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PRSRT STD US Postage PA I D Permit # 1826 Sacramento CA

G E T

P U B L I C A T I O N S . C O M

2014

POSTAL CUSTOMER

I N S I D E

JUL

ARDEN ARCADE SIERRA OAKS WILHAGGIN DEL PASO MANOR CARMICHAEL

I N T O

T H E

N E I G H B O R H O O D


NEW CUSTOM HOME Here is an exciting opportunity to own a quality custom built new home (built in 2014) in a gated subdivision of 15 custom homes!! High beamed ceilings, hardwood Àoors, fabulous gourmet kitchen, open Àoor plan, 3 car attached garage, .35ac lot plus every bedroom has its own bathroom!! $1,350,000 CARMAH HATCH 765-6210

SIERRA OAKS CUSTOM Ken Dyer Construction custom home located on a private .3 acre lot with gorgeous pool! A very spacious Àoor plan of 4 or 5 bedrooms and 4 full baths, over 4300 sf plus a 4-car tandem garage. High ceilings, hickory oak Àoors, custom cabinets with built-in buffets, and granite counters! $1,695,000 CHRISTINE BALESTRERI 996-2244

SPACIOUS HOUSE AND YARD Mariemont Avenue home over 8400 square feet with 5 or 6 bedrooms 6½ baths located on a 1½ acre parcel. Spacious rooms, each bedroom has its own bath, an amazing master bedroom suite, custom wood work, box beamed ceilings, an attached maid’s quarters, RV access and a 4-car garage. $1,999,900 ERIN STUMPF 342-1372

ARDEN ARCADE GREEN HOME Enjoy a Green lifestyle and philosophy in this special home! Passive solar with 3 bedrooms 3 baths and over 2600 sq ft. Open, artistic and angular! Wake up, ascend the spiral staircase to the sod roof, pick a fresh bouquet of Àowers and a handful of crunchy vegetables. $548,500 SHEILA VAN NOY 505-5395

TIMELESS CONTEMPORARY Artist retreat lovingly built and maintained by original owners. Home backs onto beautiful, tranquil area in a small gated community. Two distinct levels, 4 bedrooms 2½ baths with master suite and of¿ce and tons of storage. All rooms have fabulous sweeping views. $799,500 CARMAH HATCH 765-6210

QUALITY DEL DAYO Highly desirable Del Dayo neighborhood and school district. Walk out your back yard to the American River Bike Trail. Fabulous 4 bedroom 2½ bath home with walls of glass opening to a crescent shaped deck and nice yard. Make it your dream home! $549,500 SHEILA VAN NOY 505-5395

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You are invited to mix and mingle with fellow travelers at our Summer Travel Planning Event on Thursday, July 24 at 10:00 am. Come to Winding Commons Senior Community and enjoy treats and beverages and connect with our residents and others who love to explore the area ... or the world! Mission Oaks Recreation and Parks District will share their group senior travel program where you can receive news on travel deals and learn about travel opportunities. Don’t miss it! Seating is limited, so RSVP! DRE #00357904

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SACRAMENTO COUNTY’S #1 AGENT 2014 YTD!*

JUST LISTED IN CARMICHAEL 6140 ROSY LANE $1,095,000

6132 ORANGE HILL LANE $699,000

KIM’S 2014 SALES!*

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FA B U L O U S H O M E S F O R S A L E ON THE SACRAMENTO RIVER 3445 GARDEN HWY $1,395,000

ASHTON PARK ESTATES 594 ASHTON PARK LANE $1,198,000

1910 Rockwood Dr.

$2,400,000.00

530 Hawthorn Rd.

$1,900,000.00

1040 45th Street

$1,900,000.00

6628 Chiquita Way

$1,150,000.00

1720 Cathay Way

$1,065,000.00

1100 El Sur Way

$960,000.00

1428 La Sierra Dr.

$925,000.00

730 Estates Dr.

$819,000.00

1200 Stewart Rd.

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821 Lake Oak Ct.

$745,000.00

4948 Kipling Dr.

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4229 Bank Ct.

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5813 Twin Gardens Rd.

$444,000.00

4500 Surita St.

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11924 S. Carson Way

$397,000.00

3369 Shearwater Dr.

$372,000.00

2086 University Park Dr.

$370,000.00

1709 50th St.

$349,000.00

4201 Oterol Ct.

$325,000.00

Garden Hwy Lot

$255,000.00

6623 Waldorf Ct.

$227,000.00

GATED IN CARMICHAEL 3500 AUTUMN POINT LANE $1,490,000

IN WILHAGGIN 4461 ASHTON DRIVE $899,000

SIERRA OAKS VISTA 751 LILAC LANE $1,495,000

DEL PASO COUNTY CLUB 3031 MORSE AVE. $1,290,000

IN ARDEN PARK 3710 ESPERANZA DRIVE $899,000

IN WILHAGGIN 423 CLAYDON WAY $695,000

STUNNING CUSTOM HOME 5244 ARDEN WAY $1,150,000

GARDEN OF THE GODS 2020 VENUS DRIVE $319,500

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This is the Moment. This is the Market. Call Kim to discuss your 2014 real estate plans! * Source Trendgraphix Jan. 2014, *Metrolist May 2014, total sales by dollar volume.

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COVER ARTIST Gloria Vernon "The subject is a 1937 International pickup truck windshield, delaminating from age and extreme weather. My technique is photorealism using soft pastels, pastel pencils and pastel sticks." This painting received one of the three Publisher’s Awards selected by Cecily Hastings at the Fine Art Show at the California State Fair. The show runs from July 11 to 27.

EAST SACRAMENTO

L A N D PA R K

ARDEN

POCKET

Visit gloriavernonstudios.com

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LOCAL JUL 2014

PUBLISHER Cecily Hastings publisher@insidepublications.com 3104 O St. #120, Sac. CA 95816 (Mail Only) 916-441-7026 (Information Line) EDITOR PRODUCTION DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY AD COORDINATOR ACCOUNTING EDITORIAL POLICY

VOL. 13 • ISSUE 6 9 12 16 22 24 30 34 38 40 46 48 51 54 56 60 62 64 65 66 68 72 74

Marybeth Bizjak mbbizjak@aol.com M.J. McFarland Cindy Fuller, Daniel Nardinelli Linda Smolek, Aniko Kiezel Michele Mazzera Jim Hastings, Daniel Nardinelli 916-443-5087 Commentary reflects the views of the writers and does not necessarily reflect those of Inside Publications. Inside Publications is delivered for free to more than 65,000 households in Sacramento. Printing and distribution costs are paid entirely by advertising revenue. We spotlight selected advertisers, but all other stories are determined solely by our editorial staff and are not influenced by advertising. No portion may be reproduced mechanically or electronically without written permission of the publisher. All ad designs & editorial—©

SUBMISSIONS Submit cover art to publisher@insidepublications.com. Submit editorial contributions to mbbizjak@aol.com. SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscriptions at $20 per year guarantees 3rd class mailing. Send check with name & address of recipient and specify publication edition.

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Publisher's Desk Out and About Arden Susan Peters Report City Beat Shoptalk Local Heroes Artist Spotlight The Club Life Garden Jabber Spirit Matters Sports Authority Real Estate Guide Doing Good Home Insight Pets & Their People Getting There Momservations Science In The Neighborhood Many Hats River City Previews Restaurant Insider Dining Guide

CONTACT OUR ADVERTISING TEAM

Ann Tracy

Duffy Kelly

East Sacramento

Arden - Pocket - Native Advertising

Central City - Land Park

Michael Boyd

798-2136

224-1604

341-9755

Cecily Hastings Publisher - Select Accounts

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Neighborhood Identity CELEBRATING THE DIFFERENCES IN OUR UNIQUE URBAN NEIGHBORHOODS

BY CECILY HASTINGS PUBLISHER’S DESK

W

hen my husband and I first arrived in Sacramento in 1989, we had no knowledge of the city or environs, and we didn’t know a soul. It was not exactly a great way to select a neighborhood in which to buy a home and raise a family. We were grateful that we had an experienced real estate agent who spent an entire day with us and, starting in Midtown, took us through a number of neighborhoods moving eastward and then to the south. We wanted to get a feel for the architectural identity of each neighborhood. Looking back now, I realize that our driving tour was wholly inadequate in helping us make such a big decision. Here’s what I recall in a nutshell: Midtown had inexpensive historic homes that needed work and had small yards, and there was a lively shopping district. But we were warned that there weren’t many children in the neighborhood and that the crime rate was fairly high. McKinley Park looked fabulous, especially the park

itself, but we were told the public schools were weak. The Fab 40s were gorgeous, but house prices were too high for us and there was almost zero inventory on the market at the time. We never saw River Park. Heading across the H Street Bridge, we toured Sierra Oaks and thought it was lovely, with big lots and varied home styles. But the houses for sale were small and dated. The Wilhaggin homes we saw were too big, while the Arden Park homes were too small. Carmichael was a mixed bag, with some larger, luxurious homes located next to tiny cottages. The lots were huge—too large for our needs. There wasn’t much shopping close by.

We ended up buying that McKinley Park house. And I later learned that I had been dead wrong in my judgment of Curtis Park. Heading south, we loved lush and expansive William Land Park, but the homes we saw were either too large and expensive or too small and needed too much work. Curtis Park had the most amazing collection of eclectic architectural styles we saw all day. We never saw South Land Park or the Pocket or even heard their names. We probably just ran out of time that day.

It was almost a year before we actually purchased a home. The decision ultimately came down to two houses: one directly across the street from McKinley Park, the other across the street from Curtis Park. We visited both houses numerous times. Each time we went to Curtis Park, we noticed that the park was empty and lacked amenities. In comparison, fun things always seemed to be happening in McKinley Park, with its numerous facilities. To be honest, the lack of activity in Curtis Park caused me to judge the neighborhood in a negative way. It seemed like people didn’t get out of their houses to enjoy the neighborhood. I worried about making friends. We ended up buying that McKinley Park house. And I later learned that I had been dead wrong in my judgment of Curtis Park. In time, I discovered that Curtis Park is one of the most dynamic and engaged neighborhoods in the region, and substantially more active and organized than either McKinley Park or East Sacramento. In publishing four neighborhood editions, covering more than a dozen unique neighborhoods, I’ve learned that every one of our neighborhoods has its own distinct personality. It takes time to discover that personality. The process goes much more quickly if you meet long-term neighbors who share their experiences with you. To be sure, numerous biases for and against different neighborhoods exist among neighbors. For some, it is just simple pride and a reaffirmation of the neighborhood they chose.

But others are snobby about architecture, history, location or even class. And while most people would never publicly share their biases about people of different races and cultures, they seem to have no problem disparaging other neighborhoods. When we started publishing in the Pocket and Greenhaven neighborhoods earlier this year, we selected these neighborhoods based upon their distinct neighborhood identity and strong sense of community, in addition to their home values and income levels that our advertisers find valuable.

Many factors contribute to what makes each neighborhood definable and recognizable, no matter what the income levels and property values. We were amazed when some folks from East Sac and Land Park disparaged these neighborhoods because they include gated communities (as do Arden and Carmichael) and what they consider “suburban lifestyles,” usually dropping snide comments about Natomas into their remarks.

PUBLISHER page 11

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1941 Windemere Lane, Sacramento 95864

OPEN SUNDAY 2-4 PM Custom Arden Oaks home Built in 2007 3,300 square feet (approx.) Corner lot - about 1/3 acre

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PUBLISHER FROM page 9 Or consider Oak Park, which in its early years was considered one of our city’s nicest neighborhoods. After decades of decline, it started to turn around about 10 years ago, thanks in no small part to Mayor Kevin Johnson’s redevelopment efforts before he won office. Even as Oak Park is rapidly coming into its own, the stigma of the neighborhood’s name is still hard to reverse in some people’s minds. During a community meeting last year regarding McKinley Village, one of the opposition group leaders worried aloud that the development would be another Natomas or South Sacramento and that it would become a “ghetto.” When audience applause followed that remark, I was embarrassed that members of my neighborhood would be so hostile and judgmental. Our editorial mission is to help folks get to know their neighbors and community on a deeper and more meaningful level. Many factors contribute to what makes

each neighborhood definable and recognizable, no matter what the income levels and property values. As we celebrate the Fourth of the July this year, we have charming organized parades in the neighborhoods of East Sac, River Park, Pocket, Arden Arcade and Carmichael, among others. Each one has its unique feel and experience. Neighborhood parades are a wonderful way to connect with neighbors and build positive neighborhood identities. If you’ve never attended your neighborhood parade, by all means do so this year. I consider it a privilege and honor to get to know so many wonderful people from every neighborhood we serve. Granted, there are huge differences in the unique identities of our neighborhoods. But isn’t it worth celebrating that Sacramento has so much diversity in its neighborhoods?

If you are ready for more freedom, but want more than month-to-month rental ... If you want spacious apartment or cottage living and the assurance of staying in your community should your health needs change ... If you want luxury, comfort and service in a gated retirement community ... Come to a Summer Home Tour at Eskaton Village Carmichael. Take in our beautiful 37-acre campus and imagine your life with so many exciting opportunities right outside your door. Call 916-844-2999 today! Your community. Your life. Your choice.

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Pedal Mettle INSPIRED BICYCLIST FOUNDS MOONLIGHT RIDE FUNDRAISER

and was not in the physical condition that I was used to.” He was also forced to give up his furniture wholesale business that he had spent 35 years building to be the largest of its kind in the state. One day, however, his daughter suggested a bike ride.

BY DUFFY KELLY OUT AND ABOUT ARDEN

A

rden’s Point West Rotarian Tom Slagle had always been in good shape. He golfed regularly with his wife of 45 years. He bicycled and chased after his two daughters. He racked up thousands of miles running on trails and in races over the course of four decades. But when Slagle was in his mid50s, while running he noticed his body wouldn’t do what his mind told it to. Running became so difficult he had to quit. Doctors ruled out bad hips and things such as pinched nerves, and said there was nothing structurally wrong with him. But over the course of about five years, walking also became so challenging that Slagle limped with every step. More medical testing revealed the problem. He had multiple sclerosis. There was no cure. His body would continue to deteriorate. “It was a difficult time for me,” he said. “I was out of shape and I wasn’t exercising. I gained about 15 pounds

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“I can ride my bike 80, 90, 100 miles, but I have trouble walking three blocks.” “I’ve got MS, I can’t go on a bike ride,” Slagle said to her. But she insisted. That one ride changed the rest of his life. “Walking is a very difficult thing,” he said. “There’s a lot of process in walking, but on a bicycle you basically pedal. It’s so much easier than even walking. All at once I stared riding and increased my distance. I lost 15 pounds and today my heart rate is in the 50s or 60s. My health is excellent other than I have MS. For me, it’s been a life-changer. “I can ride my bike 80, 90, 100 miles, but I have trouble walking three blocks.” The power cycling has been so inspiring to Slagle that he dreamed up a nighttime bike ride fundraiser for Point West Rotary. It’s called Lunar Lunacy. The Aug. 9 event will begin at 10 p.m. under a full moon in downtown Sacramento. Participants can choose

Tom Slagle is av avid bike rider

to ride either a 5-mile loop, a 17-mile loop or be a virtual sponsor. Proceeds will help people such as Slagle overcome physical limitations. The Society of the Blind partnered with him and Point West Rotary to host the event. Many physically or visually impaired people don’t know how life-changing, how healing, riding a bicycle can be.

“My symptoms will continue to get worse,” Slagle said. “But the best thing I can do is what I’m doing right now. Being healthy, being happy and living life like every day is a celebration.” If you would like to participate as a rider, volunteer or virtual sponsor, find more information and registration materials at lunarlunacyride.com


BIG-TIME EXPOSURE Jesuit High School’s football team has been invited to “break in” the $1 billion home of the San Francisco 49ers, Levi’s Stadium, in a nationally televised game to be played Friday, Aug. 29. The Marauders varsity squad will face De La Salle as part of the inauguration of “Friday Night Lights,” a series of prep football games that is expected to be a fall tradition for Levi’s Stadium. Kickoff is set for 8 p.m. and the entire game will be televised on ESPN2, complete with professional camera work, commentary and color analysis. All stadium concessions are expected to be open and operating in a sort of trial run for NFL games. “Levi’s Stadium was designed to showcase the best football at every level,” said Julio Fuentes, executive director of the Santa Clara Stadium Authority. “Friday night prep football is a celebrated tradition here in Santa Clara and we look forward to giving these young football players the opportunity to play on the same field as the pros.” “High school football is a great tradition that deserves to be played on the game’s biggest stage, and we look forward to sharing a special experience with these young men, their coaches, family and friends,” said 49ers CEO Jed York on the stadium’s website. In five decades Jesuit has won 22 league championships and taken two CIF Sac-Joaquin Section championships.

Tickets for the game are available at Ticketmaster and will be available on game day. The high school teams are not expected to incur rental costs or security fees. The stadium seats nearly 70,000, so there’s plenty of room for Sacramento fans. Jesuit will be announcing plans for tailgates, rallies, parties, transportation and related events on its website in mid-July.

SUMMER TUNE-UP If you are still looking for a perfect mid-summer camp, look no further than to a music camp at Northminster Presbyterian Church. From 8 a.m. to noon, July 28 through Aug. 1, first- through sixth-graders will get a chance to learn note reading, singing, creative music expression and instrumental instruction on a variety of strings and woodwinds. For students who want to play chimes or recorders, the church provides the instrument. Campers wishing to learn other instruments need to bring other their own—or can rent one from the Taylor Center on Marconi Avenue just east of Fulton Avenue. The week ends with a rousing performance of “Holy Moses,” a musical performed Sunday, Aug. 3, that showcases all the fresh new talents learned at camp. It is a modern children’s look at the highlights of Moses’ life, told through songs, jokes and vignettes. The weeklong event is $40 for those registered by July 21 and $45

after. Snacks are provided daily. Space is limited and available on a first-come, first-serve basis. To register, call the church office at 487-5192 or go to northminsteronline. org. Northminster Presbyterian is at 3235 Pope Ave.

GREEN THUMBS The Arden Park Recreation and Park District welcomes new members to its garden club, which meets September through May at 10 a.m. on the second Wednesday at 1000 La Sierra Drive. Club members share secrets of successful gardening in the Arden area, with special attention paid to working with the variety of soils, coping with the drought and what to expect from the weather in the Sacramento Valley. The club is also hosting the 2014 Garden Tour on Sept. 14. It will feature a half-dozen Arden Park home gardens. Tickets are $10 per person. Funds will be used for scholarships and ongoing community programs. The Garden Club regularly participates in a variety of community activities, including the U.S. Forest Service Reforestation Program. The club also helped fund efforts to landscape Arden Middle School during its recent renovations. Among other interests, the club is a regular sponsor of the Effie Yeaw Nature Center, the Shepherd Garden Center and the Sacramento Tree Foundation. At each meeting, club members share an informal luncheon and are invited to bring a floral arrangement.

