homesteads a mining camps and replanted in and t cemetery to preserve California’s the h horticultural heritage. “I was always saying that someday I would volunteer for the garden,” s says Clevenger, an avid gardener a author of Inside Publications’ and m monthly Garden Jabber column. “But after taking a pruning class t there, I realized that ‘someday’ is n now. I told my husband I was going t help out during the pruning to s season of 2003, and I never stopped. T There’s just so much to learn.” Eventually, Clevenger took over a curator of the garden. Now, she as m manages the collection, oversees v volunteers, leads tours, works in t garden at least three mornings the a week, writes for international p publications and gives talks all over t world. the “We’re trying to put Sacramento a the rose garden on the map, and a least within the rose world,” at

BY JESSICA LASKEY VOLUNTEER PROFILE

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hakespeare said that a rose by any other name would smell as sweet. Anita Clevenger can tell you the name of that rose, where it came from, how to care for it and when it will bloom. That’s what happens when you’re a Lifetime UC Master Gardener and the curator of the Old City Cemetery’s awardwinning Historic Rose Garden. The Ohio native and longtime East Sacramento resident didn’t always know so much about roses. After taking early retirement from her job as a manager at McClellan Air Force Base, Clevenger realized that she needed something else to do. “My son, Kurt, was tired of having so much mother around,” she says with an easy laugh. When a neighbor introduced her to the beauty of old roses, she decided to check out the storied Sacramento Historic Rose Garden, which has more than 500 old garden roses from the 19th and 20th centuries.

VOLUNTEER page 25

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RT on the Rocks FIGHT OVER FARE HIKES SPLITS TRANSIT BOARD

BY CRAIG POWELL

T

INSIDE CITY HALL

o get a sense of how broke Regional Transit is, consider this analogy. Let’s say you’re part of a Sacramento family. You have a fairly well-off, middle-class lifestyle, but in the last couple of years you’ve really splurged, buying yourself a big, new Mercedes and a big, pricey cabin up at Lake Tahoe, all financed to the hilt. Meanwhile, the small business you run, RT Clothing, has never regained the boatload of customers you lost when you decided to jack up your prices by 20 percent in the middle of the last recession (oops), leaving you with a flat income for years. Fortunately, your wife, a retiree who collects both a military pension from the federal government and a healthy state government pension, has been collecting costof-living increases for years. She brings home close to 80 percent of the family income these days, bless her. Together, you have a family income of close to $150,000 per year. The charming new home you bought 30 years ago in Light Rail Estates is showing serious signs of age and, let’s be honest, neglect. Your roof is shot, the paint’s badly peeling, you may need a new furnace and your backyard pool has algae

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stains and a rather unpleasant odor. Lately, some of the sketchier kids in your neighborhood have been jumping over the fence when you’re not home, swimming in your pool, hanging around for hours on end and leaving their trash everywhere. It’s gotten so bad that many of your longtime

friends no longer accept invitations to your summer pool parties. You’ve spotted some of them going into Bob and Nancy Uber’s backyard down the street. The Ubers put in a nice, new pool last year and they let their friends drop in to swim whenever they want.

Things are going so-so until one day you decide to open up your bank and credit card statements for the first time in six months. You’re stunned (stunned!) to see all of the savings you thought you were socking away each month have somehow evaporated. Not only that, you owe a whopping $18,000 on your Visa bill. (How did that happen?) In a panic, you check the balance in your checking account and your heart sinks further. You have just $3,000 in cash and, at the rate your family burns money, it will be long gone in three months’ time. What do you do? Do you raise your prices 20 percent again on the (remaining) customers of RT Clothing (since it worked out so well for you when you raised prices 20 percent last time), or do you and your wife have a heart-to-heart talk and start seriously cutting back on your family’s expenses and upscale lifestyle? And that, folks, is pretty much the sad and increasingly tragic story of RT. Just add three zeros to all of the numbers. RT began impoverishing itself by issuing $87 million in revenue bonds in 2012 to help pay for the extension of light rail from Meadowview to Consumes Community College. (The rest of the $250 million cost of the project was funded with federal grants.) The rushed and highly political decision to build the extension, completed just last summer, foisted $10 million of new costs on RT each year ($4 million in bond payments and a further $6

CITY HALL page 27


VOLUNTEER FROM page 22 Clevenger says. “We’re letting people know about what we’re doing here. It’s really rewarding. I’d always wanted to know people internationally. Now I have friends all over the world through the rose garden.” The garden has received accolades from such prestigious organizations as the Great Rosarians of the World (Clevenger traveled to New York to accept the Garden Hall of Fame award) and the World Federation of Rose Societies (for which she traveled to Lyon, France). Not bad for someone who was looking for something to do in retirement. “You measure your days by how you’ve filled them,” Clevenger says. “Now my days are so rich. It’s like a whole new life.” The Sacramento Historic Rose Garden is at 1000 Broadway. It gives weekly tours and will hold an open garden event on Saturday, April 9. For more information, go to cemeteryrose.org. n

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CITY HALL FROM page 24 million in operating costs). It’s a cost that RT cannot afford. RT made a similar but less costly error (at $45 million) in prematurely constructing the first 1.1 mile of a proposed light rail line (dubbed the Green Line) to Sacramento International Airport. Frankly, I don’t know too many people who’d have the patience to take a light rail train from downtown to the airport that makes 13 stops along the way, as envisioned by RT. The estimated cost of completing the Green Line to the airport is a cool $1 billion. No one has a clue how to finance it. How is RT using the 1.1-mile initial segment of the Green Line? (RT staffers actually call it the “minimum operable segment,” a refreshingly forthright description, don’t you think?) The line runs from downtown to Richards Boulevard (now dubbed Township 9) and back, capturing just 300 riders a day at an annual cost of nearly $1 million. Eye on Sacramento (the civic watchdog group that I head) has

estimated that it would be cheaper for RT to pay its current Green Line passengers to take Uber or Yellow Cab to make the trip. With RT financially on the rocks, the Green Line minimum operable segment should probably be mothballed until population density in the area justifies its operation or the developers active in Township 9, whose projects benefit from the line, agree to pick up RT’s costs of operating it. State law requires that RT collect at least 24 percent of its total operating budget from passenger fares. The rest of its costs are subsidized by federal and state governments and a slice of the local half-percent transportation sales taxes (Measure A). But RT has struggled to comply with this “fare box ratio” requirement because its ridership has fallen so much. In 2008 and then again in 2009, RT approved back-to-back 25-cent fare hikes, raising the fare from $2 to $2.50. The 25 percent overall fare hike, along with cuts to RT service levels, caused ridership to plunge, and it’s never recovered. In January, RT

staff started pressing the RT board to approve another 50-cent fare hike. RT is starting to lose some customers to innovative ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft, which offer highly responsive, on-demand customer service for pretty modest prices.

RT is starting to lose some customers to innovative ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft. Meanwhile, the quality of RT’s light rail and bus service has been deteriorating, drawing passenger complaints about dirty, odorous vehicles, scary and intimidating passengers, misconduct and chronic fare jumping on light rail. Two recent murders on light rail trains have

added to the public’s negative view of light rail. Meanwhile, the owners of the Kings and prominent members of the downtown business community, supported by county supervisor Phil Serna, have been leaning very hard on RT management to clean up its trains and refurbish its downtown stations before the fall opening of the Golden 1 Center, when an uncertain number of Kings fans will try out light rail for the first time. Instead of RT’s paying for such work out of its almost nonexistent cash reserves or its nonexistent positive cash flow or, God forbid, pressing the billionaire owners of the Kings to bear some major portion of the work’s cost, RT responded by borrowing $6.2 million (by drawing down bond proceeds) to upgrade and generally spruce up its downtown stations and make other cosmetic improvements. It was, once again, an RT decision to rush into a project without thinking through the financial consequences of its decision.

CITY HALL page 29

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CITY HALL FROM page 27 Does it make any sense for RT to borrow money and incur interest costs to fix up stations for arena patrons at a time when it is experiencing chronic budget deficits and seeking to close them with major fare hikes on its riders? Is it fair to its many low-income riders? Shouldn’t the owners of the Kings, whose NBA franchise has doubled in value to $1 billion since they bought the team, be compelled to pony up to pay for such improvements, particularly since they’ll financially benefit from the work? In June, the RT board approved a budget that projected that RT would enjoy a surplus this year. Seven months later, RT management announced that it is now facing a $2.7 million deficit this year and needed an immediate 20 percent fare hike, from $2.50 to $3, or it would run out of cash within a year. (RT has been dipping into its reserves to cover budget deficits for the past two years.) A month later, RT management announced that it had also overestimated the funds it would collect from the state this year, adding another $1 million to its current budget deficit. How could RT go from a projected surplus to a deficit in just seven months? RT management offered no explanation for the apparent dramatic reversal in RT’s finances, despite numerous public calls for it to do so. It’s not yet clear whether RT is actually experiencing a serious reversal this year or whether the budget approved in July was shot full of rosy scenarios that withered as actual results started pouring in. A fare increase to $3 would make RT’s fare the highest in the nation, tied only with high-cost New York City. By what logic could relatively low-cost Sacramento possibly end up with the highest transit fare in the nation? No one on the RT board bothered to ask that question (at least not publicly), and no one on the RT management team bothered to answer it. In any event, the proposal to hike fares by 20 percent on July 1 met with strong resistance from both RT board

members and the public at a Jan. 25 board meeting. In response, staff tweaked the proposal. It still asked for a 20 percent rate hike but broken into two steps: a 10 percent hike on July 1 and another 10 percent hike in July 2017. At the RT board meeting on March 14, an overflow crowd of RT customers and representatives of several groups spent hours imploring the RT board not to impose any fare hike. They pointed out that a hike would fall most heavily on RT’s many low-income and fixed-income customers who are dependent on RT for their mobility. Their effort had no observable impact on the board. In an 8-3 split, the RT board approved a 10 percent fare hike effective July 1 but rejected staff’s proposal for an additional 10 percent hike in 2017. It also scaled back proposed hikes in the prices of passes and fares for students and the disabled. County supervisors Phil Serna and Don Nottoli opposed the fare hike, while all four of the Sacramento councilmembers on the board (Steve Hansen, Jeff Harris, RT chair Jay Schenirer and Rick Jennings) voted to approve the hike. Eye on Sacramento presented the RT board with a report prepared by Professor Emeritus Greg Thompson of Florida State University, a transit expert who chairs EOS’s transportation committee. The EOS report warned of the risk that a major fare hike would raise little money (given how fares contribute relatively little to RT’s total budget) but would further depress RT’s already anemic ridership and risk pushing RT into a transit death spiral, where fare hikes lead to ridership declines and service cuts, which, in turn, lead to further fare hikes and so on. The EOS report urged RT to focus like a laser beam on cutting costs. It identified more than a dozen ways RT could reduce costs, including outsourcing RT functions, eliminating union work rules that drive up costs, canceling proposed raises, hiring an outside law firm to negotiate union contracts, mothballing the one-stop Green Line for now, halting plans to build a circulating streetcar downtown that would load an estimated $5 million to $8 million

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in new costs on RT each year (an estimated $180 million over 30 years), and halting planning work on the Green Line to the airport for now. The report also urged the local governments that have representatives on the RT board to start appointing to the board business professionals who have experience in overseeing large organizations instead of elected officials, who are too often overextended by serving on as many as a dozen boards and commissions. Meanwhile, Hansen, who also chairs the Sacramento Transportation Authority, has been pressing to have STA place a measure on the November ballot that would ask voters countywide to approve a doubling of the Measure A halfpercent transportation sales tax, a portion of which would be allocated to RT. Such a measure would face long odds. First, county voters tend to be much more conservative and far less receptive to the notion of doubling a tax than more liberal voters in the city of Sacramento. Second, the

local economy is still quite weak. Real median household income in Sacramento County dropped 12 percent between 2007 and 2013, which can’t help but dampen voter appetite for doubling the tax. Third, an increase in the transportation sales tax rate would be a “special tax” requiring two-thirds-majority approval rather than a simple majority. Finally, voters will likely have little interest in doubling the subsidy they pay to RT if the RT board and management fail to respond to its current crisis with a real commitment to cutting its operating costs and adopting badly needed governance reforms. To read EOS’s report, “Avoiding Both Bankruptcy and a Transit Death Spiral,” go to eyeonsacramento.org. Craig Powell is a local attorney, businessman, community activist and president of Eye on Sacramento, a civic watchdog and policy group. He can be reached at craig@ eyeonsacramento.org or 718-3030. n

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Child Care STANFORD YOUTH SOLUTIONS HELPS KIDS IN CRISIS

BY TERRY KAUFMAN LOCAL HEROES

I

n 1900, Jane Lathrop Stanford donated a mansion and some stock to create a place for homeless and disenfranchised children in Sacramento. The Sisters of Mercy built a school called Stanford Lathrop Memorial Home for Friendless Children, which later became Stanford Home for Children.

Data collected in the 1990s showed abysmal outcomes for children in group homes. Today, the group is known as Stanford Youth Solutions. “Our mission is all about stabilizing families,” says Carrie Johnson, director of development and marketing. “If families are stable, if they have adequate housing, parenting support, jobs, then everything works out. When the core is strong, families can navigate through tough situations.”

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Stanford Youth Solutions offer services to kids of all ages, many of them between 11 and 17.

Johnson joined Stanford Youth Solutions about two years ago after telling the person who contacted her about the position—a board member at her last nonprofit—that she had no interest in leaving a job she loved. “She said, ‘As a favor, would you just explore it?’” Johnson recalls. “I thought I knew all the nonprofits, but when I did my due diligence and looked at the leadership, I knew I couldn’t say no.” For Johnson, with almost 15 years experience as a nonprofit professional, Stanford Youth Solutions was unique. It has a highly skilled workforce of counselors, therapists and psychologists doing extremely difficult

work for lower pay than in the private sector. But the group’s leaders are invested in the staff and provide leadership training to all, as well as support and respite as needed. “It’s an amazing organization,” Johnson says. “They offer merit-based pay, which is unheard of in the nonprofit world.” Data collected in the 1990s showed abysmal outcomes for children in group homes. So at Stanford Youth Solutions, staffers meet their young clients at parks, schools and fast-food restaurants to provide treatment, including behavioral therapy, psychotherapy and counseling.

The majority of Stanford’s clients are between the ages of 11 and 17. There are interpreters to bridge language barriers. Peer mentors who share similar backgrounds and experiences help the kids navigate their world and empower them to have an active voice in their care. Referrals come from Sacramento County Child Protective Services, Behavioral Health Services, Probation Department and schools. More than 90 percent of the children served are at or below the poverty level. Many have experienced trauma, neglect or abuse. Children who can’t stay with their families live with specially trained


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programs across the country. As a partner of The Annie E. Casey Foundation, the organization teaches its model to other youth nonprofits nationwide. Funding comes from a combination of county reimbursement, grants and private donations. Stanford was recently awarded a significant gift by the Kelly Foundation, and Johnson is hopeful that other major donors will provide financial support. “The infrastructure is stellar, but I’d love to be able to build a funding model that supports sustainability,” says Johnson, who would like to increase the family partner staff and recruit more foster families. “Working here gives me purpose,” she says. “I ask myself, ‘What’s the one thing that changes the world?’ It’s what we do.” For more information about Stanford Youth Solutions, go to youthsolutions.org. Terry Kaufman can be reached at terry@1greatstory.com n

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Victims’ Voice ATTORNEY JOHN DEMAS AND HIS FIRM GO ALL OUT FOR THEIR CLIENTS

BY JESSICA LASKEY SHOPTALK

F

or John Demas, a personal injury attorney and the founding partner of the Demas Law Group, P.C., his job is about much more than winning multimillion-dollar verdicts. It’s about getting people the representation they deserve. “Our work is so rewarding because we can have a great impact on many aspects of our clients’ lives,” says Demas, whose firm includes five attorneys and specializes in motor vehicle accidents, wrongful death, defective products, premises liability, dog bites and more. “Our clients are looking at us to be their voice. We’re in a position where we can help the underdog stand up against well-funded, powerful interests, like insurance companies and corporations, and hold them accountable. It’s critically important that we provide them with the most aggressive and thoughtful representation.” Demas has more than 20 years of experience as a personal injury attorney and he opened his own eponymous firm in 2012. Though he initially intended to become a dentist—“Then I ran into organic chemistry,” he says with a laugh— Demas is no stranger to hard work. In fact, it was observing his parents’ work ethic as immigrants from Greece providing for Demas and his three siblings that first inspired the attorney to help others in whatever way he could after graduating from McGeorge School of Law.

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John Demas is the founding partner of the Demas Law Group, P.C.

“It’s a classic immigrant story,” says Demas, who is fluent in Greek.

“My parents moved us to Sacramento when I was 3 in search of a better life.

They didn’t speak English and had little schooling, but they managed to work hard, put us through school and provide us with a better future. “Seeing the challenges they went through was particularly eye-opening for me, and that work ethic has stayed with me since.” Now that the Arden-Arcade resident has three kids of his own, ages 5, 8 and 11, he’s more determined than ever to make sure the legacy of his parents’ determination and success lives on in both his children and his community. “Our office is very involved in the local community,” Demas says proudly. “I try to make giving back part of our firm culture. We help raise money for community service organizations like Mothers Against Drunk Driving, St. John’s Program for Real Change and Mustard Seed School, to name a few. “We also developed the Green Apple Award Program, which awards gift certificates to deserving teachers to use toward school supplies for their classrooms. We also engage in educational activities regarding safety issues like teenage driving and texting, and are working on creating a college scholarship program for underprivileged kids.” As if that isn’t impressive enough, Demas is also a recipient of many awards, including the Capitol City Trial Lawyers Association’s Trial Lawyer/Advocate of the Year. He made the Top 100 Attorney list for Northern California in 2014 and 2015 and has been selected by his peers as a Northern California Super SHOPTALK page 35


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Design Innovator THIS SCULPTOR CREATES PARTNERSHIPS THAT WORK

BY JEANNE WINNICK BRENNAN MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR

A

design company by the name of blankblank may give some people reason to pause. Is it possible the founder and creative director of an award-winning company just couldn’t devise a clever enough name for his business—or could he? An industrial designer who was educated at Pratt Institute in New York, Rob Zinn is a gifted sculptor with a grand vision.

