Page 1

POWER UP

Mid-Missouri Moves Into Alternative Energy PAGE 60

COMO LAW

Local Attorneys Make Their Case At The Roundtable PAGE 46

SUMMER 2014 www.ColumbiaCEO.com

CoMo TO THE WORLD PAGE 54


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CONTENTS

Inside Columbia’s CEO • www.ColumbiaCEO.com • Volume 5, Issue 4

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Opening Bell: The Buzz On CoMo Biz

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Regional Roundup

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The Ladder Report: Who’s On The Move In CoMo?

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Data Bank: Show-Me Jobs

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The Conference Room: A Q&A With UMB’s Tony Mayfield

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Les Bourgeois Expands With A Distillery

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Show-Me Heroes Pushes Veteran Hiring Program

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Business Basics: How To Choose A Business Attorney

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Business Unusual: Stadium Shoes

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CEO Roundtable: Columbia’s Legal Eagles Make Their Case

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From CoMo To The World: Local Businesses Reach Out With International Impact

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Power Up: Mid-Missouri Moves Into Alternative Energy

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CEO At Play: Summer Fun

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Shopping: Travel Tech

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Networking

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Publisher’s Note

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Closing Quotes

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTIONS Attorney Profiles PAGE 23 Faces Behind the Places PAGE 66


STAFF

INSIDE COLUMBIA’S CEO

Publisher Fred Parry fred@insidecolumbia.net Associate Publisher Melody Parry melody@insidecolumbia.net

MEET OUR EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

Associate Publisher & Executive Editor Sandy Selby sandy@insidecolumbia.net Managing Editor Kathy Casteel kathy@insidecolumbia.net Editorial Assistant Morgan McCarty morgan@insidecolumbia.net Contributing Writers Nicole Eno, Anita Neal Harrison

TOM ATKINS President, Tom Atkins Investments

RANDY COIL President, Coil Construction

GARY DREWING President, Joe Machens Dealerships

JOAN GABEL Dean, Trulaske College of Business, University of Missouri

Graphic Designers Kate Moore kate@insidecolumbia.net Trever Griswold trever@insidecolumbia.net Rudi Petry rudi@insidecolumbia.net Photo Editor L.G. Patterson lg@insidecolumbia.net

BOB GERDING President, Gerding, Korte & Chitwood CPAs

PAUL LAND Principal/Owner, Plaza Commercial Realty

DIANNE LYNCH President, Stephens College

GEORGE PFENENGER CEO, Socket

Sales Director Deb Valvo deb@insidecolumbia.net Operations Manager Kalie Clennin kalie@insidecolumbia.net Marketing Representatives Jessica Card jessica@insidecolumbia.net Rosemarie Peck rosemarie@insidecolumbia.net

BOB PUGH CEO, MBS Textbook Exchange

GREG STEINHOFF President of Strategic Operations, Veterans United Home Loans

JERRY TAYLOR President & CEO, MFA Oil Co.

TIM WOLFE President, University of Missouri System

Inside Columbia’s CEO magazine 47 E. Broadway • Columbia, MO 65203 • Office: 573-442-1430 • Web: www.ColumbiaCEO.com Inside Columbia’s CEO is published quarterly by OutFront Communications LLC, 47 E. Broadway, Columbia, Mo. 65203, 573-442-1430. Copyright OutFront Communications, 2014. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of any editorial or graphic content without the express written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Postage paid at Columbia, Mo. The annual subscription rate is $19.95 for four issues. I

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Jes Weddle jes@insidecolumbia.net

Director of Customer Retention Gerri Shelton gerri@insidecolumbia.net

Please Recycle This Magazine.

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Joe Schmitter joe@insidecolumbia.net

Office Manager Kent Hudelson kent@insidecolumbia.net Assistant Finance Manager Brenda Brooks brenda@insidecolumbia.net Distribution Manager John Lapsley


OPENING BELL

the buzz on como biz

Rubble Rousing

3M Grant Helps Fund Wetlands Restoration

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t took a corporate sponsor, 16 government agencies and a horde of volunteers to work their magic, but the proverbial sow’s ear has yielded a silk purse for Columbians. In this case, the old Columbia sewer treatment plant has been transformed into a bird watcher’s paradise. The city dedicated the 3M Flat BranchHinkson Creek Wetlands on May 15 to celebrate the restoration of the former sewer plant site to a natural wetlands. The 3M Wetlands help filter stormwater runoff and provide habitat for wildlife. Wetland cells treat stormwater runoff from approximately 140 acres of urban watershed and can store an estimated 10 million gallons of runoff. Amenities of the 26-acre park include interpretive signs, a shelter, picnic tables, bike racks and a nature trail. The old sewer treatment pump 10

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house has been repurposed into a viewing platform with a green roof where visitors can observe wildlife attracted to the improved habitat. In fact, the 3M Wetlands has become a “hot spot” in Missouri for bird sightings, with 138 species already recorded. A $40,000 3M Foundation Environmental Stewardship Grant jump-started the restoration effort in 2010, augmented by park sales tax funds and grants from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Missouri Conservation Heritage Foundation, National Association of Counties Research Foundation and the Recreational Trails Program. Forest ReLeaf of Missouri donated 1,000 native trees and shrubs to the project , and volunteers from Columbia Aquatic Restoration Project and TreeKeepers donated their Saturdays to plant the trees and shrubs.

BEFORE: Sewer Plant No. 2 pump house prior to the 3M Flat Branch-Hinkson Creek Wetland project AFTER: Renovated Sewer Plant No. 2 pump house is now a viewing platform overlooking the 3M Wetlands. Before photo courtesy Brett O’Brien/ Columbia Parks & Recreation; After photo courtesy Chris Woodson/USFWS

Share your business news with Inside Columbia’s CEO. Email the editor at kathy@insidecolumbia.net.


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OPENING BELL

the buzz on como biz

Don’t Worry, Be Happy

Color Us ... W

hat does your logo broadcast about you to your customers? A University of Missouri researcher has found that the specific colors used in a company’s logo have a significant impact on how that logo — and the brand — is viewed by consumers. Jessica Ridgway, a doctoral student in the MU Department of Textile and Apparel Management, studied the reactions of adults to generic logos of different colors for fake companies she created. Ridgway’s research revealed that blue logos invoke feelings of confidence, success and reliability; green logos invoke perceptions of environmental friendliness, toughness, durability, masculinity and sustainability; purple logos invoke femininity, glamour and charm; pink logos give the perception of youth, imagination and fashionable; yellow logos invoke perceptions of fun and modernity; and red logos bring out feelings of expertise and self-assurance. “The study demonstrates that brands should use logo colors associated with the personality traits they want their brand to have in the eyes of consumers,” Ridgway says. “Brand managers must stay attuned to how colors are viewed and applied in popular culture, as this tends to influence consumers’ color associations.” Ridgway’s study was published last January in the International Journal of Fashion Design, Technology and Education.