For more information, go to ardenparkgardenclub.com

CONGRATULATIONS, SIERRA OAKS For the fourth time, Sierra Oaks Elementary School in the San Juan Unified School District has won the California Distinguished School Award. The state Department of Education cited the school for its strong commitment and innovative approaches to improving student academic achievement. The program recognizes schools that have made progress in narrowing the achievement gap. Schools that applied for recognition submitted detailed applications outlining the innovative practices they have implemented on campus. Through focused, frequent and ongoing teacher collaboration, coaching and student achievement data analysis, the school has seen performance gains among all of its students. Sierra Oaks also earned the distinction in 1987, 1998 and 2008. It is the only San Juan school to be a 2014 California Distinguished School, and one of only six in Sacramento County, said Carrie Wheeler Engh, Sierra Oaks’ incoming PTA president.

CALLING ALL ALUMS Calling all Sacramento Country Day School alums to celebrate the school’s 50th birthday.

ARDEN page 14

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Welcome FRANK KOLAFA to Coldwell Banker Sacramento Sierra Oaks. We are fortunate to be known for our extraordinary Sales Associates that distinguish us in communities all over the world, including right here in Sacramento.

Coldwell Banker. Love Where You Live. FRANK KOLAFA 440 Drake Circle, Sacramento, CA 95864 916.952.3271 frank.kolafa@gmail.com RealEstatePeddler.com CalBRE #01100143 ©2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office is Owned by a Subsidiary of NRT LLC. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage or NRT LLC. CalBRE License #01908304.

ARDEN FROM page 13 The coming school year will include a big variety of special events, parties and projects. There will be many events for current students, faculty, staff and families, as well as for alumni, alumni parents and friends. For more information and to register for events, visit the anniversary website at since1964.org

SUMMER CAMPS STILL OPEN There’s still time to get on the roster for all sorts of summer camps—not only for kids, but drop-in activities for adults. For instance, for the adults, Arden Park Recreation and Park District offers drop-in classes in zumba, jazzercise, balance, tennis and swimming throughout the summer and into the fall. For children, July sessions begin for the Skyhawks Sports Camps in baseball, basketball, football and cheerleading, all at 1000

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La Sierra Drive through the Arden Park Recreation and Park District. Also at La Sierra Park will be a July NASA camp and a science camp for children ages 7 to 11. For more information about the activities available at Arden Park, go to aprpd.org

There’s still time to get on the roster for all sorts of summer camps—not only for kids, but drop-in activities for adults. Fulton El Camino Recreation and Park District offers a host of summer events such as an outdoor movie night at 9 p.m. on July 3 at 2201 Cottage Way, and the 13th annual Fourth of

Jesuit High School’s football team has been invited to “break in” the $1 billion home of the San Francisco 49ers, Levi’s Stadium, in a nationally televised game to be played Friday, Aug. 29

July Parade at 10 a.m., starting at 2700 Fulton Ave. The community is also invited to the Stingrays Synchronized Swim Team Aquacade, a show demonstrating the Fulton-El Camino team’s aquatic routines. The event will be held at 5:30 p.m. on Aug. 13 at 3097 Cottage Way. Guests will be treated to the music, costumes and entertaining performances by area youth swimmers. For more information, email Teri deRosier at tderosier@fecrecpark.com

FOR THE KIDS Thinking ahead a bit, now is the time for parents to check out such organizations as 4-H and Scouts, and fall extracurricular activities or

joining an area teen group. To help, Inside Publications would like to provide a few phone numbers so your “fingers can do the walking.” - 4-H: 875-6811 - Boy Scouts of America: 929-1417 - Girl Scouts of the USA: 800-3224475 - North Area Teen Center: 486-9893 - Arcade Creek Park District: 4828377 - Arden Manor: 487-7851 - Arden Park: 483-6069 - Carmichael: 485-5322 - Fair Oaks: 966-1036 - Fulton-El Camino: 927-3802 Duffy Kelly can be reached at dk@ insidepublications.com n


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Kids Don’t Float

LIFE JACKET LOANERS AGAIN AVAILABLE TO PROMOTE SAFETY ON THE AMERICAN RIVER

BY SUSAN PETERS COUNTY SUPERVISOR

T

he warm weather is here and the Department of Regional Parks is anticipating a great summer of recreation on the American River. To help ensure youngsters enjoy the water safely, the American River Parkway Foundation once again is generously funding loaner life jackets available at seven sites along the American River for the 2014 Kids Don’t Float Program. This is the fourth year the foundation is providing life jackets. The foundation also has provided new signage at the life jacket distribution sites. Each sign features the message that “Kids Don’t Float,” and if they are under age 13 they must wear a floatation jacket per the Sacramento County ordinance and are invited to borrow a jacket and return it. The signs are in English, Russian and Spanish. Regional Parks has a longstanding partnership with the American River Parkway Foundation and the “Kids Don’t Float” program is an ongoing example. Together with safety partners such as the Sheriff’s Department, Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District and the Drowning Accident Rescue

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In cooperation with Sacramento County’s Department of Regional Parks, the American River Parkway Foundation is once again generously funding loaner life jackets available at seven sites along the American River for the 2014 Kids Don’t Float Program. Children under age 13 must wear a flotation life jacket by law.

Team (DART), the department and foundation hope everyone is reminded that safety comes first in and around our waterways. Parents and guardians are encouraged to purchase life jackets for their children prior to going to the parkway to enjoy the water. However, if that isn’t possible or if the life jacket is forgotten at home, all are welcome to borrow and return them at any of the seven sites including Ancil Hoffman Park, Howe Avenue,

Sunrise and Watt Avenue Accesses or at participating Metro Fire stations. For more information about the program, go to regionalparks. saccounty.net

PARADES, FUN AND FIREWORKS There will be an abundance of neighborhood activities to celebrate the Fourth of July.

Arden Arcade will hold its annual parade celebration that starts at 10 a.m., kicking off at the Sacramento County Building, 2700 Fulton Ave. The route goes south past El Camino Avenue and turns on Cottage Way continuing west to Bell Street, where it will turn north and finish at Howe Park. Afterward there will be food and family activities at the park. Carmichael’s celebration kicks off with a pancake breakfast sponsored by the Kiwanis Club from 7 to 11 a.m.


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at Carmichael Park, followed by the 56th annual Elks Club Parade on Fair Oaks Boulevard starting at 10:30 a.m. at Marconi Avenue and continuing to Manzanita and Cypress avenues. The parade features floats, antique automobiles, marching bands, equestrian entries, and much more. Carmichael also will experience fireworks lighting up the evening at the La Sierra Community Center, 5325 Engle Road. The first sky rocket is expected to go off at approximately 9:30 p.m. And starting at 7 p.m. there will be plenty of activities before the big show, including music, food trucks and free children’s activities including arts and crafts, inflatables and a puppet theater.

FIGHT THE BITE Congratulations to Kara Catellier, a student at Sierra Oaks School whose artwork was chosen to be in the Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito and Vector Control District’s 2015 Fight the Bite

Artwork by Kara Catellier, a student at Sierra Oaks School, was chosen to be in the Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito and Vector Control District‘s 2015 Fight the Bite calendar which will be distributed later this year. She was one of more than 3,100 entries and placed first in the 4-6 grade category as part of this year’s art contest for students in grades K-12. Winning entries were based on creativity, originality and the ability to effectively communicate one or more of the district’s mosquito prevention tips.

PETERS page 18

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PETERS FROM page 17 calendar, which will be distributed later this year. Her entry was submitted in the 4-6 grade category as part of this year’s art contest for students in grades K-12 that encourages children to use art and creatively design a calendar page promoting “Fight the Bite.” The program encourages everyone to prevent mosquitoes by practicing key messages such as draining standing water and using mosquito repellent. Kara’s poster’s message is very timely because West Nile Virus, a disease transmitted by infected mosquitoes, was confirmed in the Sacramento region in May To help stop the spread of WNV, the public is encouraged to report dead birds by calling the California Department of Public Health hotline at 877-WNV-BIRD (877-968-2473) or online at westnile.ca.gov In 2013, 15 deaths and 379 human WNV cases were reported in California.

ATTACKING ILLICIT PARLORS We’ve all seen them, the small, dark store-fronts with blackened windows advertising “massage” popping up in many strip centers. Notably different than health spas or legitimate massage operations, these shady fronts are often covers for illicit goings-on, including prostitution and human trafficking. Recently the Board of Supervisors voted unanimously to approve changes to the Business License code that will assist in preventing these illicit businesses from proliferating. The new ordinance, effective in this month and applicable to the unincorporated area, will prohibit the approval of massage business licenses for a period of one year in any location where a previous massage establishment had been closed due to illicit activity. This change was needed because the old “revolving door” method of dealing with massage parlors was not working. As soon as the Sheriff’s Department closed down an illegal operation, it would reopen under

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The County Animal Shelter reminds you that leaving a pet left in a vehicle can quickly turn deadly on warm days. Even with the windows cracked, the temperature inside a parked car can jump 20 degrees in just 10 minutes.

another name and owner. As a result, action was needed to stop the cycle while avoiding negatively impacting legitimate massage operations. To break the cycle of “ownership flips,” the ordinance provides that if a massage operation is closed down for illicit activity, the property owner will be barred from leasing to another massage business but free to lease to any other type of business allowed in that land use zone. A review of the licensing history of several trouble spots indicated that no legitimate massage business had attempted to occupy the premises after an illicit one was closed. Because there is no evidence legitimate massage businesses backfill space formerly occupied by illicit ones, the ordinance will not harm the legitimate industry. The restriction should reduce the blight and neighborhood issues that arise from illicit activity and encourage property owners to lease to other types of businesses. This is not a quick fix, but it is a step forward in the county’s ongoing efforts to weed out these bad apples and make our neighborhood commercial areas better. In April the Sheriff’s Department North Area Problem Oriented Policing (POP) Team raided 10 massage parlors that were under investigation, which resulted in the arrest of seven people. Their business licenses and permits were taken as evidence, which resulted in

their temporary closure. As a result there is an administrative process the business owners will likely go through in order to determine if their business license will be suspended permanently. Having this new ordinance will strengthen efforts to permanently close these illicit businesses. There are also building and safety issues because often makeshift walls and improvements are made to the office space to accommodate the massage operations with no permits and little regard for safety.

HOOVES TO THE RESCUE Beginning in mid-May, Arden Arcade residents going by the Wilhaggin Detention Basin off American River Drive probably spotted an unusual sight: goats and sheep. Why? Because the Department of Water Resources is using these animals as a natural way to remove vegetation from overbank areas along neighborhood creeks and floodplain areas. Goats will eat almost any vegetation, including blackberry, star thistle, and other invasive species. With continued use the goats will remove thousands of pounds of vegetation as opposed to mowing. This will help relieve clogging and debris accumulating in our creeks during storm season. The detention basin was selected for the pilot project because this 10-

acre area is challenging to clear due to dense growth of brush, grass and weeds and is surrounded by chainlink fencing on all sides. Goats can negotiate steep terrain, work near wetlands and creek areas (where spraying herbicides or using heavy, gas-powered equipment isn’t feasible or desirable), and the critters are relatively quiet. KD Goat Ranch is the contractor for the project and it is anticipated that approximately 150 head of goat and sheep have been grazing during their stay at the detention basin. If all goes well, herds may appear elsewhere in the unincorporated area.

PROTECT YOUR PETS The Sacramento County Animal Shelter reminds you that a pet left in a vehicle can quickly dehydrate on warm days. Even with the windows cracked, the temperature inside a parked car can jump 20 degrees in 10 minutes. Being outdoors in temperatures over 90 degrees also can be dangerous. It is important to provide your pet with shade and plenty of water if you can’t bring your furry four-legged friend inside. For more hot weather pet tips, go to animalcare.saccounty. net And remember that fireworks can be very stressful for your pet, causing fear and anxiety. Sadly, the volume of missing pets significantly increases during the Fourth of July holiday. Leaving a pet outside unattended even in a fenced yard or on a chain can lead to disastrous consequences. In their fear, pets who normally would not leave the yard may escape and become lost, or become entangled in their chain, risking injury or death. Also, please make sure your pets are wearing identification tags so if they become lost, they can be returned home promptly.

MUSICAL FUN Enjoy the summer nights by attending free concerts at Carmichael Park during July and continuing into August, and plan to visit the Foothill PETERS page 20


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PETERS FROM page 18 Farms area, too, for an encore outdoor performance in October. Each summer concert will be held at Carmichael Park, 5750 Grant Ave. This month’s fun starts on Sunday, July 6, with swing music performed by the band Metro Swing. A total of eight concerts will be held every Sunday at the park through Aug. 24. A variety of music will be offered, including classic rock, rhythm and blues, 50’s rock ’n’ roll, and dance band tunes. And there will be four Saturday night concerts starting on July 12 with the musical group On Air featuring classic rock with power horns. Two weeks later, on July 26, you can enjoy the music of Mick Martin and Blues Rockers. On Saturday, Aug. 9, listen to the Count performing classic rock of the 1960s to ’90s with a little soul. The final Saturday performance will be on Aug. 23 and showcase Bad Catz, a band playing rockin’ rhythm and blues. All Carmichael concerts start at 6:30 p.m. The summer concert series sponsors include both the Carmichael and Mission Oaks Recreation and Park Districts. A list of all the bands can be obtained by going to carmichaelpark.com The Old Foothill Farms area will be the site of an encore “Concert in the Park” on Saturday, Oct. 11, at Pioneer Park, 5100 Verner Ave. near Pioneer School. This event is being co-sponsored by Sacramento County and the Sunrise Recreation and Park District. The fun begins at 1 p.m. with the concert from 2 to 4 p.m. featuring the John Skinner Band. And remember the best way to enjoy any of these outdoor concerts is to bring a picnic, blanket and lawn chairs.

CONCERTS IN FAIR OAKS, TOO! There are free Thursday night concerts in Fair Oaks Village continuing through August. Each performance is at Village Park, with all shows beginning at 7 pm. This musical series is sponsored by the Fair Oaks Chamber of Commerce,

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Sacramento County’s Department of Transportation recently conducted its Spring 2014 Pothole Sweep which identified and filled 3,250 potholes in District 3. The sweep is performed twice each year: in late spring to repair potholes cause by inclement winter weather and in the fall to ready road surfaces for the storm season. If you know about a pothole, there is a simple way to report it by calling one number: 311.

Fair Oaks Recreation and Park District, and Fair Oaks Foundation for Leisure and the Arts. For a complete listing of the bands, go to fairoakschamber.com

PARKWAY ALCOHOL BAN This Fourth of July through July 6 there will be a complete ban on alcohol consumption and possession both on land and in the water within the American River Parkway between Hazel and Watt avenues. An exception exists for Ancil Hoffman Golf Course. In past years summer holiday weekends had become major problems along the American River, making the parkway less of a familyfriendly outing because of fights, public nudity, profanity and littering. The Board of Supervisors restored decorum beginning with the 2006 Labor Day weekend, and the ban is also applicable for Independence Day as well as Memorial Day. Since the restriction has taken effect, families I have talked with have expressed appreciation for making these holiday weekends once again a time for everyone to enjoy the American River Parkway.

NEW SHERIFF SERVICE CENTER Volunteers In Partnership with the Sheriff (VIPS) are ready to assist

residents of the unincorporated area in need of help at the new Sheriff’s Service Center located in the Safeway Shopping Center at Dewey Drive and Madison Avenue. VIPS are trained, dedicated and trusted volunteers who perform a variety of assignments for the Sheriff’s Department. In addition to having completed the required orientation and training, each VIP possesses a clear criminal history and has passed a required background investigation as well as demonstrated good moral character and reputation. Since 1993, the Sheriff’s Department has relied on these helpers. The new service center is administered part time by Sgt. Dean Pai and is open for business three days a week: from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays and Fridays, and from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Wednesdays. The office telephone number is 903-7480. And with summer here, please think about utilizing the Sheriff’s Vacation Watch Program, a home security check service performed by VIPs while you are away on vacation. For more information, go to sacsheriff.com

LIMITS ON PANHANDLING Panhandling is a problem and poses a safety concern especially when done on street medians with traffic,

freeway ramps, etc. And for many of us, aggressive panhandling near ATMs, banks and gasoline stations can be intimidating and threatening. In recognition of that, the Board of Supervisors in May adopted an ordinance to address aggressive panhandling in the unincorporated area similar to laws that exist in the cities of Sacramento, Citrus Heights, Elk Grove, Rancho Cordova and Galt. The first two violations under the ordinance will be treated as infractions, requiring an appearance in traffic court. A third infraction within six months of the last one will be treated as a misdemeanor, potentially subjecting someone to under a year in jail if prosecuted (prosecution is at the discretion of the Sacramento County District Attorney). Capt. Matt Morgan, who is in charge of the Sheriff’s North Division that serves the unincorporated area north of the American River, says deputies are spending the first 60 days since the ordinance took effect in June 12 informing panhandlers about the new law, including handing out information listing nearby charities where they can seek assistance. The ordinance expressly prohibits solicitations at ATMs, near an entrance or exit of any financial institution, gasoline stations, toward persons operating or occupying a motor vehicle within 200 feet of an intersection or located within 35 feet of a driveway of a shopping center, retail or business establishment, as well as on any public transportation vehicle or within 50 feet of any designated transit stop. While panhandling is viewed as a protected form of free speech, the ordinance has been crafted to comply with the First Amendment.

TARGETING POTHOLES If you know about a pothole, there is a simple way to report it by calling one number: 311. Your call can help Sacramento County’s Department of Transportation, which recently conducted its Spring 2014 Pothole


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Sweep. That’s an intensified effort to identify and repair potholes, and is part of continuous efforts to improve preventative maintenance activities for roadways in the unincorporated area. Pothole sweeps are performed twice each year: in late spring to repair potholes caused by inclement winter weather, and in the fall to ready road surfaces for the storm season. The most recent effort identified and filled 3,250 potholes in District 3. There are more than 5,400 lane miles of paved roadway in the unincorporated area. Annually, 970 potholes are reported to Sacramento County. In addition to those reports, SACDOT has an ongoing program that checks road conditions, resulting in 41,000 potholes on average being repaired each year. While calling 311 can be used for potholes, residents can also use the phone number for a range of issues, from reporting a stray animal to illegal dumping, or graffiti on a public building. And now on the new

smartphone app (available in the app store for Apple and Android users), you can take a picture of the issue and attach it to your report from your phone. Never remember another county number again—call 311! Customer service representatives are available from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays to answer questions, route calls and manage cases for verification and resolution.