He can realize threedimensional form through his fingertips. From his home base in the Sacramento Delta to numerous points around the globe, the Florida native’s blankblank brand enjoys a strong following. Private collectors, architects, interior designers, retailers and corporations in Toronto, Paris, Miami, New York and Saudi Arabia value his unique heirloom-quality lighting, furniture and objects. “Originally, ‘blankblank’ was just a placeholder name to emphasize design, freedom of art, the ability to go from a blank page to a reality,” Zinn says. “Then I realized it conveys how we work with other designers from concept to completion.” Created in 2004, blankblank takes artists’ ideas and brings them to life, using sustainable materials, new technologies and master craftsmen. Welders, painters, water-

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Robert Zinn

jet cutters of steel and aluminum, master woodworkers and fabricators throughout Northern California collaborate with Zinn and his design partners, Tim Richartz, Mark Goetz and Mike & Maikke. Ninety percent of blankblank’s manufacturing

is done within 50 miles of Zinn’s 100-year-old farmhouse in Courtland; the rest takes place within a 150-mile radius. The company’s approach—using planet-friendly raw materials, small-batch production and nearby

artisans—ensures the integrity of blankblank’s pieces. They all come with a lifetime care guarantee. Zinn creates heirloom-quality furniture that combines nature and artistry. He uses exceptional woods, clean, modern lines and bronzed fauxbois legs. Zinn has a sculptural gift: He can realize three-dimensional form through his fingertips. His handicraft and penchant for nature and simplicity are evident in everything he touches. “For the big slab tables made from salvaged wood, it starts in the forest with maybe a diseased tree that is removed, then milled and dried through a process that can take six years before it can be worked,” Zinn explains. “I begin with the idea and translate it into sketches, mockups and models. I sculpt the legs from dense foam, make the wax molds, and then we pour at the Sacramento Art Foundry, where Alan Osborne is a great partner. A welder attaches the legs to the finished table top.” Also in the Zinn network is Casella Lighting, founded more than 75 years ago by artist Alfred J. Casella. Through blankblank, the collaboration produced innovative lighting that was exhibited in Paris at the Mona Bismarck American Center for Art & American Culture at the Maison & Objet exhibit in the Christofle showrooms. A free-floating wood bookshelf entitled “Juxtaposed: Religion” by blankblank artists Mike & Maikke can be found in Gwyneth Paltrow’s living room in Amagansett, N.Y. In recently refurbished Saks Fifth Avenue stores in Puerto Rico and Toronto, Zinn’s cast plate dining


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collaborated on furniture and lighting designs for industry leaders such as Bernhardt, Herman Miller and Ralph Lauren. In 2002, his design work for fixtures in the Fleet Feet store on J Street introduced him to Northern California. Now married to Sacramento native Anna Pavao, Zinn finds the Delta’s agricultural community and its rich culture an important source of inspiration. “Living in the Delta connects us to nature, its seasons and its colors, our partners and the awareness of our carbon footprint,” Zinn says. “We are committed to this community to support other like-minded businesses, grow our network with more good partners and keep them all very busy as we promote American design worldwide.” For more information, go to blankblank.net n

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tables topped in smoked glass are used to display designer handbags. But it’s not necessary to travel far to see a blankblank product in use. Customers at Masullo Pizza in Land Park can sit on the firm’s benches and eat at its custom walnut slab dining table. The popular “Divide” benches by designer Mark Goetz are situated around the MARRS Building on 20th Street, and his “Stir Stools” are at Ginger Elizabeth Chocolates on L Street. “This coming year, we will continue to get in front of more high-end designers,” Zinn says. “Our work will be seen at significant furniture and interior design shows in New York and Miami, as well as in our affiliate showrooms: Triode in Paris, Siglo Moderno in Los Angeles and The NWBLK in San Francisco.” Zinn, who taught industrial design at Pratt shortly after he graduated,

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SHOPTALK FROM page 32 Lawyer (an honor limited to less than 5 percent of all attorneys and approximately 1 percent of plaintiff personal injury attorneys) every year since 2009. But for Demas, the awards are more than just accolades: They provided further fuel for him to do his job. “Most of our business comes from referrals from prior clients and other professionals,” Demas says, “which attests not only to the exceptional customer service we provide, but to our success in getting significant verdicts and settlements. In turn, our reputation and standing in the legal community contribute further to our success.” Need representation? Call the Demas Law Group at 441-0100. Its main office is at 701 Howe Avenue, Suite A-1. For more information, go to injury-attorneys.com. Jessica Laskey can be reached at jessrlaskey@gmail.com n

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See Spot Charm LIBRARY’S READ TO A DOG PROGRAM DELIGHTS YOUNGSTERS

BY ANGELA KNIGHT MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR

M

arvin the corgi struts through the doors of Robbie Waters Pocket-Greenhaven Library with his human handler following not too far behind. The little dog greets one of the library assistants, who is clearly a fan, and rolls on the carpet a few times to dry his stubby legs before he starts work. In the library’s reading tower, children gather around Marvin, who is wearing his bright red bandana. Allie Tulchinskiy, Marvin’s handler and “corgi mom,” places his Dr. Seuss blanket on the floor and puts out business cards while he greets his young admirers like a well-mannered celebrity. He licks a child’s hand. Another reads to him from “Biscuit,” a children’s story about a dog. A girl in a wheelchair joins the group and says, “I want to say hi.” Marvin sniffs her shoes. She climbs out of her chair and sits next to him. “Marvin is so cute,” she gushes. Another child asks, “Does he like baths?” Marvin doesn’t like baths, Tulchinskiy says. One child repeatedly orders him to “shake,” and another shoves his Spiderman shoes into Marvin’s soft belly. The corgi rolls his big brown eyes. It’s all part of a therapy dog’s job. Little hands constantly touch Marvin’s beige-and-white coat, pull on his eye whiskers and feel his rabbitlike ears. He settles in the center of the room, where the Saturday afternoon sun streams through the windows, surrounded by kids, adults and a large teddy bear. Tulchinskiy, wearing a “Keep Calm and Corgi On” T-shirt, patiently holds

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Allie Tulchinskiy and Marvin enjoy some fresh air in a local park

Marvin’s leash, even though Marvin is not trying to leave. The children take turns choosing a book and reading out loud. After every reading, there is applause and the child gets a sticker. Both Pocket residents, Marvin and Tulchinskiy are volunteers in Sacramento Public Library’s Read to a Dog program, which encourages children to read aloud to a trained therapy dog like Marvin in a nonjudgmental, no-pressure environment. Marvin’s business card says he is a “treat connoisseur, belly-rub authority, playtime professional, and snuggle savant.” He is also a Pembroke Welsh Corgi, one of two corgi breeds. Unlike most 3-year-olds,

he has his own email address and an Instagram account with nearly 6,000 followers, which he shares with his corgi sister, Stella. Together, they’ve posed in various places across the United States, including the Grand Canyon and Jackson Square in New Orleans. Marvin was bred to be a show dog. But he was too relaxed for that high-pressure lifestyle, so his original owners gave him to a corgi rescue organization. Tulchinskiy, an accountant, and her husband, a nurse at UC Davis Medical Center, adopted Marvin. At the time, he was a 5-month-old ball of fluff with a laid-back attitude. Now, it’s difficult to tell who’s benefited more from

the relationship. He’s the center of attention at home and at “work,” and they’ve made lots of friends through what Tulchinskiy calls the “corgi nation.” That close community of corgi owners helped ease the transition when the family moved from New York to Sacramento last summer. Tulchinskiy’s family had show and competition dogs when she was growing up, and she soon realized that her new puppy didn’t like to compete. “He didn’t have the right temperament [to be a show dog],” Tulchinskiy says. “He doesn’t have the intense personality or drive, so to speak. He’s very laid-back.”


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A donation of $25 per person is requested for the benefit of the comprehensive Cerebral Palsy Program at Shriners Hospitals for Children. Tours last approximately one hour. To schedule a tour, please contact Joseph Ramos at (916) 453-2018 or joramos@shrinenet.org. Instead, she and Marvin took a six-week therapy dog preparation class. Marvin had to pass a test administered by a trained evaluator from Therapy Dogs International in order to graduate. For the test, Marvin resisted taking food from the evaluator’s hand and eating food left on the ground. He was exposed to loud noises, children running around, a woman flailing about on crutches, and people poking him. The only thing that bothered him was “having things swing in his face,” according to Tulchinskiy, specifically name tags, but he’s a pro now. Tulchinskiy says Marvin adopts his “business walk,” which looks like a strut, whenever he wears the red bandana that identifies him as a therapy dog. The pair started their volunteer career by visiting patients in hospitals, but Marvin didn’t seem to enjoy that as much as working with children. “When he hears the kids reading, he settles down,” she says. They’ve been volunteers in the reading program since last October. The program has been “incredibly well received,” according to Brendle

Wells, the Pocket-Greenhaven Library branch supervisor, and she plans to keep it going “as long as Marvin and Allie want to volunteer.” “I love watching the kids make breakthroughs,” Tulchinskiy says. When they first started, she introduced Marvin to a young girl who was terrified of dogs. Now, the child regularly attends the Saturdayafternoon reading sessions at the library. Another girl, who doesn’t like to read aloud, sits with one arm around Marvin and whispers in his ear. Marvin doesn’t seem to mind. “He’ll listen to anything,” Tulchinskiy says. “He loves it.” Allie Tulchinskiy and her corgi Marvin volunteer every second and fourth Saturday from 1 to 2 p.m. at Robbie Waters Pocket-Greenhaven Library, located at 7335 Gloria Drive. They also sometimes volunteer at Belle Coolidge Library, at 5600 South Land Park Drive. For more information about Sacramento Public Library’s Read to a Dog program, go to saclibrary.org/kids n

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Stories Unearthed HISTORY COMES TO LIFE (AND DEATH) AT THE OLD CITY CEMETERY

BY SCOT CROCKER

A

INSIDE DOWNTOWN

t some point, tourists and new arrivals to Sacramento walk the streets of Old Sacramento and enjoy the quaint shops, woodplank sidewalks and exhibits, buildings and museums that pay homage to the Old West and the Gold Rush. Underneath that nostalgic façade, however, is the reality that Sacramento was birthed by a band of tough, ruthless, hard-nosed, pennypinching, abrasive men and women. Their stories come to life—or death—at Sacramento’s Old City Cemetery at 1000 Broadway. Famous people are buried there. Ancestors of local families are there. Plain folks and families rest in the cemetery’s 31-plus acres of plots, crypts, gardens and mausoleums. And under every tombstone is a story. Thanks to the more than 140 volunteers of the Old City Cemetery Committee who keep digging up new dirt, those stories don’t fade away. They actually continue to grow. Sacramento wasn’t an easy place after gold was found in 1848. Every kind of person imaginable descended on Sacramento, from gamblers and prostitutes to pastors and shopkeepers. They set up home wherever they could, headed to the

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Volunteers Jane Howell and Jean Robinson

gold fields and often came back to Sacramento empty-handed. There was no city then, no real government and no real law. John Sutter Sr. started his New Helvetia colony with the approval of the Mexican government. He planned to start a city called Sutterville before gold was discovered.

Gold changed everything. Sutter made a fortune. People flooded in. Sutter Sr. asked his son, John A. Sutter Jr., to form a city called Sacramento where Sutterville was going to go. John A. Sutter Jr. is buried in the old cemetery. But he didn’t die here. After setting up the city in the

gridlike configuration that we know today, Sutter Jr. fought with his father. Junior left for Acapulco, where he died. He was brought back to Sacramento for his final resting spot. In 1849, Sutter Sr. gave 10 acres of land to the city for a cemetery. It was built south of downtown on the highest ground in the city. It’s actually a large hill. Other land was later donated. Over the decades, the cemetery fell into disrepair from vandalism and age. Other cemeteries opened, making the city cemetery obsolete. Monuments were marred. Headstones toppled. In 1987, citizens worked with city officials and the County Sheriff’s work release program to refurbish the grounds with plants, flowers, bushes and gardens. “There are still a few open plots out here, and we still have burials even though the oldest burial is from 1849,” said Jean Robins, one of the cemetery volunteers. “There is one mausoleum that was passed down through the years to its current owner. He’s been trying to sell it for years.” There are some notable characteristics to the back stories of the people laid to rest in the cemetery. Almost everyone was an immigrant or from an immigrant family. The Gold Rush brought people of every nationality, religion and color to Sacramento. The city cemetery is uniquely integrated. “There is little segregation in the cemetery,” said Jane Howell, a longtime volunteer and docent. “There are some areas

DOWNTOWN page 40


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in the cemetery that split a little by religion or race, but you’ll find a mix throughout the cemetery.” Early Sacramentans were aligned by community groups and associations. Parts of the cemetery are designated for members of the Masons, Odd Fellows and Sacramento Pioneer Association. Volunteer firefighters are interred in one area, California state leaders in another. Survivors of the Donner Party are buried here, and there are memorials to Union and Confederate soldiers who died in the Civil War. There are plots for notable families like the Crockers and McClatchys. Also buried at the old cemetery are early community leaders who tried to tame a rough-and-tumble town of beer bars, gambling halls, houses of prostitution and other businesses serving the prospectors on their way to the gold fields. “Sacramento was home to fights, floods, fires, disease and a chance to get rich,” said Robins. “We even have early leaders who were severely injured or killed in battles in the streets of Sacramento, including a mayor and sheriff.” Other cemetery residents left their mark on Sacramento by building successful businesses. Their names are on streets, buildings and communities we know today. There’s the Curtis family. William Curtis Sr. and his wife Susan arrived in Sacramento in 1852 from Massachusetts. Within two years, they had a homestead and acquired land that Curtis Sr. eventually donated to the city for Curtis Park. His youngest daughter, who was considered extremely beautiful and ambitious, died unexpectedly at the age of 25. Why or how she died is still a mystery. Then there’s the Clunie family, which had a hotel on K Street. Florence Turton Clunie donated money to build a community center and pool at McKinley Park in the 1930s. There are legendary brewers Adolph Heilbron and Capt. Frank J. Ruhstaller. In 1888, Heilbron founded

Buffalo Brewing Company, which became the largest brewery west of the Mississippi. Ruhstaller owned Ruhstaller brewery and was president of the Fort Sutter national bank and chief stockholder in Capital Hotel. Another famous person buried at the cemetery is railroad tycoon Mark Hopkins, one the legendary “Big Four.” He’s entombed in a 350-ton granite structure from the Rockies that cost more than $80,000—a small fortune at the time. “I’d have to say he wouldn’t have been too happy about his wife putting out that big of an expense,” said Robins. “He was considered cheap. He had a nice home in Sacramento, grew fruits and vegetables but didn’t give them away to neighbors. He sold them.” Alexander Hamilton’s youngest son, William Stephen Hamilton, was buried in the cemetery in 1850. “Not sure what he was doing in Sacramento when he died,” said Howell. “But since he’s been here, he’s moved around a lot.” According to cemetery records, he was exhumed twice in the 1800s and buried three times in three different locations. The stories go on and on. There’s the infamous daughter of Judge Edwin B. Crocker and his second wife, Margaret, of Crocker Art Museum fame. Before she died, Aimee Crocker made quite a stir as an American heiress, princess, bohemian, world traveler, mystic and author. She’s known for her adventures in the Far East, her extravagant parties in San Francisco, New York and Paris, and her collection of young husbands and lovers. If you’re interested in learning more about Sacramento’s colorful history, visit the Old City Cemetery, which is open daily. Better yet, don’t let these stories fade away. The Old City Cemetery Committee accepts donations to keep the stories and the cemetery itself living on for everyone to enjoy. For more information, go to OldCityCemetery.com. Scot Crocker can be reached at scot@crockercrocker.com n


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Helping Vets THIS JUDGE OVERSEES A SPECIAL COURT FOR MILITARY VETERANS

BY JESSICA LASKEY MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR

W

hen David Abbott enlisted in the Marine Corps as a college student in 1968, he probably had no idea that he would eventually be helping fellow military personnel nearly 50 years later through the local Veterans Treatment Court he helped found as a judge of the Superior Court of California, Sacramento County. “Sacramento has a huge veteran population,” Abbott says. “There’s a real need for Veterans Treatment Court here, and Sacramento was the only large county that didn’t have one. With the impetus from the District Attorney and the Public Defender’s offices, I was lucky enough to become involved in getting it going in 2014.” Abbott was the right man for the job, considering he’s spent the majority of his judicial career as a trial lawyer. While serving in the Marine Corps (he was given the commission of Second Lieutenant upon graduating from college and was on active duty from 1974 to 1978), he worked as a judge advocate. After graduating from McGeorge School of Law, he worked as a trial lawyer specializing in tort litigation. Since being appointed to the Sacramento County bench in 2002, Abbott has served as a trial judge for the last 15 years with one exception, when he heard custody and felony pretrial cases at the county jail for two years. Abbott’s background proved he was more than up to the task when the area’s Veterans Treatment Court needed founding.

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Judge David Abbott

“Veterans Treatment Court is a collaborative court,” Abbott explains, “which means it’s a collaboration between the DA and the Public Defender’s offices. It’s built for veterans who are experiencing PTSD, suffering from traumatic brain injury or the aftermath of sexual trauma from their military experience and, as a result, have committed a crime. A ‘nexus’ is required to qualify for treatment court: There has to be a

connection between their condition and their criminal activity.” The Arden Park resident explains that the court is designed for people who don’t otherwise have a history of criminal activity, but who break the law due to military service-related issues. “Veterans are eligible for probation and can be admitted to Veterans Treatment Court if the DA agrees, if the Public Defender agrees and

if I agree,” Abbott says. “Our court is staffed with a full-time probation officer who oversees their probation, a liaison from the Veterans Affairs office to connect them with treatment programs provided by the VA—like PTSD clinics and rehab programs— and, if there’s an injury, they’re overseen by a psychologist and neuropsychiatrist to address their specific issues. NEIGHBOR page 45


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The Mayor’s Race HOW STEINBERG AND ASHBY DECIDED TO RUN

BY R.E. GRASWICH

A

ngelique Ashby and Darrell Steinberg each want to be the next mayor of Sacramento. Both candidates promise to extend downtown’s economic revitalization and build upon public investment in the new arena. Both vow to promote pubic safety and fiscal responsibility. All that sounds good. But what will the winner really do once he or she walks through the double doors on the fifth floor at City Hall and claims Kevin Johnson’s office? Will they lead or divide? Will they push bold initiatives or work quietly behind the scenes on business as usual? There are other people campaigning for mayor, notably Tony Lopez, a charismatic former world champion boxer. Lopez earns his living as a bail bondsman. He hasn’t received any respect from the community elites who bestowed political endorsements on Steinberg and Ashby and are financing their campaigns. But Lopez is worth watching. He’s an outsider in a time when outsiders upend established candidates. He has name recognition and a compelling narrative, elements essential to successful campaigns. If nothing else, Lopez may draw enough votes to hold Ashby and

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Angelique Ashby

Steinberg below 50.1 percent in the June primary, forcing a November runoff. How that would play out is anyone’s guess. Given the campaign’s awkward start, an indecisive June would not be surprising. Steinberg, a career politician with deep credibility and respect among his peers, was looking for a soft landing spot after being termed out as Sacramento’s state senator. For six previous years, he served as leader of the Senate, a job that placed him alongside California’s most powerful officials. He enjoyed ornate offices in the Capitol, recast in 19th-century splendor. He controlled

Darrell Steinberg

hundreds of jobs Legislation couldn’t move and the state budget couldn’t pass without his nod. That power disappeared on Oct. 15, 2014, when Steinberg left the Senate. Sacramento is a cruel place for a former elected official, which is why many scramble for peripheral jobs. An instant has-been, even a former Senate president has zero value to people who do business at the Capitol—people whose only interest is whether you can get bills passed or killed. When you can do neither, you are irrelevant. Such has become Steinberg’s fate at age 56. After 20 years in office,

climbing from the Sacramento city council to the Assembly and Senate, mastering the political netherworld, there was nowhere to go. He took a job at a law firm, but grinding away as an attorney never motivated Steinberg. He was mentioned as a possible nominee for the State Supreme Court and floated as a potential replacement for Attorney General Kamala Harris, who will abandon her state job if elected to the U.S. Senate. He thought about running for lieutenant governor. And there was always mayor, a resolutely provincial stop for a politician with a statewide


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1462 33rd Street • 737-PINK portfolio, but appealing from a legacy perspective. “I have options and choices, and that’s a good thing,” Steinberg says. “The court and attorney general, those would be appointments by the governor. We have a good relationship, but those are his choices. I have options, and running for mayor is what I’ve chosen to do. And I’m running hard.” While the mayor’s job would seem a comedown for someone accustomed to the pinnacles of power, even that decision had complications. Steinberg wasn’t looking for a competitive race—or a race against Johnson. And Johnson dithered about a third term. Last summer, Johnson told friends he wasn’t running. But a scandal from his past was revived by the website Deadspin: a scandal over Johnson’s relationship with a 16-year-old girl during his Phoenix Suns days. Johnson’s competitive fires stirred. He moved toward a third campaign but backed away in October. With no incumbent, Steinberg was game. He drew support from almost

every elected official in town. Seven city councilmembers endorsed him. But the eighth city councilmember had plans of her own. Angelique Ashby, 41, a brash outsider elected to her second term from North Natomas in 2014, had been dreaming about the mayor’s job for years. Like Steinberg, Ashby didn’t want to run against Johnson. But the mayor’s office was an obvious step for her ambitions. Tired of waiting for Johnson, Ashby jumped. She plotted her announcement while Johnson stalled. Finally and coincidentally, on the same day Ashby declared she was running, Johnson announced he was finished. “I wanted to make my plans clear,” Ashby says. “My decision to run had nothing to do with what other people might be planning. That’s not me. I’m running because I love this city and plan to be a great mayor.” One experienced political pro. One striver hungry for new challenges. And a boxer. The field was set for a mayor’s race with distinct choices. R.E. Graswich can be reached at reg@graswich.com n