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A national movement to bar employers from posing questions about job-seekers’ criminal records on job applications is gaining traction in Columbia. The Mayor’s Task Force on Community Violence is recommending the Columbia City Council enact an ordinance that would prohibit all public and private employers from asking about a person’s criminal history on job applications. Task force members hope such a law would assist former convicts with reintegration into the community and the workforce after their release, noting that recidivism is more likely when released ex-offenders are unemployed. “Ban the box” initiatives have passed in large cities such as Baltimore, Chicago, Detroit, San Francisco, New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C.; last year, Kansas City enacted a ban that covers only city job applications.

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s the Class of 2014 sets out into the workaday world, inquiring minds want to know: Which careers will make them happiest? According to the jobs search and review site CareerBliss, “work happiness” depends on an individual’s manager and co-workers, the dispensing of encouragement and rewards, opportunities for professional growth, company environment and culture, workflow and day-to-day responsibilities. Taking those elements into account, the site has compiled a tech-heavy list of careers that it says today’s newest professionals will find most fulfilling.

TOP 20 HAPPIEST JOBS For The Class Of 2014

1. Java Developer 2. Embedded Software Engineer 3. .NET Developer 4. Medical Technologist 5. QA Engineer 6. Credit Analyst 7. Management Consultant 8. Network Engineer 9. Data Analyst 10. Web Developer 11. Business Analyst 12. Software Developer 13. Process Engineer 14. Manufacturing Engineer 15. Electrical Engineer 16. Systems Administrator 17. Network Administrator 18. Accountant 19. Recruiter 20. Financial Analyst


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OPENING BELL

Roofing Manufacturer To Open Facility In Moberly GAF Roofing has announced plans to build a new shingle laminator facility in Moberly, an expansion that is expected to create 125 new jobs in Randolph County. GAF will invest nearly $149 million to develop a 147-acre site with a 320,000-squarefoot facility for manufacturing and warehousing. Company officials say the new, stateof-the-art plant will have the highest production capacity in the industry. Founded in 1886, GAF is the largest roofing manufacturer in North America. Its products include steep-slope and commercial roofing systems, supported by a national network of factory-certified contractors. Headquartered in Wayne, N.J., the company employs more than 3,200 workers in 30 plants across the country. The Missouri Department of Economic Development has offered a strategic incentive package to GAF if the company meets specific job creation and investment criteria.

CenturyLink Rewards Tech Teachers

WESTMINSTER COLLEGE PRESIDENT ANNOUNCES RETIREMENT PLANS

The CenturyLink Clarke M. Williams Foundation’s Teachers and Technology grant program has awarded $4,400 to Laddonia’s Community R-VI High School in Audrain County to purchase computer tablets and keyboards for agricultural science classes. The program awards grants to schools in CenturyLink’s local service areas on behalf of teachers who have developed innovative plans to implement technology in the classroom. Named after CenturyLink’s founder Clarke M. Williams, the foundation gave more than $50,000 to 12 Missouri schools during the 2013-14 school year to support technology in the classroom.

Westminster College President Barney Forsythe will retire from his post at the end of the 2014-15 school year. Forsythe joined the Westminster administration in 2005 as senior vice president and dean of faculty after serving 35 years in the U.S. Army, rising to the rank of brigadier general. Forsythe was named the 20th president of the Fulton college in 2008. In April, the Westminster Board of Trustees voted to close the college’s Mesa, Ariz., campus after one year of operation. The college based the closure decision on less-than-expected enrollment and market demand.

SBA Honors The Bank Of Missouri

The U.S. Small Business Administration has recognized The Bank of Missouri for outstanding loan production in eastern Missouri. As an SBA Top 10 lender, the bank ranks No.1 in volume with 40 loans, and No.3 in dollars loaned, lending $8 million to small businesses. Headquartered in Perryville, The Bank of Missouri has 20 branches in southeast, southwest and central Missouri.

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regional roundup

St. Mary’s Honors Nurse With National Award St. Mary’s Health Center recognized its first DAISY award winner, Tessa Ellis, during a surprise ceremony in May at the Jefferson City hospital. The national award honors an outstanding nurse for commitment to education, training, skill and extra care provided to patients. The DAISY Foundation was established in 1999 by the family of Patrick Barnes, who died at 33 from complications of an immune system disease. The family created The DAISY (diseases attacking the immune system) Award to honor extraordinary nurses.

LINN TECH PLANS NAME CHANGE On July 1, Linn State Technical College will change its name to the State Technical College of Missouri. The name change at Missouri’s only state technical college has been touted as a better reflection of the school’s statewide role. Enrollment at the college in Linn represents 80 percent of Missouri counties, producing graduates to fuel the state’s technical workforce. Fitch Ratings recently affirmed the BBB long-term rating on approximately $7.7 million of outstanding series 2006 auxiliary revenue bonds issued by the college.

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OPENING BELL

THE LADDER REPORT Look Who’s Moving Up In Columbia

➔ KAREN CRABTREE has been named CenturyLink vice president/general manager for the Missouri market. CenturyLink realigned its Missouri and Kansas market structure when Bill Fallin, CenturyLink vice president/general manager for southern Missouri/Kansas, retired in May. Crabtree previously served in the Columbia office as vice president/general manager for northern Missouri; she joined CenturyTel in 2006 and moved to Columbia in 2011.

➔ NEIL OLSON, dean of the UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE, has been appointed to the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board. He will serve a three-year term on the board representing American colleges of veterinary medicine. Each of 25 NAREEE advisory board members represents a specific category of U.S. agricultural stakeholders as outlined in the 2008 Food, Energy, and Conservation Act. Olson has served as dean of MU’s veterinary college since 2007.

➔ Boone Hospital Center honored its outgoing vice president and chief operating officer, RANDY MORROW, with its first-ever Lifetime Leadership Achievement Award. Morrow, who retired June 6, joined the hospital staff in 1975 as an accounting manager.

