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north arkansas electric cooperative edition

October is National Co-op Month.

Electric co-ops are proud to power more than 20 million American homes, businesses, farms and schools in 48 states.

The cover of this year’s Arkansas Next Pros magazine features journeyman lineman Clint Ray, who works in NAEC’s Ash Flat district. The magazine highlights several technical careers and is distributed to high school students across the state by Arkansas Business Publishing Group. Ray completed the High Voltage Lineman Technology Program at Arkansas State University-Newport in 2011. He said he wanted a career that allowed him to work outside and help others. “I enjoy meeting new people on the job every day,” Ray said. “That could be when replacing a pole or restoring power after a storm. I also like being a role model for kids. They definitely like the bucket trucks. That makes your day.” To read Ray’s profile and the rest of the magazine, see the link in the news section at www.naeci.com. 22

OCTOBER 2019

NORTH ARKANSAS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

IMAGES: NRECA; ABPG; HERESWENDY/ISTOCK.COM

NAEC lineman featured in magazine


Downed power lines can look relatively harmless, but don’t be fooled. They likely carry an electric current strong enough to cause serious injury or possibly death. These tips can help you stay safe around downed lines: • If you see a downed power line, move away from the line and anything touching it. • The proper way to move away from the line is to shuffle with small steps, keeping your feet together and on the ground at all times. This will minimize the potential for a strong electric shock. Electricity wants to move from a high voltage zone to a low voltage one — and it could do that through you. • If you see someone who is in direct or indirect contact with the downed line, do not touch the person. You could become the next victim. Call 911 instead. • Do not attempt to move a downed power line or anything in contact with the line by using another object, such as a broom. Even normally non-conductive materials, such as wood or cloth, if slightly wet, can conduct electricity and electrocute you. • Be careful not to put your feet near water where a downed power line is located. • Do not drive over downed lines. Chris Waltrip, safety and training coordinator, said members should avoid power lines even if they aren’t down. For example, never try to cut a tree that is touching or could touch the lines. You could be electrocuted. Contact NAEC, so it can be removed safely.

my co-op

IMAGES: NRECA; ABPG; HERESWENDY/ISTOCK.COM

For safety, stay clear of power lines, especially if they’re down

Always contact NAEC before working within 10 feet of power lines Unfortunately, people often see the cleared expanse of the cooperative’s right-of-way as an ideal location to install a billboard, operate large equipment or build a structure. North Arkansas Electric Cooperative asks that anyone who wants to work within 10 feet of the overhead energized lines or conductors contact the cooperative before any work begins.

“We can go to the site and see if it is safe for you to work in that area,” said Chris Waltrip, NAEC safety and training coordinator. “If we determine it is not, we can take steps, such as adding cover to lines, to help ensure your safety.” Anyone wanting to work near lines may contact NAEC from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday by dialing 870-895-3221 or by visiting a co-op office.

NORTH ARKANSAS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

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Profile for Inside Information

2019 October NAECI Arkansas Living  

North Arkansas Electric Cooperative Edition "Center Pages" of "Rural Arkansas" Monthly Magazine

2019 October NAECI Arkansas Living  

North Arkansas Electric Cooperative Edition "Center Pages" of "Rural Arkansas" Monthly Magazine

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