SUPPORT THE PARKWAY The American River Parkway is a unique 23-milelong natural resource that provides a quick escape from the stress of urban life and offers plenty of outdoor recreational amenities. It is a public asset worth protecting and preserving. Please show your support by purchasing a yearlong unlimited Parks Pass. This convenient annual parking/day use pass is great for joggers, bicyclists as well as outdoor and nature enthusiasts who frequent

the parkway. The pass costs only $50 per year, and pays for itself with 10 trips. Passes are sold at the American River Parkway Foundation Office in the William B. Pound Recreation Area and online at arpf.org Susan Peters represents the Third District on the Sacramento County Board of Supervisors. She can be reached at susanpeters@saccounty.net n

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The Misunderstood Pit Bull BRINGING HOME A DOG WITH A BAD REP AND A SWEET DISPOSITION

BY R. E. GRASWICH

kennels. She read the information

CITY BEAT

A

cards. Both dogs had been at the shelter for about three months.

year or two after our

Neither looked sinister. They were

family dog, a stray German

sort of cute. Elizabeth agreed to meet

shepherd named Jade, died

them, one at a time, in the socializing

a peaceful death from old age, my

yard, a fenced area at the back of the

wife Elizabeth decided we needed

shelter.

a new family pet. There were

Coconut arrived first. Aloof, calm

three conditions. The new dog

and indifferent, she did nothing to

had to be female. She had to be an

sell herself. Fair enough. Next we

orphan from the city’s Front Street

brought out Paisley. She sniffed us,

Animal Shelter. And she had to be

then patrolled the fence line, nose to

something other than a pit bull.

the ground, tail wagging, enjoying her

My wife had never been around pit

freedom. She came back and sniffed

bulls. She had no personal experience

us again. She was pleased to be out of

with the breed. She just didn’t like

her kennel but didn’t want to make

them. Her prejudice was the classic

any emotional attachments, as if she

type that grows from the toxic

had been disappointed by people and

brew of myth and fear and media

wasn’t ready for more rejection.

reports and legends, some true, some

My wife looked at me and said,

embroidered, some lies, all repeated

“What do you think?” Before I could

relentlessly until they harden into

answer, she said, “I want her.”

accepted fact.

Paisley, to judge from her

I was in no position to argue.

astonishingly white teeth, was about

Pit bulls can be dangerous. They

1 year old. She was not spayed, a

are extraordinarily powerful. Their

condition that under shelter laws

strength can intensify negative

would have to change before she

consequences of behavior that would

could come home. We paid our fees

be considered normal in other breeds.

Elizabeth Graswich and Madeleine Rose

Many of them have been notoriously tormented by sadistic human captors

the smallest opening and dash madly

up in the shelter, and, well, you’re

and exploited for violence.

through the shelter. They have done

going to run into a lot of them.”

There was another consideration. By the time my wife was ready for

this to me twice.)

The warning didn’t bother

and were instructed to return in four days, after surgery. On the appropriate day, Paisley was handed over. We were warned she was raw from surgery and would

Elizabeth. Determined to rescue a

be groggy and sensitive. (She was

fair to warn my wife before we toured

shelter dog, she pressed ahead. She

neither, oblivious to her scar.) We

the shelter: We will see pit bulls,

counted on the fill-in-the-blanks to

were required to sign up for pit bull

shelter for a few years. I had taken

more pit bulls, a few fill-in-the-blank

make her day.

training classes.

dog-handling classes and knew how

breeds, a Chihuahua or three, and pit

to safely remove a 65-pound pit

bulls. I told her: “It’s not the shelter’s

the first two young females we saw

easy. Madeleine Rose—we ditched

bull from his kennel, leash him and

fault, but pit bulls are really overbred

were Coconut and Paisley, both brown

the name Paisley—ate two wooden

take him for a walk. (Pit bulls are

in Sacramento, and a lot of them end

and white, about 50 pounds. Clearly

door moldings and chewed on the

pit bulls. Elizabeth peered into the

leg of an antique bedroom bureau.

her new dog, I had been serving as a volunteer at the Front Street

far easier to remove than a trio of Chihuahuas, which can bolt through

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IA JUL n 14

Thus experienced, I thought it only

When we entered the kennel area,

I won’t say the first few weeks were

In late afternoon, she would become


Congratulations to our 2014 Spring Smile Essay Winners!!!

Runner up in 8-10 year old age group: Elena Grohs from Mrs. Harding's class at Blue Oak Elementary!

Runner up in 11-14 year old age group: Shelly Schwarzbart from Mrs. Liby's class at Sierra Oaks!

Grand Prize iPad Winner for 11-14 year old age group: Clare Epolite from Mrs. Hale's class at St. Mary Elementary

Grand Prize iPad Winner for 8-10 year old age group: Divya Mamidi from Mrs. Hales' class at Mary A. Deterding Elementary

Thank you to everyone who participated! We SMILED reading through all of the entries and enjoyed them so much that we are happy to announce we will be running our next essay contest this Fall! Look for updates and details on our website and our social media accounts! Call our ofÀce today to schedule your complimentary orthodontic consultation.Visit us at either of our convenient locations in Sacramento and Roseville, California

3406 American River Drive, Suite E, Sacramento, CA 95864 • 486-4233 125 B Ascot Drive, Roseville, CA 95661 • 786-2442 AmericanRiverOrthodontics.com comically possessed, like Curly from The Three Stooges. She raced around the house, crashed into furniture,

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spun in circles and froze with a surprised look on her face, panting. One afternoon, she raced around and leaped onto the dining room table. We attended classes with other pit

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What’s In Your Mattress? EUROPEAN SLEEP DESIGN PRIDES ITSELF ON OFFERING GREATER DURABILITY, COMFORT

BY JESSICA LASKEY SHOPTALK

A

dmit it. If you’ve had your mattress for at least a few years, perhaps even less, you’ve probably already noticed that dreaded “two dips and a hump” bedscape that is all too familiar to conventional mattress owners. Save kicking out your bed partner (“Sorry, Hon, you make the mattress sag”), what’s an uncomfortable sleeper to do? Jill and Chip Huckaby, owners of European Sleep Design, are out to fix that failed mattress model once and for all. “You’re only as good as your weakest link,” Jill Huckaby says, “and polyurethane foam (traditional mattress cushioning) is the weakest link.” Huckaby explains that conventional companies—she rattles off their names, and I definitely recognize my own mattress maker in that list—all use polyurethane (read: synthetic) foam cushioning as the top layer of their products. “It’s the egg crate-looking stuff,” Huckaby says. “Memory foam is also polyurethane, just denser and heat sensitive. Densities can vary. The softer, lesser-quality poly will compress faster, but if it’s really hard it’s not comfortable to lay on. “Other companies are trying to sell you a $2,000 to $3,000 mattress that looks like it’s two-stories high, but they’re using foam to build it up. You bought that 24-inch mattress, which just means there are more layers of cheap foam inside.”

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IA JUL n 14

Jill and Chip Huckaby are the owners of European Sleep Design

Deflated density is one thing, but Huckaby also explains that polyurethane is made of petrochemicals, products that release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as the mattress ages, not to mention the flame-retardant chemicals that are added to meet fire resistance laws. But what if you’ve been smart and instead of relying on layers of foam, you’ve sprung for a spring mattress? Metal coils can’t fail, right? “The coils are tempered steel for rigidity,” Huckaby explains. “If you cut open a 5-, 10-, 20-year-old mattress, the coils are still usable, but

the steel is so hard, it just holds your body mass up. It’s not conforming. The foam on top is where the contour support comes from, and in short order, within months of purchase, it starts to compress and form body impressions.” Huckaby is not trying to be an alarmist, but it is pretty frightening to think about all the compounds we could be ingesting just by trying to get a good night’s sleep. With all these scary stats, what’s the solution for true beauty rest? “We’re not your typical mattress store,” Huckaby says. “We bring our

components in from Europe. The German and Swedish designs are more advanced, they put more effort into building products for durability and performance with natural, nontoxic materials.” So how much better built is a European Sleep Design mattress? “When you come in, you can feel and see the difference,” Huckaby says. “We’re a full-disclosure company. All our mattresses have a zippered cover so you can inspect the internal organs of your mattress. The cover is made of knit organic cotton backed by a layer SHOPTALK page 26


Actual Wilhaggin home. Jonathan Perez Photography

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SHOPTALK FROM page 24 of organic Merino wool, which means it has the pliability to conform to your body contours. “Wool wicks moisture to keep your temperature regulated and acts as a natural fire barrier; flame retardants on other mattresses are known carcinogens, but our materials are all Öeko-Tex certified nontoxic. “Next is a layer of all-natural latex that we source from Holland, which provides greater elasticity and a better feel. Then there are up to 3,500 micro coils—the support layers— from Germany and Sweden, which are high-grade steel and smaller in diameter than traditional coils so they can nest like a honeycomb. They’re individually pocketed, which makes them very flexible and map very closely to your body.” The final foundation of the mattress is a suspension system of flexible wooden slats that are entirely customizable to the sleeper’s support needs, even with two very different snoozers in one bed. So what are you waiting for? Your best, most natural, comfortable sleep is just a mattress away. Ready for some high-quality Zs? Contact the Huckabys at European Sleep Design at 989-8909, go to sleepdesign.com or visit the Folsom showroom at 6606 Folsom-Auburn Road.

YARD DUTY “After 30-plus years, you get to know a lot of people,” says Steve Demetre, owner and operator of Demetre Landscapes. That person-toperson connection is what has kept Demetre in business since 1984. “I’d always been interested in landscaping,” Demetre says, “so when I left Bell Hardware Nursery & Landscape,” which he’d owned with his brother, Doug, since 1979, “I decided to start my own business.” He loaded up on horticulture classes at California State University, Sacramento, American River College and UC Davis Extension so that when he and his business partner started Demetre Landscaping, he was more than ready.

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Steve Demetre is the owner and operator of Demetre Landscapes

Now, Demetre counts clients in numerous neighborhoods, including Rancho Cordova, the Pocket, Land Park, Curtis Park, Tahoe Park, East Sacramento, Fair Oaks, Carmichael and Citrus Heights, to name a few, and a stellar record with the Better Business Bureau. “I operate on the premise that people are willing to wait patiently if they know you’re going to do a good job,” Demetre says. “We stay on the job 100 percent until it’s done. We don’t have two or three jobs going at one time. I work with the crew so it’s done right the first time. “We’ve made a lot of people happy.” So happy, in fact, that Demetre often does repeat business. Where he did a front yard, he’s called back “a year or 10” later to complete the backyard. The company can tackle so many yard issues that it’s no wonder he’s so busy all the time: he and his crew handle irrigation, planting, sod, lighting, drainage, pruning, you name it—just no hardscaping. “I’m 66 years old. I don’t do that anymore,” Demetre says with a laugh. The workload got even harder nine years ago, when his business partner died. “He used to run the crew, but now it’s all me,” Demetre says. “I’ll drive the big loading truck before 2 p.m. and then switch to a smaller truck to do bids and repairs.” And some tasks aren’t even landscape-related: Demetre regularly

has customers call and ask his advice on where to find household items. Like with his landscaping, Demetre always takes the time to give his clients as much attention and accuracy as possible. “It’s a comfort zone people have with me,” Demetre says. “As you can imagine, I’ve been doing this for a long time. I’ve learned a lot over the years. “And things run smoother when you’ve been doing it so long.” Does your yard need some sprucing up? Call Demetre Landscapes at 6488455 or go to demetrelandscapes.com

HER JUST DESSERTS “Bakers share,” Marlene Goetzler says. “We’re very generous with information.” Goetzler should know. As the coowner (with her husband, Walter) of the popular Freeport Bakery for the past 27 years, Goetlzer knows how far the exchange of information—recipes, business tips—can go toward making a bakery business soar. This acute acumen is perhaps part of the reason Goetzler was tapped this year to be president of Retail Bakers of America (RBA), a job that’s just as sweet as it sounds. “The RBA has about 550 members and we focus on certification and education for bakers, including webinars and road shows,” says Goetzler, who has served on the RBA board for the past seven years.

“We have a service called Baker to Baker, a Web-based support group you can come to if you’re having a problem with an employee, if you have a question about a formula or a piece of equipment you’re using. The only thing we don’t discuss is pricing.” The group’s goal of bolstering bakers across the country is a challenging one and requires a lot of infrastructure, which is why when Goetzler took the reins, she had her work cut out for her. “The current board is just amazing,” Goetzler says, “but when I first became involved with the RBA, the building (we’d had) 10 years ago in Washington, D.C., was gone, we only had four part-time employees”— down from 20 full-time—“and the money was almost gone. We were looking at closing it down. We were even talking to an attorney, but we decided to give it one more try and worked with a strategic planner and participated in full-day workshops back East. “We just kept asking ourselves, ‘What do bakers want?’ ” The teamwork and dedication paid off. Not only is the RBA still in business, it’s thriving. Its widespread membership keeps Goetzler traveling frequently to attend the road shows that she sees as the backbone of the RBA’s mission. “We used to do a big trade show every year, but had to eliminate that for the expense,” Goetzler says. “Now that people can find and buy equipment online, the trade shows lost momentum. But we also lost the connection with people. Road shows allow you to network, to support each other and learn.” In her new role as president, Goetzler travels to as many shows as she can, from Tucson to Long Island. But she wouldn’t change her busy schedule for the world. “As president, I’m going to support them,” Goetzler says. “We do hands-on workshops, bakery tours, educational classes and vendor display areas for local vendors. We try to go to places that have lots of bakeries but that don’t get the chance to go to big shows.


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HAVE “INSIDE,” WILL TRAVEL 1. Erla Goller, Gina Viani, Diane Grenz, and Carolyn Chatfield in Machu Picchu, Peru 2. Jini Bauer, Carol Bass, Patti Malhoski, Marijana Pavic, Ginny Douglas, Pat Ingoglia, Dorothy Calkins, Nancy Harris, Cindy Daugherty, Vicki Silverbach, Eileen Hayes, Lynn Hall, Barbara Bussey at the Kasbah du Toubkal retreat, Atlas Mountains, Imlil, Morocco 3. Roma Heerhartz next to the sculpture of Gregorius of Nin in Split, Croatia 4. Charla King, Marilyn Poindexter, and Marsha Geremia in Ireland 5. River City Chorale of Sacramento toured the Rhine River singing in various venues 6. Bryan and Brooke Hill at Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris, France

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Moving Past Trauma FORMER REFUGEE HELPS FELLOW IMMIGRANTS FIND A SAFE HARBOR IN SACRAMENTO

BY TERRY KAUFMAN LOCAL HEROES

M

arius Koga is an expert on the traumatic effects of war, deprivation, dislocation and transplantation. He has spent years studying posttraumatic stress disorder, tracking the psychological landscape of refugee populations resettled in the United States and writing scholarly works on the science behind the debilitating brain changes that plague these populations. He holds degrees in medicine and public health from prestigious universities and is a well-respected international expert on PTSD. Even if he didn’t have these credentials, Koga would be an expert: He spent more than a decade imprisoned, beaten and tortured in postwar Romania, where he incurred the wrath of the Communist government for speaking out against the psychological control of political dissidents. He fled under cover of night in 1989 to a refugee camp in Serbia, leaving behind everything he had known, then found his way to the United States, a land of both opportunity and lack of interest. “We refugees come from cultures with a communal mentality,” he observes. “In the American system, there is no

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Marius Koga is an expert on the traumatic effects of war, deprivation, dislocation and transplantation

discrimination; everybody is equally disregarded.” For immigrants whose wounds are still fresh, that sink-or-swim mentality is one more nightmare with which they must cope. Koga himself struggled with the demons of his immigrant experience while establishing a career, as well as a home for his wife and two children, in Sacramento. He knew that he was

more fortunate that most. “These refugees move from pre-migration trauma to post-migration stress,” he says. In addition to a new language, they are expected to learn a new culture, new ways of interacting, new definitions of right and wrong. Men who once held important jobs and supported families find themselves emasculated by a system in which they have no jobs, no stature and no

power. Depression, domestic violence and divorce are epidemic. “Those who make it do so only after years of trial and tribulation,” says Koga. Koga ended up using his own immigrant experience to change the way California’s health system manages these fragile communities. As the director of refugee health research for UC Davis’s School of Medicine, he oversees a system that is tracking, in real time, the mental health of large groups of immigrants across the state. Physicians at nine major county clinics are capturing data on the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and disparities among patients and transmitting it to Koga’s team. “We’re getting a GPS on the lives of refugees,” he says, “profiling them and seeing pathologies.” He also founded VIRTIS, the Veteran, Immigrant and Refugee Trauma Institute of Sacramento, a nonprofit whose logo is Odysseus’s ship. Like Odysseus, immigrants must undergo a huge transformation to survive and move beyond their pasts. Koga compares the recently arrived refugee to a glass of wine into which poison has been introduced: “No matter how much you dilute it, you won’t get the poison out. There is no way to heal unless you adopt a completely different paradigm,” he says. Treatment must address “not just wounding of the brain, but wounding of the soul.” Funded by Koga and other volunteers, VIRTIS provides critical services and resources to refugees, including free psychological counseling, mentoring by former refugees with similar backgrounds, HEROES page 33


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law office of brian d.wyatt ,PC HEROES FROM page 30 and training for educators and law enforcement personnel who regularly interact with refugees. Koga receives no salary for his work; it is a labor of love. He points with pride to the partnership between VIRTIS and UC Davis Medical School. “We want to recruit others to underwrite this work,” he says. “My biggest challenge is ensuring that VIRTIS will continue even if people leave. I want to translate it into a model that is bigger, wiser and smarter.” The organization’s original focus on refugees from Eastern Europe has expanded to encompass refugees from Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan and other turbulent regions. VIRTIS is steeling itself for an influx of Syrian refugees over the next few years. For Koga, the stories continue to resonate. “I was a refugee myself,” he says. “I remember the border guards and the dogs. I look at everyone as myself. I hear stories of loss, grief, trauma, confusion. My years of imprisonment are nothing compared to what I hear.”

He sees an even deeper purpose to his work. “I’ve written about the anatomy of evil, and my work with refugees keeps me close to the source of evil,” says Koga. “I have empathy but also a desire to fight the enemy. I want to get beyond what happened to me and ask, ‘How is it possible for people to do this?’” For more information about VIRTIS, go to virtis-ptsd.org

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Trash to Treasure POWER INN ART PROJECT TURNS DUMPSTERS INTO CANVASES

BY DEBRA BELT ARTIST SPOTLIGHT

I

t was going to be a great idea or we were going to become a laughingstock,” says Sally Freedlander, vice chair of the Power Inn Alliance board of directors, about the Art of the Dumpster project on display this summer at 3101 Power Inn Road. A look at the dumpsters painted by 10 regional artists confirms that it is a brilliant idea. From bold to cool to glistening chrome, the lowly receptacles have been transformed into symbols of creativity and possibility. “To see what these artists did, how they took one thing and turned it into something completely different, is just one small example of what we can do with our surroundings,” Freedlander says. Commissioned by Power Inn Alliance, which advocates for the Power Inn business and transportation triangle, and curated by Sacramento Metropolitan Arts Commission, Art of the Dumpster brings together artists Brenda Louie, Nathan Cordero, Waylon Homer, John Berger, Gioia Fonda, Jim Piskoti, Mark Emerson, Joy Bertinuson, Robert Ortbal and Susan Silvester in an exhibit in which 22-foot-long dumpsters serve as their canvases. Each artist brought a different approach to the project. Together, the works form a cohesive statement of ingenuity. Emerson, a veteran painter, transferred his trademark bold and geometric style to an Atlas Disposal dumpster using exterior house paint

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The Art of the Dumpster project on display this summer at 3101 Power Inn Road features artwork by 10 regional artists

"Bulldozer with Passengers" by John Piskoti


Joy Bertinuson created a functional piece inspired by a parklet, which invites visitors to sit down and relax

and 11 daring colors including black, turquoise, orange and light pink. This, he says, is the largest piece he’s ever worked on. The dumpster was “rusty and dirty,” he says, but he wiped it down, scraped off the Atlas label and went to work, spending about six weeks to lay down a double coat of paint and pattern. Silvester went after her dumpster with a spray washer and primer paint. “There was rust and gunk and the surface was slick,” she says. Using house paint and acrylics, Silvester created an elaborate forest scene with dreamlike characters. One side depicts daytime in pale green and blue. On the other side, nighttime is rendered in deep blues. “I don’t see it as a dumpster,” Silvester says. “It’s another surface, a blank space that needed painting.” Piskoti, a retired art professor, tapped into the trash aspect of his

dumpster. Large yellow bulldozers dominate the surface of his work, and purple mountains of garbage make up the background. Seagulls and a skunk watch over the scene. LED lights extend upward to indicate puffs of smoke from the bulldozers. “I remember going to the city dump,” he says, “and I was struck by this surreal apocalyptic scene of garbage and bulldozers and seagulls. It was an out-of-this-world experience, and it’s played out every day all over the world.” Piskoti’s visual commentary reflects the active industry in the Power Inn area, which Freedlander describes as a center for innovation, green jobs and repurposing. The area’s Atlas Disposal is on the “cutting edge of trash, using anaerobic digestion for waste management and employing food waste to run trucks,” she says. “The DUMPSTERS page 37

Bertinuson's dumpster is one of two with artwork both inside and outside. John Stuart Berger's creation can be seen in the background.