➔ DAVID R. COIL, project manager at COIL CONSTRUCTION, graduated in May as one of 19 students in the inaugural class of the University of Missouri Robert J. Trulaske, Sr. College of Business executive MBA program. The Trulaske executive MBA is a 21-month program that offers a hybrid of online and face-to-face classes. The program is designed for working professionals who wish to pursue an MBA degree. 16

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➔ BENJAMIN S. FABER has joined BUKOWSKY LAW FIRM in Columbia as an associate. He will handle criminal defense and traffic cases throughout mid-Missouri and student conduct proceedings at the University of Missouri. Faber holds a bachelor’s degree in history and a law degree from the University of Missouri, and is a graduate of Rock Bridge High School. He is certified in dispute resolution.

Cathy Atkins (center), flanked by MU Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin and College of Business Dean Joan Gabel

➔ The UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI TRULASKE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS honored CATHY M. ATKINS, resource development director for HEART OF MISSOURI UNITED WAY INC., with a Citation of Merit at the college’s annual Honors Luncheon in May. Atkins, a 1992 graduate of the MU School of Journalism, has been a member of the college’s marketing advisory board since 2006. She is the former owner of Savant Business Development Systems, which she closed in 2013. The Citation of Merit recognizes individuals for career accomplishments as well as involvement in and support of the college.

➔ NIC AND BROOKE PARKS, coowners of THE PINBALL CO., have acquired GAMEROOM MAGAZINE and plan to resume publication in the fall. The magazine, which ceased publication in 2010, will revert to a quarterly publication focused on pinball games, arcades and jukeboxes new and old, as well as restoration and maintenance of pinball machines. The Pinball Co. is a Columbia-based online merchant of pinball and arcade products and services.

➔ LINDA NEWKIRK has announced her retirement as executive director of the ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION GREATER MISSOURI CHAPTER. She will step down at the end of June.


up & coming

➔ COLUMBIA COLLEGE has named JEFF MUSGROVE vice president for adult higher education. Musgrove previously served as the college’s southeast regional director, overseeing campuses in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. He also was campus director of Columbia CollegePatrick Air Force Base in Florida. Musgrove succeeds MIKE RANDERSON, who retired in January. Columbia College also promoted PATTY FISCHER to executive director of human resources, from her current position as director of human resources. In her new role, Fischer will sit on the college’s administrative council and help guide strategic decision-making regarding HRrelated matters. JUSTIN GRAY has been promoted from manager of digital marketing to assistant director of digital marketing at Columbia College. Gray will lead efforts to integrate digital marketing into all aspects of the college’s marketing and will pilot innovative digital initiatives.

➔ ROB MEDCALF is the new director of nightlife for THE BROADWAY COLUMBIA – A DOUBLETREE BY HILTON. Originally from St. Louis, Medcalf honed his knowledge of wine and spirits while working in California’s Napa Valley and Australia. His primary focus will be on all aspects of the nightlife scene at The Broadway, and overseeing The Roof and its food service. He is also responsible for staffing, product testing and acquisition, mixology and marketing. The Broadway opened in downtown Columbia in April. SUMMER 2014

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THE LADDER REPORT

➔ HAO LI, co-founder and president of Nanova Inc., has won the University of Missouri President’s Award for Economic Development. Li, an associate professor in the MU department of mechanical and aerospace engineering, won the $5,000 prize for “distinguished activity in meeting the university’s goal of serving as an economic engine for the state through entrepreneurial innovation.” Nanova, founded in 2008, produces orthopedic, dental and cardiovascular devices using biocomposite and nonthermal plasma technologies, an outgrowth of research by Li and other professors. Bolstered by Chinese venture capital, the company is currently building a 6,000-square-foot manufacturing facility in Columbia and expects to have 20 employees by 2015.

STORAGEMART, a Columbia-based storage-unit rental company, has expanded into Iowa with the purchase of 14 Des Moines-area Budget Storage properties. StorageMart President CRIS BURNAM noted the Des Moines firm was the largest provider of self-storage in the area. The deal represents about 1.1 million square feet of rental space in 8,573 storage units.

SEAN SPENCE, GREG WOLFF and MIKE NICHOLS have launched a new online event ticketing business, EVERYTICKETGIVES. The company’s website, www.everyticketgives.com, offers event-planning resources and a sales portal for ticketed events. EveryTicketGives donates 50 cents from every ticket sold to the charity of the event host’s choice. Fees are borne by ticket buyers; services are free to event hosts.

NORTHWEST MEDICAL ISOTOPES LLC has announced plans to build a radioisotope production facility at Discovery Ridge Research Park. The company, headquartered in Corvallis, Ore., presented expansion plans in May for a $50 million capital investment in Columbia that includes construction of a 50,000-square-foot building and a payroll of up to 68 employees when fully operational. NWMI will produce molybdenum-99, an isotope used to produce technetium-99, commonly used in medical scans for cancer, heart disease, and bone and kidney disease. The company will break ground on the building next year, and expects to begin operations by the end of 2016.

SBA HONORS LOCAL SMALL-BUSINESS OWNERS ➔ The U.S. Small Business Administration celebrated Small Business Week May 5-9. The agency’s St. Louis District Office honored Eastern Missouri small-business owners for their achievements in eight categories, including four Columbians. BEAU AERO MARTIN is the SBA’s choice for Small Business Exporter of the Year. Martin is the sole owner and president of GME SUPPLY, which he founded in 2005. GME Supply distributes industrial equipment and supplies worldwide, specializing in industrial safety equipment for cell tower maintenance, tower and steel construction, oil and gas, wind generation, residential and commercial construction, and manufacturing. Martin moved the 18

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company to Columbia from New York in 2011. He used an SBA loan obtained in 2012 to build a new building for his company. Twins BRYNNE AND BAILYE STANSBERRY were named Young Entrepreneurs of the Year. The sisters founded TWOALITY LLC in 2010, and used an SBA loan to start their business of selling the clear boots with interchangeable liners that they invented. They came up with the concept in high school as a project for Distributive Education Clubs of America and kept working on it through their time at Columbia College, where they graduated in 2012 with degrees in business administration. C. ANNE WILLIAMS, owner of JOBFINDERS

EMPLOYMENT SERVICE, was honored as the Woman-Owned Small Business of the Year. Williams founded JobFinders 27 years ago; it operates out of offices in Columbia, Jefferson City and Mexico, Mo. The company’s three operating divisions — JobFinders, JF & Associates and JF Medical Brokers — provide staffing solutions such as temporary staffers, direct hire/recruitment services, out-placement services and human resources consulting. Inc. magazine ranks the company at No. 637 on its list of the 5000 fastest-growing companies in the country. Williams used the FastTrac program of Missouri’s Small Business & Technology Development Center, an SBA-guaranteed loan and other resources to grow her company.


