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the joy that comes from serving others. Class leaders also organize monthly family service projects, designed to teach participants that every pair of hands can make a difference. The group recently raised $240 for Children’s Receiving Home of Sacramento with a coffee and doughnut stand during soccer Saturday. Past projects have included a book sale to raise funds for the local library; distribution of sock packs filled with toiletries for those in need; gardening for Saint John’s Program for Real Change; and a lemonade stand to raise funds for Happy Tails and Effie Yeaw Nature Center. The class is sponsored by the Baha’is of Sacramento. There is no charge to attend. The class meets every Thursday from 4 to 5 p.m. at Coloma Community Center, located at 4623 T St. To learn more, email neighborhood.childrens.class@gmail. com.

EAST SAC LIFE FROM page 12 AARP’s Tax-Aide team in Northern California, contact the South Sacramento district coordinator at taxaidesosac@hotmail.com or go to aarp.org/giving-back.

BRING YOUR OWN SAC Under the Reusable Bag Ordinance passed by the city council last March, single-use plastic bags will no longer be provided by many Sacramento retailers, including grocery stores, large pharmacies, convenience stores and stores like Target that have grocery or pharmacy sections starting Jan. 1. In lieu of plastic, shoppers will have the option to purchase recyclable paper or reusable bags at checkout. Bags will cost a minimum of 10 cents each. Shoppers also can bring their own bags. Restaurants and farmers markets are exempt from the bag ban. Groceries and pharmacies may still provide plastic bags to carry produce or meat within a store, to carry prescription medication or to segregate food or merchandise that could damage or contaminate other items. WIC and CalFresh participants using vouchers or EBT cards will not be charged for bags. For more information, go to cityofsacramento.org.

CAREGIVER SEMINAR

LEAF SEASON ENDS Leaf pile collection will end on Jan. 31. After that date, customers should place yard waste only in their designated green bins. Piles placed on the street after Jan. 31 may be tagged as illegal dumping and subject to fines. For more information, go to cityofsacramento.org.

CHRISTMAS TREE COLLECTION As El Nino looms, it’s important to keep our gutters clear of debris, including those old Christmas trees that can languish for weeks before the claw arrives. East Sac Cub Scout Pack 128 can help. For the second year, the pack will hold a Christmas tree recycling fundraiser. On Sunday, Jan.

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For the second year, the East Sac Cub Scout Pack 128 will hold a Christmas tree recycling fundraiser.

3, and Sunday, Jan. 10, scouts will pick up Christmas trees from East Sacramento and River Park homes and transport them to a recycling center. Trees must be at the curb by 8 a.m. A $10 donation per tree is requested. Proceeds will fund a new Pinewood Derby track for the pack’s annual wooden car race. To pay by mail, send a check to Pack 128, P.O. Box 191838, Sacramento, CA 95819. To pay with a credit card, email eastsacpack128@ gmail.com. Be sure to include an address and specify a preferred pickup date.

TEACH YOUR CHILDREN WELL Looking for a way to introduce your little one to the concepts of compassion, courtesy and community service? The Sacramento Neighborhood Children’s Class may be the perfect fit for you. Open to all children ages 4 to 9, the weekly virtue classes focus on instilling in young minds the values of trust, patience, helpfulness, gratitude, friendship and respect. Participants will develop a sense of their place within the community and experience firsthand

Caregivers of people living with dementia face many difficult decisions, and daily responsibilities sometimes overshadow important long-term care planning. On Friday, Jan. 8, learn about the legal decisions to consider when someone you love has dementia. From 3 to 4 p.m., the Triple-R Adult Day Program will host a one-hour talk with local attorney Colleen Watters, who will explain the importance of getting one’s legal ducks in a row. Watters will address topics such as advanced care directives, living trusts and conflict among family members about how to care for their loved one. Attendees will also learn the importance of having their own financial affairs in order. Watters, who specializes in estate planning and living trusts, will provide an overview of helpful legal documents that can make future medical and legal decisions easier once the older adult with memory loss is unable to speak for themselves. The talk will be held in the Cypress Room at Ethel MacLeod Hart Senior Center, located at 915 27th St. Family members providing care for a person

East sacramento jan 2016