"Feliz Cumpleaños Solo Madera" by Gioia Fonda

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DUMPSTERS FROM page 35 Art of the Dumpster project initiates inventive thinking and uses art, business and advocacy to draw people into the heartbeat of the Power Inn area.” Ortbal says this was a different kind of project that called for a different kind of approach. He sorted through 10 possible ideas and opted to have his dumpster painted in chrome. Working with Sacramento Chrome & Paint, Ortbal specified a line near the bottom of the dumpster that shows the original surface in varying degrees. “I was trying to get at perceiving the world in a different way—our ethereal nature versus our corporal nature,” he explains. It’s a conceptual piece with a lot of nuance. Chrome is a highly reflective surface that functions like a mirror, tapping into our narcissistic tendencies. (Some people may check their reflection when viewing the piece.) Ortbal also predicts that the photographic appeal of the chrome piece will be a magnet for social media.

With all the work and creativity invested in the project, one question looms: What will happen to the dumpsters after this summer’s exhibit? Emerson says he wouldn’t mind if his dumpster returned to its original purpose. But according to Freedlander, it will be impossible to send the dumpsters back to their former life. “We plan to take the collection and sprinkle it throughout the Power Inn community at entry and focal points,” she says. “Our next task is to identify areas and work with landowners to place the art there. We are very optimistic.” Freedlander says she hopes the art will encourage community dialogue and interaction all summer long with Second Saturday celebrations July 12 and Aug. 9 and free public access from sunup to sundown every day through Aug. 30. For more information about Art of the Dumpster, go to powerinn.org/art

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Pretty as a Picture THESE CLUBBERS LOVE TO PAINT ON PORCELAIN

BY GWEN SCHOEN THE CLUB LIFE

Y

ou can do this,” said a confident Bonnie Lee Boeck. “You just need to know a few techniques.” I am quite certain that producing the beautiful painted porcelain pieces filling Boeck’s Auburn home takes a bit more than knowing a few techniques. How about a steady hand, an eye for color, a skill for creating balance and more than a little artistic talent? I’m not sure I could produce such amazing art if it were paint-bynumbers. If it truly is possible for anyone to create porcelain art, where would you begin? Boeck, a member of Camellia City Porcelain Artists, whipped out a list of members in the area who teach in their home studios. That’s how she got started painting 17 years ago. During a long recovery from an illness, her husband decided she needed something to occupy her time, so he introduced her to a porcelain artist and teacher in the Bay Area. “I was instantly hooked,” said Boeck, who has since moved to Auburn. “Then I got my mother involved and she became addicted as well.”

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Bonnie Lee Boeck, a member of Camellia City Porcelain Artists, started painting 17 years ago.

“Really, you could do it,” she persisted. “First, you sprinkle out powdered paint. Blend it with medium. Load your brush and then gently draw the brush across the porcelain in a curved line. See how easy?” I wasn’t convinced. A few years ago, I tried my hand at painting ceramics. “Absolutely not the same thing,” Boeck scolded. “Ceramics is a craft. This is art. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter deemed porcelain painting an art, not a craft. The resolution, passed by Congress, states

that ‘the art of painting on porcelain requires great skill, intensive training and great artistic ability and produces works of beauty.’” OK, then. I am forever destined to be a crafter. “Porcelain painting starts with a white porcelain surface which has been glazed. The powdered paints used are mineral based,” Boeck explained. “After the paint has been mixed with a medium, it is applied to the porcelain with a soft brush, just as you would when painting a canvas. Porcelain paint, which is done in

very thin layers, is applied in stages, working light to dark. After each layer, the porcelain is kiln fired, then repainted and fired again. Once it’s fired, the paint is permanent. It’s a long process. “What I enjoy about porcelain painting is the translucent look,” said Boeck. “That makes it possible to create beautiful layers of color and the appearance of texture. You can’t do that with any other painting technique.” I was thinking about my grandmother’s collection of porcelain


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“What I enjoy about porcelain painting is the translucent look,” said Boeck. “That makes it possible to create beautiful layers of color and the appearance of texture." teacups as I looked around Boeck’s home. Certainly this art form is not limited to teacups. There were amazing framed paintings on the walls, vases that looked like stained glass, trays, bowls and platters. Boeck had selected a variety of subjects, including the traditional flowers, but also wildlife and cottage scenes. My favorite was a framed picture of three very happy, elegant pigs. Grandma would have loved it.

The Camellia City Porcelain Artists club sponsors lots of workshops and demonstrations during its meetings and encourages beginners and the curious to attend. The club meets at 10 a.m. on the fourth Monday of the month, August through May, at Shepard Garden and Arts Center in McKinley Park. Most meetings include a workshop or speaker demonstrating various painting techniques. The club frequently has special meetings and events on weekends. Annual dues are $30 a year, but visitors are always welcome. Usually 25 to 30 artists attend meetings. If you’d like to know more about porcelain art, circle the weekend of Oct. 11 and 12 on your calendar and plan to attend the club’s annual Porcelain Fired Art Show at Shepard Garden & Art Center. You will also find more information on the California China Painting Art Association website, ccpaa.net If you know of an interesting club in the area, contact Gwen Schoen at gwensclubs@aol.com n

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Tag, You’re It! WHY IT’S IMPORTANT TO LABEL YOUR PLANTS

BY ANITA CLEVENGER GARDEN JABBER

M

y husband gave me a set of tall metal plant markers for our garden years ago. They are still on a shelf in the garage. Back then, I knew the names and locations of everything I’d planted. Labels were for public gardens and forgetful gardeners. Not for me. I still know the names of my 60-odd roses, but it sometimes takes me a moment to pull them out of my memory. Will there be a time when I can’t recall them at all? Already I don’t remember the identities of other plants in my garden or in the driveway “pot ghetto.” Once, they all had plastic stick tags, but many are now gone or illegible. Not only do I forget their names, but I don’t remember what I’ve planted or where. I dig into forgotten dormant bulbs in the winter, wonder what is popping up in the spring and mourn the loss of a small smothered plant during fall cleanup. I need to do better at keeping track. Things are much better organized in the public gardens where I volunteer. In the Historic Rose Garden in Sacramento Historic City Cemetery, we list all of the roses

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by location in a database, and we hang laminated tags on each rose. Water-efficient plants at Fair Oaks Horticulture Center are marked with sturdy metal stakes bearing plant labels. It’s good information for visitors and gardeners alike. Many kinds of plant markers, mounted on wires or stakes, are sold in garden centers and online. There are some drawbacks to putting upright markers in the garden. I’ve tripped over them again and again. Inexpensive ones bend out of shape. Heavy-duty ones can hurt you. They may get overgrown or moved out of position. Still, it’s a simple way to mark what you have—or what you have lost. A sign next to a dead plant or in an empty space may indicate that a plant is gone for good or is just dormant and will come back. Gardeners are optimists and know that hope and some plants spring eternally. Every potted plant in my garden came with a label on its pot or a tag stuck into the pot. I find plastic “stick tags” all over the place, like little white grave markers reminding me of dearly departed plants. My friend Barbara Oliva says that tags “go walking.” While I’ve never seen one move on its own, I’ve watched squirrels toss them aside as they frantically bury a nut, and I’ve heard about dogs or children pulling

them out. Worse yet, kids sometimes move the tags around. Tags break, get buried or fall out. For a while, I used popsicle sticks, but they are only good for a little while until they rot. Plastic or metal is much more durable and more likely to stay put if attached to something rather than stuck into the soil. For roses and other plants with woody stems, you can use wraparound plastic tags that loop and lock. You can also punch a hole into a stick tag and attach it to the plant, its pot or support, or a stake. The tags for my tomatoes are at eye level, fastened onto each cage with a zip tie. Our favorite material for fastening hanging tags in the cemetery rose garden is strips of nylon stockings, which are an increasingly rare commodity now that women wear pants or go bare-legged. The nylon

is soft, unobtrusive and rots away after a couple of years. More sturdy materials can damage the plant. Twine, string and wire all have their advocates. Most “permanent” marking pens will fade in the sun, leaving faint frustrating traces. A soft pencil makes surprisingly durable markings. Other alternatives are printed labels, paint pens or garden pens. There are many creative ways to label your plants. I’ve visited friends’ gardens where they paint the names of roses onto rocks, plates or handmade ceramic plaques. If you aren’t into garden art, you can make a schematic map of your garden, identifying the locations of your plants. Many people use garden journals to write down what they’ve planted and where, illustrating them with sketches or photos. A simple list of what you’ve planted is better than what I usually do: digging a hole, thrusting a plant into it and losing its tag in the process. A rose by any name smells as sweet. If you want to know how to take care of it, buy another just like it or recommend it to a friend, you need to know what the heck it is. Anita Clevenger is a lifetime Sacramento County UC Master Gardener. For answers to gardening questions, call 875-6913 or go to ucanr.edu/sites/sacmg n


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CONTRIBUTED BY SUSAN MAXWELL SKINNER Great food, wine and company blessed the recent Taste of Carmichael fundraiser. Presented by Carmichael Kiwanis, the festival benefits many local nonprofit organizations. Learn about the event at carmichaelkiwanis.org

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Assemblyman Ken Cooley (right) enjoyed dessert with artist David Peterson, Jake Carr (Oakmont senior residence) and Bev’s Angels volunteer Penny Johnson


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Nice Guys Win TAKE A MOMENT TO SAY SOMETHING UPLIFTING OR ENCOURAGING

BY NORRIS BURKES SPIRIT MATTERS

R

ecently I was sitting in my hospital office, staring at the June calendar, when I noticed I’d missed participating in the eighth annual Say Something Nice Sunday on June 1. In case you missed it, too, the day was organized by a Baptist church in Charleston, S.C., to encourage people to be nice. Participants are asked to take a two-part Civility Pledge. The first part contains a promise to “Refrain from saying anything ugly, demeaning or derogatory to anyone in my workplace.” The second part is an effort “to say something nice, uplifting or encouraging.” Well, I thought, as I left the office to visit patients, this should be easy. I may have missed the formal day, but I can still salvage the sentiment. After all, chaplains get paid to avoid derogatory comments and promote uplifting things. At a nearby nurses’ station, I saw my first opportunity to kick off my

pledge drive. Behind the desk sat a familiar doctor wearing a bright checked shirt. “I like that pink shirt, doctor,” I said. He responded with a glare. “He doesn’t think it’s pink,” a nurse said in his defense. “He says it’s orange.” “Aren’t those red squares on a white background?” I asked her. “Don’t red and white make pink?” “I tried to tell him that,” she whispered. The doctor dismissively swiveled his chair away from us. This “nice” stuff wasn’t as easy as it sounds. I was beginning to wonder if nice guys really do finish last. An hour later, I was back in my office charting patient visits when my email program chirped. Hoping the Baptists were sending revised instructions, I quickly checked my in-box. The email was from Rev. Christopher Flesoras, a Greek Orthodox priest from Roseville. He’s a newly commissioned chaplain in the Air National Guard and is in line to replace me when I retire next month. His email contained a nice thank-you for my mentorship during the past year. He sounded as if he could be bucking to become grand marshal of the Say Something Nice Sunday Parade, even. But his note, like his recent life, took a solemn turn. Flesoras asked for prayers for his 41-year-old wife, Krissy, as she undergoes more clinical trials for lung cancer.

“Please ask your readers to pray for Krissy,” he said. “Every prayer lifted up and intercession with God is a blessing for her and, by extension, for our family.” This athletic mother of two had been battling lung cancer for the past two years. And before you ask, she never smoked cigarettes. In fact, she’s the one out of every nine lung-cancer victims stricken through apparently no fault of their own. Wow. Here was a guy who took a moment, literally on his way to the doctor’s office with his sick wife, to say something nice to me. His words were a true reflection of Apostle Paul’s admonition in Colossians 4:5-6: “Be gracious in your speech. The goal is to bring out the best in others in a conversation, not put them down, not cut them out.”

to be clear, I know June 1 has passed, but I’m thinking we’ll need more than just one Sunday a year. Norris Burkes is a chaplain, syndicated columnist, national speaker and author of the book “No Small Miracles.” He has posted a link to Krissy Flesoras’ blog documenting her saga and providing resources for those who support people with lung cancer on his website, the chaplain. net n

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Soccer Star SACRAMENTO REPUBLIC FOOTBALL CLUB PRESIDENT SHOOTS FOR THE MAJOR LEAGUE

BY R.E. GRASWICH SPORTS AUTHORITY

W

arren Smith was in high school when he played his first soccer game. He survived less than one minute. As the game began, the ball came toward Smith. An opposing player executed a technique known as the slide tackle. The opponent slid into Smith and Smith’s leg snapped. The broken bone ended his soccer career. Fortunately for Sacramento soccer fans, the devastation of a high school sports injury didn’t destroy Smith’s appreciation for soccer or sports. Today, as president of the Sacramento Republic Football Club professional soccer team, Smith is trying to lead the city to the promised land of bigtime soccer. He’s off to an impressive start. The Republic, which two summers ago was a figment of Smith’s imagination, is the hottest ticket in town, with about 5,100 season ticket holders and more box-office demand than can be satisfied. Not bad for a club that lacks a permanent home and plays in a developmental minor league. “We’ve been blessed with early success,” Smith says. “But I tell our people we’ve got a long way to go. This is only the beginning.”

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Warren Smith is president of Sacramento Republic Football Club

Smith knows about pacing and patience. He has seen countless pro sports teams disintegrate in Sacramento, from indoor (and outdoor) soccer and outdoor (and indoor) football to hockey. Amid the wreckage of broken franchises, Smith can present himself as a unique Sacramento sports promoter, the guy who has done it right, twice. About 18 years ago, Smith and Bob Hemond dreamed up Raley Field and the Sacramento River Cats, which became one of the most successful minor-league baseball teams in history. Smith went on to run minorleague baseball and soccer franchises in Portland, Ore., rescuing them from

bankruptcy and helping turn them into multimillion-dollar assets. He did this without leaving Sacramento. Today, Smith is applying the triumphs and errors from his sports background to the Republic, which is building a temporary home at Cal Expo after selling out three games at Hughes Stadium on the Sac City College campus. “It’s pretty basic,” he says. “We keep close watch on our expenses and put our focus on marketing and promotion. Sports teams get in trouble because they spend too much. We won’t do that.” For an entrepreneur who has inspired soccer fans across the

Sacramento region to buy Republic tickets, hats, shirts and scarves, Smith has a professionally detached view about soccer. Maybe it’s the broken leg. “Let me make it clear, I love soccer,” he says. “But what we’re doing isn’t about soccer. It’s about Sacramento. We want to give Sacramento an attraction where people can gather and have fun and celebrate our community.” Soccer is the perfect vehicle for Smith’s dream of community involvement because Sacramento loves soccer. Before Smith sold one Republic ticket, he immersed himself in data that confirmed 130,000 soccer


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The stadium piece is most difficult. Smith is considering eight sites around the downtown grid, including the railyards, where a new arena for the Kings was planned before the switch to Downtown Plaza. Smith figures he will need $100 million for an 18,000-seat pro stadium. He hopes taxpayers will agree to subsidize about $30 million. Talk of a rival suburban MLS stadium in Elk Grove doesn’t bother Smith. The MLS, he says, isn’t interested in suburban stadiums, noting, “They’ve learned the model works best in the urban core, where you generate excitement before and after games, which only last 90 minutes.” For the next few years, the Cal Expo stadium, named Bonney Field after the plumbing company, will have to satisfy Sacramento’s thirst for soccer. With only 8,000 seats at Cal Expo, Smith worries about disappointing eager fans. He knows selling tickets can be either the easiest thing or the hardest thing in sports. R.E. Graswich can be reached at reg@graswich.com n

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5500 WYNDHAM HILL CT 4727 OAK TWIG WAY 4961 OLIVE OAK WAY 4249 GLENRIDGE DR 5314 ANGELINA AVE 5305 BAUMGART WAY 3700 GORDON WAY 6034 WINDING WAY 3700 ORANGERIE WAY 2917 PALM ESTATES CT 6907 LINCOLN AVE 5205 WHISPER OAKS LN 5541 DYE WAY 7110 STELLA LN #15 2436 VIA CAMINO AVE 5858 SHARPS CIR 4817 MELVIN DR 4720 MARGUERITE WAY 6152 VIA CASITAS 5133 KOVANDA AVE 4307 GALEWOOD WAY 5209 SAGEL CT 4776 OAK TWIG WAY 7220 WILLOWBANK WAY 6032 CHERRELYN WAY 6111 WINDING WAY 5712 FRONTIER WAY 5519 TASHI BELL LN 3927 OAK VILLA CIR

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$735,000 $308,000 $540,000 $275,000

95819 EAST SACRAMENTO, RIVER PARK

640 40TH ST $609,900 4100 FOLSOM BLVD #2A $420,000 5737 MONALEE AVE $462,500 5331 SANDBURG DR $445,000 1332 40TH ST $1,050,000 4408 C ST $465,000 558 LAGOMARSINO $479,500 650 52ND ST $370,000 5413 E ST $450,000 544 36TH STREET $510,000 5669 ELVAS $395,000 282 40TH ST $510,000 710 50TH ST $615,000 1425 57TH ST $510,000 5190 MODDISON WAY $334,000 401 SAN ANTONIO $383,000 530 SANDBURG DR $405,000 658 41ST ST $428,025 95 51ST ST $300,000 1352 61ST ST $391,000 4911 B ST $394,500 5400 AILEEN WAY $398,500 5125 J ST $319,000

REAL ESTATE page 53

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Get listed. Get an offer. Get moving. Total Unit Sales

C21 Select RE

26

REMAX Gold

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Beautiful custom Carmichael home with views of the gorgeous American River. Master suite with Àreplace, pool, spa and steam room. $2,100,000 Mike Zohrab (916) 799-9700

Keller Williams

78

Lyon

104

Coldwell Banker

130

Wonderful contemporary 6 Bed/5 Bath home that features marble entry, 3 Àreplaces, gourmet kitchen and pool $1,295,000 Nancy Bernheimer (916) 208-1332

0

Look Who’s Selling Houses!