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OPENING BELL

SHOW-ME JOBS A Snapshot Of Local Employment

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data bank


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SPEC IA L ADV E RTI S I N G S ECTI O N

Attorney Profiles Columbia’s diverse legal community offers an attorney to fit any need. From personal injury and family law to environmental protection, Columbia’s lawyers can do it all. The only challenge lies in choosing the lawyer to best fit your legal needs. Flip through this portfolio to meet a select few of Columbia’s high-caliber attorneys.

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SPEC IAL ADV E RTI S I N G S ECTI O N

Legal Firm Profile

Harper, Evans, Wade & Netemeyer Attorneys At Law 401 Locust St., Suite 401 573-442-1660 www.lawmissouri.com

The firm of Harper, Evans, Wade & Netemeyer offers more than 100 years of combined experience, in-depth knowledge of the law and quality legal services. The firm’s nine attorneys pride themselves in taking proactive approaches in the client’s best interests. Furthermore, HEWN’s attorneys are known for their fantastic customer service and accessibility and are involved throughout the community in a variety of volunteer capacities.

Milt Harper mharper@lawmissouri.com

Areas of Expertise: Injury Law, Criminal Defense Law, Divorce Law Milt Harper has been practicing law for over 40 years with the goal of helping people protect their rights against a complex legal system. “We fight hard for our clients and we listen to our clients,” Harper says. “We treat every case with a dedication to get great results for those who have placed their trust in our firm. No other local office has our level of expertise for injury cases, criminal defense and divorce/family law.” Milt was formerly Boone County Prosecuting Attorney and a judge on the Circuit Court. He is a member of Super Lawyers of Missouri and Kansas and a member of the Million Dollar Advocates. 24

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Ron Netemeyer rnetemeyer@lawmissouri.com

Areas of Expertise: Personal injury, Wrongful death, Medical malpractice, Worker’s compensation Ron Netemeyer believes hard work and attention to detail are attributes of success. As lead counsel, Ron has obtained a long list of favorable results on behalf of injured people and their families, including multiple million dollar verdicts and settlements. “I get my clients great results and I always put the client’s interest as my top priority,” he says.

Jeffrey L. Hilbrenner jhilbrenner@lawmissouri.com

Areas of Expertise: Criminal Law, Personal Injury, Estate Planning Inspired by his work in a congressional office in

I SUMMERof2014 The choice a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely upon advertisements.

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SPEC IAL ADV E RTI S I N G S ECTI O N

Legal Firm Profile Washington, D.C., Jeff Hilbrenner has been practicing law for nine years. “We work hard for our clients. We answer their questions and keep them informed about their cases.” Hilbrenner attributes his success to hard work, exceptional co-workers and mentors, and great family support. He serves as the current board president of Ronald McDonald House Charities of Mid-Missouri.

Kay Evans kevans@lawmissouri.com

Areas of Expertise: 100% Criminal Trial Practice, Drug Violations, Felonies, Juvenile Crimes, Misdemeanor, Parole & Probation, Sex Offenses, Traffic Violations, DWI, MIP, Criminal Fraud Kay Evans joined Milt Harper in 1995 and continues to exclusively practice criminal law. She firmly believes that an attorney must know their client to effectively represent him or her. Evans takes pride in establishing a professional relationship with each client. She challenges all cases with the same vigor, regardless of the level of seriousness.

Helen Wade hwade@lawmissouri.com

Areas of Expertise: Paternity Cases Divorce Cases, Modify Child Support, Child Custody Helen Wade focuses primarily on domestic cases including paternity and divorce cases, motions to modify child support, custody and maintenance awards. She believes that every

domestic case is extremely important and she commits herself to the professional and aggressive representation of clients who have domestic problems. Helen is a member of our local school board.

Melissa Faurot mfaurot@lawmissouri.com Areas of Expertise: Family Law, Adoption, Juvenile Law, Guardianship, Paternity, Modification, Wills Melissa Faurot’s practice is rooted in her passion for family. She is the dedicated mother of four step-children and two biological children. Melissa understands the importance of children in the lives of their parents and enjoys helping others maintain a strong relationship with their children whatever the domestic situation may be.

Kevin O’Brien kobrien@lawmissouri.com

Areas of Expertise: 100% Criminal Trial Practice, Criminal Law, Criminal and administrative action involving university students, DWI, MIP, Federal, Felonies, Grand Jury Proceedings, Juvenile Crimes Misdemeanor, Probation Hearings Sex Offenses, Traffic Violations, Criminal Fraud Kevin was Chief Public Defender for Central Missouri for over 10 years and is one of the most respected criminal defense lawyers in Missouri. He wins cases on his hard work, client attention and courtroom expertise. He will fight for you.

Katy Reeder kreeder@lawmissouri.com

Areas of Expertise: Family Law Dissolution of marriage, Paternity Guardianship, Child support, Adult order of protection, Child order of protection, Contempt of court Before attending law school, Reeder worked for the Boone County Children’s Division, serving families with children in foster care. “While working for the Children’s Division, I began to understand the hardships that families of mid-Missouri face in our court systems,” she says. “I wanted to be an advocate for clients, to give them a voice in the courtroom, so that they could feel as if they were being listened to by those figures who make big decisions about their lives and children.”

Jill Elsbury jelsbury@lawmissouri.com

Areas of Expertise: Personal injury Wrongful death, Medical malpractice, Premise liability, Product liability, Worker’s compensation, Criminal defense Jill Elsbury was 21 when she first encountered the justice system. “When I was 21 I represented myself on a worker’s compensation claim,” she says. “I went up against a 35-year-old St. Louis attorney and ended up negotiating a settlement worth three times his original offer. It was then that I realized that I wanted to practice law.” She attributes her success to her parents raising her to be responsible, courteous and driven.

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely upon advertisements.