NEIGHBOR FROM page 42 “We want to help them recover,” he continues. “If during a flashback brought on by PTSD they committed an offense that brought them before the court and/or if they’re selfmedicating by abusing alcohol or other drugs to deal with the effects of their conditions, we want to help them cope with the problem, learn to deal with their triggers and understand what they’re going through. That way, they’re in a better position to control it and not reoffend. The goal is to help people resolve their issues instead of warehousing them in jail or prison. We want to help change the direction of their lives.” Being a lifelong upholder of justice, however, Abbott doesn’t want it to seem that the transgression just goes away, even if someone is suffering. “As a condition of their probation, these veterans must undergo rehab,” Abbott says. “But the reason they’re being seen here at all is because they were charged and convicted of a crime. To get into Veterans Court, you have to plead guilty, and your sentence is suspended while you’re undergoing

treatment. But you don’t get a free pass. That’s very important: The consequence of your action is still there. It’s not a dodge. You will be held accountable. And if you violate the terms of your probation, you can be ordered into prison.” The program seems to work. Abbott says the rate of recidivism (relapse into criminal behavior) is the lowest among the other collaborative courts in the county and lower than the general criminal population. Best of all, the program helps people get back on their feet. “Vietnam-era veterans have been living with these problems for 30 or 40 years, so it’s gratifying to finally be able to get them the kind of attention they need,” Abbott says. “And the majority of the people we’re seeing now are from the Middle East conflicts, so it’s good that we’re able to help them while they’re still young. If we can solve the problem that was created by their military service, they can go on to lead successful lives.” Jessica Laskey can be reached at jessrlaskey@gmail.com n

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NFL Dreams SIX YEARS AGO, THE RAIDERS’ AL DAVIS FLIRTED WITH SACRAMENTO

BY R.E. GRASWICH SPORTS AUTHORITY

S

ix years ago, on a fine spring day in late March, Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson began work at 7:15 a.m. with a TV interview at “Good Day Sacramento.” After that, he had breakfast at Fox & Goose, then headed to City Hall for his weekly meeting with reporters. During his talks with the media, Johnson never mentioned what he would do later that day: drive to Alameda for a secret one-hour meeting with Oakland Raiders managing partner Al Davis. The discussion between the mayor and the NFL team owner was one of two such sessions, private talks designed to build a relationship and explore possibilities of moving the Raiders to Sacramento. A move would be complicated and expensive, but it had to start somewhere. Davis, as always, was wily and game, even in his 80th year. Johnson, as always, was eager and rogue, operating beyond his depth, without consent from fellow city councilmembers. Johnson came away from the March 2010 meeting distressed by Davis’ physical condition. The renowned football owner and coach

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The Raider Image store at Arden Fair Mall

was bandaged from a recent fall and was barely able to move around. But Johnson was impressed by the sharpness of Davis’ mind. The mayor said, “Al knows exactly what he wants.” The wish list presented by Davis was simple. He wanted a stadium for his beloved Raiders—a stadium engineered to appropriate but not preposterous expectations. He wanted a state-of-the-art practice facility. He wanted offices for his staff. And he wanted an iconic space for something only Al Davis would demand: a Raiders hall of fame. The price tag for all this would be significant. The stadium alone would cost around $900 million, double what Johnson had figured as the price for a new arena for the Kings. The practice field, offices and hall of fame could

easily add several hundred million dollars. Still, the mountain didn’t intimidate Johnson. He believed that as long as he and Davis were talking and working together, they could make the project happen. Cooperation and partnership: Those would be the keys. Neither the city nor the Raiders could afford the bill. The city’s entire budget, from cops and fire service and parks to water and sewage and garbage and everything else,was just under $1 billion. The Raiders at the time were worth maybe $700 million. Clearly, the project would need help with financing, a creative approach. And while Davis made all the decisions for the Raiders, he didn’t own the team outright. His share had historically been below 50 percent, though he briefly owned 67 percent

following the death of a partner (and the resolution of various lawsuits that always seemed to entangle Davis). Twenty percent of the 67 percent was quickly sold to a Wall Street investment group, leaving Davis with 47 percent. As Johnson’s special assistant during his first term, I had a box seat for the dealings with Davis. Johnson wasn’t overly optimistic. He’s good with math and has always been pragmatic when it comes to dollars, but he’s also a dreamer, forever ready to take a big risk on a big play for a big payoff. And in Johnson’s mind, there was no bigger payoff than the Raiders. There was no question in his mind Sacramento could support the NFL team, despite the city’s moderate size, average household incomes and provincial business environment.


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Bay Area wealth would follow the Raiders to Sacramento, Johnson believed. And football fans across the region would flock to NFL games in the valley, sacrificing household necessities to buy Raiders season tickets and gear. The mayor was convinced public support would not be a problem. Nor would political support, once the city council understood the potential. Sacramento had the perfect location: the old concrete stadium abandoned next to Sleep Train Arena, where the Kings once planned to build a football stadium for the Raiders in 1989. This time around, all that was needed was a deal framed upon shared responsibilities—the city, Raiders and NFL pulling together to lock down a legendary franchise within reach of its legacy fans and give Davis what he always wanted but never achieved: a stadium all for himself. Of course, it never happened. The relationship Johnson hoped to build with Davis ended when Davis said the Raiders expected to

contribute minimal cash equity to the project. The financing plan would be the city’s burden. The Raiders’ presence in Sacramento would be the team’s equity. “Now I know why Al Davis never got his own stadium,” Johnson said. Davis died in October 2011. His widow Carol inherited the 47 percent. Son Mark became managing partner. Son like father, he’s still looking for a home of his own.

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47


A New Neighborhood WILL MCKINLEY VILLAGE BE LIKE EAST SAC?

BY JORDAN VENEMA BUILDING OUR FUTURE

J

ust north of East Sacramento, wedged between I-80 and the Union Pacific Railroad, lies a large, leaf-shaped plot of land. The property has been a visible landscape to thousands of daily commuters, but the heretofore-empty lot has gone mostly unnoticed, despite construction that is transforming the site into Sacramento’s next neighborhood. New housing development McKinley Village is a project by Riverview Capital Investments and The New Home Company. The project has been in the works since 2007, but due to the sluggish housing economy, construction didn’t begin until June 2014. Now that ground has been broken, developer Phil Angelides hopes McKinley Village will join Sacramento’s list of iconic neighborhoods. “Sacramento is known for its wonderful neighborhoods, whether it’s Land Park, where my family lives, or McKinley Park, or East Sacramento,” says Angelides, president of Riverview Capital Investments. “Our goal here is to create a neighborhood, not a subdivision.” But it might be an uphill battle convincing some East Sacramento residents, who fear the 336-home project will increase traffic and congestion. Angelides says McKinley Village will fill a need for housing in the downtown Sacramento area. The development’s homes will fall into one of five categories, or “villages.” “The intent of having the villages with the different housing types is to meet different demographic

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Kevin S. Carson, Northern California President of The New Home Company, with developer Phil Angelides amid the construction at McKinley Village

profiles,” says Kevin Carson, president of The New Home Company for Northern California. “Because we really want McKinley Village to be attractive to all groups.” From stacked flats—two-story buildings with upstairs and downstairs units—to courtyard houses and traditional single-family homes, the homes will range in size from 1,295 to 3,100 square feet, says Angelides. “While there are five model complexes, there are actually 61 different elevations,” he says. “And when you take into account colors and materials, no two homes will look the same. We’re really trying to build on the architectural diversity BUILDING page 51


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The Highest Honor BEING AT A DEATHBED ISN’T SAD; IT’S A PRIVILEGE

BY NORRIS BURKES SPIRIT MATTERS

A

s a part-time hospice chaplain, I often get unnecessary sympathy from friends and acquaintances. They say things like “Your job must be so sad.” Or “I can’t say I envy you.” The irony is that I rarely feel sad. Instead, I am honored to be present in that sacred moment when someone takes his or her final breath on this earth. Take, for example, the family that called me on a dreary day last month requesting that I bring a blessing for their dying mother.

I immediately hopped in my car and set my windshield wipers on delay to wipe away the drizzle of the indecisive rain. A few minutes later, I rang the doorbell in a home not far from mine. A dour woman in her 60s answered the door. She introduced herself as the patient’s daughter and led me to the kitchen, where she’d been discussing funeral plans with the hospice nurse. As we sat down together, the devoted daughter explained how she’d recently quit her job to take care of her mother. “My mother is a lifelong Catholic,” she said, “so she’d appreciate a blessing.” “Where is she now?” I asked. “Sleeping in the master bedroom,” she replied, nodding toward the hallway. “She’s unrousable,” added the nurse. I stood in anticipation they’d join me. “I’m not religious at all,” the daughter said. “You go ahead.”

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Feeling dismissed, I walked down the darkened hallway with some confusion in tow. I’m a bit unclear what people want me to do in these solo situations. Am I supposed to arouse the loved one like a nurse who awakes her patient for medication? Or should I whisper a prayer so as not to disturb the patient? I also wondered how I would feel in her position. I might be thinking, “I’ve got my eternal questions answered, so I don’t want a stranger bothering me on my deathbed.”

A gently creased smile edged across her face Nevertheless, I walked into the master bedroom, filled with the smells of ointments, diapers and the dust of a well-used room. The woman was sleeping peacefully on her back, hands folded across her stomach. I reached out with my index finger to trace the shape of the cross on her forehead. With my touch, she startled awake. I took a step back and smiled. She returned a solemn, unreadable expression. What was she thinking? I was an unescorted stranger in her bedroom. Did she think I was there to do her harm? Was she wondering why she didn’t recognize me? “I’m Chaplain Norris,” I said. “Your daughter asked me to say a prayer with you.” A gently creased smile edged across her face, giving a hint of understanding.

I took a retreating step into the hallway and invited the nurse and the woman’s daughter to join what was likely the patient’s last wakened moment. A minute later, we stood around the bed as the woman blinked in recognition of our intent. We joined hands and I cleared my throat to say the blessing. “May you hear the familiar voice of your loved ones, “May you hear the tender call of God’s invitation, “And may you experience the love of both. “Amen.” With that, our patient shut her eyes. In their closing, I thought I could see traces of the Apostle Paul, who said in 2 Timothy 4:7, “I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith.” As I drove to see my next patient, I noticed the rain had given up for the day. I thought about my friends who say this job would be too sad for them. Sad is the last word I’d use. It’s not sad. It’s an honor. It’s a calling. Norris Burkes is a chaplain, syndicated columnist, national speaker and author of the book “Hero’s Highway,” about his experiences as a hospital chaplain in Iraq. He can be reached at ask@ TheChaplain.net n

Chaplain Norris Burkes is available to speak at churches, community events and veteran or healthcare organizations. Contact him at norris@thechaplain.net or 243-6260.


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BUILDING FROM page 48 and history of both Midtown and East Sacramento.” According to Carson, project architect Mike Woodley spent hours walking through East Sacramento to capture the atmosphere and architectural nuances of the neighborhood. The idea was to create architectural consistency between East Sac and McKinley Village. “It’s going to feel a little more eclectic,” says Carson. “From Spanish to Monterey to Craftsman, Colonial, European cottage and farmhouse, there’s going to be a number of different styles.”

Prices will probably range from $400,000 to $800,000. The developers say they will assess market prices at the end of year, when the first McKinley Village homes go on sale. Still, they believe the price for a McKinley Village home will be more affordable than comparable homes in East Sacramento. Though McKinley Village won’t have restaurants or retail stores, Angelides says the development is the antithesis of a gated community and will draw people from other neighborhoods. “We’re connected to East Sacramento, connected to midtown,”

he says. “It’s an urban neighborhood that’s very walkable.” The developers worked closely with Shelly Willis, executive director of Sacramento Metropolitan Arts Commission, to select eight local artists to provide art for McKinley Village. “There will be various sculpture and art pieces throughout the neighborhood,” explains Angelides, as well as streets named after contemporary artists. The intent, he says, is to pay homage to Sacramento’s art community. McKinley Village also incorporates parks into its plan, with three major parks and more than 10 pocket parks and greens. The central park

features a recreation center designed by local architect David Mogavero, with a community room, gym, pool and outdoor area that can be used for weddings and family events. Aesthetically, the recreation center will be unique to McKinley Village but will contain visual references to East Sac’s Clunie Community Center and Shepard Garden and Arts Center. Sacramentans will get the opportunity to see McKinley Village after Labor Day, says Angelides. “When people come, they’ll see the five completed model home complexes,” he says, as well as the recreation center and the first completed city park. Until the first families begin moving into McKinley Village later this year, Sacramento won’t really know what kind of impact the development will have on other neighborhoods. And it will be years, perhaps even decades, before McKinley Village proves it can join the family of Sacramento neighborhoods. Jordan Venema can be reached at jordan.venema@gmail.com n

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Roses, R.I.P. CITY DIRECTIVE SOUNDS DEATH KNELL FOR CEMETERY ROSE GARDEN

BY R.E. GRASWICH CITY BEAT

R

esidents of Sacramento’s Old City Cemetery don’t vote or pay taxes. They don’t complain to city councilmembers. And they don’t speak to the media. But it’s not hard to imagine that if they did break their eternal silence, our dearly departed pioneers at 1000 Broadway might say this: Please don’t kill our climbing roses. That’s exactly what the city of Sacramento is proposing to do between now and December: rip down, replant, propagate or otherwise remove about 50 living legacies that have honored the city’s earliest residents and gained international recognition for decades. For living souls who love roses and donate time and energy to keep the Old City Cemetery alive with splashes of climbing color, the rose eviction is heartbreaking. “It feels like the old saying ‘We have to destroy the village in order to save it,’” says Anita Clevenger, a Master Gardener who has volunteered at the cemetery’s Historic Rose Garden for 13 years. “The best outcome is for us to work together with the city and find a solution. But that’s not what we’re hearing from

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Anita Clevenger volunteers at the cemetery’s Historic Rose Garden

the city. We have a directive that the climbing roses have to be taken down by the first of December.” The directive is a newly adopted city document called Guidelines for Pruning, Trimming and Planting in the Historic Old City Cemetery. The guidelines, adopted in February, set the vegetation clock at 1953, based on an aerial photo from that year. The climbing roses and their trellises missed the photo opportunity by 40 years.

The condemned flowers have drawn awards and attention from rosarians around the world. And while the unbending guidelines are a thorn deep in the side of volunteers, the city says the cemetery’s legacy as a burial plot surpasses its status as a rose garden. “Our goal is to preserve and respect the historical significance of the cemetery,” says Roberta Deering, the city’s preservation director. “We’re trying to strike a balance, because some of the roses are beautiful. But

they are newer plantings, and this is a historic cemetery.” The Old City Cemetery has been around since Sacramento’s founding in 1849, but the Historic Rose Garden is a relatively young shrub. The garden was created in 1992 with the support of Jim Henley, the legendary city historian who died in 2014. When Henley directed his attention to 1000 Broadway, the Old City Cemetery was a civic embarrassment. Historic monuments had tumbled into disrepair. The gardens—a source of pride and beauty for grieving families and citizens out for a pleasant stroll in the 1800s—suffered from decades of abuse and neglect. No archives exist to document precisely how the original gardens were arranged. But one day around 1990, Henley discovered a photograph from the 1860s in a Library of Congress collection. The photograph showed roses climbing to the heavens at the Old City Cemetery. Armed with the photo, Henley encouraged volunteers to plant climbing roses, and he had arbors and trellises built. The garden blossomed anew. “People in the 19th century didn’t have parks like we do today, so they turned their cemeteries into parks,” Clevenger says. “They planted flowers in between the monuments and behind them. Roses were especially prominent. You can see them represented on markers, with a broken rose for a child who died, or a full rose for a full and complete life.” The city admits roses have a timeless presence at the cemetery. But Deering says, “They were a little more structured in the 19th and early


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20th centuries. It wasn’t as rambling as the newer plantings.” Several months ago, garden volunteers began hearing from city staff that the climbing roses were a problem. The volunteers asked why. Answers were vague. Someone from the parks department, which maintains the cemetery grounds, mentioned “security,” suggesting criminals might hide behind the roses. Volunteers scoffed at the idea that the

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garden poses a special threat for drug or other criminal behavior. City staff suggested relocating the climbing roses alongside the cemetery’s Broadway, Riverside or Muir Way fences. Clevenger doesn’t think that will work, given vehicle traffic and environmental issues. And propagating quarter-century-old roses isn’t a simple job. The process can take two years, well beyond the city’s Dec. 1 deadline. “This isn’t a fight any of us want to have,” Clevenger says. “We keep all the roses pruned. We’ve never been given any evidence that the climbing roses have damaged anything. And the historic garden is such a beautiful, romantic place.” For now, the city isn’t budging. Says Deering, “There are members of the volunteer community who would like to do whatever they want. But this is a cemetery.” R.E. Graswich can be reached at reg@graswich.com n

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53


Just Do It VOLUNTEERING IS A WONDERFUL THING

BY STEPHANIE RILEY

W

PARENT TALES

hen my daughter Emma was in kindergarten, a nice group of girls invited her to join a newly formed Girl Scout troop. Well, in reality, a nice group of moms invited me to have Emma join the troop. I, and by extension my daughter, jumped at the chance. Although I had never had the experience of being a Girl Scout, I knew enough about Girl Scouting to know that I wanted Emma to be a part of it. The opportunity to build lasting friendships among girls her age was definitely a plus. (At my age, I know how important strong female friendships are.) But I was also intrigued by the opportunities tied up in the Girl Scout experience. I had, for a long time, seen stories about community service projects initiated by Girl Scouts, and I’d read about the long-term benefits of being on a team. Emma and I both joined. We had great fun learning about friendship and being a compassionate “sister to every Girl Scout.” We even learned about recycling and sustainable design. One of the volunteer troop leaders had just completed a remodel of her home and had a female architect come speak with the girls.

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We were all impressed, girls and moms alike. Just as we started to see the girls bond into a cohesive unit, we got disappointing news. Both troop leaders needed to devote more time to their families and their day jobs, which meant that either the rest of the moms would have to step up and lead the troop or the group would disband. I’m embarrassed to say that none of us stepped up. With a lack of volunteers, the troop fizzled. Emma still talks about her disappointment, and I still feel the guilt. It’s not that I don’t volunteer; it’s just that I failed to step up at that time. I had no idea that no one else would jump in. Mama guilt is a pretty heavy burden. Over the years, I have served as a volunteer in a variety of capacities. I spent a lot of time working with students in all three of my kids’ classrooms. I helped organize a variety of fundraisers and school events and eventually served as the chair of the Parent Teacher Student Organization. I think my kids were proud of my involvement in their school, even though I swear, I sometimes saw them roll their eyes when they spotted me walking onto the campus. The novelty of having a parent at your school definitely wears off when a child hits about sixth grade. How can you flirt with a boy in your math class when your mom is in the room? If there was a downside to my time spent volunteering at the school, it would be that my kids got a little lazy. They came to expect to see me at

the school and had no qualms about forgetting their lunches, math books or science fair projects at home. Aside from being used as my kids’ courier, my time as a school volunteer was a positive experience. Many times, I heard teachers say they couldn’t be as effective as they were without the involvement of community volunteers, and I believe it. I was first bitten by the volunteer bug when I was in fourth grade and our teacher decided that our GATE class should spend some time tutoring the students in the special day class. We were given the opportunity to teach basic skills to children with developmental, cognitive and intellectual challenges. Jody was easily two or three years older than I was, and I was paired with her to help her identify colors and fruits using a set of flashcards. We eventually graduated to walking around the classroom, then the school grounds, me pointing to things and Jody excitedly shouting out the colors. Ever since Jody mastered those colors, I’ve been hooked on the high you get from volunteering. There is nothing that compares to the feeling of knowing you’re making a difference for someone. My kids have turned out to be pretty good little volunteers, too. Just two weeks ago, I took my oldest daughter, Erin, to donate blood. Two hours later, she emerged from BloodSource with a big smile on her face. She had just donated plasma for the very first time. I’ve donated blood but never plasma. That’s a big deal! “What made you decide to donate?” I asked her. I couldn’t have been more

surprised by her response: “They called and asked.” I’m not sure which of us was more proud at that moment. I wonder how many other people would step up, whether donating blood or giving time or resources in their communities, if someone just asked. I know a lot of organizations that couldn’t get by without the generous commitment of their volunteers. Several years ago, I interviewed a woman who started a program that provided mentors and enrichment experiences for children in foster care. She told me that “one involved adult” often marks the difference between a child with direction and motivation and a child who takes a wrong path. Sometimes that adult is a parent; sometimes it’s a teacher. And sometimes it’s a volunteer who happens to be at the right place at the right time. The important thing is that someone steps up. To those who already volunteer their time and talents in our community I say, “thank you.” All of us have something to give— and something to receive—through volunteering. In honor of National Volunteer Month, perhaps it’s time to think about how you can make a difference in your community. There are so many organizations that would love to make use of your time and talents. You don’t even have to wait to be asked. Stephanie Gandy Riley can be reached at: stephanieriley@sbcglobal.net n


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Doing It Right THIS CURTIS PARK COUPLE VALUES THEIR HOME’S HISTORY

BY JULIE FOSTER HOME INSIGHT

W

hen Sharyn Kaplan and Mark Schneider decided to renovate their Curtis Park home, their focus on historical detail translated into two years of research. Previous owners had remodeled the kitchen sometime

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“We renovated rather than remodeled using appropriate patterns and materials for the time period of the home.”

during the 1970s. Once Kaplan and Schneider began contemplating a renovation, they wanted to do it right. “We renovated rather than remodeled,” Kaplan explains. “This


means using appropriate patterns and materials for the time period of the home.” Kaplan found a book, “Bungalow Kitchens” by Jane Powell, in a Berkeley bookstore. It became their reference guide for the project. They studied each section, gleaning information on why and how certain materials were used.