LYON SIERRA OAKS Lg Master Suite & large walk-in, vaulted ceilings with skylight in living room, marble Àreplace, light and open concept, dining area with leaded glass built-ins, Upstairs 1 Bed/1 Bath rental unit $740,000 Kelley Waters (916) 206-5966

Gorgeous Remodeled 4 Bed/3.5 Bath Home in Sierra Oaks Open Áoor plan, custom Kitchen, Baths, Windows, Doors and Wood Flooring with Two EnSuites. $745,000 Debbie Davis (916) 213-2323

*As of Date 06/30 #1 in Listing Sales in Units** #1 in Listing Sales in Units Market Share** #1 in Total Sales in Units**

** Statistics based on Trendgraphix reporting in the 95608, 95821, 95825, 95826 and 95864 zip, aggregated brokers

A beautiful & spacious Arden Park home with a versatile Áoor plan. 5 Bed/3 Baths including master suite with large walk-in closet. $725,000 Tom and Nancy Harvey (916) 599-3018

Luxurious Wilhaggin! This 4 Bed/ 3 Bath is being sold in present market condition. The 16,039 sf lot boasts pool, patio & substantial yard along with a newer sauna! $650,000 Michael Glascock (916) 600-9689

Tremendous opportunity for a small developer! InÀl project would be ideal, subdivide the lot into 5 home sites. Located in Del Norte Woods area. $625,000 Gloria Knopke (916) 616-7858

Beautiful custom home built for entertaining. Has 4 Bed/2.5 Baths, Family Room and Formal Dining room. It is in a private setting with year round creek and greenbelt. $619,000 Nancy Arndorfer (916) 838-1763

One of a kind property in Carmichael that boasts .60 acres with beautiful style and imagination. Over 2400 sq/ft with 3-4 bedrooms and 2 1/2 baths. $575,000 Tom Phillips (916) 799-4571

Wonderful InÀnity home in gated community. 5 Bed / 3 Bath plus a den and bonus room, formal living/dining rooms, Germaia pool and spa. $549,000 Tom Phillips (916) 799-4571

Nicely updated 3 Bed/ 2 Bath in Arden Park.The curb appeal welcomes with its 2012 renovation,including driveway, water-wise landscaping,irrigation and electrical. Large yard with pool! $479,000 Brenda Siravo (916) 300-4996

Charming cottage like 2-3 Bed/ 1 Bath home has a remodeled kitchen, huge 1/4 acre yard and original hardwood Áoors $249,900 Sara Raudelunas (916) 826-1500

2580 Fair Oaks Blvd. Suite 20 481-3840 • GoLyon.com

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Sierra Oaks


Neighborhood Real Estate Sales

95821 ARDEN-ARCADE 2701 CLOVER LN 2910 WHITNEY AVE 2073 SILVER CT 3237 EASTWOOD RD 4201 OTEROL CT 3309 BROOKWOOD RD 3561 MIAMI ST 3956 ROSEMARY CIR 2520 CATALINA DR 3230 FIELDCREST DR 3240 LERWICK RD 2570 VERNA WAY 4618 BRIARWOOD DR 14013800 4434 PARK GREEN CT 3204 CARNELIAN CT 2440 MICHELLE DR 2710 WRIGHT 3301 CHENU AVE 3834 COUNTRY HAVEN COURT 3300 ARBOR WAY 3500 GABILAN WAY 2016 EL CAMINO AVE

$140,000 $215,000 $150,000 $240,000 $325,000 $328,000 $333,000 $229,000 $304,900 $620,000 $210,000 $234,000 $360,000 $330,000 $415,000 $173,800 $179,000 $325,000 $417,000 $199,000 $330,000 $117,000

95822 SOUTH LAND PARK 7265 LOMA VERDE WAY 7442 24 ST 3210 ELLWOOD AVE 7035 CROMWELL WAY 5669 LA CAMPANA WAY 5642 CAPSTAN WAY 1142 LANCASTER WAY 10 LUNDY CT 6811 W 23RD ST 2293 68TH AVE 6860 DEMARET DR 5813 13TH. ST 7528 BOWEN CIR 5661 CAZADERO WAY 3181 TORRANCE AVE 924 LINVALE CT 6017 HOLSTEIN WAY 2181 57TH AVE 5617 BRADD WAY 1230 27TH AVE 4925 CARMEN WAY 2436 37TH AVE 1443 LONDON ST

$110,000 $112,000 $146,000 $275,000 $180,000 $460,000 $349,500 $229,000 $130,000 $135,000 $175,000 $485,000 $168,000 $220,000 $115,000 $447,000 $480,000 $175,000 $190,000 $555,000 $265,000 $229,000 $80,000

1800 60TH AVE 5677 JACKS LN 5885 GLORIA DR #1 7511 WAINSCOTT WAY 5656 HELEN WAY 2409 39TH AVE 7056 21ST ST 7459 29TH ST 7448 WINKLEY 2136 STACIA WAY 5665 DELCLIFF CIR 7521 21ST ST 7321 WILLOWWICK 1103 DARNEL WAY

95825 ARDEN

102 E RANCH RD $295,200 649 WOODSIDE SIERRA #4$83,000 2128 UNIVERSITY PARK DR$305,000 485 HARTNELL PL $401,000 2086 UNIVERSITY PARK DR$370,000 1407 HOOD RD $124,500 2212 WOODSIDE LANE #6$125,000 3210 COTTAGE WAY $259,999 1217 VANDERBILT WAY $265,000 3216 STREVEL WAY $222,000 442 HARTNELL PL $371,000 144 HARTNELL PL $290,000 2472 LARKSPUR LN #363 $101,000 933 VANDERBILT WAY $260,900 1901 BELL ST $244,000 874 WOODSIDE LN #3 $131,000

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3107 VIA GRANDE 2119 COTTAGE WAY 1497 UNIVERSITY AVE 979 FULTON AVE #493 1041 FULTON AVE #384 3253 VIA GRANDE 3116 MERRYWOOD DR 425 HARTNELL PL 977 FULTON AVE #490 1428 COMMONS DR 1413 HOOD RD

95831 GREENHAVEN, S LAND PARK

$93,000 $75,500 $320,000 $77,000 $120,000 $150,000 $209,000 $395,000 $107,000 $340,000 $123,500

308 RIVER ISLE WAY $239,000 6360 CHETWOOD WAY $449,000 61 WINDUBEY CIR $245,000 19 ESTUARY CT $288,000 10 SEA CT $358,000 7647 ROMAN OAK WAY $511,500 7361 DURFEE WAY $194,000 443 DE MAR DR $267,000 7756 PARK RIVER OAK CIR $225,000 563 RIVERGATE WAY $325,000 6824 GLORIA DR $430,000 6319 N POINT WAY $438,000 6241 RIVERSIDE BLVD #201$118,000 7341 BARR WAY $330,000 15 WATERFRONT CT $281,000 737 EL MACERO WAY $345,000 40 ESTUARY CT $240,000 14 RIPPLE CT $350,000

508 ROUNDTREE CT $107,900 6875 CLAIBORNE WAY $202,500 6150 RIVERTON WAY $433,000 6705 FREEHAVEN DR $494,500 6457 S. LAND PARK DR $499,000 1107 ROUNDTREE CT $115,000 403 ROUNDTREE CT $120,000 7448 DELTAWIND DRIVE $228,000 1157 MONTE VISTA WAY $502,500 7720 OAKSHORE DR $439,000 109 BLUE WATER CIR $260,000 6456 S LAND PARK DR $465,000 825 FLORIN RD $170,000 775 PORTUGAL WAY $198,000 728 RIVERCREST DR $250,500 7268 FARM DALE WAY $270,000 23 PARK WEST CT $172,000 1065 SILVER LAKE DR $312,000 23 PARKSHORE CIR $361,638 1009 GREENHURST WAY $313,000 528 VALIM WAY $473,000

95864 ARDEN

3408 WINDSOR DR 3115 BAKULA WAY 3208 BERKSHIRE WAY 2020 VESTA WAY 3208 CHURCHILL RD 3453 WEMBERLEY DR 3333 WEMBERLEY DR 3329 WELLINGTON DR 3217 WEMBERLEY DR

$172,900 $229,000 $220,000 $262,500 $181,000 $196,500 $185,500 $180,000 $168,000

What makes an area like the American River Corridor so special? Things like the Parkway, a 23 mile preserve that provides endless opportunities for every outdoor enthusiast and has more visitors annually than Yosemite. Wonderful schools and communities centrally located within Sacramento. What makes an American River Corridor Specialist? Knowledge of the ins and outs of a unique place like the Corridor, local market knowledge and a deep appreciation for this special place and its very special people. When you’re passionate about where you live... it shows! Put my passion to work for you! A Different Approach to Real Estate. Angela Heinzer Your hyper-local agent

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REAL ESTATE FROM page 51

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Big Bucks COMPETITION PITS FUNDRAISERS AGAINST EACH OTHER

BY GLORIA GLYER DOING GOOD

T

he Man/Woman/Students of the Year fundraiser sponsored by the Greater Sacramento chapter of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society is a contest with a worthy goal: Candidates compete to see who can raise the most money for the organization. This year, the competitors raised a record-breaking $480,000, $100,000 above last year’s total. The top fundraiser was Alex Stamas, who raised more than $125,000 to receive the Man of the Year crown. Stamas is in high school but competed in the adult category. The other Man of the Year candidates were Jim Anderson, Doug Brauner, Ronnie Cobb, Roland Guillen and Jason Silva. Dulcy Wilson, a leukemia survivor, was crowned Woman of the Year; Bernice Creager was the runnerup. Other candidates were Yvette Cockrell and Niki Hirst. Lauren Montee and Austin D’Souza from Cosumnes Oaks High School won the Students of the Year title. They competed against Julianna Hess and Megan Hester-

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McCullough (Sacramento City College); Christopher Hicks and Brendan MacDonald (Davis Senior High School); and Russell Patty and Jason Heathers (Rio Americano High School). The winners get to name a research grant in honor or in memory of a person of their choice and direct it toward a specific LLS research portfolio. To get involved with next year’s contest, contact Jennifer Pear at Jennifer.Pear@LLS.org or 929-4720. For more information, go to mwoy. org/sac

CONSIDER THIS PLACE The Sharing Place, a project of Swing at Cancer, is calling for support via the most reliable way: cash. The Sharing Place needs the funds to continue its mission of providing lodging to families whose children or adult family members are receiving medical care in Sacramento-area hospitals. It’s easy to help out: Write a check to Swing at Cancer and mail it to 5105 F St., Sacramento, CA 95819. For more information, call (916) 452-4663.

THANKS FOR FIVE YEARS After five years of leading the Sacramento chapter of ALS Association, Amy Sugimoto is stepping down as executive director. She’s returning to WEAVE, where she had previously served as retail operations manager. At WEAVE, she will focus on developing sustainable

revenue streams through a new retail concept to be launched. At ALS Association, Sugimoto helped develop programs and services for patients and caregivers. Among her achievements, she partnered with UC Davis and Forbes Norris to bring two ALS clinics to the region. She also established the Summer Soiree event and increased revenue from the Walk to Defeat ALS by 150 percent. For more information, go to alssac.org

A CAPITOL CAMPAIGN For the first time in several years, the California State Employees Charitable Campaign increased its take, raising $6.6 million for thousands of nonprofits across the state. The campaign, in its 57th year, allows California state employees to use payroll deduction to support nonprofits of their choice. More than 80,000 state employees in the fivecounty capital region participate. For more information, go to csecc.org

CONNECTING United Way has created an online volunteer center to connect the region’s volunteers and donors with nonprofits. You can go to the site to volunteer, donate unused materials and household items to nonprofits, learn about upcoming special events and advocate for causes. In other words, the online center will do just about everything for those seeking to help or be helped. To visit the center, go to volunteercenter.uwccr.org

CRAB FUNDS Are crab feeds worthwhile? Ask the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Back in February, its 10th annual crab and shrimp feed raised more than $87,000 for the organization. About 800 crab lovers attended the event, dining on seafood prepared by Dos Coyotes. Save Mart and American Health Care sponsored the feed. The foundation will hold its Walk to Cure Diabetes on Sunday, Oct. 5, starting at the west steps of the State Capitol. Corporate teams lined up include Bank of America, General Produce, Save Mart, UC Davis Med Center, SMUD and Hewlett-Packard. For more information, go to norcal. jdrf.org

GIVING TO A GIVING PROGRAM Walmart gave Saint John’s Program for Real Change a $50,000 grant to expand its employment readiness program, which teaches homeless mothers skills to find a job. Walmart also gave a $50,000 grant to Placer Food Bank in Roseville for its backpack program and $25,000 to Greater Sacramento Urban League for its education and training program. Gloria Glyer can be reached at gglyer@sbbmail.com or (530) 4775331. n


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Family Friendly A LAND PARK HOUSE GETS A 21ST-CENTURY MAKEOVER

BY JULIE FOSTER HOME INSIGHT

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A really nice family lived here before us and raised their kids here. It had a good feel.â&#x20AC;?

W

ith the idea of children in their future, Scott and Gayle Govenar knew they needed more space than their two-bedroom, one-bath house could

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provide. So when a 3,600-squarefoot house facing William Land Park came on the market, they were interested.

In 2005, they became the third owners of the house, built in 1951 by Newton Cope. (Cope is famous locally as the man who turned an 1853 firehouse in Old Sac into The

Firehouse Restaurant.) Though the house had been well maintained, it needed updating and reconfiguring. Scott, a fan of midcentury modern HOME page 58


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The existing crystal chandelier, though not technically midcentury modern, worked perfectly in the room, so the Govenars left it in place in a tribute to the original home.

HOME FROM page 56 architecture, envisioned a home that combined their need for more family space with the clean, modern look he appreciated. “Scott had the vision for this house,” says Gayle. “I don’t think I have that kind of vision for seeing how we could open it up and achieve what we wanted.” What she appreciated was the house’s familyfriendly vibe. “A really nice family lived here before us and raised their kids here,” she explains. “It had a good feel.” Remodeling took eight months. Wanting no delay once the project commenced, they stored all the appliances and materials in the garage before building began. During construction, the couple lived in the house except for two occasions: when the maple flooring was installed and when the walls were plastered. The house needed major updating of its heating, plumbing and electrical systems. “When you buy an older house, you have the expectation that you will need to do these things,” Scott explains. “And you have to have contingencies since you don’t know what’s behind those old walls.” The interior was a mishmash of colors and patterns. The light fixtures

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and window coverings were outdated, and concrete tiles covered most of the floor, though the white carpeting in the living room was spotless. The front and back yards needed attention. Previous owners had painted the living room’s flagstone fireplace white. Adding a raised concrete hearth stained a warm brown, along with shelving and cabinets of zebrawood, added a warm snap of color. The couple refreshed the dining room by removing the draperies and a set of accordion doors and painting the walls. The existing crystal chandelier, though not technically midcentury modern, worked perfectly in the room, so the Govenars left it in place in a tribute to the original home. Creating an open, efficient area for family and social gatherings meant reconfiguring the kitchen. The couple removed a wall and relocated a small bathroom. A new pantry created more storage space and lessened counter clutter. A new entryway allows for an enticing visual sweep of 60 feet through the kitchen and playroom to the revitalized backyard. Anigre, an African hardwood, was used for the kitchen cabinets. Countertops are dark gray flecked with black. Dark-blue concrete tops


The Govenar family

the island. On the walls, glass tiles in light blue and opaque white are interspersed with small blue ceramic Spanish accent tiles. Throughout the house, art by local artists including Joan Moment, Darrell Forney, Gary Dinnen, Eric Dahlin, Peter and Camille VandenBerge, John Tarahteeff, Alan Post, Shirley Hazlett and Ianna Frisby adorns walls and shelves.

“A good designer who is willing to work outside the box smoothes the entire process. It is really an exercise in flexibility.” “Sacramento has an incredibly robust art scene with some of the most talented artists.” Gayle explains. “We enjoy supporting them and their work. We especially enjoy meeting them on the Studio Arts tour in September.” Landscaping, which took a year, began once interior work was complete. What was a “sea of grass” in the front yard became a charming entry/family area buffered from the street, yet still offering views of the park. “We wanted a place where we

could sit and the kids could play,” Gayle says. Local landscape architect David Gibson planted a hedge of Grecian laurel to divide the space into two distinct areas. On one side of the hedge is a grassy street-side verge. On the other, there’s a patio and a grassy area for children to romp. The frontentry gate is made of powder-coated steel in a simple geometric pattern. Built from artificial flagstones painted white, the backyard fireplace creates a visual link between the inside and outside spaces. Utilizing artificial flagstones saved a considerable sum as well. Artificial turf in a shady spot of the backyard play area keeps the children and the sweet family dog from tracking mud into the house. Looking back on the project, Gayle says she was astounded by the number of decisions involved in remodeling an older home. The process, she points out, requires patience and a sense of humor. “A good designer who is willing to work outside the box smoothes the entire process,” she says, noting the contributions made by designers Kari Miner and Cheryl Holben, Kristy Lingner of River City Builders and landscape designer Gibson. “It is really an exercise in flexibility.” If you know of a home you think should be featured in Inside Publications, contact Julie Foster at foster.julie91@yahoo.com n

ild u B / ign s e D es c i v Ser For All of Your Kitchen, Bath and Whole-House Remodeling Needs .com

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Don’t Meet Me at the Fair ANNUAL SUMMER EVENT ISN’T ALWAYS KIND TO THE ANIMALS

BY SUE OWENS WRIGHT PETS & THEIR PEOPLE

O

n July 11, the California State Fair will open at Cal Expo, marking 160 years of operation if you count the first agricultural exposition held in San Francisco in 1854. Sacramento has been the state fair’s permanent home since 1859, though the fair has been held at several locations in our city prior to its final move to Cal Expo in 1968. Many older Sacramentans grow misty-eyed recalling the halcyon days when the fair was held on Stockton Boulevard, with its mature shade trees that sheltered fairgoers from the hot August sun. For me, this eagerly anticipated yearly event marked the end of summer vacation and the last hurrah of fun before school started. In those days, families could dine on delicious homemade meals prepared by local church groups, which also provided complimentary fans for fairgoers to cool themselves while listening to the orchestra playing on the bandstand. Rainbowcolored dancing waters spouted from a fountain gracing the facade of the

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grand old brick Counties building. That fountain no doubt soothed a few tired feet and cooled the kiddies. Animal attractions historically have been featured at the state fair, including horse races. I recall the excitement of cheering on our favorite Thoroughbred in many a photo finish. Undeniably, the most exciting venue has always been the midway, with its thrilling rides and other amusements. I watched my father pitch his hardearned dimes to win souvenirs for his family at the carnival. Sometimes he’d let me pitch some coins, too, but Dad was a deadeye shot. He nearly always won a prize, to the delight

of his young daughter. Those prizes included stuffed toys, glassware and even live animals such as chameleons, turtles, yellow chicks and fuzzy ducklings. What child could resist? Fairgoers were intrigued by the exotic chameleons displayed on a bright-green sandwich board to demonstrate their amazing camouflage abilities. Everyone wanted a chameleon, including me. At the end of the day, fairgoers went home with a menagerie of prize pets and no clue of how to properly feed or house these delicate creatures. They came with no care instructions.