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Attorney Profile

Connie M. Sullivan Sullivan Law Firm, LLC

Areas of Expertise Family Law Criminal Law

1001 E. Walnut St., Suite 100 Columbia, MO, 65201 573-777-7007 www.sullivanlawfirmllc.com Connie Sullivan is an avid reader and has always enjoyed legal thrillers and non-fiction works about crime and justice. In fact, it was these books that prompted Sullivan’s interest in becoming a lawyer. “I wanted to be part of making the legal system work,” she says. Sullivan has been practicing law in Columbia for the past 17 years. In the last seven years, she has practiced primarily in family law. She is a certified domestic mediator and guardian ad litem. “Divorce and issues of child custody and support are always emotional for the people involved and can be very traumatic without the support of an attorney they can trust to act in their best interest and the best interest of their children,” she says. “I give my clients plenty of time to tell their stories and express their concerns so that I can give them the best advice for their individual needs.” If you’re looking for an attorney, Sullivan advises you to work to find an attorney who is a good 26

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listener. “Look for an attorney who listens when you talk, who doesn’t rush through your appointment, and who doesn’t rush you into making a decision about representation,” she says. Sullivan’s 10 years as an assistant prosecutor and her jury trial experience also make her an excellent choice for criminal defense. As an assistant prosecutor and in private practice, she has always been eager to work on cases that are a low priority for many – animal welfare cases. Sullivan is an avid supporter of the Rainbow House, Central Missouri Humane Society, Second Chance, and Dogs Deserve Better. Sullivan provides compassionate representation and passionate advocacy at a reasonable cost. “I think practicing law is a service profession. Being an attorney offers so many opportunities to help others,” she says. “People don’t usually seek legal advice because life is good; they call attorneys when they need help. So I’m here to help.”

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SPEC IAL ADV E RTI S I N G S ECTI O N

Attorney Profile

Areas of Expertise Personal Injury Wrongful Death Criminal Defense

L. G. “Greg” Copeland The Copeland Law Firm

900 E. Broadway Columbia, MO 65201 573-874-3100 www.CopelandLawFirm.com

Connie Sullivan is an avid to find an attorney who is a good reader has always enjoyed Copeland listener. “Look for anto attorney L. G. and Copeland received strives legal thrillers and non-fiction who listens when you talk, who both his Juris Doctor provide the direct accessiworks about crime and justice. doesn’t rush through your apand undergraduate debility, customerand service In fact, it was these books that pointment, who and doesn’t rush grees from the Universervices he would expect prompted Sullivan’s interest in you into making a decision about sity of Missouri has to for representation,” himself. In fact, the becoming a lawyer.and “I wanted she says. be partpracticing of making the the past, her experience been lawlegal for sys- reasonIn Copeland went tem work,” she says. with jury trials, in private more than 30 years. to law school is because pracSullivan has been practicing tice and as an assistant prosecuCopeland focuses on perhe was not satisfied with law in Columbia for the past 17 tor have helped to boost Sullisonal wrongful services was on cases years. Ininjury, the last seven years, she legalvan’s eagernesshe to work death and criminal has practiced primarily indefamily receiving. other’s might consider low priorlaw. SheWhen is a certified ity or difficult as animal fense. asked domestic why Success is — such found mediator and guardian ad liwelfare or criminal offense someone should consider through many avenues, cases. tem. “Divorce andLaw issues of child but Copeland Additionally, Sullivan is an avid The Copeland Firm says he attricustody and support are always supporter of Second Chance, over another firm, Copebutes his success to hard emotional for the people inCentral Missouri Humane Sociland says he and his staff work fact that he volved and can be very traumatic etyand andthe Rainbow House. provide an support aggressive applay golf. Cope-compaswithout the of an attor- doesn’t Sullivan provides ney theyincan trust to actsetin their landsionate representation proach a small firm advises those look-and pasbest interest and the best inter- ing sionate advocacy at reasonable ting. “The Copeland Law for an attorney ofahis est of their children,” she says. cost. “I think practicing law is a Firm provides principled, expertise to give him a call “I give my clients plenty of time service profession. Being an atethical representation to on the phone earlier on a to tell their stories and express torney offers so many opportupeople who need help case, rather their concerns so that I can give nities to than help later. others,” she says. with accident claims or them the best advice for their in“People don’t usually seek legal dividual needs.” advice because life is good; they criminal defense,” CopeIf you’re looking an attorcall attorneys when they need land says. “We are for a result ney, Sullivan advises you to work help. So I’m here to help.”

oriented law firm.”

2014 I INSIDE COLUMBIA’S CEO I The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely upon SUMMER advertisements.

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SPEC IAL ADV E RTI S I N G S ECTI O N

Attorney Profile

AW Smith

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Serious Injury

AW Smith Law

Wrongful Death

2100 W. Broadway Columbia, MO 65203 573-777-3333 www.awsmithlaw.com

Winning Difficult Jury Trials

According to AW Smith, very few lawyers take cases to trial anymore. Jury trials are labor intensive, expensive and risky. For the past 12 years, Smith has built a proven track record of winning jury trials and difficult cases. “Of course I’ve lost jury trials,” he says. “You can’t win them all. The losses are always lessons that keep me humble. I’ve never charged a client a penny if I lose. If the opposing side thinks you aren’t savvy enough to take a case through trial, they aren’t ever going to pay you the full value of the case for a settlement. I call it savvy. Some call it crazy. Whichever you prefer, I’ve probably got it. “It’s simple human nature. If an insurance company doesn’t think you can take it from them, they sure won’t give it to you voluntarily. That’s why actually ‘showing up’ to try these cases is so important. Most lawyers won’t do that. The insurance companies know which ones will. Be sure you have one of them.” Smith was raised on a farm in Mid-Missouri and lost his father in an accident when he was 12 years old. “I’ve been dealt a lot of first hand experience on the short end of the stick,” he says. 28

Areas of Expertise

Doing Things Differently Through perseverance and positivity, Smith has found success with the law. “I’m often described by my clients as extremely positive, optimistic and caring. I really have a disdain for negativity. My grandmother always gave me solid advice. Here are my favorites: If you don’t have something nice to say, keep your mouth shut. If you don’t like it, don’t look at it.” When looking for an attorney of Smith’s expertise, Smith advises prospective clients to not hire an attorney based on advertisements alone. “Interview several lawyers before making a decision,” he says. “Ask each lawyer about their jury trial experience.” Smith supports Big Brothers Big Sisters; Boys & Girls Club; Take Care of My Kids; Ava’s Grace Scholarship Foundation and Columbia Public Schools. “I’m a principles man,” Smith says. “It’s not always about money. I always follow my heart – even if it’s unpopular or different I’m a great believer in humanity. I strive to always treat others with the due respect they deserve. I have a chip on my shoulder when I see someone being treated poorly or unfairly.”

I SUMMERof2014 The choice a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely upon advertisements.

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SPEC IAL ADV E RTI S I N G S ECTI O N

Attorney Profile

Glen Ehrhardt Rogers, Ehrhardt, Weber & Howard, L.L.C.