Their Tudor Revival-style home situated on two large lots is one of seven houses featured on the upcoming Curtis Park Home & Garden Tour. “It gave me a place to start my research,” she says.

Their Tudor Revival-style home situated on two large lots is one of seven houses featured on the upcoming Curtis Park Home & Garden Tour. Built in 1923 for approximately $6,500, the 2,200-square-foot house was designed by the Sacramento architectural firm Dean & Dean. Tudor Revival buildings, popular during the 1920s and ’30s, are known for their steeply pitched gable roofs, half-timbered construction, arched entryways, leaded-glass windows and timber beams. The firm designed many Tudor Revival commercial projects around Sacramento, including The Sutter Club, Westminster Presbyterian Church, Memorial Auditorium and Sierra 2 Center, which was originally built as a school. The firm was also recognized for its numerous residential projects. In 1923, Home Designer magazine wrote of Dean & Dean’s Tudor Revival homes, “One feels the dominance of English architecture … this type being more admired as time passes because of its wonderful adaptability to most any clime HOME page 58

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HOME FROM page 57 and the fact that with age its air of hominess and permanency is so greatly enhanced.” The couple moved out last March for the duration of the nine-month project. Bringing their home into the 21st century meant taking the kitchen and two bathrooms down to the studs. Though the original diamond-paned leaded-glass windows in the front of the house were retained, the remaining windows in the back were replaced with doublepaned painted wood windows. All plumbing and electrical systems were updated to meet code requirements. A separate heating and cooling system was installed for the second story. In the kitchen, they installed Marmoleum flooring. Made from

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nontoxic linseed oil, cork dust, wood dust and resin, the flooring is a natural alternative to vinyl tile. With no chemical odor or off-gassing, it is the first floor covering to receive the Asthma & Allergy Friendly certification, according to the Green Building Supply website. Overhead lighting is supplied by schoolhouse-style fixtures with a subtle beige stripe. Staying true to the style of the home, the kitchen cabinets meet historical size dimensions. The “floating” sink cabinets are not connected to the floor and are a 1923-era design. A 6-inch space around the existing chimney was enough to add a spice cabinet. The exhaust fan cover with its artdeco stripe provides a bit of zip and

coordinates with the black stripe in the flooring. Kaplan and Schneider faced a challenge when it came to choosing countertop and backsplash tile for the kitchen. They wanted flat tile in a matte finish. “It took a lot of time to find someone who would do this,” says Kaplan. Flax-colored wool carpeting on the staircase replaced the previous dark green carpeting. Blue-green wallpaper in a soothing damask pattern revived the master bedroom and delightful sitting room. Original elements to watch for on the Curtis Park Home Tour include a stained-glass window next to the fireplace with a California poppy motif, arched beams in the living room, the built-in china case in the

dining room and original light fixtures in the downstairs bathroom and the hallways. I’d like to thank Janice Calpo for her help with this story. The Curtis Park Home & Garden Tour takes place Saturday, April 30, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are $20 to $30 and can be purchased online at sierra2.org or in person at Sierra 2 Center, 2791 24th St. For more information, call 452-3005 or go to sierra2.org. If you know of a home you think should be featured in Inside Publications, contact Julie Foster at foster.julie91@yahoo.com n


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Savoring Flavor FOOD MOVEMENT PROMOTES THE PLEASURES OF SLOWING DOWN

BY GWEN SCHOEN FARM TO FORK

N

ot long ago, my husband and I were walking our dogs when a young neighbor stopped to chat. In the course of the conversation, he asked us our secret to being happily married for 43 years. “We eat dinner together every evening,” I replied. He laughed. I’m sure he expected something far more profound. “It’s true,” I said. “It’s not so much the eating, but we try as often as possible to prepare fresh, seasonal meals from scratch. Then we sit down together to talk about the events of the day. For us, it’s a quiet, unhurried, personal time we treasure. Sure, we might dash off to club meetings and sports afterward, but dinner is an event.” A few weeks later, I found myself sitting in Cafe Dantorels in Curtis Park with Charity Kenyon and Kathy Les, leaders and organizers of Slow Food Sacramento. As they talked about the meaning and focus of Slow Food, I thought to myself, “They get it. They understand why something as simple as dinner is so important.” Slow Food International, the parent organization, is the complete opposite of fast food. It was founded

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Meera Ekkanath Kelin, cookbook author, with Adam Lovelace, cooking class instructor at Sacramento Natural Foods Co-Op

by Carlo Petrini in Italy in the early 1980s with the goal of preserving regional traditions, gastronomic pleasures and a slow pace of life: simple things like dinner. The group’s logo is a snail because “it moves slowly, calmly eating its way through life,” according to the Slow Food website. The group gained international attention in 1986 when it protested the opening of a McDonald’s at the Spanish Steps in Rome. The organization now has more than

100,000 members and chapters in 150 countries. Slow Food USA was launched in 2000 and has 200 chapters. The Sacramento group is one of the most active and progressive in the United States. “One of the things we try to do is educate our members about traditional foods from various cultures,” said Les. “That is a Slow Food goal, to preserve our food heritage, to slow down and savor.” That’s a tough goal for a society that thrives on grab-and-go cuisine.

“Our mission is good, clean and fair food for all,” Kenyon explained. She is a Slow Food USA Governor, representing the Central Valley region. “By good, we mean that food should be tasty, seasonal, local, fresh and wholesome,” said Kenyon. “Clean food should nourish a healthful lifestyle and be produced in ways that preserve biodiversity, sustain the environment and ensure animal welfare without harming human health. And by fair, we mean that


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food should be affordable by all while respecting the dignity of labor from field to fork.” Preserving food cultures and heritage foods through education is at the top of Slow Food’s list of goals. The group encourages farmers to grow heritage foods such as heirloom peaches and tomatoes and use sustainable farming methods. It supports restaurants and chefs who support those farming methods. Chefs who follow Slow Food principles are awarded the group’s Snail of Approval designation. (A list can be found at slowfoodsacramento.com.) Members frequently sponsor cooking classes, such as a recent Indian food class at Sacramento Natural Foods Co-op taught by Meera Klein, author of “My Mother’s Kitchen: A novel with Recipes.” Guest speakers and teachers are generally experts in traditional cuisines such as Indian, Italian or Spanish. They lead edible bike tours through the city to visit local gardens and bus tours to visit local farms and wineries. You might also find members doing

cooking demonstrations and offering tastings at local farmers markets. “We are especially proud of our School Garden Coalition,” said Les. “It is a network of local schools where we sponsor on-campus gardens. It’s a wonderful way to introduce children to the joys of growing food and nurturing the land.” The difference between farm to fork and Slow Food? “We were here first,” said Kenyon. “Since the beginning, we have been promoting farm to every fork. Our mission is to end hunger and fight poverty through food access.” The lesson? Cook dinner from scratch using whatever is in season at local farms. Gather family and friends around the dinner table. Turn off the television and the cellphones. Talk. Slow down. Savor. For more information about Slow Food Sacramento, go to slowfoodsacramento.com Gwen Schoen can be reached at gwen.schoen@aol.com n

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Share My Ride CARPOOLING IN THE AGE OF SMARTPHONES

BY WALT SEIFERT GETTING THERE

A

hitchhiker thumbing a ride is the ultimate low-tech way of filling a seat in cars already on the road. Such primitive “carpools” connected willing drivers and would-be passengers in a haphazard fashion. Times have changed. Today, computers and smartphones can match thousands of drivers and potential passengers quickly and efficiently. I’m using the term carpool loosely to include any arrangement that ends up in higher vehicle occupancy. More traditionally, carpools refer to an arrangement in which people who live near each other regularly drive in the same car to work (or take kids to school). Cars without passengers have always been an untapped resource. According to Pete Hathaway, a former executive with the Sacramento Area Council of Governments, a good way to beat congestion would to be to fill the thousands of empty seats in cars on freeways. Overwhelmingly, people choose to drive alone. Single-occupant vehicles dominate and clog the roads. Yes, there are carpools, but only about 10 percent of people use carpools despite the cost savings

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and incentives. (And 60 percent of those are “fampools” that consist of a husband and wife or a parent and child.) Carpool lanes, reserved carpool parking at workplaces, and appeals to environmental consciousness all have been employed to boost the numbers. There are problems with carpooling. It requires both effective marketing and large concentrations of residents and jobs to come up with good matches. People have to be matched not only in origin and destination but in working hours. It lacks flexibility. Working late or making side trips on the ride home are no-nos. There are also social issues. Do people want to talk, think or sleep? Who controls the radio and temperature?

New technology can help people looking to share a ride. The Bay Area carpool website 511.org offers a list of “casual carpool” locations and two carpooling apps in addition to traditional ride-matching services.

Cars without passengers have always been an untapped resource. Casual carpooling is an upgrade to hitchhiking. In the Bay Area, solo

drivers pick up total strangers at set locations and drop them off on the other side of the Bay Bridge. Drivers benefit from short lines and reduced fares at toll booths. San Francisco commuters can use mobile apps from two private services: Carma and Scoop. These apps increase the time flexibility of carpooling by delinking morning and afternoon commutes and offering on demand, one-time trips. There are also offshoots of the big, fast-growing “shared economy” transportation companies Uber, Lyft and Sidecar, offering shared ride services called UberPOOL, Lyft Line and Sidecar Shared Rides. As a customer, you can expect a lower fare if you share a ride with


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another passenger headed in the same direction. Half of all Uber and Lyft rides in San Francisco are now through one of these services. Since there is a paid driver, it’s not carpooling in the old sense of “going my way.” The new services appeals to Millennials, especially tech-oriented residents of San Francisco and other cities. No doubt the success of Uber and Lyft has opened more people to the idea of sharing rides with strangers. The new services are not

available yet in Sacramento (though UberPool recently expanded to the East Bay). If they are profitable, we’ll see expansions to our region and other markets. Uber is also experimenting with variations on the theme. The UberCOMMUTE pilot program in Chicago allows commuters who aren’t regular Uber drivers to offer up seats in their cars to Uber users. Users get rates even lower than UberPOOL, while drivers get reimbursed for some of their trip costs. Uber gets a cut, of

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course. In Seattle, UberHOP drivers pick up passengers at predetermined locations, similar to casual carpooling. There’s ridesharing for longdistance trips, too. Rideshare boards have long been common on college campuses. Online services modernize the rideshare board and expand its reach. But as with other sharing services, the usual and reassuring group affinity of users—fellow students, fellow employees or neighbors—may not be exist. When you think about it, there truly is a gigantic number of unused seats available on the road. Package and food delivery vehicles and other business-owned cars and trucks are prowling the streets and highways constantly. Would it make sense to offer those spaces to others? Technology and transportation are in a time of yeasty transition. Many new concepts will bubble up and be tried. It’s hard to imagine all the possibilities or outcomes. Walt Seifert is a bicyclist, driver and transportation writer. He can be reached at bikeguy@surewest.net n

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Personal Space GETTING THROUGH THE GARDEN GATE

BY ANITA CLEVENGER

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n Sacramento, nearly every backyard is shielded from view by a high fence. It drives me crazy. I’m from Ohio, where one backyard is open to the next, so I find the privacy of our backyards rather claustrophobic. Without getting a drone to fly overhead, a periscope to peer over fences, or outright trespassing, how do you see what’s behind the fences? Quite a few organizations in the Sacramento area sponsor garden tours in the spring and fall. This April and May, here are few that give you a chance to visit some of these mysterious gardens and see how the other plants live. On Saturday, April 9, California Native Plant Society’s Gardens Gone Native tour will feature approximately 20 Sacramento-area gardens that use at least 50 percent natives, and often more. Native-plant gardens are usually water efficient and wildlife friendly, buzzing with native bees and butterflies. Although the tour is self-guided, you may have an opportunity to talk with the people who garden and live there. The 30th annual Curtis Park Home and Garden tour takes place on Saturday, April 30. A fundraiser

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for Sierra Curtis Neighborhood Association, it’s a must-see for people who love the eclectic architecture of this area. You get to tour both backyards and houses in this popular neighborhood. The day also features

music, food, and information tables in Curtis Park. A tradition for 18 years, the East Sacramento Garden Tour is a ritual for many on Mother’s Day weekend, which falls on May 7 and May 8 this year. Benefiting David Lubin

Elementary School’s enrichment program, the tour will feature seven gardens in the Fabulous Forties and nearby. Hungry? There will be food trucks and a Sweet Stop at the school. Not to be left out, the Land Park Garden Tour, Tea and Fine Arts Festival will be held Sunday, May 15, hosted by Holy Spirit School. You will get to tour gardens in yet another of Sacramento’s favorite neighborhoods and have tea in the park. Some of the gardens on these neighborhood tours are more about outdoor entertaining and garden decorations than about plants. That suits many people who love outdoor living and don’t want to spend much time digging in the dirt. If you are a hard-core gardener who wants to focus on plants, you can join a plant club with members who share your enthusiasm. The Sacramento Rose Society and Sacramento Perennial Plant Club sponsor tours to members’ home gardens. Once you get to know people in the club, you can invite someone to your garden and ask if you can see theirs, too. Of course, you can also get to know your neighbors and do the same. By visiting other peoples’ gardens, you not only satisfy your idle curiosity; you learn about plant and design possibilities, open opportunities for plant and crop exchanges, and make or deepen friendships. I’ve heard that you don’t really know a person until you have seen their garden. It takes some courage to show another gardener what your own garden looks like. My hat is off to GARDEN page 67


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Big Top Fun FUNDRAISER WITH A CIRCUS THEME HELPS THE BLIND

live and silent auctions, a buffet dinner and dessert. Tickets are $50 before April 1, $60 after April 1. For tickets, go to Sacramento.AssistanceLeague.org or email alsac@gmail.com. Table sponsorships are also available.

BY TERRY KAUFMAN

T

DOING GOOD

he days are longer, the sun is warmer, and it is a season of rebirth. As fledgling birds take their inaugural flights, individuals and organizations are spreading their wings to take those scary leaps of faith. Thank goodness for a generous community that provides a huge safety net of support. Celebrate spring by doing something good for your world. The options are diverse and impactful.

DREAM BIG On Friday, April 29, Assistance League of Sacramento will present Dream Big! Under the Big Top, an annual fundraiser that benefits eight philanthropic communitybased programs. These programs clothe schoolchildren, provide teddy bears to traumatized children, provide blankets, scarves and other handcrafted items to children and teens in crisis, and awards scholarships to community college students, The event will be held at The Center at Twenty-Three Hundred, located at 2300 Sierra Blvd., from 6 to 9 p.m. It will feature entertainment,

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SHED SOME LIGHT Society for the Blind was recently awarded $40,000 from AT&T to fund teaching programs for adults with vision loss. The money will help people who are living with low vision and blindness learn the skills and get access to the tools and technology they need to live independently and achieve their work and personal goals. The classes focus on orientation and mobility, Braille, adaptive technology and independent living. Students learn how to travel safely and independently inside their homes and in public. They learn how to use alternative techniques and tools to navigate day-to-day tasks such as cooking, cleaning, shopping, home maintenance, organization and personal finance. They also learn Braille to read, write and use technology for email, online shopping and banking, and creating documents. For 60 years, Society for the Blind has enabled people with low vision or blindness to achieve their full potential. The nonprofit provides low-vision eye care, life and job skills training, mentorship, and tools to maintain independence. For more information or to make a donation, go to societyfortheblind.org.

SPREAD A MESSAGE Sacramento resident Ronald S. Javor spent his career working for the state on affordable housing and safe housing issues. He also volunteered his time with local advocacy and service organizations to address homelessness. After retiring, he decided to devote his energies and writing talents to the next generation: teaching children about the impact of homelessness on children in their own community and their families.

Celebrate spring by doing something good for your world. The options are diverse and impactful.. Javor recently published his fourth children’s book about homelessness and hope, “Many Houses, Many Homes.” His goal was to help young people understand that all children, even those without homes, have dreams and aspirations. His previous books include “Homer,” “Wendy” and “Jerome.” All are available on Amazon.com. Half of Javor’s profits will go to organizations assisting homeless persons.

SHED THOSE UNEMPLOYMENT DOLDRUMS On Thursday, April 28, the State Employment Development Department, in conjunction with a number of other governmental agencies and corporate sponsors, will host Honor a Hero, Hire a Vet. This regional job fair, held at McClellan Conference Center, is an excellent opportunity for veterans and others seeking employment to hone their jobseeking skills and find employment. As many as 150 employers are expected to be on hand to talk with veterans and others seeking employment in a range of job categories. This is the 10th year that the event is being held. It is expected to draw as many as 300 job seekers. Attendees should dress for success and bring resumes. They will learn about job openings, meet and interview with employers, and participate in professional career workshops. Employers should contact Ryan Perez or John Plane at 227-0301 if they need more information or wish to attend. The event is free for employers and includes two lunch tickets. The job fair is open to all job seekers. It will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at McClellan Conference Center, 5411 Luce Ave. Terry Kaufman can be reached at terry@1greatwriter.com n


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GARDEN FROM page 64 people who offer their homes and gardens for the big tours. Fortunately, our garden is too cramped to accommodate crowds, so I won’t be tempted to volunteer. I also admire people whose gardens always seem to look neat and beautiful. Ours is at its best now, when roses, wisteria, azaleas and poppies explode into bloom, but it’s never as well tended as I’d like. Whenever other gardeners come over, I try to keep apologies to a

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Anita Clevenger is a Sacramento County UC Master Gardener. For answers to gardening questions, call 876--5338 or go to ucanr.edu/ sites/sacmg/. They will host an Open Garden at Fair Oaks Horticulture Center in Fair Oaks Park on Saturday, May 21, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. n

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Flood Control HOW FOLSOM DAM KEEPS WATER AT BAY

BY DR. AMY ROGERS SCIENCE IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

L

evees, those earthen walls along the American River, do a fine job of keeping the residential neighborhoods of Arden-Arcade and Carmichael dry as long as the amount of water flowing in the river doesn’t exceed 115,000 cubic feet per second (cfs). But more than a dozen times since 1905, flows from 20 to 150 percent greater than that have poured into the American River from its 2,000-square-mile watershed. What protects Sacramento at such times? Folsom Dam. According to Rick Johnson, executive director of Sacramento Area Flood Control Agency, Folsom is “the backbone of our flood control system.” Folsom is actually a complex of eight dikes and four dam structures located immediately downstream from the confluence of the North and South forks of the American River. Folsom Dam has nine different official purposes, including municipal water storage, hydroelectric power generation, irrigation, recreation and fishery management.