Offering live animals as prizes is not a good lesson in kindness to animals for a child, but plenty of other bad lessons have been taught to kids every year at the California State Fair, including live birthing of calves and nursing sows immobilized in cruel birthing crates. You may remember what happened to a stressed pregnant cow several years ago when it panicked and escaped its enclosure. I look forward to the fair every year. I have missed only one in my life, but this tragic incident almost soured me on attending it ever again. I understand that the bovine births are now being televised from remote cameras to reduce the animals’ stress in an already-stressful situation. The state fair has never seemed to me a very kind place for animals. Animals and entertainment for the masses isn’t always a good mix. I find myself pitying the poor creatures in livestock barns, races, rodeos, elephant rides, petting zoos and on the midway. Sacramento summers are typically hot, and though some precautions are taken to cool them, many of the animals look miserable. I’m sure that is even truer for animals in midway sideshows. Back in the 1960s, fairgoers might have seen sideshow “freaks” like the Amazing Five-legged Lamb and the Giant Vietnamese Rat, which wasn’t really a rat at all but a capybara, a large semiaquatic rodent from South America. The fair finally ceased giveaways of animals on the midway, but I was dismayed last year to see that goldfish were still offered as prizes in various PETS page 63


Spacious Ranch This beautifully updated 3 bedroom 2.5 bath Ranch style home is teaming with amenities. Over 1850sft with New Maple Cabinets, Custom Granite, Stainless Appliances, Hardwood Flooring and New Fixtures! Priced to Sell at $514,900 Call Mark 916-410-1284

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The Big Picture TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS NEED TO TAKE HEALTH IMPACTS INTO ACCOUNT

BY WALT SEIFERT GETTING THERE

M

aking decisions can be difficult, as anyone who lives with an endlessly equivocating Libran knows. Good decisions are guided by information about all potential consequences. When choices are made in a knowledge vacuum, or if only partial ramifications are considered, outcomes are likely to be less than optimal. That’s why governments (and private developers) are starting to do health impact assessments before embarking on major transportation and development projects. Transportation projects are often especially massive in scope and cost. Their impacts are profound and enduring. Ideally, health impact assessments make health an explicit consideration when evaluating all public policies— not just transportation and land-use projects. It’s a more holistic approach. Community health shouldn’t be ignored. Health assessments create better projects and policies by involving the public and evaluating long-term effects. They insure benefits and harms are equitably

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spread among the vulnerable, such as the young and old or economically disadvantaged. Canadians and Europeans have done formal health impact assessments for several decades. More recently, U.S. agencies have started to use them, mostly on a voluntary basis. In 1986, the World Health Organization urged policymakers to “be aware of the health consequences of their decisions and to accept their responsibilities for health.” The California Department of Public Health notes that “the most important determinants of health and disease are subjects of policymaking in institutional sectors outside

the authority of the public health sector.” In other words, government officials make a multitude of decisions that affect health, usually without any input from public health professionals. Dr. Richard Jackson, a former California state health officer, said, “Transportation decisions are health decisions.” You might think that impacts to human health are already analyzed in the environmental impact reports required for major projects. They are, but only to a degree. The physical environment is the focus of those reports, not health. Transportation projects do affect air and water quality. In turn, poor air quality is

associated with strokes, heart disease, lung cancer, asthma and other respiratory diseases. Water quality may affect cancer rates and cause other diseases. Dirty air and water have decidedly unhealthy consequences, but in developed countries such as the United States, those consequences are only part of the picture. Other impacts of big transportation projects directly affect human life and limb. A road widening usually results in higher vehicle speeds and greater difficulty in crossing the street. This can lead to vehicle crashes, more serious crashes and motorist, pedestrian and bicycle injuries and fatalities. The dangers and downright


When updating its general plan, the Humboldt County board of supervisors had its public health agency consider the health impacts of three future growth alternatives, ranging from restricting development to existing urban areas to allowing continued sprawl. The public health officer partnered with a nonprofit to conduct a health impact assessment. County planners and a community group participated. The conclusion was that the most compact development alternative would improve health outcomes for almost all 35 community-prioritized indicators, while the sprawl alternative would harm health. Knowledge is power, including the power to do good.

More kittens are born each year than there are families available to give them a home. Join the Sacramento SPCA in reducing pet overpopulation. Schedule an appointment to have your cat spayed or neutered at its affordable, highquality spay/neuter clinic.

Walt Seifert is a bicyclist, pedestrian, driver and transportation writer. He can be reached at bikeguy@ surewest.net n

Call 504-2811

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AMEN

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DAY

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Sue Owens Wright is an awardwinning author of fiction and nonfiction about dogs. She writes the Beanie and Cruiser Mysteries for dog lovers. For more information, go to sueowenswright.com n3

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carnival booths. Goldfish are also living, feeling beings, and they have no place on the state fair midway. Think how hot the water in those tiny fish bowls must get on a triple-digit day. You can imagine where those fish end up when the novelty wears off, if they survive that long. Animal-rights groups have been trying to persuade officials to stop allowing goldfish to be offered as carnival prizes at this year’s fair. I hope they succeed. The animals have never been winners in these games of chance. In fact, most have no chance of survival. I hope that the California State Fair will restrict prize giveaways on their midway to stuffed toys and other inanimate objects and will take steps to ensure that henceforth our state fair is kind to all animals.

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nastiness of roads designed to maximize speeds and car volume discourage trips made by public transit, walking or cycling. The resulting reduced physical activity has a huge and negative impact on health. There is an average increase of about 40 minutes per day of physical activity for participants in the Natomas Unified School District Safe Routes to School program. This is according to a health assessment done by the Centers for Disease Control and the UCLA School of Public Health. The extra activity increased the percentage of students who are active for at least 30 minutes every day from 12.8 percent to 21.4 percent. There are many examples of health impact assessments improving, creating support for and even justifying and helping to secure funding for projects. A health impact assessment for the East Bay Greenway proposal lent support to the project and came up with recommendations to make it better. The proposed project was to build a greenway with a walking/ biking trail under the elevated Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) train tracks for 12 miles from East Oakland to Hayward. Proponents hoped that more open green space would make it easier for residents to be active and help fight the increasing incidence of diabetes and obesity. The assessment concluded the project would increase physical activity, foster social contacts between neighbors and reduce stress. By recommending that the greenway connect to existing bike or walking paths, the assessment further encouraged activity. Discussions revealed security concerns were a barrier to greenway use. The assessment recommended lighting, other design features and creating a citizen watch group to patrol the trail. In Georgia, health assessors made similar recommendations for the Atlanta BeltLine, a project to develop 22 miles of an abandoned railroad. According to the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, the project will “promote the health of local residents” far more than if the BeltLine had been built without the assessment.

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To the Family Go the Spoils JULY CONTAINS DADDY’S BIRTHDAY, WHICH MEANS IT’S HIS MONTH TO RELAX—SORT OF

BY KELLI WHEELER MOMSERVATIONS

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uly to most people means summer in full swing, the pop and sizzle of fireworks, the smoky mouth-watering smell of barbecue, the sweet juiciness of watermelon, and the sting of too much sun on your shoulders. To the Wheelers, it comes down to one thing: Daddy’s birthday. Forget June and Father’s Day. One-day celebrations—those are for amateurs. In our house, July becomes the month of celebrating all things Dad because for the other 11 months he’s been busy spoiling us. The least we can do is give him his very own birthday month.*

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*(To be paid off with his credit card at a later date—this falls under the aforementioned spoiling.) So how do we spoil this man who has made it his life’s mission to make sure his family is happy and wants for nothing? With his birthday on July 5, we start by turning the Fourth of July holiday into a big backyard swim party—that he buys all the stuff for, barbecues for, cleans up after, and spends the next week trying to rebalance the chemicals in his pool and resurrect his trampled lawn. But every year, after he hoses the scorch marks off his driveway from the fireworks show for dozens of families, he always says, “That was pretty fun, wasn’t it?” Next, I beg him to take time off work and forgo the paycheck that pays for aforementioned spoiling by joining friends and family on group vacations. In the name of keeping the party rolling with summer and family fun, he will drag the camping gear out of the rafters, make sure flashlights and air pumps have batteries, stock up the coolers and with amazing

ingenuity make packing and unpacking an overloaded SUV look like it should be an Olympic event. But every time, after we get back and he cleans all the dirt and garbage out of the car before hosing off the outside, he always says, “That was a good time, wasn’t it?” The past few years with the California State Fair moved to July, celebrating Dad’s birthday month also means going to the fair. So after Dad comes home after a long, hot day working construction, we persuade him to give up the recliner to hit the midway, the food booths, the photo booth and all the exhibits before the sun goes down on another fun year at the fair. And when he comes home with his wallet a bit lighter and his arms weighed down with the had-to-have midway game prizes and trinkets that will have cost far too much to be forgotten in a week, he will always say, “That is a fun tradition, isn’t it?” Throughout July, we will continue to try and spoil Daddy for his birthday month by taking over the chores he usually does and staying on top of the ones that make him happy when he comes home after a hard day at work. We’ll pick up the dog poop in the backyard before friends come to play. We’ll take out the garbage and roll out the garbage cans to the curb on Thursdays. We’ll try to have the dishes out of the sink, the dishwasher unloaded, the clean clothes on the bed folded and put away—socks and underwear ready to go in his drawers. But when the chores gradually become neglected because the kids are busy splashing in the pool with friends or time has run long visiting

with my girlfriends who have stopped by, Dad will wave off promises to take care of it later. Without resentment, he just does it himself. Eventually, when he’s grabbed a cool drink and joined us outside and I thank him for picking up our slack, he will always wave it off and say, “You guys looked like you were having fun. Life is good, isn’t it?”

Eventually, when he’s grabbed a cool drink and joined us outside and I thank him for picking up our slack, he will always wave it off and say, “You guys looked like you were having fun. Life is good, isn’t it?” It sure is. With Daddy in it— continuing to spoil us during his birthday month of spoiling—knowing he is happiest when we’re happy, life is definitely good. Happy birthday, Daddy. We’d love you even without the aforementioned spoiling. Kelli Wheeler is a Sacramento mother of two and author of “Momservations—The Fine Print of Parenting.” She can be reached at Momservations.com n


Swim Smart SIX SAFE-SWIMMING TIPS THAT AREN’T COMMON SENSE

person drowning as a consequence of eating. The swimming-eating myth probably arose from the commonsense observation that if you exercise hard on a full stomach, you may get a “stitch” in your side. Few recreational swimmers swim at that level of intensity, and even if you did, a cramp isn’t going to make you sink like a rock. Your muscles will work just fine—and get you to the shore or shallow water if necessary.

BY DR. AMY ROGERS SCIENCE IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

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his month, many of us will escape the heat in a pool or the Sacramento or American rivers. Swim safety is a priority, with the No. 1 goal being to prevent drownings. But there’s more to a healthy swim experience than not drowning. To enhance your aquatic adventures, here are six smart swimming tips that come from science, not common sense. Clear water isn’t necessarily clean water. Swimming pool water should be clear, but clarity alone doesn’t mean the water is free of disease-causing microorganisms because germs are invisible to the eye. A pool’s main defense against germs is a mixture of chlorine-containing molecules collectively called free chlorine. At the proper concentration and pH, free chlorine will kill bacteria and other microbes in the water. If you’re wondering whether your favorite pool has the right chemical balance to control germs, you can check it yourself by buying chlorine test strips and dipping one in the water. Or use your nose: There should be a faint whiff of bleach near the water surface.

An excessive “chlorine” smell at the pool means someone needs to add more chlorine.

An excessive “chlorine” smell at the pool means someone needs to add more chlorine. Most people think that an eye-irritating odor around a pool is a sign of too much chlorine in the water. In fact, that strong smell isn’t free chlorine. It’s chloramines. Chloramines are formed when free chlorine reacts with contaminants in the pool, especially urine. The way to get rid of that smell is to shock or superchlorinate the pool with enough free chlorine to turn the chloramines into a gas (ammonia) that dissipates into the air. Be aware that a stinky pool may also be a germy pool because, unlike free chlorine, chloramines are not very good at killing microbes.

Avoid swimming in public waters after a heavy rainfall. Runoff from a storm washes soil, animal waste and sewage overflow into lakes, rivers and ocean shores, increasing the number of potentially dangerous bacteria in the water. The effect is temporary; most diseasecausing germs naturally die off within a day or two. Go ahead and swim after eating. Junior just finished a bowl of ice cream and wants to jump in the pool. But Mom puts him on landlocked timeout because she knows you shouldn’t swim right after you eat. Nonsense. There has never been a single documented case of a

Use extra sun protection around water. Solar ultraviolet radiation causes sunburns and damages DNA, raising your risk for skin cancer. Being near water increases your sun exposure because some of the radiation is reflected. If you’re in the path of that reflected ultraviolet light, you get a double dose, from above and below. The direction of the reflected light depends on the angle at which the sun is hitting the water. At midday, when the sun is straight overhead in the sky, light is reflected straight up—at people in or on the water. If you’re in a boat, a hat alone won’t protect your face. By contrast, in late afternoon, the sun is lower on the horizon and light skips off the water at an angle

SCIENCE page 67

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Many Hats MORE THAN AN ACTOR, HE ALSO WRITES, TEACHES, DIRECTS AND DOES VOICEOVERS

BY JESSICA LASKEY ARTIST SPOTLIGHT

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hen people use the term “Renaissance man,” they’re usually being generous. If you’re using it to describe Matt K. Miller, you’re being accurate. Miller is one of those rare artistic professionals who does more than just act. He also directs, teaches, writes award-winning plays and lends his expressive, resonant voice to everything from commercials to anime. Yes, you read that right: anime. “When I was living in Los Angeles, I submitted a cassette tape—that tells you how long ago it was—to an anime producer I knew,” says Miller, who was cast as Tenchi in the Cartoon Network anime series “Tenchi Muyô!” Miller’s cartoon work is just one fascinating facet of his career, which started back in his native Rockville Centre, N.Y. He did theater in high school and college, then looked for a place where he could spread his wings. He didn’t want to go straight to New York without a union card, so he headed to Chicago instead. It was the early 1980s, a good time to be an actor in the Windy City. With consistent acting work, it wasn’t long before he earned his membership card for all three unions: Actors’ Equity Association, the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists. After eight years in Chicago, Miller moved to Los Angeles in 1990.

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Matt Miller

“I really tried to do it all in L.A.,” Miller says. “I got a lot of anime work because I could record really fast. You have to be able to act, have a character and match the ‘lip flap’ of the animation. It’s tricky, but I happened to have a knack for it.” There, he added to his résumé, working in anime, theater, television and film. He had roles on the soap operas “Santa Barbara” and “General Hospital” and appeared in the film “Gods and Generals.” But Miller wasn’t satisfied living in L.A. “I was working a lot but had no real artistic satisfaction,” he admits. “I wasn’t happy in L.A. My first marriage was breaking up, and I

found I was happier doing work out of town.”

“I really tried to do it all in L.A. I got a lot of anime work because I could record really fast. You have to be able to act, have a character and match the ‘lip flap’ of the animation."

A majority of those out-of-town opportunities were coming from Sacramento Theatre Company, where Miller was performing regularly. (In fact, the first time I ever saw Miller onstage was at STC in 2003 in “Fully Committed,” a manic one-man show in which Miller played a total of 40 distinct characters.) STC’s thenartistic director, Peggy Shannon, loved working with Miller so much that she offered to keep him busy onstage if he moved to Sacramento. Move Miller did, in the one week he had off between “Fully Committed” and his next show.


SCIENCE FROM page 65 "I rented a truck, packed up my stuff in L.A. and got outta Dodge,” Miller says. Now situated in Sacramento, Miller has worked as both an actor and director with nearly every professional theater company in town, including STC, B Street Theatre, Capital Stage and New Helvetia. He even served as STC’s artistic director during the 2010-2011 season. But it was his connection to Sacramento Shakespeare Festival that got him going on his current career track. "I directed ‘Twelfth Night’ for the festival,” Miller recalls, “and because the plays are technically part of a class at Sacramento City College, the school made me an adjunct professor so I could direct. After ‘Twelfth Night,’ they offered me Storytime— directing children’s theater—and this year I’ll be teaching Intro to Acting as well.” Miller is not new to teaching, considering he’s done one-on-one actor coaching for years as well as led master classes for STC’s Young Professionals Conservatory and sessions at various summer camps. But teaching gives him the stability he was longing for, especially since settling down with his wife, Katherine, and having a child. “People kept telling Kat that she should meet me,” Miller says. (You can hear his grin all the way through the phone.) “So many people tried to set us up that she thought, ‘Is he paying you people?!’” The persistence paid off: After a six-month engagement, the pair married onstage at STC in May 2006 and welcomed their son, Max, two years later. While Miller and his wife are both professional actors, they might have to make way for the newest addition to the acting clan. “Max played Tiny Tim in ‘A Christmas Carol’ at STC,” Miller says proudly. “He stole the show. Now he’s been asking when he can be in a show again.” With a Renaissance man like Miller as his dad, you can sure that Max will be wowing the world in no time. n

closer to the ground. People on the shore will catch those reflected rays. Don’t borrow air from a scuba diver. Do you ever take a big breath and see how deep you can dive? Or have you been snorkeling and followed a fish to the bottom? Then you’ve tried freediving, which is swimming deep while holding your breath. Serious freedivers include spear fishermen and anyone catching California abalone, which by law may not be taken using scuba gear. Say you’re freediving and you encounter a scuba diver. You borrow some air from the scuba tank. This gives you extra time to explore, maybe to bag another abalone, and then you hold your breath and swim to the surface as usual. Sounds great, right?

Even from a modest depth of, say, 10 feet, the change in volume of the air can be enough to damage your lungs. If you hold your breath while rising from greater depths, air expansion can kill you. Wrong. The air from the scuba tank is compressed by the pressure of the water column above you. As you ascend, the pressure decreases, and the air you’re holding in your lungs expands. Even from a modest depth of, say, 10 feet, the change in volume of the air can be enough to damage your lungs. If you hold your breath while rising from greater depths, air expansion can kill you.

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Use these science-based tips when applicable, and use common sense for everything else. Have fun and be safe in the water! Amy Rogers is a writer, scientist and educator. Learn more at her website, ScienceThrillers.com n

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Celebrating Spiritual Awareness COMMUNITY SUPPORT GROUP HOSTS HOLIDAY CARNIVAL IN WEST SACRAMENTO

By Jessica Laskey RIVER CITY PREVIEWS

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ou can celebrate not only the founding of our fair nation, but also the universal good that lives in us all at the Center for Spiritual Awareness’ 4th of July Carnival: Picnic & Performance in West Sacramento. The CSA was founded in 1998 to provide compassionate, spiritual support to its members and the community at large—regardless of race, gender, religion or sexual orientation—under the spiritual leadership of the Rev. Georgia Prescott. Combine that with traditional Fourth of July fare (hot dogs, potato salad and apple pie), original performances and familyfriendly activities galore, and you’ve got one kickin’ carnival. Festivities begin at noon, when children are turned loose outside the CSA’s 12,500-square-foot facility to bop in the bounce houses, enjoy the slick Slip ’n’ Slide, get their faces painted and dunk (or get dunked) in the dunk tank. At 1:30 p.m., the CSA Teens group will present an original theater piece, “America the Change,” that incorporates spoken word, dance

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Celebrate 4th of July at the Center for Spiritual Awareness’ 4th of July Carnival: Picnic & Performance in West Sacramento. Photo courtesy of David Seals Photography.

and musical duets on cello and violin to explore their experiences growing up American. Next, the team at Generation Next Media will perform “The Living Constitution: A Lively Look at the Creation of America,” which was commissioned by the Sacramento Public Library for its 2012 “One Book” celebration and has since been performed around the region at elementary schools, high schools and churches. The witty, high-energy romp through 250 years of the making of a nation will have history buffs, patriotic parents and energetic kids highly entertained. Admission to the picnic is free. Admission for both performances is a suggested donation of $10 for adults and $5 for children under 12, though no one will be turned away for inability to pay. Satisfy your hunger with a hot dog, potato salad and

beverage combo for $2, plus plenty of separate side dishes and desserts to choose from. For more information, call CSA at 374-9177. The Center for Spiritual Awareness is at 1275 Starboard Drive in West Sacramento.