302 Campusview Drive, Suite 204 Columbia, MO, 65201 573-442-0131 www.rewhlaw.net

Areas of Expertise Personal injury Wrongful death Insurance defense and coverage matters Employment law Construction law Contracts Workers’ compensation Automobile accidents Premises liability

Glen Ehrhardt graduated from the University of Missouri School of Law in 1985 and joined David B. Rogers at The Law Offices of David Rogers in 2000. Today Ehrhardt is a Principal in the firm now known as Rogers, Ehrhardt, Weber & Howard, L.L.C. REW&H strives to provide superior and cost effective client representation in all areas of its law practice on a daily basis. “We emphasize client communication and meticulous evaluation of cases that allows REW&H to provide its individual, corporate, and insurance clients a partner in the legal process to lead the way to successful results,” Ehrhardt says. “Our firm’s central location allows us to handle cases and effectively represent clients in all areas of the state.” According to Ehrhardt, the legal profession — especially the field of litigation — allows for the opportunity to interact and deal with many persons from all walks of life and to learn on a daily basis. Ehrhardt says that hard work, diligent case investigation and discovery, and striving to treat everyone, including clients, witnesses, and opposing attorneys and their clients with dignity and respect are the keys to success. Ehrhardt believes the knowledge and insights he has gained from practicing with attorneys such as Bunky Wright, Hamp Ford,

David “Art” Oliver, Roland Walker, and David Rogers have impacted and helped shape him both as an attorney and more importantly as a person. “Today I am fortunate to practice law with Libby Weber, James Howard and Andrew Bach and truly value the “team approach” in our cases and the family atmosphere. In our law firm we strive to nurture and promote teamwork on a daily basis,” Ehrhardt says. “When everyone works together as a team, in an atmosphere of mutual respect, it truly makes for a successful and rewarding law practice.”

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely upon advertisements.


SPEC IAL ADV E RTI S I N G S ECTI O N

Legal Firm Profile

Tim Gerding

Areas of Expertise Civil Litigation

Evans & Dixon

Business Litigation

501 W. Cherry St. Suite 200 573-777-8823 www.evans-dixon.com

Business Law

On February 1, 2014, Tim Gerding joined Aimee Davenport, and soon thereafter so did Bryan Bacon, in spearheading the opening of the Columbia branch of the St. Louis firm Evans & Dixon. Prior to joining Evans & Dixon, Gerding practiced for 10 years with Rotts, Gibbs & Gerding, where he focused on litigation and trial practice. It was there that Gerding says he gained valuable experience from his now former partners, Bill Rotts and Finley Gibbs, in personal, responsible and diligent representation of individuals and businesses alike. Gerding completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Iowa and graduated from the University of Missouri School of Law in 2004. He focuses his practice on areas of civil and commercial litigation, insurance defense and a vast array of business services. He, Davenport and Bacon

opened a branch of Evans & Dixon with the goal of “uniquely bringing large firm resources to Columbia, for the betterment of Columbia industries and business,” Gerding says. With Evans & Dixon, Gerding is fortunate to continue to offer clients his best work. “I have a natural style in legal argumentation, and an innate desire to help others either succeed in an endeavor, or to save them from an unexpected challenge. The law was a perfect fit for me 10 years ago and continues to be,” he says. “Over the years, I’ve learned the most important thing is to be always driving home the client’s interest first, while also being entirely forthright and professional with other lawyers.” When he’s not working, this Columbia native enjoys spending time with his wife and young daughter, swimming laps and golfing.

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely upon advertisements.


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THE CONFERENCE ROOM

Bank On It

A Conversation With UMB’s Tony Mayfield by KATHY CASTEEL

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ony Mayfield, previously president of UMB Bank’s Central Missouri region, recently stepped up to the position of chairman and CEO of UMB Bank’s Greater Missouri region. In his new role, Mayfield, 46, is responsible for the strategic leadership of UMB teams in various communities throughout Missouri. He has more than 23 years’ experience in the banking and financial services industry and has been with UMB since 2005. Mayfield and his wife, Cori, moved to Columbia in 2009 with their daughters, Emma and Clara. A graduate of William Jewell College, Mayfield also holds an MBA from the University of Missouri. He is active in the community and holds board positions for several nonprofit and civic organizations, including the advisory board of the University of Missouri Crosby MBA program and the MU “Score One for Hunger” campaign leadership committee for the Food Bank of Central & Northeast Missouri. Mayfield has served as a Trulaske College of Business “Professor for the Day” and has spoken at numerous student seminars for the Crosby MBA program. We checked in with Mayfield for a brief conversation about his new role at UMB and his view of current issues facing the banking industry in Missouri.

›› Describe your new role with UMB Bank. I am the chairman and CEO for Greater Missouri, which includes all of UMB’s markets outside of metro Kansas City and St. Louis. I have the privilege of leading a team of talented market leaders and commercial lenders all over the various communities in Missouri. As CEO, I am able to actively support these teams by providing strategic leadership for the region as well as assisting in team and talent development.

›› What is the business credit outlook for this summer? Is UMB Bank making business loans? The business outlook in our Greater Missouri markets has been one of increasing optimism. UMB leaders across the region are consistently hearing about clients and prospective clients

gaining new projects, expanding their businesses and filling new positions due to current or anticipated growth. We continue to see consistent loan growth as we are supporting many of our clients and prospects in their growth endeavors with working capital lines, and equipment and real estate financing, as well as specialized private banking options for individuals and families.

›› Thanks in large part to technology, banking has become more convenient and user-friendly for your customers. What innovations does UMB Bank offer to help clients run their businesses better? UMB has a loyal and vibrant clientele in the commercial industry, and we continue to find solutions to meet their needs. We have our UMB Mobile Deposit program that allows our commercial and small-business clients to deposit checks remotely, using mobile phone and tablet technology. Through an application available for Apple and Android smartphones and tablets, business clients can take a photo of the front and back of the check they want to deposit. The mobile application processes the image and submits the “substitute check” to the bank for deposit. This product is similar to our current Remote Deposit Capture Web solution; however, no desktop scanner is required, so deposits can be completed anywhere there’s a wireless signal.

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THE CONFERENCE ROOM ›› U.S. monetary policy has sent interest rates for depositors down to an almost negligible level. How has this decline affected deposits? Are there incentives for depositors to save these days? Or are we looking at a future of negative interest rates — where customers pay the bank to hold their money? UMB has continued to see an increase in our deposit base, and we have been noted in several publications, such as Forbes magazine, as one of the strongest banks in the United States for our performance throughout the past 100 years and the Great Recession. Our commitment to safety and soundness — as well as working to provide a unique and outstanding customer experience — has supported this continued growth in deposits. People want to do business with organizations they trust and with people who care about their businesses and their well-being.

›› What challenges do you see on the horizon for the banking industry? The key headwinds I would note are the heightened regulatory scrutiny, the low interest-rate environment, and finding and retaining talented employees in the banking industry who will help us continue our commitment to deliver an outstanding experience to our clients.