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Flood control is the dam’s only job with immediate life-or-death consequences. Before the dam was built in the 1950s, the American River’s flow would vary tremendously. During heavy rain or snowmelt, vast quantities of water could enter the river in a short time and flood downstream. Folsom Dam blocks those surges and holds the excess water in the reservoir of Folsom Lake. This provides the double benefit of protecting people and property downriver and storing water for the dry season. Unfortunately, water storage and flood protection are contradictory goals. For flood control, the perfect dam would have an empty reservoir behind it, leaving plenty of room for a deluge. For water storage, the perfect

dam would have a full reservoir, maximizing the amount of water available. Day by day (or hour by hour in times of crisis), people decide how much water to keep at Folsom and how much to release. Keep too little and farmers, fish and municipalities suffer when there’s not enough water. Keep too much and a big storm could overwhelm the dam. The dam’s managers are keenly aware of how that could happen, because in February 1986, it nearly did. The floods of 1986 were caused by back-to-back “pineapple express” storms. Also called “atmospheric rivers,” these tropical storms carry warm, moisture-laden air from the Pacific and dump it, fire-hose style, over Northern California. For the 10

days of the storm period in ’86, sites in the watersheds of the American and Sacramento rivers recorded 30, 40, even 50 inches of rain. Adding to this unprecedented precipitation, the warm air of these storms brought snow only to high elevations (above 7,000 feet) and actually melted existing snow lower down. Water flow into the American River peaked at more than 250,000 cfs. When Folsom Dam was built, the highest peak flow on record was only about half that. Sacramento’s dam and levees were not designed to handle a weather event of this magnitude. Folsom Lake filled and kept rising. Dam officials faced an impossible choice: Release water into the river and risk overwhelming the levees


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VISIT insidepublications.com downstream, or risk overtopping the dam. The decision was made to release, and the American River came within 6 inches of overtopping the levees. Extreme weather events like the storms of ’86 have become more common in the past 50 years. Scientists using tree rings to study ancient weather patterns now say that California weather in the first half of the 20th century, upon which Sacramento’s flood control system was based, was aberrantly mild. Folsom Dam, “backbone” of the system, isn’t steely enough. One proposed solution to Folsom’s shortcomings was to construct an additional dam on the American, below the North and Middle forks. This controversial Auburn dam has a long, contentious history and looks unlikely to be built. So modifications to the existing dam complex at Folsom were begun. The main channel dam and other structures are being raised 3.5 feet, and a whole new concrete dam and spillway have been built. The new dam provides a way to increase flood control storage space

(that is, more room for floodwater) in anticipation of a major storm. In the original Folsom Dam, water can be released through eight small outlets that discharge up to 27,000 cfs. Bigger flows are possible only through large gates located near the top of the dam. This means that managers can dump a lot of water fast only when the reservoir is already mostly full. The new dam has big gates at the bottom, so large releases (up to the levees’ capacity of 115,000 cfs) can begin before the reservoir is dangerously high. In a race against rising water, this gives dam managers a head start. During the peak flood season (November to March), Folsom is kept 40 to 60 percent empty. Accurate predictions of future water flows are crucial to effectively managing the reservoir. How do flood managers know when to brace themselves for a big one? Find out next month. Amy Rogers is a scientist, educator, and novelist. Learn more about her science thriller “Reversion” at AmyRogers.com n

“Sacramento’s Volvo Service” 2009 Fulton Ave. Sacramento (916) 971-1382 svsauto.com

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Neighborhood Real Estate Sales Sales Closed February 12 - March 15, 2016

95608 CARMICHAEL

3546 ALTAMONT DR 6036 LINCOLN AVE 6109 MARWICK WAY 5721-5731 GIBBONS DR 6360 TAMI WAY 3618 TARRO WAY 4001 LINUS WAY 4656 OAKBOUGH WAY 2537 WINSFORD LN 6326 MORAGA DR 2318 FALLWATER LN 6361 MARKLEY WAY 5905 OAK AVE 5517 WHITNEY AVE 4109 GEYSER LN 3418 WINFIN WAY 6147 ORSI CIR 5515 MILLBURN ST 6825 RAPPAHANNOCK WAY 4032 TRIPLETT CT 6446 DORINDA WAY 6883 GRANT AVE 5415 CEDARHURST WAY 3500 VERLA ST 3821 HOLLISTER AVE 5512 CORONAWOOD LN 4145 SHERA LN 5310 MOODY LN 6412 MARKLEY WAY 5530 KENNETH AVE 2542 LOST DEER LANE 6715 LINCOLN AVE 2065 CASTELLEJA CT 3841 DOTTY ST 5609 SAPUNOR WAY 5931 SARAH CT 4530 STONEY WAY 5351 RIDGEFIELD AVE 4251 GOLD FLOWER CT 5773 CADA CIR 5505 COLONEL RD 5300 MUSTANG WAY 5725 RIVER OAK WAY 3032 VALASSTRADA COURT 1360 GARY WAY 4833 MELVIN 3929 OAK VILLA CIR 6404 PALM DR 2607 GUNN RD 3404 WALNUT AVE 5228 LOCUST AVE 4722 WILMER ST 2016 SANTA LUCIA WAY 5778 HASKELL AVE

95811 MIDTOWN 1818 L ST #509 1818 L ST #408 1818 L ST #411 1818 L ST #312 1414 T ST 1818 L ST #605 530 21ST ST

95815 WOODLAKE 2188 FORREST ST

70

IES APR n 16

2159 CANTALIER ST $281,000 $296,000 $175,000 $245,000 $250,000 $299,000 $302,000 $330,000 $348,000 $360,000 $265,000 $271,500 $434,000 $272,500 $431,000 $449,500 $279,000 $290,000 $335,500 $375,000 $385,000 $980,000 $299,900 $365,000 $388,000 $473,000 $200,000 $298,000 $299,000 $339,000 $759,900 $220,000 $400,000 $545,000 $230,000 $275,000 $361,000 $369,500 $405,000 $295,000 $315,000 $435,000 $580,000 $415,000 $735,000 $210,000 $165,000 $515,000 $470,900 $190,000 $337,500 $339,000 $394,000 $410,000

$464,000 $454,000 $549,000 $547,000 $729,000 $541,000 $525,000

$254,000

$415,000

95816 E SAC, MCKINLEY PARK 561 37TH ST 2526 P ST 3004 O ST 1477 33RD ST 3135 SERRA WAY 2226 E ST 3835 H ST 3330 L ST 500 ALHAMBRA BLVD 3155 O ST 389 SANTA YNEZ WAY

95817 TAHOE PARK, ELMHURST 3450 37TH ST 2125 48TH ST 3989 2ND AVE 3915 1ST AVE 2500 51ST ST 3940 8TH AVE 3926 12TH AVE 2730 59TH ST 2709 39TH ST 3500 44TH ST 2216 56TH ST 3738 3RD AVE 2033 36TH ST 4841 V ST 4131 BROADWAY 3216 6TH AVE 3717 7TH AVE 3948 4TH AVE 4224 U ST

$599,500 $430,000 $329,000 $332,500 $347,000 $380,000 $484,500 $421,500 $449,000 $415,000 $590,200

$175,000 $460,000 $271,000 $342,000 $350,000 $215,000 $251,000 $293,000 $135,000 $340,000 $460,000 $289,000 $335,000 $380,000 $170,000 $205,500 $240,000 $280,000 $400,000

95818 LAND PK, CURTIS PK 3316 CUTTER 2639 FRANKLIN BLVD 2020 21ST ST 621 6TH AVE 2629 HARKNESS ST 2796 19TH ST 1713 BURNETT WAY 2781 13TH ST 1518 9TH AVE 1840 BIDWELL WAY 2555 DONNER WAY 2415 18TH ST 2215 23RD ST 615 FREMONT WAY 2716 10TH AVE 2030 21ST ST 2674 27TH ST 2607 28TH ST 1820 CASTRO WAY 2942 26TH ST 2516 PORTOLA WAY

$525,900 $373,000 $910,918 $355,000 $550,000 $450,200 $338,000 $1,065,000 $490,000 $530,000 $625,000 $365,000 $405,000 $320,000 $700,000 $918,837 $200,000 $381,000 $421,500 $605,000 $403,500

95819 E SAC, RIVER PARK 4400 G ST 1131 57TH ST 230 MEISTER WAY 701 48TH ST

$450,000 $492,000 $575,000 $680,000

960 55TH ST 4131 P ST 740 42ND ST 3803 MODDISON AVE 5400 C ST 1901 49TH ST 4297 D ST 1857 48TH ST 4900 M ST 1146 JANEY WAY 5326 SANDBURG DR 1656 48TH ST 4233 D ST 55 PRIMROSE WAY 5328 H ST 5725 MONALEE AVE 921 41ST ST 510 MEISTER WAY 417 SAN ANTONIO WAY 1139 58TH ST 1441 44TH ST 1357 46TH ST 5904 CAMELLIA AVE

$500,000 $530,000 $465,000 $325,000 $489,000 $560,000 $400,000 $610,000 $805,000 $410,000 $500,000 $570,000 $475,000 $396,293 $400,000 $430,000 $589,500 $512,000 $676,000 $817,500 $1,242,500 $1,172,000 $431,000

95821 ARDEN-ARCADE 3243 BACK CIR 4174 DENA WAY 4622 ENGLE RD 2940 MONTCLAIRE ST 3224 MONTCLAIRE ST 3633 DARLENE 2554 CASTLEWOOD DR 2960 HOWE AVE 3010 WATT AVE 3212 BACK CIR 2911 HERON WAY 4408 EDISON AVE 2024 EL CAMINO AVE 3211 LERWICK 3308 WRIGHT ST 4615 EL CAMINO AVE 3608 LARCHMONT SQ LN 2120 MARCUS CT 4639 SAGAR AVE 3919 WHITNEY AVE 3404 LEATHA WAY 2704 WATSON ST 2541 FULTON SQ LN ##37 2537 ANDRADE WAY 3701 SUN SHADOWS LN 3621 DOS ACRES WAY 3404 CONCETTA WAY 2417 LESLIE 2737 MARILONA DR 3013 SAND DOLLAR WAY

$230,500 $301,600 $297,500 $335,000 $345,000 $234,500 $280,000 $200,000 $205,000 $172,500 $230,000 $320,000 $91,000 $162,000 $175,000 $330,000 $115,000 $117,000 $489,000 $240,000 $270,000 $290,000 $125,000 $284,000 $232,500 $250,000 $346,000 $225,000 $261,000 $350,000

95822 SOUTH LAND PARK 2205 IRVIN WAY 1501 SHERWOOD AVE 7436 AMHERST ST 1500 ENDRES CT 1448 65TH AVE 7587 SAN FELICE CIR 1422 69TH AVE 7573 SKELTON WAY 7480 HITHER WAY 5501 DANJAC CIR

$250,000 $458,250 $195,000 $297,000 $185,000 $210,000 $180,000 $214,800 $238,000 $425,000

9 PETRILLI CIR 6534 23RD ST 6005 MACHADO WAY 7458 WINKLEY WAY 7078 HOGAN DR 2081 ARLISS WAY 1500 WAKEFIELD WAY 3201 TORRANCE AVE 5725 MILNER WAY 2541 FERNANDEZ DR 4630 FEGAN WAY 1370 GRANT LN 1449 66TH AVE 4328 CONSTANCE LN 2540 FERNDALE AVE 6981 MIDDLECOFF WAY 3245 WATER MILL WAY 6032 PARK VILLAGE ST 4829 CRESTWOOD WAY 2050 KIRK WAY 7472 TAMOSHANTER WAY 4125 23RD ST 5861 14TH ST 4309 ULRICH WAY 2192 IRVIN WAY 1449 FRUITRIDGE RD 2229 HOLLYWOOD WAY 2177 ONEIL WAY 1454 64TH 1432 MATHEWS WAY 2343 52ND AVE 6431 HOGAN DR 7367 NELMARK ST 2081 WAKEFIELD WAY 5220 S LAND PARK 2162 56TH AVE

95825 ARDEN

2380 ALTA GARDEN LN #B 2333 BELL ST 2400 SALIX WAY 2038 UNIVERSITY PARK DR 21 COLBY CT 1049 BELL ST #12 887 WOODSIDE LANE E #1 2404 LARKSPUR LN #257 1512 CLINTON RD 2224 WOODSIDE LN #4 613 WOODSIDE SIERRA #3 1632 WAYLAND AVE 743 COMMONS DR 217 ELMHURST CIR 1505 HESKET WAY 937 FULTON AVE #502 790 FULTON AVE 601 WOODSIDE SIERRA #1 2530 EXETER SQUARE LN 157 HARTNELL PL 2301 HIGHRIDGE DR 2280 WOODSIDE LN #3 273 MUNROE 2407 PENNLAND DR 953 FULTON AVE #534 1326 OAK TERRACE CT #9 2348 ESTRELLITA WAY 2298 SIERRA BLVD #B 2424 PENNLAND DR

$297,000 $215,000 $382,000 $225,000 $238,000 $145,000 $150,000 $180,000 $210,000 $230,000 $380,500 $465,000 $210,000 $335,000 $147,000 $285,300 $275,000 $490,600 $635,000 $165,000 $165,500 $265,000 $380,000 $419,000 $285,000 $339,000 $350,000 $185,000 $180,000 $186,000 $195,000 $185,000 $193,000 $245,000 $454,000 $245,000

$115,000 $215,000 $265,000 $315,000 $328,500 $170,000 $74,900 $120,500 $260,000 $150,000 $97,000 $243,000 $285,000 $385,000 $226,000 $110,000 $780,000 $218,000 $260,000 $384,950 $285,000 $184,000 $325,000 $335,000 $86,000 $94,400 $146,000 $168,500 $258,000

95831 GREENHAVEN, SOUTH LAND PARK 667 CULLIVAN DR 7492 DELTAWIND DRIVE 8065 LINDA ISLE LN 1217 EL ENCANTO WAY 380 DEER RIVER WAY 6933 13TH ST 6608 BENHAM 1424 LOS PADRES WAY 7220 SWALE RIVER WAY 7459 SALTON SEA WAY 7055 EIDER WAY 631 CAPELA WAY 661 CORIANDER WAY 1327 PALOMAR CIR 6761 PARK RIVIERA WAY 915 SOUTH BEACH DR 430 DEER RIVER WAY 7481 MAPLE TREE WAY 1397 PALOMAR CIR 8 GENOA CT 7345 FLOWERWOOD WAY 1017 ROUNDTREE CT 30 YUBA RIVER CIR 6297 LAKE PARK DR 6978 FLINTWOOD WAY 611 RIVERGATE WAY 6631 14TH ST 6833 BUENA TERRA WAY 7718 RIVER VILLAGE DR 556 RIVERGATE WAY 7564 POCKET RD 809 STILL BREEZE WAY 7469 POCKET RD 97 MOONLIT CIR

95864 ARDEN

1408 KEENEY 1507 GLADSTONE DR 3600 CODY WAY 3127 BAKULA WAY 2017 MEDUSA WAY 2799 FAIR OAKS BLVD 1710 ROLLING HILLS RD 3536 BODEGA CT. 2904 SIENNA LN 3309 NORTHROP AVE 2442 CATALINA DR 1713 PLUTO WAY 3241 SIERRA OAKS DR 1711 MAPLE GLEN 1316 GLENWOOD RD 3711 EL RICON WAY 4425 VALMONTE DR 2654 KADEMA DR 720 MORRIS WAY 949 TUSCAN LN 3249 WEMBERLEY DR 2405 WATSON ST 4605 MORPHEUS LN 3904 EL RICON WAY 4101 LAS CRUCES WAY 4304 VULCAN DR 4346 ALDERWOOD WAY 4165 STOWE WAY

$255,000 $340,000 $380,000 $340,000 $407,500 $510,000 $261,000 $435,000 $455,000 $290,000 $415,500 $262,500 $325,000 $349,000 $390,000 $425,000 $505,000 $285,000 $302,000 $311,000 $405,000 $130,000 $289,000 $326,000 $385,000 $295,000 $350,000 $322,000 $340,000 $365,000 $401,975 $630,000 $293,800 $335,000

$215,000 $250,000 $307,500 $180,500 $310,000 $1,700,000 $480,000 $425,000 $550,000 $140,100 $376,000 $389,000 $1,100,000 $469,000 $215,000 $468,000 $510,000 $599,000 $530,000 $1,210,000 $183,000 $212,100 $324,900 $449,649 $670,000 $338,000 $342,000 $550,000


Classic East Sac brick Tudor. Needs your cosmetic updates. Near parks! $449,000 Pettit Gilwee 330-0490

Sierra Oaks Vista! 3-4 bed, 3 bath on .69 ac lot! Guest suite, lovely yard! $898,000 Dan & Terri Wakabayashi 425-9738

Your own private lake! Stunning Tudor with 7 bed/4 bath. Open Áoor plan Priced to sell! $1,100,000 Annette Black 826-6902

PENDING

Hollywood Park Gem! Updated 3bd / 2 ba home in desirable neighborhood. Family room. Nice! $319,000 Matt Bistis 798-0822

Iconic Boulevard Park duplex in Midtown with park parking and granny Áat $849,000 Dave Philipp 212-1322 Liz Edmonds 838-1208

PENDING

Cute bungalow. 2 blocks to Med Center. Many updates. Laminate / tile kit & bath, pretty yard $269,000 Kathy Pardun 247-7030

Historic Tuttle House built in 1898. Completely remodeled 4 beds / 4 baths, pool $739,000 Pettit Gilwee 330-0490

SOLD

Hollywood Park 3/1 w/ hardwood Áoors, updated bath, newer roof, 2 car garage $280,000 Dan and Terri Wakabayashi 425-9738

Charming ivy-covered cottage. Beautiful 1940s architecture, Spacious living room, close to UC Med Center, more! $350,000 Elizabeth Weintraub 233-6759

PENDING

Immaculate well-maintained home. 4 bed, 2 bath, light and airy open Áoor plan $299,000 Pettit Gilwee 330-0490

Simply stunning! 5 bed / 3.5 ba. Elegant, with a custom feel. 3811 sq ft. Executive living! $550,000 JoAnn Kaleel 402-1817

Comfort and convenience – East Sac. Remodeled & open kit, Ànished bsmnt, detached 2-car gar, more! $658,500 Michelle Krebaum 804-4580

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On the Ball THIS SPORTS PAINTER GRAVITATES TO WINNERS

BY JESSICA LASKEY ARTIST SPOTLIGHT

M

ike Tate can describe his daily life as a sports painter in four words.

“Painting, eating, sleeping,

hustling,” he says from a coffee shop in Lake Tahoe, where he regularly travels by RV to sell his highly sought-after artwork depicting baseball, NASCAR and golf. “I’m always on the lookout for momentous moments in sports,” explains Tate, who got his start at age 15 painting signage and skating rink murals before he moved on to painting houses, warehouses and churches to support his young family. “Part of my philosophy is to capture an epic moment in time, the strength or the emotion of the player, not just another baseball painting.” Tate grew up a San Francisco Giants fan. Now in his mid-50s, he moved from Arizona to McClellan at age 1 and has been in Sacramento

Painter Mike Tate

ever since. But it wasn’t until 2014 that he decided to combine his sports

“hustling” phase of his four-word

After he finished, he said, ‘I need to

passion with painting.

career. Today, he’s still going strong.

tell you something. At the expense

stuck in Tate’s mind as he watched

of offending you, I want to tell you

the Giants advance to the World Series later that year.

“I had just finished painting 30

“My work was up at five different

This mysterious chance encounter

townhomes in Jackson when I told

Starbucks in town at one time,” Tate

to quit painting all this other stuff

my wife, ‘I’m going to do something

says. “In my first week, I sold seven

(nature scenes like poppies and

“With the businessman’s voice in

different when I’m done with this

originals. And wherever I go—coffee

aspens) and go into sports work

my head, I told my wife, ‘If the Giants

project,’” Tate recalls. “My passion

shops, bars—I always carry my

exclusively.’ In the very back of my

win, I’m going into full-time sports

has always been fine art, so Carol

portfolio and flip it open and wait to

portfolio, I had some paintings I’d

art,’” Tate says. “That way, I could

said, ‘Do it.’ I made a promise to her

see what happens.”

done of Giants players Tim Lincecum,

ride their coattails for at least a year

Buster Posey and Sergio Romo. He

and build my business.”

that I would study the art market for

One such coffee shop selling session

said, ‘You’re one of the best sports

When the team succeeded in

artists I’ve ever seen. You need to

clinching the championship, Tate

in Reno and stopped at Jungle Java,”

focus on that. There’s a big vacuum

kept his word and dedicated all of his

and social media marketing every

Tate says. “I had just grabbed my

for work of this quality.’ He walked

artistic energy to depicting the Giants

morning for a year, Tate started the

coffee when a very wealthy-looking

away and then came back and said,

on their march to victory, including

businessman walked up and asked

‘Don’t forget what I told you.’”

a particularly striking portrait of

one year before jumping in. I went after it the smart way.” After studying Internet art sales

transformed Tate’s career. “In 2014, I was on a business trip

if he could look at my portfolio.