ROCK THE CROCKER Summer is in full swing, so why not cool off and catch some even cooler activities at the Crocker Art Museum this month? First up is Art Mix/Hip Hop from 5 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, July 10. Get hyped for everything hip-hop including live performances by FLOW Sacramento (featuring the Element Brass Band), hip-hop DJ sets by Sacramento’s best mix-masters, a music video showcase presented by Sol Collective, a DIY beat laboratory and writing workshop, wearable

mix tape art making, plus in-gallery performances by Foreign Native. Shop at the Hip Hop Pop Up Shop for local music, merchandise and more, enjoy under-$5 drink specials all night and 10-minute talks on the current exhibition “African American Art: The Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights Era and Beyond If classical music is more your jam, don’t miss the Classical Concert at 3 p.m. on Sunday, July 13, featuring musicians from the Camellia Symphony under the direction of conductor Christian Baldini. The concert will highlight female composers and their compelling stories, and music, to complement the “Workt by Hand: Hidden Labor and Historical Quilts” exhibition. Be a cool cat and get down at the Jazz in the Courtyard concert at 6 p.m. on Thursday, July 17, featuring MJ’s Brass Boppers, a “singing and swinging” party band that will


Artist Matt Bult's solo exhibition comes to Alex Bult Gallery July 10 through Aug. 2

transport you to New Orleans with its sensational Southern sound. Tickets are $6 for members, $10 for students and kids, $12 for nonmembers. Has your tyke ever dreamed of being locked in a museum overnight like Ben Stiller in the kooky adventure movie “Night at the Museum”? From 5 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, July 24, make their dreams a reality with the Night at the Museum event presented by the Crocker with the help of the Sacramento Theatre Company. Kids can wear their PJs or dress up as their favorite character from the movie while they enjoy art activities, live animal shows, screenings of the film, dancing and more at this familyfriendly fun fest. The event is free for members and is included in general admission. For tickets and more information on all Crocker events, call 808-1182 or go to crockerartmuseum.org The Crocker Art Museum is at 216 O St.

THE FOREST FOR THE TREES See the great outdoors depicted by a great artistic eye when artist Matt Bult’s solo exhibition “Meadow/ Wood” comes to the Alex Bult Gallery (the names aren’t coincidence: the gallery is owned by Bult’s son) from July 10 through Aug. 2.

Bult is a multimedia mastermind, making arresting artwork with everything from traditional acrylics and watercolor to assemblage and collage to found pieces of wood. This particular exhibition was inspired by a meadow near Bult’s Nevada City home and is dedicated “to the memory of our dog Kira, who passed away on March 10th, 2014,” Bult says. Meet the award-winning artist at the preview party from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, July 10 or during the Second Saturday artist reception from 6 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, July 12. For more information, call 476-5540 or go to alexbultgallery.com The Alex Bult Gallery is at 1114 21st St., Suite B.

UNDER THE BIG TOP It’s supercalifragilisticexpialidocious! “Mary Poppins” flies into the Wells Fargo Pavilion from July 8 through 13 as part of the Sacramento Music Circus season. You surely won’t need a spoonful of sugar to swallow this whimsical Disney classic, complete with flying nanny (played by Julie Andrews in the film, who won an Academy Award for her portrayal), bottomless bag and famously hummable songs. For this show only, you can get a $20 discount off tickets in the yellow, red or blue

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PREVIEWS page 70

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PREVIEWS FROM page 69 seating sections for kids ages 4-12. Just don’t feed the birds … Ride an umbrella from England to the sunny “South Pacific” for the musical of the same name on July 22 through 27. The Rodgers and Hammerstein classic will have you singing before you even sit down, with songs like “Some Enchanted Evening,” “Bali Ha’I,” “Younger Than Springtime” and “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outa My Hair,” tunes that helped the show win a Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1950 and 10 Tony Awards when it debuted on Broadway in 1949. The show, which explores themes of love, war and race amid a lush musical backdrop, inspired the movie that was the third-highest-grossing U.S. film in the 1950s. For tickets and more information, call 557-1999. The Wells Fargo Pavilion is at 1419 H St.

BIG FUN! Just as it’s starting to get blistering outside, it’s time for the state’s biggest outdoor extravaganza: the 2014 California State Fair is open for business July 11-27 at Cal Expo. Just be sure to bring your sunscreen. With 70 exhilarating midway rides, statewide competitions for everything from art to agriculture, wine and beer gardens, livestock displays, live horse racing, free concerts galore and more food than you could ever consume in one sitting—get a deep-fried Snickers; you’ll thank me—the State Fair has the most summer excitement you can get for a single ticket. For tickets and more information, go to bigfun.org Cal Expo is at 1600 Exposition Blvd.

DROP-DEAD AWESOME Whether you’ve jumped on the zombie bandwagon or cover your eyes during ads for “The Walking Dead” television show, the Trash Film Orgy (TFO) Zombie Walk is sure to draw undead aficionados of all kinds on Saturday, July 12, which also marks

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The 25th annual Festival of Concerts, presented by the Sacramento Youth Symphony’s Summer Chamber Music Workshop is scheduled for July 9, 16, 18, 19 and 20 at various venues.

the opening of the 14th annual TFO Film Festival. Started in 2001, the Zombie Walk is designed to promote the TFO Film Festival, and it’s better than ever this year. Beginning at 5 p.m. at Roosevelt Park (940 P St.), get your zombie on at the free Carnival of the Dead, which will include hours of undead entertainment (including live music with Tragically White), food trucks (including Squeeze Inn and Fuzion), professional make-up stations, a zombie shooting gallery, dancing, carnival games, vendors, contests, prizes and more. At 9 p.m., the Dead Walk starts, which is a largescale performance art experience where folks dress up as zombies and infiltrate the streets of midtown. New this year, the TFO will actually shut down 10th Street to do a zombie parade to the tunes of the Undead Marching Band. Once you’ve dragged your undead self around midtown, the party continues at 10 p.m. at the Dead Party at the Crest Theatre (1013 K St.) for the opening night of the TFO Film Festival, which will feature a stage performance and a special screening of “Dawn of the Dead.” Though the Crest event is only for adults 18 and over, the rest of the

evening’s events (the Carnival of the Dead and the Dead Walk) are open to all ages. Bloody good! For more information, go to trashfilmorgy.com

SUMMER STRUMMIN’ What do you get when you combine talented young musicians, top-notch instruction and fun, free performances? The 25th annual Festival of Concerts, presented by the Sacramento Youth Symphony’s Summer Chamber Music Workshop and directed by Susan Lamb Cook, on July 9, 16, 18, 19 and 20 at various venues. Founded in 1990 by Cook, the summer session of the SYS Summer Chamber Music Workshop introduces young musicians to chamber music literature and rehearsal techniques through individualized coaching in duets, trios and quartets with music professionals, as well as public performance opportunities. Over the years, the program has gone from teaching 15 participants with three teachers to serving more than 70 students a week with a staff of 25. Talk about a growth spurt! This year’s Festival of Concerts will feature student chamber ensembles

at noon on two Wednesdays, July 9 and 16, at Westminster Presbyterian Church (1300 N St.) and at 3 p.m. on Friday, July 18 at Capistrano Hall at California State University, Sacramento (6000 J St.). The students will be joined by faculty performers at the Festival Chamber Concert at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, July 19 in the Music Recital Hall at CSUS. The annual Concert in the Courtyard, featuring orchestra, piano and woodwind students from the SYS Chamber Music Workshop joined by faculty players, will take place at 7:30 p.m. on Sunday, July 20 at St. Anthony’s Memorial Center at St. Anthony’s Church (660 Florin Road), with a reception following in the courtyard. For more information, call 731-5777 or go to sacramentoyouthsymphony.org

LOOKING GOOD The name of the GOOD Street Food + Design Market really says it all. The modern market is an amalgam of local vendors selling everything from food to furniture with an emphasis on education and community, and the next market takes place from 1 to 5 p.m. on


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Sunday, July 6 on Del Paso Boulevard. The award-winning event is designed to bring consumers and creators into direct contact. Merchants must go through a rigorous selection process to offer their wares, which range from artists offering home decor, furnishings, clothing and jewelry to fine food purveyors, local chefs, grocers, bakers and organics urban farmers serving delectable—and sensible—food items.

Groove to live music while you shop for local products and you’ll be saying one thing when the afternoon is over: “That was GOOD!” The GOOD Street Food + Design Market takes places the first Sunday of every month at 1409 Del Paso Blvd. For more information, go to gooddesignmarket.com Please email items for consideration by the first of the month, at least one month in advance of the event. Jessica Laskey can be reached at jessrlaskey@ gmail.com n

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THEATRE GUIDE Maple and Vine

The Submission

Thru – July 20 Capital Stage Company 2215 J St 476-3116 Capstage.org Katha and Ryu have become allergic to their 21st century lives. After they meet a charismatic man from the a community of 1950s re-enactors, they forsake cell phones and sushi for cigarettes and Tupperware parties. Exploring feminism, racism, homophobia, and marital strife.

Provenance Thru July 26th B Street Theatre 2711 B St 443-5300 Bstreettheatre.org This is a charming metaphysical drama and magical story of Cleo, a librarian, high atop a mountain. Her self-imposed isolation is broken, only to teach an older gentleman to read, and Frances, a worldly woman, on a quest to read a list of 100 books.

Teatro Espejo One Act Festival

»Thru – July 5« Big Idea Theatre 1616 Del Paso Blvd, Sac 960-3036 BigIdeaTheatre.com Complex, new drama about an AfricanAmerican family struggling to leave the projects, has just been selected for the nationals preeminent play festival. A young, white, gay playwright, submitted his work under a pseudonym in the hope of increasing its chances for production by hiring a black actress to stand in for him as author.

Great Train Robbery Ride July 12 – July 26 Sacramento River Train 400 N Harbor Blvd, W Sac 800 866-1690 Lauren.dinnertrain@gmail.com Take a ride back to the Old West on the Sacramento River Train! During the 3 ½ hr trip, keep an eye for outlaws who tend to hide out along the tracks. Guests will de-board the train and a BBQ lunch will be served in kid-friendly Elkhorn Park.

South Pacific

Thru July 27th Wilkerson Theatre 1723 25th St Teatroespejo@hotmail.com “Las Nuevas Tameleras” is a bilingual play, captures three contemporary Latinas in an uproariously comical attempt at making tamales for the first time.

Journey’s End Thru July 6th California Stage Theatre 2509 R St 451-5822 CalStage.org This study in war abandons the notions of “war” that echo in hometown newsprint or the mouths of politicians in favor of the War lived by those who fight. A surreal Waiting for Godot with only cold lead and poison gas to look forward to.

July 22- July 27 Wells Fargo Pavillion 1419 H St 557-1999 This Rodgers and Hammerstein classic features some of the most beautiful music ever composed for theatre. Love transcends both the harsh realities of war and social stereotypes in this sweeping tale that won a Pulitzer Prize and 10 tony Awards. “some Enchanted Evening” and “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outta My Hair.”

Davis Shakespeare Festival Thru Aug 3rd Veterans Memorial Center 203 East 14th & B St, Davis 530 802-0998 Shakespearedavis.org “Much Ado About Nothing” and “She Loves Me”.... check website for scheduled performances.

Les Miserables Thru July 13th Davis Musical Theatre 607 Pena Dr, Davis 530 756-3682 The musical masterpiece that has swept the world for over 25 years, comes to the Davis Musical theatre Company stage for the first time in this end of the season.

916-505-4673 (Prices vary depending upon brand, quantity and expiration.)

SUBMIT EVENTS TO ANIKO@INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

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Two Good THESE TWO MEAT & CHEESE SHOPS ARE TOPS IN DOLING OUT DELICIOUSNESS

BY GREG SABIN RESTAURANT INSIDER

T

here’s something convivial about a plate of meat and cheese. Maybe it’s because it’s meant to be shared, each diner groping and grabbing, stabbing at the plate with knives, forks and fingers. A pile of beautifully shaved meat sitting daintily, enticingly on a strong wood-grain board surrounded with pickled bits is as close to art as simple food gets. Sure, you can create a visual, auditory, olfactory and gustatory masterpiece with an amazing variety of equipment, time and skill. You can master the world of molecular gastronomy or modernist cuisine or zero-gravity braising. You can paint a plate with smears and smudges and foams. But that’s a different world. The world I find myself gravitating toward is one of perfectly aged ham, sliced translucent-thin, a solid triangle of sheep’s milk cheese and a pile of vinegar-soaked veggies. It’s a world I do not tire of. A world that I’ll return to for any occasion, not just a special occasion. Lucky me, then, that I got to sample the wares at Sacramento’s two newest meat-and-cheese joints. We’ll start with Block Butcher Bar. Located right next door to LowBrau Bierhall on 20th and K streets, Block feels a world away from the high-pitched party atmosphere at the popular sausage-and-beer hangout. Owned by the same group as LowBrau, Block feels like a place for more quiet contemplation—serene revelry, if you will.

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Block Butcher Bar is located on 20th Street in Midtown

The music is low. The waiters and waitresses show no skin. The walls are adorned with meat hooks and pickling spices. The beauty of wood and steel and hundreds of bottles of whiskey creates the right vibe for you to enjoy the simple, but by no means plain, treats that will be put before you. Other than a handful of appetizers and a decent grilled cheese sandwich, Block’s menu is as simple as “pick your meat, pick your cheese.” That’s it.

The meat selection is lovely, sophisticated and not so large as to be overwhelming. The cheese selection is easily broken down into four simple categories: cow, goat, sheep and blue. This is not an intimidating selection for the average diner. You do not need to have majored in curds and minored in whey to understand what is going on. However, should you just not want to choose, the cultured servers will be happy to bring out a plate of their favorites. But whatever you do, don’t skip the Iowa white spread, a

seasoned whipped lard concoction that melts on toast and tastes wonderfully like pig butter. Along with the well-curated selection of meats and cheeses is a selection of brown alcohol large enough to make comprehending it difficult. More than 100 bottles of whiskey rise up the ceiling, looming over the bar with their glowing brownness. Whether you are a fan of single-malt, blended, bourbon, rye, American, Canadian, Irish, Scotch or Japanese (that’s right, Japanese), you’ll find a nip of something to your liking. For nondrinkers, there’s an exceptional array of hand-mixed colas and other nonalcoholic treats. Compared to the cacophony next door at LowBrau, and the overall party happening most nights on 20th Street, Block feels like a little oasis where adults are allowed to eat, drink and feel comfortable acting like adults. A bit farther down J Street in East Sac, you’ll come across a brighter, lighter, cheerier version of Block Butcher Bar: The Cultured & The Cured. This little (and I mean little) meat-and-cheese shop feels much more like a shop and less of a restaurant than Block. The deli case is front and center, showcasing another well-curated variety of incredibly fine culinary delights. A small selection of plates is available to eat on-site or off, but they are worth the stop. This is going to sound like a bit of overstatement but here goes: C&C probably has the best mac and cheese in town. There, I said it.


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Warm your belly with a classic from The Cultured and The Cured, mac and cheese made with Fiscalini cheddar and Parmigiano Reggiano

Rich, thick, cheesy, it’s everything you want mac and cheese to be. A fork will stand up in it. A crispy cracker of fried prosciutto actually does stand up in it. Peas are thrown in when in season. It’s my ultimate m&c. Get ready for another: best grilled cheese in town, too.

Block feels like a little oasis where adults are allowed to eat, drink and feel comfortable acting like adults. I don’t know that I’d order a grilled cheese anywhere else. These people turn perfectly delicious firm cheeses into beautiful lava flows of scrumptious dairy on ridiculous

bread, then add little touches like sauteed seasonal mushrooms. I have simply never had better. Other dishes blow it up as well. Yummy bites like brie and asparagus bread pudding and fresh pea soup are handled deftly and with skill. With a few tweaks to the seating arrangement (on a recent visit, all the tables were on the sidewalk) and the addition of a beer and wine license (can’t even bring your own), it’ll be a perfect hang for after-work and earlyevening meals. Insider tip: C&C will deliver across J Street to local favorite Bonn Lair. Block Butcher Bar is at 1050 20th St.; 476-6306; blockbutcherbar.com The Cultured & The Cured is at 3644 J St.; 732-3600; culturedandcured.com

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INSIDE’S

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4715 Manzanita Ave Near Winding Way

485-7747 Member of Opentable.com Dine In & Take Out Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Beer, Wine & Well Drinks (Daily 5-7) Banquet Room

Family owned and operated Celebrating 20 years!

ARDENCARMICHAEL

La Rosa Blanca Taqueria

Andaloussia

L D Full Bar $$-$$ Fresh Mexican food served in a colorful family-friendly setting

1537 Howe Ave. 927-1014 L D $-$$ Authentic Moroccan cuisine, lunch & dinner specials, belly dancing weekends • bestmoroccanfood.com

Bandera 2232 Fair Oaks Blvd. 922-3524

4215 Arden Way (Arden and Eastern)

482-1008 Open 7 days a week

Lunch 11-4 pm • Dinner 4-9 pm Sundays • 4-7 pm • Closed Mondays

Mon - Sat 11am-10pm; Sun 12-9

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Dine in,Take Out or Delivery

D Full Bar $$-$$$ American Cooking served in an all-booth setting. • Houtons.com

Bella Bru Café 5038 Fair Oaks Blvd. 485-2883 B L D $-$$ European-style cafe serving espresso, omelettes, salads, sandwiches, dinner entres, full bar, table service from 5 p.m., patio dining bellabrucafe.com

Café Vinoteca 3535 Fair Oaks Blvd. 487-1331 L D $$ Full Bar Italian bistro in a casual setting • Cafevinoteca.com

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Chinois City Café 3535 Fair Oaks Blvd. 485-8690 L D $$ Full Bar Asian-influenced cuisine in a casual setting • Chinoiscitycafe.com

Ettore’s 2376 Fair Oaks Blvd. 482-0708 B L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Patio European-style gourmet café with salads, soup, spit-roasted chicken, and desserts in a bistro setting • Ettores.com

AWARD WINNING NEIGHBORHOOD ITALIAN BISTRO!