BEST BANKS DENIZEN Forbes magazine again named UMB to its list of Best Banks in America, ranking it at No. 16 on the 2014 list, based on asset quality, capital adequacy and profitability; UMB has made the Forbes list every year since the magazine began ranking banks in 2009. UMB Bank, N.A., is a subsidiary of UMB Financial Corp. Headquartered in Kansas City, it operates banking and wealth-management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas. With one office in Columbia, UMB is 10th in local market share. UMB Financial Corp. reported record year-end earnings of $134 million for 2013, up 9.2 percent over 2012 year-end earnings. First-quarter 2014 earnings were $23.4 million.

RANKINGS FROM MONEYRATES.COM FOR THE 10 BEST STATES FOR BANKING:

1. Missouri

Missouri is the best state in America for banking, according to an analysis by MoneyRates.com, a website that offers information on bank rates, personal finance, savings accounts and investments. Analysts determined state-by-state banking conditions in 2014 based on four criteria: breadth of choice, stability, quality of service and competitive rates. The Show-Me State ranked No. 1 with top 10 performances in each category. “Missouri has a thriving banking industry with more than 350 banks based in the state,” the study noted. “Out of that large population, the state experienced no failures during 2013.”

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2. Kansas 3. Nebraska 4. Massachusetts 5. California 6. Oklahoma 7. Pennsylvania 8. Iowa 9. New York 10. Arkansas


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HOMEGROWN

Spirited Expansion Les Bourgeois Adds A Distillery Division

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rapevines aren’t the only things growing in Rocheport these days. Les Bourgeois Vineyards continues with expansion plans at its Rocheport facility, debuting its newest enterprise this spring with the introduction of Rocheport Rum, now available at the winery and other shops and restaurants in the area. The white rum, bottled under the Planck & Anchor label, is the first product in Les Bourgeois’ distillery division, the result of a partnership between the winery and Jefferson City entrepreneur Jonny Ver Planck. “Jonny has the know-how, and we have the facilities and distribution network to turn out a really great product,” says Les Bourgeois CEO Rachel Holman. “It’s very exciting.” Ver Planck, owner of The Shrunken Head Tropic Lounge in downtown Jefferson City, is a native Californian with a passion for tiki bars. A 25-year career as a musician, recording/sound engineer and tour manager took him to

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by KATHY CASTEEL

more than 25 countries with frequent stops in Belize and Hawaii. After opening The Shrunken Head last year, Ver Planck began casting about for a microdistillery opportunity; a fruitless search in the capital city sent him north to Rocheport, where he found a friendly welcome in LBV owner Curtis Bourgeois and winemaker Jacob Holman. Planck & Anchor Distillers currently has seven spirits in the pipeline at the LBV facility: white, gold, coconut, aged and spiced rums plus vodka and gin. Rocheport Rum White was released May 1; the Rocheport Rum Gold release will follow later this year. Others will come online as they are ready, Holman says. The new distillery division reflects the expansive vision LBV has assumed the last few years, CEO Holman says, amid a desire to partner with other local businesses. The winery — the thirdlargest in the state — installed a new bottling line in 2009 and bottled the first full vintage on the new line in 2010; capacity is 52 bottles per minute. Last


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HOMEGROWN year, Les Bourgeois bottled 130,000 gallons, or 54,000 cases. LBV began leasing space to Broadway Brewery in 2013 when the Columbia craft brewery outgrew its space downtown and moved its fermentation tanks to the Rocheport winery. Brewer Paul Dickerson says the equipment in the LBV building produces 120 barrels of beer each month. The Planck & Anchor distilling operation began this year with the first batch of 54 cases of Rocheport Rum White; a second batch is currently in the tanks. “For 2014, the only additional release will be the gold rum,” Holman says. A physical expansion of facilities is also on tap at the winery. Construction is underway in the old Pete’s Café portion of the building in preparation for a tasting room remodel. The new space will accommodate more guests for wine tastings, Holman says, and will provide a larger retail space. The current tasting room at the other end of the building will transition to space for large tour groups and private events, as well as overflow of walk-in guests. Holman hopes all brewery, distillery and tasting-room construction will be complete by early spring of 2015. “These new endeavors have broadened our horizons on offering local products to our customers,” Holman says. “They will allow us to diversify our line while staying true to our mission of supporting the community and representing all our region has to offer. These expansions in fermentation sciences allow us the opportunity to partner with other local businesses that share our passion for the industry and the culture we have long been committed to growing.” At the winery, Les Bourgeois will be serving Rocheport Rum-based slushies — Piña Colada and Rum Runner — in the A-Frame this summer. Rocheport Rum cocktails are available in the Blufftop Bistro. Bottles are on sale in the winery’s tasting room. Area purveyors have been quick to join the sales effort of the new spirits. Local establishments serving Planck & Anchor Rocheport Rum include Broadway Brewery, Günter Hans, Mojo’s, Sycamore, Tellers, The Blue Note and The Shot Bar. Bottles are also available at Arena Liquor, Hy-Vee, Lucky’s Market, Moser’s and Top Ten Wines.

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Distiller Jonny Ver Planck was all smiles as he cut the ribbon on Les Bourgeois Vineyards’ newest endeavor, Planck & Anchor Distillers, on May 1. Ver Planck shared the spotlight at the Rocheport Rum launch party with LBV CEO Rachel Holman (left), and Vice President of Winery Operations Cory Bomgaars and Head Winemaker Jacob Holman (right).


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HUMAN RESOURCES

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ooking to hire a few good men and women? Search no further than the veterans of the Show-Me State. That’s the message Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has been spreading since 2010 when he launched the Show-Me Heroes program to help connect veterans with job opportunities in Missouri when they return home from their service commitments. Show-Me Heroes asks Missouri businesses to sign a pledge to recruit and interview veterans for appropriate job openings in their companies. Administered through a partnership of the Missouri Division of Workforce Development and the Missouri National Guard, the program offers resources to veterans looking for work and employers willing to hire them. Spouses of veterans and service members are also eligible for the program’s services. The program taps into the benefits of training, education, motivation and character of Missouri’s veterans and members of the National Guard and Reserve, says Nixon, adding that these traits are vital to Missouri’s economic future The website, www.showmeheroes.mo.gov, serves as a clearinghouse for job postings, training tools and links to aid veterans in their job search. The site also showcases employers who have signed on to the Show-Me Heroes program. Employers may take advantage of the state’s On-The-Job Training Program, which offers reimbursement of 50 percent or more of the wages of workers hired through the program, as well as matching businesses to job applicants, paperwork relief and ongoing guidance and support. Veteran Outreach staff stationed at career centers throughout the state provide additional assistance. To date, nearly 6,700 veterans have found jobs with the more than 3,900 Missouri businesses that have taken the pledge.