72

IES APR n 16

ARTIST page 75


HAVE “INSIDE,” WILL TRAVEL 1. Chris and Carolyn Hunt with Sara Hunt in Mudanjiang, China for the wedding of Tom Hunt and MeiYu 2. Bruce, Sarah, Madeline, and Matthew Inman at the Grand Mosque, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 3. Andy Baker of Chocolate Fish Coffee in Copan, Honduras with his coffee supplier, Pedro Antonio Romero of Finca Los Popitos 4. Vickie & Morgan Fong, Penny & Howard Wong in Copper Canyon, Mexico 5. Naomi and Bill DeFazio in Ka'anapali, Maui, Hawaii 6. Mark Grundmann in front of the Oriental Pearl Tower in Shanghai, China

Take a picture with Inside Publications and e-mail a high-resolution copy to travel@insidepublications.com. Due to volume of submissions, we cannot guarantee all photos will be printed or posted. Can’t get enough of Have Inside, Will Travel? Find more photos on Instagram: InsidePublications

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Pups at Play DOGGY DASH SET TO SCAMPER OFF ON APRIL 9

BY JESSICA LASKEY RIVER CITY PREVIEWS

W

alk. Stay. Play! Join the Sacramento SPCA for its 23rd Annual Doggy Dash and Bark at the Park Festival at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, April 9, at William Land Park. Get your tail wagging for the 2k or 5k walk, then stay for the Bark at the Park Festival, where you can enter your canine pal in the Pup Show, high-flying disc contest or the ever-popular pug races. Watch canine demonstrations, participate in a variety of canine contests, visit with pet-friendly businesses, learn about Sacramento-area animal rescue organizations, or just sit back and enjoy all of the animal action. (Pets are welcome, naturally!) Registration fees start at $30 per person and proceeds from the Doggy Dash will help the Sacramento SPCA care for more than 7,000 homeless animals in 2016. Walk registration begins at 8:30 a.m., and the Bark at the Park Festival runs from 9 a.m. until approximately 1 p.m. Walk begins at 10 a.m. For more information or to register, call 5042802, go to sspca.org/dash or email specialevents@sspca.org William Land Park is at 3800 W. Land Park Drive.

74

IES APR n 16

The Sacramento SPCA 's Doggy Dash and Bark at the Park Festival is on Saturday, April 9

ON THEIR TOES Find out what the School of the Sacramento Ballet is up to when its Pre-Professional Division presents “Dancing and Desserts” at 6 p.m.

on Saturday, April 9, at the ballet’s new home at the E. Claire Raley Studios for the Performing Arts. It’s the company’s first event in the new space!

The enchanting evening will feature show-stopping desserts and champagne as well as an amazing evening of ballet and contemporary works. For tickets, call School Administrator Marla Quinn at 5525800, ext. 100. The E. Claire Raley Studios for the Performing Arts is at 2420 N St. See the students show off their talents yet again at a free performance at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, April 22, at their 2016 Dance Demonstration at Hiram Johnson High School. The performance will include excerpts from “Etudes,” “Coppelia,” “Raymonda,” “The Sleeping Beauty” and “Sylvia,” as well as a partnering demonstration, Regional Dance America pieces choreographed by faculty member Sunchai Muy and company members Julia Feldman and Christopher Nachtrab, and pieces from other dance genres like tap, lyrical and contemporary. Want to see the youngsters, too? The Children’s Division of the School of the Sacramento Ballet will have its annual dance demonstration at Hiram Johnson at 1 and 3:30 p.m. on Sunday, April 24. They will be showing excerpts from classical ballets as well as pieces in tap and lyrical. Hiram Johnson High School is at 6879 14th Ave. For more information, go to sacballet.org

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, SYS! Help the Sacramento Youth Symphony celebrate a milestone and the continuing contributions of PREVIEWS ARTIST page 75 77


/LF/LF

3(55, &75,&LQF (/( Call Frank Perri

455-3052 1740 36th St.

perri1740@att.net

ARTIST FROM page 72

‡5HVLGHQWLDO ‡&RPPHUFLDO ‡7URXEOHVKRRWLQJ 3URXGO\VHUYLQJ(DVW6DFUDPHQWR UHVLGHQWV EXVLQHVVHVZLWKTXDOLW\ ZRUNIRUPRUHWKDQ\HDUV think for two weeks. That was the

Madison Bumgarner midthrow during the Game 7 pitching performance against the Kansas City Royals that helped win his team the title. Local media took notice of Tate’s work, and suddenly he found himself conducting four TV interviews in seven days, including a live, two-hour painting presentation on Channel 40 during the airing of the Giants parade. “I sold four prints of that piece when I was on TV while the paint was still wet,” Tate says, his voice still full of disbelief. A savvy self-promoter, Tate pitched his work to Tim Flannery, the Giants’ third-base coach (now retired), who asked the artist to bring a Bumgarner print to a charity concert Flannery was going to play with his band. “Halfway through the concert, I realized that I could probably sell the original painting to this crowd and put a price of $12,000 on it,” Tate says. “It sold, and I gave half of the

most money I’d ever made in one night, and the most I’d ever given away.” This model of half profit, half donation is one that Tate now follows for most of his big-ticket paintings, helping raise funds for Make-A-

La dame chante.

Wish Foundation, the Bryan Stow Foundation, charities founded by Giants pitcher Jeremy Affeldt and retired Dodger Steve Sax, as well as local causes like a dog rescue and the Folsom High School football team. “Usually when you’re creative, you don’t want to be put in a box,” Tate says. “But people kept telling me to find my niche, which made me mad at first. But when that businessman told me to stop wasting my time, I

Cécile McLorin Salvant FRI, APR 29 • 8PM

The youngest winner of the prestigious Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition was virtually an unknown when she entered the contest in 2010. Since then, Salvant has been nominated for a Grammy Award for her U.S. debut album, WomanChild.

realized there aren’t a lot of sports artists out there anymore. Now that I’ve disciplined myself to the niche, I love what I do.” To see Mike Tate’s work, go to squareup.com/market/miketatestudio n

proceeds to the charity. I couldn’t

New York Chamber Soloists Orchestra with Sharon Isbin, guitar

> SAT, APR 2 • 8PM

globalFEST Live Creole Carnival

> featuring Casuarina, Emeline Michel and Brushy One-String

THU, APR 7 • 8PM

Tina Packer’s Women of Will with Nigel Gore

A fierce, playful look at Shakespeare’s most powerful heroines

SAT, APR 9 • 3PM | SUN, APR 10 • 2PM |

Escape Everyday Stress with a Peaceful & Memorable Experience

Aimee Mann & Billy Collins

> An Evening of Poetry, Acoustic Music and Conversation

MON, APR 25 • 8PM

Spa Packages | Massage Therapy | Body Treatments Skin Care | Nail Services | Gift Certificates

Celebrating 15 Years in Business!

Black British Writers’ Tour of North America

> featuring Roger Robinson, Jay Bernard, Gabriel Gbadamosi, Colin Grant, Johny Pitts, Bernadine Evaristo, Warsan Shire, Kare McCarthy-Woolf, Nick Makoha, Diran Adebayo

TUE, MAY 3 • 8PM

Open Tuesday - Saturday

4250 H Street #1 • 455-6200 • blueskydayspa.com

mondaviarts.org

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75


THEATRE GUIDE A BIT MORE: ART

April 8 – April 10 Big Idea Theatre 1616 Del Paso Blvd. Sac 960-3036

How much would you pay for a white painting? Would it matter who the painter was? Would it be art? One of Marc’s best friends, Serge, has just bought a very expensive painting. It’s about five feet by four, all white diagonal lines. To Marc, the painting is a joke, but Serge insists Marc doesn’t have the proper standard to judge the work. Lines are drawn and these old friends square off over the canvas, using it as an excuse to relentlessly batter one another over various failures.

NEWSIES

April 12 – April 17 Sacramento Community Center Theater 1301 L St, Sac 808-5181

They delivered the papers, until they made the headlines; direct from Broadway comes Newsies, crowd-pleasing new musical from Disney. Based on true events, Newsies tells the captivating story of a band of underdogs who become unlikely heroes when they stand up to the most powerful men in New York. It’s a rousing tale about fighting for what’s right; and staying true to who you are. Filled with one heart-pounding number after another, it’s a high-energy explosion of song and dance you just don’t want to miss.

THE PRODUCERS

April 13 – April 24 CSUS University Theatre 6000 J St, Sac 278-4323

Max and Leo come up with the great Broadway con -- oversell a sure-fire flop and keep all the money when it fails. But what happens when it becomes a hit? The Producers, by Mel Brooks and Thomas Meehan, comes to Sacramento State’s University Theatre. This production will be directed by Professor Ed Brazo. Note: This performance contains mature themes and language.

TOUR and PERFORMANCE at CROCKER ART MUSEUM By B Street Theatre April 12 Crocker Art Museum 216 O St, Sac 808-1182

In spectacular and often hilarious form, professional actors present a series of short plays written by kids in this special Fantasy Festival production. A great value, this two-for-one program includes a guided museum tour and a theatrical performance by B Street Theatre in the Crocker’s beautiful Setzer Auditorium. (Advanced registration by 5 pm Mon 4/11)

A MASTERPIECE OF COMIC... TIMING Thru April 17 B Street Theatre 2711 B St, Sac 916 443-5300

In the Royal Palms Hotel in Scottsdale Arizona, Danny “Nebraska” Jones is set to write the world’s funniest comedy, as soon as he gets over his melancholy, an ex-girlfriend and an anxious producer. Oh, and it’s snowing in the bedroom. Farce, slapstick, and pratfalls come together in the world premiere of Robert Caisley’s, A Masterpiece of Comic... Timing.

BLACKBERRY WINTER

Thru April 17 Capital Stage 2215 J St, Sac 476-3116

Years of success, meticulous planning, and an eye for detail have in no way prepared Vivienne Avery for her mother’s slide into the grip of dementia. Initially hiding behind insomnia-fueled baking and a polite smile, stories about her mother leave Vivienne’s inner turmoil quietly laid bare on stage. Blackberry Winter juxtaposes these stories, large theatrical gestures, and a childlike Alzheimer’s “creation myth” to recount one woman’s witnessing of the inevitable.

GOODBYE FREDDY by Elizabeth Diggs April 14 – May 1 Geery Theatre 2130 L St, Sac 214-6255

What happens when secrets go to the grave? Six friends find out it’s not easy keeping things buried, especially your darkest fears. On the night after Freddy’s funeral, long time college friends gather at the home of Kate and Hank to mourn their loss. Hank is beside himself, and their dear friend Nessa knows the real reason why. Her ex-husband Andy tries to stop her incessant need to spill the beans and in the midst of it all, Paul and Alice confront infidelity and mistrust.

ELECTRICIDAD

Thru April 17 California Stage Theatre 2509 R St, Sac 212-9315 This incredible work is adapted from the popular Greek classic, Electra by Euripides. Alfaro’s adaptation takes audiences to “cholo-landia” where the East Los Locos are mourning the death of their leader, “El Auggie.” The powerfully poetic work attacks the violence taking place over generations, between groups who would have more to gain by working together; ill-place loyalties; the passion of revenge being mistaken for an expression of love; the inability to forgive dooming future generations. The tragic results are seen in the pages of every newspaper.

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European Masterworks Franz Joseph Haydn | Harmoniemesse Vaughan Williams | An Oxford Elegy Antonín Dvořák | Psalm 149

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last major masterpie ce

Sara Duchnovnay, Soprano Malin Fritz, Mezzo Soprano Christopher Bengochea, Tenor Matt Boehler, Bass Narrator: Phillip Ryder

PROJEC T E SUPERTIT D T R A N SL A L E TIONS

SATURDAY, MAY 14 AT 8 PM 7:00 PM Pre-concert talk by Conductor Donald Kendrick Community Center Theater

SCSO

20

th

SEASON

Donald Kendrick, Music Director

SUBMIT EVENTS TO ANIKO@INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

Haydn’s ra rely performe d

SACRAMENTOCHORAL.COM

TICKETS CCT Box Office 916.808.5181 or TICKETS.com


PREVIEWS FROM page 74

The force will be with you when the SP&O presents “Salute to John Williams” at 8 p.m. on Saturday, April 23. Let the music of Williams transport you beyond your imagination to new worlds through heart-pounding adventures in a performance of film favorites “Superman,” “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” “Harry Potter,” “E.T.” and, of course, “Star Wars.” Both concerts will be held at the Community Center Theater (1301 L St.). For tickets and more information, call 808-2000 or go to sacphilopera.org

its illustrious artistic director and premier orchestra conductor, Michael Neumann, at the 60th Anniversary Gala from 6:30 to 10 p.m. on Friday, April 29, at the Crocker Art Museum. Enjoy an elegant (black tie optional) evening under the stars filled with fine wine, gourmet food and entertainment provided by SYS musicians and Mumbo Gumbo. A cocktail reception, dinner and entertainment are all included in the $150 ticket price, proceeds from which will help the SYS continue its legacy of instruction and artistic excellence. For tickets and more information, call 731-5777 or go to sacramentoyouthsymphony.org The Crocker Art Museum is at 216 O St.

PERFORMANCE ART

JUST LIKE HEAVEN You’ll positively be in paradise when regional singing group Samantics presents “In Paradisum,” an original requiem written by founder and director Sam Schieber, on April 15-17. A requiem on April 15th? (The “death and taxes” joke is too easy!) But no joke, Samantics will be presenting this ambitious original score that features texts from the traditional Requiem liturgy, the Psalms and the poems of George Herbert. In keeping with the subject matter, the piece will be serious (mostly), but you can count on a few Samantics touches—this is a group that regularly spoofs celebrities complete with ridiculous props, but also brings the big guns with a full choir of 35 tremendously talented voices, plus guest soloists Mark Beams, Brad Bong, Kate Campbell, Natasha Collier, Lesley Hamilton, Maureen Mette, Robert Rennicks, Betty Schneider, Lisa Singh and Madeleine Wieland. There will be a celebratory reception following each performance. Performances will be at 7 p.m. on Friday, April 15, at the Vacaville Performing Arts Center (for tickets to this performance, visit vpat.net or call 707-469-4013); at 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 16, at St. Clement’s Episcopal

Gary Dinnen's artwork will be on display at Archival Gallery

Church in Berkeley; and at 4 p.m. on Sunday, April 17, at First United Methodist Church in Sacramento (2100 J St.). For tickets, email tickets@samanticschoir.org

FRIENDS 4EVER What do you get when you put two renowned regional artists, who also happen to have been buddies for more than 40 years, in one room? The dynamo show “Decades: New Works by Gary Dinnen and Jay Weldon” at Archival Gallery all this month, with a special Second Saturday reception from 6 to 9 p.m. on April 9. “Decades” celebrates the friendship between these two different (Dinnen does whimsical ceramic animals, Weldon does watercolors) but equally awesome artists that started 40 years ago. This exhibition marks the first time the two popular artists have shown together in 20 years.

For more information, call 9236204 or go to archivalgallery.com. Archival Gallery is at 3223 Folsom Blvd.

MAY DVORAK BE WITH YOU You might wonder what “Star Wars” and composer Antonín Dvořák have in common, but if you’re the Sacramento Philharmonic and Opera, you know: dynamic music that’s as fun to listen to as it is to play. Check out Dvořák’s “New World” Symphony No. 9 at 8 p.m. on Saturday, April 9, performed by Cleveland Institute of Music graduate Joshua Roman, the youngest principle cellist ever appointed to the Seattle Symphony in its history. The evening will include Dvořák’s brooding Cello Concerto under the direction of conductor Edwin Outwater.

The B Street Theatre lobby will be looking extra festive this month when students from Christian Brothers High School show off their pieces as part of a special workshop presented by encaustic artist Jaya King. The school invited King to be a featured artist (previous featured artists have included Wayne Thiebaud and Gregory Kondos, so King is in good company) to speak to the art students about a career in the arts and inspire them to create a painting using her techniques. After days in the classroom and a mini studio King set up to teach the aspiring artists about encaustic—the ancient medium that involves painting with hot wax— the students created a piece of their own that is now exhibited and for sale at the B Street. Part of the proceeds will go to the young artists and some will benefit the theater’s youth programs. For more information about King, go to jayasart.com. While you’re admiring the art, why not treat yourself to a performance of the world premiere of Robert Caisley’s “A Masterpiece of Comic … Timing,” through April 17? In the Royal Palms Hotel in Scottsdale, Ariz., Danny “Nebraska” Jones is set to write the world’s funniest comedy—as soon as he gets over his melancholy, an ex-girlfriend and an anxious producer. Oh, and it’s snowing in the bedroom.

PREVIEWS page 78

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77


PREVIEWS FROM page 77 Farce, slapstick and pratfalls come together in this hilarious piece that asks, “What could be funnier than a play about trying to write a play and having that play not be funny?” Mayhem and creative differences collide as the characters—Jones, his neurotic producer Jerry Cobb and Cobb’s assistant, among others—duke it out while they try to create the next hit Broadway show. For tickets and more information, call 443-5300 or go to bstreettheatre. org. The B Street Theatre is at 2711 B St.

GET MOVING! Need a way to get your kids motivated to move? Why not make workouts such as kickboxing, yoga and Zumba for kids a whole lot of fun with Kids Unplugged, a local youth fitness group founded by Sarah Turtletaub? Turtletaub’s philosophy is to get kids to enjoy exercise, instead of dread it, by making her workouts amped up with great music and full of stress-free, noncompetitive joy. Who wouldn’t love to jump around with their friends for an hour? Classes are hosted at gymnasiums around the city: at 2:30 p.m. on Sundays at Bikram Yoga Natomas (3270 Arena Blvd.; no class on April 17); at 4:30 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at Fitness Rangers (1717 34th St.); and at 4:30 p.m. on Wednesdays at the Body Lab (4219 Arden Way). For more information, go to kidsucorp.com.

“A Masterpiece of Comic … Timing” is playing at B Street Theatre. Photos courtesy of Rudy Meyers.

The dynamic duo explore California’s water supply, management, policy and use, and how these are all drastically changing, through stories about real people (including interviews and personal essays by 20 top water leaders) and Taylor’s stunning artwork and photography. To order your copy, call 444-6240 or go to watereducation.org

in ceramic at her exhibition “Faces and Figures, The Next Level,” at ARTHOUSE on R. Fisher’s otherworldly realism will have you looking twice at these exquisite pieces. Ask her how she did it at the special Second Saturday reception from 6 to 9 p.m. on April 9. For more information, go to arthouseonr.com. ARTHOUSE on R is at 1021 R St.