Kilt Pub 4235 Arden Way 487-4979 L D $ Beer/Wine British Pub Grub, Nightly Dinner Specials, Open 7 Days

Jackson Dining 1120 Fulton Ave. 483-7300 L D $$ Wine/Beer Creative cuisine in a casual setting • Jacksoncateringevents.com

Jack’s Urban Eats 2535 Fair Oaks Blvd. 481-5225 L D $ Full Bar Made-to-order comfort food in a casual setting • Jacksurbaneats.com

The Kitchen 2225 Hurley Way 568-7171

916.487.1331 3535 FAIR OAKS BLVD./ SACRAMENTO, CA 95864 WWW.CAFEVINOTECA.COM

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D $$$ Wine/Beer Five-course gourmet demonstration dinner by reservation only • Thekitchenrestaurant.com

3032 Auburn Blvd. 484-0139 2813 Fulton Ave. 484-6104

Leatherby’s Family Creamery 2333 Arden Way 920-8382 L D $ House-made ice cream and specialties, soups and sandwiches

Lemon Grass Restaurant 601 Munroe St. 486-4891 L D $$ Full Bar Patio Vietnamese and Thai cuisine in a casual yet elegant setting

The Mandarin Restaurant 4321 Arden Way 488-47794 D $$-$$$ Full Bar Gourmet Chineses food for 32 years • Dine in and take out

Matteo's Pizza 5132 Fair Oaks. Blvd. 779-0727 L D Beer/Wine $$ Neighborhood gathering place for pizza, pasta and grill dishes

Roma's Pizza & Pasta 6530 Fair Oaks Blvd. 488-9800 L D $$ Traditional Italian pizza & pasta Family Friendly Catering + Team Parties • romas-pizzaand-pasta.com

Roxy 2381 Fair Oaks Blvd. 489-2000 B L D $$-$$$ Full Bar American cuisine with a Western touch in a creative upscale atmosphere

Ristorante Piatti 571 Pavilions Lane 649-8885 L D $$ Full Bar Contemporary Italian cuisine in a casually elegant setting

Sam's Hof Brau 2500 Watt 482-2175 L D $$ Wine/Beer Fresh quality meats roasted daily • thehofbrau.com

Thai House 527 A Munroe in Loehmann's 485-3888 L D $$ Wine/Beer Featuring the great taste of Thai traditional specialties • sacthaihouse.com

Thai Chef's House 2851 Fulton Ave. 481-9500 L D $$ Thai cusine in a friendly, casual setting

Willie's Burgers 5050 Fair Oaks Blvd. 488-5050 L D $ Great burgers and more


T N RA A ST RE IL Y M FA D AN LL SE A

July

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Town & Country Village 2621 Marconi Avenue • (916) 484-3411 Downtown 1020 12th Street, Suite 110 • (916) 444-1040 *Offer valid at participating location shown. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Restrictions may apply. See store for details. Edible Arrangements®, the Fruit Basket Logo, and other marks mentioned herein are registered trademarks of Edible Arrangements, LLC. © 2014 Edible Arrangements, LLC. All rights reserved.

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SENIORS EAT FREE!

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1500 Eureka Road, Roseville (916) 787-3287 2585 Iron Point Road, Folsom (916) 983-1133

Maximum discount $15, one discount per senior. Offer good May 1 - July 31, 2014. Dine in only. Must present proof of age. Not valid for Happy Hour nor in combination with any other offer.

Summer Hours 11am - 11pm daily

11 pm

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Family owned and operated!

07/31/14

SUNDAY Croixnut Day (flavor changes every week)

FRENCH TEA SERVICE $25/PERSON Set menu includes: tea sandwiches, assorted pastries, macaroon, tarts and choice of organic tea (reservation required)

Located on the corner of 9th & K in downtown Sacramento M-F 7-6, Sat 8-6, Sun 8-4 | 551-1500 | info@estellspatisserie.com


MIDTOWN

Aioli Bodega Espanola 1800 L St. 447-9440 L D $$ Full Bar Patio Andalusian cuisine served in a casual European atmosphere

Biba Ristorante 2801 Capitol Ave. 455-2422 L D $$$ Full Bar Upscale Northern Italian cuisine served a la carte • Biba-restaurant.com

Buckhorn Grill 1801 L St. 446-3757

Lucca Restaurant & Bar 1615 J St. 669-5300 L D Full Bar $$-$$$ Patio Mediterranean cuisine in a casual, chic atmosphere • Luccarestaurant.com

(With coupon. Not valid w/any other offers. Dine in only. LLimit 1 coupon per party. Substitutions extra. Exp. 7/31/14)

D $$-$$$ Eclectic menu in a boutique setting

Mulvaney’s Building & Loan 1215 19th St. 441-6022 L D Full Bar $$$ Modern American cuisine in an upscale historic setting

Café Bernardo

B L D $ No table service at this coffee roaster and bakery, also serving creative artisanal sandwiches

Centro Cocina Mexicana

$19.95

(for 2 or more) Includes: Beef Tacos, Cheese Enchiladas, Chile In Rellenos, Rice/Beans, Chips & Salsa

2028 H St. 443-7585

Old Soul Co.

B L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Patio Casual California cuisine with counter service

Monday–Thursday after 4pm Six Course Mexican Platter for Two

Moxie

L D $$ Wine/Beer A counter service restaurant with high-quality chicken, char-roasted beef, salmon, and entrée salads

2726 Capitol Ave. 443-1180 1431 R St. 930-9191

Simply Great M Mexican Food!

1501 16th St. 444-5850

Paesano’s Pizzeria 1806 Capitol Ave. 447-8646 L D $$ Gourmet pizza, pasta, salads in casual setting • Paesanos.biz

2730 J St. 442-2552

FREE DINNER

Restaurant

2813 Fulton Avenue • 484-6104 Live music Fridays

Folsom

402 Natoma Street, Folsom • 673-9085 Live music Fridays & Saturdays

Hot City Pizza

1801 Capitol Ave. 441-0303

5642 J Street 731-8888

L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Patio Regional Mexican cuisine served in an authentic artistic setting • zocolosacramento.com

EAST SAC

Chicago Fire

3301 Folsom Blvd. 455-2233

3260B J St. 449-8810 L D $-$$ Thin-Crust Pizza, Deserts and Beer in an intimate setting and popular location

B L D $$ Full Bar Patio Pacific Northwest cuisine in a casual bistro setting •

4920 Folsom Blvd. 452-5516 B L D $ Fountain-style diner serving burgers, sandwiches, soup and ice cream specialties

1730 L St. 444-1100

B L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Outdoor Dining Crepes, omelettes, salads, soups and sandwiches served in a casual setting

Ernesto’s Mexican Food 1901 16th St. 441-5850

B L D $-$$ Full Bar Outdoor Dining Fresh Mexican food served in an upscale, yet familyfriendly setting • Ernestosmexicanfood.com

58 Degrees & Holding Co. 1217 18th St. 442-5858 L D $$$ Wine/Beer California cuisine served in a chic, upscale setting • 58degrees.com

Fox & Goose Public House

Paragary’s Bar & Oven 1401 28th St. 457-5737 D $$ Full Bar Outdoor Patio California cuisine with an Italian touch • Paragarys.com

Suzie Burger 29th and P Sts. 455-3300 L D $ Classic burgers, cheesesteaks, shakes, chili dogs, and other tasty treats • suzieburger.com

The Streets of London Pub 1804 J St. 498-1388 L D $ Wine/Beer English Pub fare in an authentic casual atmosphere, 17 beers on tap streetsoflondon.net

1001 R St. 443-8825

Tapa The World

B L D $-$$ Wine/Beer English Pub favorites in an historic setting • Foxandgoose.com

2115 J St. 442-4353

Harlow’s Restaurant 2708 J Street 441-4693

L D $-$$ Wine/Beer/Sangria Spanish/world cuisine in a casual authentic atmosphere, live flamenco music - tapathewworld.com

L D $$ Full Bar Modern Italian/California cuisine with Asian inspirations • Harlows.com

Thai Basil Café

Italian Importing Company

L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Patio Housemade curries among their authentic Thai specialties Thaibasilrestaurant.com

1827 J Street 442-6678 B L $ Italian food in a casual grocery setting

Jack’s Urban Eats 1230 20th St. 444-0307 L D $ Full Bar Made-to-order comfort food in a casual setting • Jacksurbaneats.com

Kasbah Lounge 2115 J St. 442-4388 D Full Bar $$ Middle Eastern cuisine in a Moroccan setting kasbahlounge.com

2431 J St. 442-7690

The Coconut Midtown 2502 J Street 440-1088 Lunch Delivery M-F and Happy Hour 4-6 L D $-$$ Beer/Wine Food with Thai Food Flair

The Waterboy 2000 Capitol Ave. 498-9891 L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Patio Fine South of France and northern Italian cuisine in a chic neighborhood setting • waterboyrestaurant.com

La Bombe Ice Cream & More 3020 H Street 448-2334 L D $ European and American Frozen Confections, sandwiches, soups and espresso

Burr's Fountain

Crepeville

D $ Wine/Beer Fresh made to order pizza served in a cozy dining room; or to take out

Italian Stallion

33rd Street Bistro

D $$ Full Bar Chicago-style pizza, salads wings served in a family-friendly atmosphere • Chicagofirerestaurant.com

(With coupon. Not valid w/any other offers. Dine in only. Exp. 7/31/14)

Zocolo

L D $$ Full Bar Patio Regional Mexican cooking served in a casual atmosphere • Paragarys.com

2416 J St. 443-0440

Buy 1 Dinner Plate At Regular Price & Get The Second Dinner Up To $7.00 FREE. Must Include 2 Drinks.

La Trattoria Bohemia 3649 J St. 455-7803 L D Wine/Beer $-$$ Italian and Czech specialties in a neighborhood bistro setting

Clarks' Corner Restaurant 5641 J St. L D Full Bar $$ American cuisine in a casual historic setting

Clubhouse 56

Les Baux 5090 Folsom Blvd. 739-1348 BLD $ Wine/Beer Unique boulangerie, café & bistro serving affordable delicious food/drinks all day long • lesbauxbakery.com

723 56th. Street 454-5656

BLD Full Bar $$ American cuisine. HD sports, kid's menu, beakfast weekends

Opa! Opa! 5644 J St. 451-4000 L D Wine/Beer $ Fresh Greek cuisine in a chic, casual setting, counter service

Evan’s Kitchen 855 57th St. 452-3896 B L D Wine/Beer $$ Eclectic California cuisine served in a family-friendly atmosphere, Kid’s menu, winemaker dinners, daily lunch specials, community table for single diners • Chefevan.com

Nopalitos

Español

Selland's Market Cafe

5530 H St. 452-8226 B L $ Wine/Beer Southwestern fare in a casual diner setting

5340 H St. 473-3333

5723 Folsom Blvd. 457-3679 L D Full Bar $-$$ Classic Italian cuisine served in a traditional family-style atmosphere

B L D $$-$$$ Wine/Beer High quality handcrafted food to eat in or take out, wine bar

Formoli's Bistro

Star Ginger 3101 Folsom Blvd. 231-8888

3839 J St. 448-5699 B L D Wine/Beer Patio $$ Mediterranean influenced cuisine in a neighborhood setting

Asian Grill and Noodle Bar • starginger.com

Istanbul Bistro 3260 J Street 449-8810 L D Wine/Beer $$ Mediterranean-inspired cuisine in cozy neighborhood bistro setting

DOWNTOWN Foundation

400 L St. 321-9522 L D $$ Full Bar American cooking in an historic atmosphere • foundationsacramento.com

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full service patio dining . . .

Chops Steak Seafood & Bar

Morton’s Steakhouse

1117 11th St. 447-8900

621 Capitol Mall #100 442-50

L D $$$ Full Bar Steakhouse serving dry-aged prime beef and fresh seafood in an upscale club atmosphere • Chopssacramento.com

D $$$ Full Bar Upscale American steakhouse • Mortons.com

Downtown & Vine

10th & J Sts. 448-8960

1200 K Street #8 228-4518

Wine Bar, Event Center & Retail Sales, 36 wines by the glass, beer on tap • downtownandvine.com

Ella Dining Room & Bar 1131 K St. 443-3772

Saturdays & Sundays beginning at 9 am breakfast Πlunch Πdinner $5 Bloody Mary Bar $10 Bottomless Mimosas

BELLA BRU Π485.2883 Fair Oaks Boulevard & Arden Way

bellabrucafe.com/Luna Lounge tab

L D $$$ Full Bar Modern American cuisine served family-style in a chic, upscale space • Elladiningroomandbar.com

Esquire Grill 1213 K St. 448-8900 L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Outdoor Dining Upscale American fare served in an elegant setting • Paragarys.com

Estelle's Patisserie

901 K St. 916-551-1500 L D $$-$$$ French-inspired Bakery serving fresh pastry & desserts, artisan breads and handcrafted sandwiches. EstellesPatisserie.com

Fat's City Bar & Cafe 1001 Front St. 446-6768

Rio City Café

1110 Front St. Old Sac 442-8226 L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Seasonal menu of favorites in a setting overlooking river • Riocitycafe.com

Ten 22 1022 Second St. 441-2211 L D Wine/Beer $$ American bistro favorites with a modern twist in a casual, Old Sac setting • ten22oldsac.com

LAND PARK Freeport Bakery

2966 Freeport Blvd. 442-4256 B L $ Award-winning baked goods and cakes for eat in or take out • Freeportbakery.com

Iron Grill 13th Street and Broadway 737-5115 L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Upscale neighborhood steakhouse • Ironsteaks.com

Jamie's Bar and Grill 427 Broadway 442-4044

The Firehouse Restaurant

Riverside Clubhouse

L D $$$ Full Bar Global and California cuisine in an upscale historic Old Sac setting • Firehouseoldsac.com

Frank Fat’s

L D $ Full Bar Featured on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives. Dine in or take out since 1986

2633 Riverside Drive 448-9988 L D $$ Full Bar Upscale American cuisine served in a contemporary setting • Riversideclubhouse.com

Taylor's Kitchen

806 L St. 442-7092

2924 Freeport Boulevard 443-5154

Il Fornaio

Tower Café

L D Full Bar $$-$$$ Chinese favorites in an elegant setting • Fatsrestaurants.com

400 Capitol Mall 446-4100 L D Full Bar $$$ Fine Northern Italian cuisine in a chic, upscale atmosphere • Ilfornaio.com

Grange 926 J Street • 492-4450 B L D Full Bar $$$ Simple, seasonal, soulful • grangerestaurant.com

Hock Farm Craft & Provision 1415 L St. 440-8888 L D $$-$$ Full Bar Celebration of the region's rich history and bountiful terrain • Paragarys.com

Claim Jumper 1111 J St. 442-8200 L D $$ Full Bar Upscale American in a clubby atmosphere

Mikuni Restaurant and Sushi Bar 1530 J St. 447-2112 L D Full Bar $$-$$$ Japanese cuisine served in an upscale setting • Mikunisushi.com

IA JUL n 14

D $$ Full Bar Relax with drinks and dinner in this stylish downtown space

D $$-$$$ Full Bar Steaks and Asian specialties served in a casual historic Old Sac location • Fatsrestaurants.com

1112 Second St. 442-4772

78

Parlaré Eurolounge

D $$$ Wine/Beer Dinner served Wed. through Saturday. Reservations suggested but walk-ins welcome.

1518 Broadway 441-0222 B L D $$ Wine/Beer International cuisine with dessert specialties in a casual setting

Willie's Burgers 2415 16th St. 444-2006 L D $ Great burgers and more. Open until 3 am Friday and Saturday n


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CARMICHAEL VIEW ESTATE A joy to share with family and friends. Gated. Private. Glorious $1,750,000 JOHN GUDEBSKI 870-6016 CalBRE#01854491

MILLION DOLLAR AMERICAN RIVER VIEW!!! 7 BR 4 BA, 4600 sq ft, pool $1,282,500 DENISE CALKIN 803-3363 CalBRE#01472607 CalkinRealEstate.com

BEAUTIFUL RANCH STYLE HOME across from Del Paso Country Club. Large gourmet kitch, fam rm, formal liv & din rm, pool, covered patio $825,000 ANGELA HEINZER 212-1881 CalBRE#0100489 AngelaHeinzer.com

AUTHENTIC CALIFORNIA ADOBE Absolutely beguiling hand crafted home on .77 acres along Del Paso CC $750,000 JOHN GUDEBSKI 870-6016 CalBRE#01854491

PERFECT EMPTY NESTER built by Lewis & Bristow, 2 bedrooms plus den, 2 bath, Classic 1 story ranch design, walls of glass, serene yard w/pool $649,000 JONATHAN BAKER 837-4523 CalBRE#00484212

PRIVATE MEDITERRANEAN VILLA Stunning custom gate opens to paradise! 4/5 bed, 5 bath home amazes w/workout rm, 8 car garage, MUST SEE! $1,500,000 KAREN SAENZ 549-8212 CalBRE#01083222 SaenzSells.com ARDEN OAKS Park-like feel on .77 of an acre. Kitchen light & bright, fam rm looks out to back yd, perfect for entertaining $1,150,000 ANGELA HEINZER 212-1881 CalBRE#0100489 AngelaHeinzer.com DEL NORTE BEAUTY! approx. 4000sqft. 6/bd 4 full bath, plus office possible 7th bdrm or game room 4 car garage, pool surrounded by lush backyard KAREN SAENZ 549-8212 CalBRE#01083222 SaenzSells.com

SPACIOUS & PRIVATE IN GATED COMMUNITY located in Carmichael at the end of a cul-de-sac in a parklike setting. Open flr plan w/spacious living areas $425,000 IONE KOCH 947-9440 CalBRE#01337215

ARDEN PARK VISTA CONTEMPORARY Open flr plan wonderful natural light, artful & extensive renovations. 3 bd, 2ba, lrg covered patio, spacious yard $574,000 JONATHAN BAKER 837-4523 CalBRE#00484212

A VACATION AT HOME! Beautiful waterways, pools, spas, & MORE. Spacious upstairs 2 bed, one of the largest fl plans Timberlake has to offer $101,000 GERRY SCOTT 715-7428 CalBRE#01922592 4 BR W/2 MASTERS in desirable Carmichael w/RV access. Great floor plan, plenty of rm for lg family. Huge lot, refinished hd wood flrs, fresh paint! LEEANA ANDERSON 283-4863 CalBRE#01048768 UNIVERSITY PARK SINGLE STORY nicely updated & the location couldn't be better! Great room w/vaulted ceilings, formal din rm, bright kitchen 2bd/2ba $409,900 ANGELA HEINZER 212-1881 CalBRE#01004189

SIERRA OAKS OFFICE 440 Drake Circle, Sacramento, CA 95864 916.972.0212

80

IA JUL n 14

CARMICHAEL CUTIE 3bd, 2ba huge great rm. Kitchen w/granite counters & Walk-in pantry. Both bathrooms have been nicely updated. Must See! $300,000 ROBERTA LAUTRUP 944-4434 CalBRE#00579502

GIBBONS PARK REMODELED RANCH 1 story 3 bed/2 bath, tile roof & Spanish Colonial architectural elements, approx. 1800 sf, new kitchen & floors! Gorgeous! LEEANA ANDERSON 283-4863 CalBRE#01048768

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Inside arden jul 2014  
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