FIGURATIVELY SPEAKING

PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST

Marvel at artist Michele Fisher’s ability to capture narratives, symbolism, archetypes and mythology

Spring has sprung at the Crocker Art Museum. Don’t miss out on the

WATER, WATER EVERYWHERE What do you get when water journalist Rita Schmidt Sudman and artist and writer Stephanie Taylor team up? A beautiful book that’s both pleasing to the eye and informative to the brain: “Water: More or Less” is available now through the Water Education Foundation and amazon. com. Get the kids moving with Kids Unplugged

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classical concert, student self-portrait show and more. Starting on April 7 and running through May 22, check out the “High School Self-Portrait Show,” composed of self-portraits of high school artists within our region done in diverse mediums in collaboration with Chalk it Up! and Christian Brothers High School. Congratulate the young artists in person at the reception from 1 to 3 p.m. on Sunday, April 17. The Classical Concert featuring the Gold Coast Trio (violin, cello and piano) at 3 p.m. on Sunday, April 10, will make a believer of you yet. The lively performance will feature violinist Rachel Vetter Huang, cellist Susan Lamb Cook and pianist Hao Huang tackling a vibrant program of works by Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990), a contemporary of Andy Warhol, whose work is now on exhibit. (Warhol documented his meeting with Bernstein in his famous memoir “The Andy Warhol Diaries.”) The concert will also include the jazz-infused classic “Café Music” by Paul Schoenfield, which premiered in 1987, the year of Warhol’s death. The concert is expected to sell out, so call 808-1182 to reserve your tickets now. Want to boogie down like in the good ol’ days? The Crocker and event group Unseen Heroes are teaming up again (after a very successful Sacramento Prom Night) to bring you “Art Mix: Studio 54” from 5 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, April 14. Inspired by the ongoing Andy Warhol exhibition, the museum will transform into Studio 54 for one night only: Marvel at celebs, linger in the Rock Candy Romper Room or be blown away by the battle of the blowouts when local salons do their best Farrah Fawcett flip or Shaun Cassidy feather. Prizes will be awarded for the chic-est 1970s attire, so be sure to strut your stuff on the dance floor. Enjoy food and drink discounts during happy hour from 5 to 6 p.m. and $5 drink specials all night (this event is for guests age 21 and over.) Catch what’s new in the dance world with “HATCH: Dance Works in Progress” at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 28. Now in its fifth rendition, HATCH will serve up unique dance courses within different


THE SINGING REVOLUTION SPRING CONCERT

MAY 1, 2016 AT 4:00 P.M. Featuring four choirs

Carmichael Seventh Day Adventist Church 4600 Winding Way, Sacramento CONDUCTORS: Lynn Stevens and Melanie Huber

Don’t miss the Crockett-Deane Ballet Company and the Deane Dance Center’s annual spring production of “The Story of Sleeping Beauty“

environments at the museum in an inspired interplay between the built environment and kinesthetic sensibility. Developed by Lorelei Bayne, vice chair and dance coordinator in the Department of Theater and Dance at Sacramento State, HATCH presents a variety of original performances by both established and emerging choreographers. This year’s program will feature works inspired by the exhibition “Andy Warhol: Portraits,” as well as a Q&A session with the dancers and choreographers postperformance. For tickets and more information on all Crocker events, call 808-1182 or go to crockerartmuseum.org The Crocker Art Museum is at 216 O St.

BEAUTY AWAKENS Eager to revel in the beauty of a classic fairytale told in the sweeping strokes of ballet? Don’t miss the Crockett-Deane Ballet Company and the Deane Dance Center’s annual spring production, “The Story of

Sleeping Beauty,” April 15-17 at the Center at Twenty Three Hundred. Princess Aurora (danced by Sarah Kroll) and Prince Désiré, good and evil fairies and a cast of your favorite fairytale characters will entertain, while the stunning costumes and sets and music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky will complete the pretty picture. The traditional choreography has been done by Marius Petipa, with additional choreography by director Don Schwennesen. Performances are at 8 p.m. on Friday, April 15 (a special preview of Act III for $5); at 2 and 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 16 (there will be a reception following the evening performance); and at 2 p.m. on Sunday, April 17. For more information, go to deanedancecenter. com. The Center at Twenty Three Hundred is at 2300 Sierra Blvd.

TICKETS $30 Preferred, $17 General, $12 Students

(916) 646-1141

www.sacramentochildrenschorus.org

140th Anniversary Sacramento Valley

SCOTTISH GAMES & FESTIVAL April 23-24, 2016

Yolo County Fairgrounds • Woodland, CA More details or discount tickets at

PREVIEWS page 80

www.SacramentoScotGames.org IES n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

79


PREVIEWS FROM page 79

EAT WITH YOUR EYES Do you love food? Do you love film? Then the Sacramento Food Film Festival is made for you. Check it out on April 7-16 at various local locations. The 10-day festival will showcase award-winning short films, documentaries and family-friendly movies, food by the area’s best chefs (including Randall Selland and Kurt Spataro), drinks by celebrated bartenders (Brad Peters of Hock Farm and others), music, art, VIP experiences and more. Why all the festivities, you ask? Childhood obesity is a leading public health concern that

opportunity. Organist Ryan Enright will re-create Felix Mendelssohn’s renowned 1840 organ recital in Leipzig at St. John’s Lutheran Church in midtown. The program will feature the accomplished organ musician doing what he does best with the work of Mendelssohn and Johann Sebastian Bach, as well as a bit of improvisation. For tickets and more information, go to stjohnslc.org/concert St. John’s Lutheran Church is at 1701 L St.

VISIT NIHONMACHI

Take a step back in time to the days before before World War II and learn about what it wa was like living in Sa Sacramento’s disproportionately niho nihonmachi affects low(Ja (Japan-town) income and fro from 1 to 3 p.m. minority children on Saturday, (40 percent of Ap April 2, at Sacramento th the Asian children are obese).. C Community For more C Center (on information and a tthe site of complete schedule tthe former of events, go to Merryhill m. sacfoodfilmfest.com. School). Do you remember LEIPZIG OF t h g th the “Sumo yan Enri Organist R FAITH Tournament” You probably never on the 4th of July thought you’d get the in Japan Alley, O-bon dancing in chance to hear a repeat of a concert the street and attending Lincoln that happened in 1840, but at 2 p.m. Elementary and Junior High School? on Sunday, April 17, arrives your April Ikuma Adachi, Alice Takeda Kataoka, Victor Shibata and Marian Uchida do, and they’re back by popular demand with a multimedia t 489.2739 c 832.2898 presentation about their experiences dynamodave@att.net living in Japan-town. www.dynamodaves.com Prior to World War II, there were more than 50 Japan-towns in California. Today, only three exist: in San Francisco, San Jose and Los Angeles. For the early immigrants, Affordable nihonmachi was the gathering place General Handiwork and haven from the racial prejudice of Light Plumbing, the broader community. People came Electrical & Carpentry from near and far to Sacramento’s FREE ESTIMATES Lic# 615016

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Laura Carpenter's artwork will be featured at Beatnik Studios

then-thriving nihonmachi, which included markets, doctors, dentists, hotels, boarding houses, pool halls, restaurants, a soda factory, a pharmacy and more. This event is presented by the Jan Ken Po Cultural Association, whose mission is to honor the Japanese culture and the foundation of the Japanese American experience by providing activities that educate and stimulate an appreciation of this heritage. For more information, call 4228783 or email jkpca21@yahoo.com. The Asian Community Center is at 7334 Park City Drive.

SPRING FLING Spring is the time to spruce up your house, so why not decorate with some fresh blooms care of Relles Florist’s

Spring Bouquet DIY class at 10 a.m. on Saturday, April 9? For $35, participants will learn how to make a spring bouquet inspired by both the Western line and European design techniques. Relles will provide the flowers, containers and tools; you bring your own apron. Register in advance by calling 4411478 or going to rellesflorist.com. Relles Florist is at 2400 J St.

HELP IS HERE Are you caring for a loved one who is suffering from dementia? Finding yourself wracked with guilt for feeling frustrated, resentful or just plain exhausted? The Triple-R Adult Day Program is here to help with an informative and emotional seminar from 3 to 4:15 p.m. on Friday, April 8, at the Hart Senior Center’s Cypress Room.


Spring Puddles has all you need for

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For many who are taking care of someone with dementia, there can be a feeling of living for two people, and we can find ourselves shorttempered or resentful and then feel guilty and ashamed. In the midst of caring for others, it’s easy to lose sight of how our lives are affected by daily exposure to those in need. This seminar will explore ways to deal with guilt and self-criticism, as well as find ways to lighten up, laugh and let go through honest dialogue led by Julie Interrante. Free respite is available if arrangements are made in advance. Space is limited, so RSVP to calbers@ cityofsacramento.org or call 808-6475. The Hart Senior Center is at 915 27th St.

SIZZLING SEXTUPLET Beatnik Studios ushers in spring with “Six from City,” on display now through April 22. The exhibition brings together paintings by six members of a longstanding critique group established

by Chris Daubert at Sacramento City College. The artists are Laura Carpenter, Jill Estroff, Ed Forrest, Chris Markel, Christine Nicholson and Stephanie Fry Rallanka. Varying widely in style from expressionist landscape to geometric abstraction, these paintings are unified by expressive intensity and a concentration on surface and gesture. Don’t miss the opening reception from 6 to 9 p.m. on Friday, April 1. For more information, call 400-4281 or go to beatnik-studios.com. Beatnik Studios is at 723 S St.

GOING NATIVE Passionate about all things plants? Don’t miss the California Native Plant Society’s two April events that are sure to bring out your green thumb. First up is the 2016 Gardens Gone Native Garden Tour from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, April 9. Twenty-three California native plant

PREVIEWS page 83

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TradiƟonal German

Maifest

Family FesƟval

ATradiƟonalGermanFamilyFesƟval

“Maifest”  

Maypole Dancing

Sunday,May1,2016

Arts & CraŌs



Games

12:00noonto5:00p.m.

FreeAdmission

Biergarten

 

Bratwurst Coīee and Cake Ice Cream

PREVIEWS FROM page 81 gardens in the Sacramento and Yolo county areas will be open to lookieloos and landscape aficionados to learn from; attendees can even speak with garden hosts and docents about the landscape designs and plants. Registration for the free event is at gardensgonenative.eventbrite.com. For more information, contact Colene Rauh at 717-5517 or clrauh1@ gmail.com. Wild about wildflowers? Then Wildflower Wonders from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 16, at Soil Born Farms is for you. The all-day Wildflower Show and Plant Exhibit will include expert naturalists (who will provide friendly and knowledgeable interpretation at each exhibit), hundreds of fresh-cut native wildflowers, shrubs, trees and grasses on display, as well as stunning photographs of each featured habitat. Activities will include an art table, a scavenger hunt, the Plant Community Food Chain game, a Focus on Flowers table with microscopes available for use, exhibits from the Audubon Society and Soil Born Farms and, last but certainly not least, the Native Plant Sale presented by Elderberry Farms. The event has a suggested donation of $5 but no one will be turned away for lack of funds. For more information, contact Chris Lewis at 812-2876 or cnpschris@gmail.com. Soil Born Farms is at 2140 Chase Drive in Rancho Cordova.

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Is your HVAC system a mystery to you? Demystify your heating and air-conditioning system with the help of SMUD’s informative workshop “HVAC Introduction, Maintenance and Operation” from 9 a.m. to noon. on Saturday, April 9. Learn about the components of your heating, ventilation and airconditioning system and how they work together. In addition, you will learn about the steps you can take to optimize the efficiency of your system, when and how to maintain your system, and when to seek a heating and air-conditioning contractor to perform maintenance, or replace the system. Interested in solar power but don’t know where to start? Check out the “Solar for Your Home” seminar from 6 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, April 27.This workshop will provide expert advice from SMUD’s solar specialists and answer your questions about potential savings, system size and cost so you can decide if solar is the right choice for you. For more information on all SMUD workshops, go to smud.org/ workshops. Questions? Call 888-742-7683. Workshops are held at the SMUD Customer Service Center’s Rubicon Room at 6301 S St.

“DECEM: Repose, Reflection and Renewal” will be a musical and spiritual journey in recognition of the 10th season of VOX Musica (“DECEM” means “10”) and will focus on the music of medieval prophetic visionary and composer Hildegard Von Bingen—considered to be some of the finest music produced in the Middle Ages. The concert will include chant, poetry and the strains of medieval music scholar Diane Silva on the vielle, a medieval stringed instrument similar to a violin that is rarely heard. Performances will be at 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 2, at the Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament (1017 11th St.) and at 7 p.m. on Sunday, April 3, at Beatnik Studios (723 S St.). For tickets and more information, call 844-2586 or go to voxmusica.net.

RAISE YOUR VOX

Q&A FOR THE VA

The next innovative concert project by Sacramento’s esteemed women’s chamber ensemble VOX Musica is coming up April 2-3.

Are you a veteran wondering how to buy a home using the Department of Veterans Affairs home loan program? The free

Ichliebe Bratwurst!

Hostedby:STVͲGermanLanguageSchool www.stvͲgermanlanguageschool.org workshop presented by Jai Jett and Beth Sherman from 6 to 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 28, at the Dunnigan Realtors office on Freeport Boulevard will answer your questions and more. Mortgage Loan Specialist Jai Jett of Pacific National Lending and Realtor Beth Sherman of Dunnigan Realtors will go over the eligibility requirements, process and benefits of using the VA home loan program for veterans, service members and their spouses and discuss the homebuying process. Reference materials will be provided to take home and all questions are welcome. For more information, contact the organizers at jjett@ pacificnationallending.com or beth@ liveinsac.com. The Dunnigan Realtors office is at 4215 Freeport Blvd. Jessica Laskey can be reached at jessrlaskey@gmail.com. Please email items for consideration, at least in advance of the event. n

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New Skool S.F. RESTAURATEURS OPEN AN OUTPOST IN SACRAMENTO

BY GREG SABIN

And if you squint just the right

RESTAURANT INSIDER

way, you might mistake the array of

T

tables and chairs for a third-grade

he restaurant business tends

classroom.

to be local. Sure, there are

While Skool’s principals have their

national chains, huge franchise

tongues planted firmly in their cheeks

operations and international

when it comes to design, the food that

conglomerates that run food outlets.

comes out of the kitchen is serious,

And, of course, there’s a handful of

and seriously excellent.

nationally known celebrity chefs, with

Each dish arrives at the table

restaurants in New York, D.C., Las

with casual grace, beautifully plated

Vegas and a few in their hometowns,

and well portioned. A sampler of

be it Santa Rosa or Savannah. But

raw preparations ($27) mixes cured

most restaurateurs stick close to

ocean trout, amberjack and salmon

home. So close, in fact, that rarely

tartare. The trout sits resplendent on

does a restaurant owner set up shop

a thickly grained wood plank, served

in both Sacramento and the Bay Area.

with pickled roe, shaved fennel, frisee,

That’s why it’s news when a San

tangerine and sliced radish. The

Francisco restaurant opens a branch

amberjack gains flavor from eggplant,

in our humble town.

pickled mushroom and daikon. The

I’m talking about Skool on K

salmon comes potted in a squat mason

Street, an offshoot of San Francisco’s

jar, mixed with quail egg and ginger

Skool restaurant. The new place

mustard. It’s a decadent little pot.

basically has the same menu as

A bowl of clams and mussels ($17),

the original, a heavily Japanese-

steamed in sake and served with

influenced collection of seafood

lemon grass dashi broth, is one of

dishes. Skool is led by two husband-

the finest shellfish preparations I’ve

and-wife teams: owners/operators

eaten in recent memory. It’s a healthy

Andy Mirabell and Olia Kedik and

portion of shells without a clunker in

executive chef Toshihiro Nagano and

the batch, and the broth is so lovely

his wife, pastry chef and creative

you’ll want to soak up every last bit.

director Hiroko Nagano. Their

Pan-roasted trout ($25) served

experience in running Skool in San

with broccolini and sunchokes is

Francisco certainly shows in the new

beautiful dish. The portion size is

Sacramento location. Open only a few weeks, the front of the house and the

Yaki Ika, (grilled squid) at Skool

kitchen already run like a well-oiled machine. The space sits set back from K Street just up from 23rd, a fine example of the new Midtown. Across

door. Skool is housed in the storefront

smattering of Japanese kitchen

previously inhabited by Anatolian

regalia. The name, Skool, is not just

Table.

a clever play on the term for a group

The interior of Skool plays on cozy

of fish but also an inspiration for

the street are The Golden Bear, Der

minimalism, with black-and-white

classroom design elements. Menus are

Biergarten and Sticky Gator BBQ &

wall art, a gridlike setup of simple

printed on lined notebook paper and

Soul Food. There’s a boutique a few

wooden tables and chairs and a brief

secured to boards with No. 2 pencils.

doors down, a vegan restaurant next

84

IES APR n 16

spot on for an entrée, and the simple flavors meld beautifully. The kitchen shows amazing restraint in letting the freshwater treat (the only one on the menu) speak for itself without adding much more than a sliced lemon, a spot of chimichurri and an aggressive grind or two of black pepper. Clever small bites fill nearly half the menu. The mushroom “fries”


($8) feel like a guilty pleasure served with a ridiculous white miso aioli. Deviled eggs ($11) get the Skool treatment when topped with Spanish-style anchovies, flying fish roe and Peruvian chili sauce. Fish ribs, chicken wings and salmon chips round out the small-plates menu and bolster a well-priced and attractive daily happy hour (known at Skool as Detention Hall). Skool is a fine addition to the ever-growing portfolio of Midtown restaurants. Its owners’ experience in the City definitely shows in the quick and nearly flawless opening here in Sacramento. We’re happy to have this midsemester transfer in our classroom here in the valley. Skool is at 2319 K St.; 737-5767; skoolonkstreet.com Greg Sabin can be reached at gregsabin@hotmail.com n

The dining room at Skool

IES n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

85


Welcome Back for the First Time! ing t a r b ! Cele ars

e y 0 1

INSIDE’S

MIDTOWN

Jack’s Urban Eats

1800 L St. 447-9440

L D $ Full Bar Made-to-order comfort food in a casual setting • Jacksurbaneats.com

Aioli Bodega Espanola L D $$ Full Bar Patio Andalusian cuisine served in a casual European atmosphere

Biba Ristorante

2801 Capitol Ave. 455-2422 L D $$$ Full Bar Upscale Northern Italian

cuisine served a la carte • Biba-restaurant.com

Buckhorn Grill

1801 L St. 446-3757

L D $$ Wine/Beer A counter service restaurant with high-quality chicken, char-roasted beef, salmon, and entrée salads

e atato pa . com 08

’13

09

5644 J Street

’14

916.451.4000

Café Bernardo

2726 Capitol Ave. 443-1180 1431 R St. 930-9191

B L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Casual California cuisine with counter service

Centro Cocina Mexicana

Premier Antique & Design Center

Chicago Fire

2416 J St. 443-0440

D $$ Full Bar Chicago-style pizza, salads wings served in a family-friendly atmosphere • Chicagofirerestaurant.com

Crepeville

1730 L St. 444-1100

Over 120 Dealers 45,000 sq ft

IN BUSINESS SINCE 1977

& Design Center Amorini Antiques 455-1509 Aquila Fitness 207-7500 Fifty-Seventh Street Antique Mall 451-3110 The Ruralist 956-0776

The Lighting Palace - Sales and Repair 817-9625

Free Customer Parking

Sassi Salon 739-0878 Sekula’s 712-8303

Evan’s Kitchen 452-3896

Design Alchemy 999-1409

Mike & Greg The Pottery Guys 731-4556

Dance “10” 769-4857

Picket Fence Antiques 455-6524

Urban 57 Home Décor & Design 476-6190

855 57th Street (Between J & H Streets)

86

IES APR n 16

2115 J St. 442-4388

D Full Bar $$ Middle Eastern cuisine in a Moroccan setting

Lucca Restaurant & Bar 1615 J St. 669-5300

L D Full Bar $$-$$$ Patio Mediterranean cuisine in a casual, chic atmosphere • Luccarestaurant.com

Mulvaney’s Building & Loan 1215 19th St. 441-6022

L D Full Bar $$$ Modern American cuisine in an upscale historic setting

Old Soul Co.

1716 L St. 443-7685

B L D $ No table service at this coffee roaster and bakery, also serving creative artisanal sandwiches

Paesano’s Pizzeria

1806 Capitol Ave. 447-8646

L D $$ Gourmet pizza, pasta, salads in casual setting • Paesanos.biz

Paragary’s Bar & Oven 1401 28th St. 457-5737

L D $$ Full Bar Outdoor Patio California cuisine with a French touch • Paragarys.com

Suzie Burger

B L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Outdoor Dining Crepes, omelets, salads, soups and sandwiches served in a casual setting

29th and P Sts. 455-3300

Ernesto’s Mexican Food

Tapa The World

B L D $-$$ Full Bar Outdoor Dining Fresh Mexican food served in an upscale, yet family-friendly setting • Ernestosmexicanfood.com

L D $-$$ Wine/Beer/Sangria Spanish/world cuisine in a casual authentic atmosphere, live flamenco music - tapathewworld.com

58 Degrees & Holding Co.

Thai Basil Café

1901 16th St. 441-5850

4 Star Dining

Kasbah Lounge

2730 J St. 442-2552

L D $$ Full Bar Patio Regional Mexican cooking served in a casual atmosphere • Paragarys.com

Sacramento’s

1230 20th St. 444-0307

1217 18th St. 442-5858

L D $$$ Wine/Beer California cuisine served in a chic, upscale setting • 58degrees.com

Fox & Goose Public House 1001 R St. 443-8825

B L D $-$$ Wine/Beer English Pub favorites in an historic setting • Foxandgoose.com

Harlow’s Restaurant 2708 J Street 441-4693

L D $$ Full Bar Modern Italian/California cuisine with Asian inspirations • Harlows.com

Italian Importing Company 1827 J Street 442-6678

B L $ Italian food in a casual grocery setting

L D $ Classic burgers, cheesesteaks, shakes, chili dogs, and other tasty treats • suzieburger.com

2115 J St. 442-4353

2431 J St. 442-7690

L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Patio Housemade curries among their authentic Thai specialties Thaibasilrestaurant.com

The Coconut Midtown

2502 J Street 440-1088 Lunch Delivery M-F and Happy Hour 4-6

L D $-$$ Beer/Wine Food with Thai Food Flair

The Waterboy

2000 Capitol Ave. 498-9891

L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Patio Fine South of France and northern Italian cuisine in a chic neighborhood setting • waterboyrestaurant.com


EAT DRINK SPORTS

SACRAMENTOPHILHARMONIC & OPERA

SACRAMENTO’S PREMIER SPORTS LOUNGE GIANTS BASEBALL IS BACK Catch all the games on our 150” HD movie theater screens Breakfast served every Sat & Sun 9am - noon

HAPPY HOUR

M-Th 3-7pm All Day Friday

Watch for our new lunch cards coming soon!!! Plan on having lunch with us at the Clubhouse

Check out our new website: www.ch56sports.com

A SALUTE TO Saturday, April 23 • 8:00 pm Sacramento Community Center Theater The music of John Williams has transported us beyond our imagination. To new worlds. Through heart-pounding adventures. Be there as the Sacramento Philharmonic & Opera performs all your John Williams favorites: Superman, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Harry Potter, E.T., and of course, Star Wars. May the force be with you!

TICKETS START AT JUST $15!* Order Now! 916-808-5181 • SacPhilOpera.org

Clubhouse 56 ō 723 56th Street ō 916.454.5656

All subscription/packages are sold exclusively by the SacPhilOpera * Sacramento Community Center Theater facility fee - $3 per ticket

Simply The Best Martini Hour Downtown

Study at the First Law School in the Nation to Offer MPA and MPP Degrees

Reduced Priced Cocktails & Half Off Selected Appetizers

Monday - Friday 3 - 6

Frank Fat’s

McGEORGE SCHOOL OF LAW

- Master of Public Administration (MPA) - Master of Public Policy (MPP)

Learn more at our online webinars or on-campus information sessions. Register at 916.340.6192 or go.mcgeorge.edu/PublicPolicy. McGeorge School of Law

est. 1939

806 L Street Downtown Sacramento 916-442-7092 www.FrankFats.com

Public Policy

Public Administration

IES n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

87


This Month at the Market

A LOOK AT WHAT’S IN SEASON AT LOCAL FARMERS MARKETS IN APRIL

88

STRAWBERRIES

ENGLISH PEAS

MUSTARD GREENS

This popular fruit, with its fresh aroma, bright red color and sweetness, is a sure sign that spring has arrived in Sacramento. To eat: Eat right out of the basket, or serve with whipped cream or ice cream for dessert.

The pods are not edible, so you must shuck the sweet, tender peas before eating them either raw or cooked. To eat: Steam, boil, blanch or sautĂŠ them. They are delicious in pasta with a light, lemony mascarpone sauce.

The leaves of the mustard plant are highly nutritious and have a peppery flavor. To eat: Add a small amount of raw greens to a salad.

MORELS

FAVA GREENS

LEEKS

This mushroom has a strong, nutty, earthy flavor. Its harvest season is short, but you can find dried morels year-round. To eat: Saute gently in butter with chopped shallots, then add cream for a lovely, light sauce.

This vegetable, which is related to onions and garlic, is sweet and delicately flavored. Trim the tough green leaves and use the white stalk. To eat: Use to add flavor to stocks, soups or stews.

Commonly found in Asian dishes, these greens are mildly sweet and buttery. Early in the season, they are tender enough to eat raw. To eat: Use to wrap fish or seafood before cooking.

IES APR n 16


A

Zocolo

Les Baux

L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Patio Regional Mexican cuisine served in an authentic artistic setting • zocolosacramento.com

BLD $ Wine/Beer Unique boulangerie, café & bistro serving affordable delicious food/drinks all day long • lesbauxbakery.com

1801 Capitol Ave. 441-0303

Opa! Opa!

33rd Street Bistro

L D Wine/Beer $ Fresh Greek cuisine in a chic, casual setting, counter service

B L D $$ Full Bar Patio Pacific Northwest cuisine in a casual bistro setting • 33rdstreetbistro.com

Nopalitos

Burr's Fountain 4920 Folsom Blvd. 452-5516

B L D $ Fountain-style diner serving burgers, sandwiches, soup and ice cream specialties

Cabana Winery & Bistro

5530 H St. 452-8226

B L $ Wine/Beer Southwestern fare in a casual diner setting

Selland's Market Cafe 5340 H St. 736-3333

Clubhouse 56

B L D $-$$ Beer/Wine Dog friendly patio Family friendly neighborhood pub featuring housemade burgers, sandwiches, salads & inhouse smoked meats • www.eastsacshack.com

BLD Full Bar $$ American. HD sports, kid's menu, breakfast weekends, Late night dining

Español 5723 Folsom Blvd. 457-3679

L D Full Bar $-$$ Classic Italian cuisine served in a traditional family-style atmosphere

Evan’s Kitchen 855 57th St. 452-3896

B L D Wine/Beer $$ Eclectic California cuisine served in a family-friendly atmosphere, Kid’s menu, winemaker dinners, daily lunch specials, community table for single diners • Chefevan. com

Formoli's Bistro 3839 J St. 448-5699

B L D Wine/Beer Patio $$ Mediterranean influenced cuisine in a neighborhood setting •

Hot City Pizza

5642 J St. 731-8888

L D $ Pizza for Dine In or Take Out or Delivery 100 Beers on tap • eastsacpizza.com

La Trattoria Bohemia

(ALL APRIL)

L U N C H,DI N N E R,

AND HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

1131 K STREET DOWNTOWN SACRAMENTO 916.443.3772 WWW.ELLA DINING ROOM AND BAR.COM

B L D $$ Wine/Beer High quality handcrafted food to eat in or take out, wine bar

The Shack

723 56th. Street 454-5656

D

Y IL

T

5644 J St. 451-4000

5610 Elvas 476-5492

LD $$ Wine tasting and paired entrees. Sunday Brunch 10 - 2. • cabanawine.com

N

M

U TA

N

5090 Folsom Blvd. 739-1348

EAST SAC 3301 Folsom Blvd. 455-2233

SE

A LL

FA

S RE

RA

5201 Folsom Blvd. 457-5997

Star Ginger

3101 Folsom Blvd. 231-8888

L D $$ Asian Grill and Noodle Bar

DOWNTOWN Foundation

400 L St. 321-9522

L D $$ Full Bar American cooking in an historic atmosphere • foundationsacramento.com

Chops Steak Seafood & Bar 1117 11th St. 447-8900

L D $$$ Full Bar Steakhouse serving dry-aged prime beef in an upscale club atmosphere

Claim Jumper 1111 J St. 442-8200 L D $$ Full Bar Upscale American in a clubby atmosphere

Downtown & Vine 1200 K Street #8 228-4518

Educational tasting experience of wines by the taste, flight or glass • downtownandvine.com

GET US DELIVERED @ TRYCAVIAR.COM/SACRAMENTO

BUY 1 GET 1 ½ OFF Discounted item must be of equal or lesser value. Not valid with any other discount. Not valid on holidays.

E ES

3649 J St. 455-7803

L D Wine/Beer $-$$ Italian and Czech specialties in a neighborhood bistro setting

7042 Folsom Blvd ∫ (916) 476-4508 ∫ www.fahrenheitbbq.com

IES n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

89


ch the swirl! t a C

Grange

926 J Street • 492-4450

B L D Full Bar $$$ Simple, seasonal, soulful • grangerestaurant.com

Say Thank You with Flowers Administrative Professionals Week April 24 - 30

Hock Farm Craft & Provision 1415 L St. 440-8888

L D $$-$$ Full Bar Celebration of the region's rich history and bountiful terrain • Paragarys.com

We honor all competitorÊs coupons!

See works by local artists in our showroom and online

Relles Florist

Mikuni Japanese Restaurant and Sushi Bar 1530 J St. 447-2112

L D Full Bar $$-$$$ Japanese cuisine served in an upscale setting • Mikunisushi.com

22400 400 J Street S • 4441-1478 41 14478

RellesFlorist.com

Ten 22

Buy 8 oz. yogurt or higher,

GET UP TO 8 OZ. OF YOGURT FOR FREE! Limit one free 8oz. yogurt per coupon

Shaved Ice & Shaved Snow available!

A combination between ice cream and shaved ice. Fluffy like cotton candy and very refreshing.

HeavenLy’s Yogurt

5535 H Street 11 to 10:30 pm Daily

Ella Dining Room & Bar 1131 K St. 443-3772

L D $$$ Full Bar Modern American cuisine served family-style in a chic, upscale space Elladiningroomandbar.com

Esquire Grill 1213 K St. 448-8900

L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Outdoor Dining Upscale American fare served in an elegant setting • Paragarys.com

Estelle's Patisserie

901 K St. 916-551-1500 L D $$-$$$ French-inspired Bakery serving fresh pastry & desserts, artisan breads and handcrafted sandwiches • EstellesPatisserie.com

Fat City Bar & Cafe 1001 Front St. 446-6768

D $$-$$$ Full Bar American cuisine served in a casual historic Old Sac location • Fatsrestaurants.com

The Firehouse Restaurant 1112 Second St. 442-4772

L D $$$ Full Bar Global and California cuisine in an upscale historic Old Sac setting • Firehouseoldsac.com

Frank Fat’s 806 L St. 442-7092

L D Full Bar $$-$$$ Chinese favorites in an elegant setting • Fatsrestaurants.com

Il Fornaio

400 Capitol Mall 446-4100

L D Full Bar $$$ Fine Northern Italian cuisine in a chic, upscale atmosphere • Ilfornaio.com

90

IES APR n 16

Voted Best Florist 14 years by readers of Sacramento Magazine

1022 Second St. 441-2211

L D Wine/Beer $$ American bistro favorites with a modern twist in a casual, Old Sac setting • ten22oldsac.com

LAND PARK Casa Garden Restaurant 2760 Sutterville Road 452-2809

L D $$ • D with minimum diners call to inquire $$ Wine/Beer. American cuisine. Operated by volunteers to benefit Sacramento Children's Home. Small and large groups. casagardenrestaurant.org

Freeport Bakery

2966 Freeport Blvd. 442-4256

B L $ Award-winning baked goods and cakes for eat in or take out • Freeportbakery.com

Iron Grill 13th Street and Broadway 737-5115

ARDENCARMICHAEL Bella Bru Café

5038 Fair Oaks Blvd. 485-2883

B L D $-$$ Full bar, casual, locally owned European style café with table service from 5 pm and patio dining • bellabrucafe.com

Café Vinoteca

3535 Fair Oaks Blvd. 487-1331

L D $$ Full Bar Italian bistro in a casual setting • Cafevinoteca.com

Ettore’s

2376 Fair Oaks Blvd. 482-0708

B L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Patio European-style gourmet café with salads, soup, spit-roasted chicken, and desserts in a bistro setting • Ettores.com

L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Upscale neighborhood steakhouse • Ironsteaks.com

Jackson Catering & Events

Jamie's Bar and Grill

L D $$ Wine/Beer Creative cuisine in a casual setting • Jacksoncateringevents.com

1120 Fulton Ave. 483-7300

427 Broadway 442-4044

L D $ Full Bar Featured on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives. Dine in or take out since 1986

Riverside Clubhouse

2633 Riverside Drive 448-9988

L D $$ Full Bar Upscale American cuisine served in a contemporary setting • Riversideclubhouse.com

Taylor's Kitchen

2924 Freeport Boulevard 443-5154

D $$$ Wine/Beer Dinner served Wed. through Saturday. Reservations suggested but walk-ins welcome.

Tower Café

1518 Broadway 441-0222

B L D $$ Wine/Beer International cuisine with dessert specialties in a casual setting

Willie's Burgers

2415 16th St. 444-2006

L D $ Great burgers and more. Open until 3 on Friday and Saturday • williesburgers.com

Jack’s Urban Eats

2535 Fair Oaks Blvd. 481-5225

L D $ Full Bar Made-to-order comfort food in a casual setting • Jacksurbaneats.com

The Kitchen

2225 Hurley Way 568-7171

D $$$ Wine/Beer Five-course gourmet demonstration dinner by reservation only • Thekitchenrestaurant.com

La Rosa Blanca Taqueria 2813 Fulton Ave. 484-6104

L D Full Bar $$-$$ Fresh Mexican food served in a colorful family-friendly setting

Leatherby’s Family Creamery 2333 Arden Way 920-8382

L D $ House-made ice cream and specialties, soups and sandwiches

Lemon Grass Restaurant 601 Munroe St. 486-4891

L D $$ Full Bar Patio Vietnamese and Thai cuisine in a casual yet elegant setting

Luna Lounge

5026 Fair Oaks Blvd. 485-2883

B L D $-$$ Full neighborhood bar serving dinner nightly. Open at 11am daily. Weekend breakfast. • bellabrucafe.com

Matteo's Pizza

5132 Fair Oaks. Blvd. 779-0727

L D Beer/Wine $$ Neighborhood gathering place for pizza, pasta and grill dishes

The Mandarin Restaurant 4321 Arden Way 488-47794

D $$-$$$ Full Bar Gourmet Chineses food for 32 years • Dine in and take out

Roxy

2381 Fair Oaks Blvd. 489-2000

B L D $$-$$$ Full Bar American cuisine with a Western touch in a creative upscale atmosphere •

Ristorante Piatti

571 Pavilions Lane 649-8885

L D $$ Full Bar Contemporary Italian cuisine in a casually elegant setting • piatti.com

Sam's Hof Brau

2500 Watt 482-2175 L D $$ Wine/Beer Fresh quality meats roasted daily • thehofbrau.com

Thai House

427 Munroe in Loehmann's 485-3888 L D $$ Wine/Beer Featuring the great taste of Thai traditional specialties • sacthaihouse.com

Willie's Burgers

5050 Fair Oaks Blvd. 488-5050 L D $ Great burgers and more • williesburgers.com n


IES n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

91


Coldwell Banker

#1 IN CALIFORNIA

MIDTOWN MARVELOUS! Bring your pup! Summer will be fabulous on this home's oversized, shaded deck overlooking a spacious yard w/alley access. This New Era Park (Midtown) hm features oversized rms, frplc, classic hrdwd flrs, & blt-ins. STEPH BAKER 775-3447 CaBRE#: 01402254 ADORABLE EAST SAC BUNGALOW! This 2bed/1bath doll house sits on a large lot with a 2 car garage & partial bsemnt. Do not miss this one! $465,000 POLLY SANDERS & ELISE BROWN 715-0213 CaBRE#: 01158787, 01781942

SOLD

EAST SAC BUNGALOW! Adorable, unique, & fun! 2bed, hardwoods, delightful vintage kitchen & bath, family rm opens to wonderful garden. $459,900 PALOMA BEGIN 628-8561 CaBRE#: 01254423

TAHOE PARK! Perfect starter home in Tahoe Park. Open living and dining area. 2 bedrooms & 1 bath on a spacious corner lot. $299,900 THE WOOLFORD GROUP 834-6900 CaBRE#: 00680069, 01778361, 00679593

DESIRABLE EAST SACRAMENTO! Original home & original condition. 3bds, CH&A, high ceilings & det. Garage. Lrg patios & many fruit trees. SUE OLSON 601-8834 CaBRE#: 00784986

NEW ENGLAND STYLE COTTAGE! Prime East Sac location. 2000+SQFT, 2bd/2.5ba, Master Suite w/French doors to balcony overlooking backyard. $549,000 THE WOOLFORD GROUP 834-6900 CaBRE#: 00680069, 01778361, 00679593

SOPHISTICATED ELEGANCE! Enjoy Birdseye views from East Sacr’s only midrise condo tower. Resort-like living nestled amongst the trees! MARK PETERS 600-2039 CaBRE#: 01424396

CUTEST CORNER DUPLEX! In Midtown's Boulevard Park! Charming nearly-twin mirrored ING units both feature wd flrs, decorative fireplaces, roomy living END rooms, & tile kitchens.PShared yard. $429,000 STEPH BAKER 775-3447 CaBRE#: 01402254 SOCAP LOFTS-RARE CORNER TOWER UNIT! 2br/2.5ba. Enjoy "birdsnest" views from your huge west facing balcony. 2 car garage. Immediate occupancy well in time for the grand opening of Golden 1 Arena. MARK PETERS 600-2039 CaBRE#: 01424396

STUNNING ELMHURST HOME! Blt in 1924 & underwent massive renovation/addition in 2015. 4bd/2bath Huge Master Suit, custom kitchen & lrg bkyd. $659,000 TOM LEONARD 834-1681 CaBRE#: 01714895

SOLD

CAMPUS COMMONS! 4400 Model! Nearly 1,750sqft of gorgeous living space. Attached 2 car, updtd kitch & baths, Nepenthe HOA membership. MARK PETERS 600-2039 CaBRE#: 01424396 EAST SAC TUDOR! 3 bed, 3 bath +bonus room, updated throughout, 2 car garage, great backyard for entertaining! $899,000 MICHAEL OWNBEY 616-1607 CaBRE#: 01146313

TOTAL VALUE IN EAST SAC! Art Deco meets East Sac Classic. This home features 3 bdrms/2bath with Master suite on a huge lot. TOM LEONARD 834-1681 CaBRE#: 01714895

BRAND NEW CONTRUCTION! 4/3 + Office, almost 2,400 sq ft of pure beauty on large lot and private/quiet street. This is a must see. $839,000 TOM LEONARD 834-1681 CaBRE#: 01714895

PRIME EAST SAC LOCATION COMING SOON! Wonderful 3bd, 2ba hm, over 1,600sf close to Bertha Henschel Prk. Just off corner of 45th & C on a tree lined street. TOM LEONARD 834-1681 CaBRE#: 01714895 BEAUTIFUL EAST SAC! Adjacent to Fab 40s on a lrg lot. 3BD/3BA w/mstr ste. Rmdld in 2013 creating an elegant 2nd level. 2-car gar. $570,000 POLLY SANDERS & ELISE BROWN 715-0213 CaBRE#: 01158787, 01781942

SOLD

IN THE HEART OF EAST SAC! Stunning rmdld 3bd/3ba Spanish style hm on Fabulous 46th St boasts bsmnt w/fam rm & bar & finished garage. $879,950 POLLY SANDERS & ELISE BROWN 715-0213 CaBRE#: 01158787, 01781942

SACRAMENTO METRO OFFICE 730 Alhambra Boulevard #150 • 916.447.5900

TIDY COTTAGE! Well kept 3 bed/2bath stucco home with open concept living/ kitchen/dining area. Close to UCD Med Center. $299,000 DEBBIE TOWNE 532-2652 CaBRE#: 01305405

ColdwellBankerHomes.com

MOVE IN READY IN ELMHURST! Updated kitchen and bath. 2 Bdrms and 1 Bath. Drought friendly front and backyards. $373,000 THE WOOLFORD GROUP 834-6900 CaBRE#: 00680069, 01778361, 00679593

facebook.com/cbnorcal

©2015 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office is Owned by a Subsidiary of NRT LLC. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage or NRT LLC. CalBRE License #01908304.

Inside east sacramento apr 2016  
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