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by KATHY CASTEEL

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Boone County employers that have hired veterans through the Show-Me Heroes program include: AAF International Aerotek American Home Care AmeriStaff AutoZone Beyond Meat Cell Pak Columbia Area Career Center Express Employment Professionals First Student Gates Corp. GSN Staffing Columbia Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans’ Hospital Home Care Equipment Inc. IBM Job Point JobFinders Kelly Services Lowe’s Home Centers Inc. Manpower MarineParents.com Mark Hall Cabinetry MBS Textbook Exchange Midway Electric Inc. Miller’s Professional Imaging Missouri Department of Corrections O’Reilly Auto Parts Pepsi Beverages Co. Primaris Reality House Programs Inc. Salvation Army South Hampton Place University of Missouri Health Care Veterans United Home Loans


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BUSINESS BASICS

Keep It Legal

How To Choose A Business Attorney by ANITA NEAL HARRISON

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mart business owners find a good attorney, and they do so early in the company-formation process, says Paul Bateson, a technology commercialization counselor with the Small Business & Technology Development Center. “There are many pitfalls that can cost additional time, money and liability, and it starts right when you are forming the company,” says Bateson, a nonattorney who helps new business owners connect with resources such as attorneys and other advisers at the SBDTC and the University Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Business owners looking to hire an attorney should be aware of three things as they search: the tasks attorneys perform, how attorneys bill for their services, and what to expect in the attorney-client relationship. Understanding these areas will help business owners choose the right attorney for them.

TASKS BUSINESS ATTORNEYS PERFORM Business situations that call for professional legal help include: »» »» »» »» »» »»

Determining what kind of organization to form. Defining partner and shareholder responsibilities. Conducting real estate transactions. Creating contracts. Raising money from investors. Securing intellectual property.

A general business attorney will be able to handle most of these tasks for traditional small businesses, Bateson says, but securities law and IP law are two areas requiring specialists. Jake Halliday, outgoing president and CEO of the Missouri Innovation Center and the MU Life Science Business Incubator, explains further. Halliday deals with technology-based companies that have the potential to grow to at least $20 million in annual sales and usually require investment by third parties. “Such companies need the services of an IP attorney to properly protect their inventions and a patent attorney registered to file with the U.S. Patent 42

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and Trademark Office,” he says. “They need attorney support for the many kinds of contracts they will encounter as the business grows … [and] they need a securities attorney to advise on many aspects of raising money from investors.” Halliday adds that investors will want to know that attorneys are assisting the company with IP protection and contracts or they will not invest. “And messing up on raising money can land you in jail,” he notes. Business owners who need services from various specialized attorneys may choose to work with a large firm that has multiple departments; however, Halliday points out, specialists who practice on their own tend to be less expensive.

HOW ATTORNEYS BILL Some businesses have the financial wherewithal to have their attorneys do all of the steps in a given task. “ ‘Go set up my corporation. Do all the paperwork … I don’t want to see you until it’s done,’ ” Bateson offers as an example. More commonly, businesses try to limit the attorney’s help to those tasks requiring a legal expert. Bateson suggests

business owners ask potential attorneys if they are willing to do the work requiring legal knowledge and then just advise the business owner on how to do simple things, such as registering with the Secretary of State’s office or securing an employer identification number from the Internal Revenue Service.


ceo’s how-to guide

“So you’re getting a division of labor as to what’s really technical and could use some legal experience versus something the business owner can do themselves,” Bateson says. Halliday offers similar advice. “The main issue for paid legal services is not so much negotiating the rate; it is understanding when you are on the clock and controlling the time spent on your matters — avoid the ‘runaway train,’ ” he says. He also recommends looking “for a mix of higher and lower hourly rates for experienced attorney time (for the tough stuff) and a junior associate (for much of the legwork)” and notes that some routine tasks, such as setting up an limited liability corporation or creating an operating agreement, should be offered at a fixed price.

J.P. Morgan once said, “I do not pay my lawyers to tell me what I cannot do, but to tell me how to do what I want to do.”

WHAT TO EXPECT IN THE RELATIONSHIP J.P. Morgan once said, “I do not pay my lawyers to tell me what I cannot do, but to tell me how to do what I want to do.” Both Bateson and Halliday say Morgan put it well. “Just remember this,” Bateson says. “The attorney works for you; it’s not the other way around. If I’m a business owner, and I’m at Point A and I need to get to Point D, and in-between there is Point B and Point C, the attorney’s role is to tell me how to navigate from Point A to B to C to my end destination of D and to do so in a way that I’m limiting and managing my risk and exposure to a degree I’m comfortable with.” SUMMER 2014

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BUSINESS UNUSUAL

Keep On Truckin’

Stadium Shoes Caters To CoMo’s Fast-Casual Style by MORGAN McCARTY photos by L.G. PATTERSON

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ood trucks began winning the stomachs of Columbians a few years ago. From hot dogs to Jamaican fare or down-home biscuits, Columbians on the go won’t go hungry — or shoeless, either, if local entrepreneur Nathan Fleischmann has his way. In April, Fleischmann rolled out his mobile shoe store, Stadium Shoes. “Columbia has been enjoying how fun it can be to have food trucks around town,” Fleischmann says, “but it has not had the opportunity for other forms on the vanguard of contemporary retail culture, such as mobile retail beyond food and things like pop-up shops and digital kiosk shopping.” The mobile shoe store operates out of a 20-foot-long converted Freightliner truck. The interior of the truck was designed with a modular system, so that stainless steel shelves can be moved around as inventory and customer preferences change. Under-the-shelf LED lights help showcase inventory items and a hardwood laminate floor lends a boutique-like feel to the space. When the back and side doors to the truck hang open, the effect is airy, welcoming and comfortable. Stadium Shoes is a reality after more than three years of planning, research and crowd funding. Fleischmann raised 44

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$7,286 from 63 backers in his Kickstarter campaign and received a cash prize of $3,000 for placing second in the 2013 Regional Economic Development Inc. BOOM pitch competition. The Stadium Shoes truck has the capacity to stock up to 100 pairs of men’s and women’s shoes at a time, ranging in price from $18 to $130; most shoes fall in the $30 to $60 price range. In the first few months of operation, Fleischmann happily declares that “business is in line with the financial projections I initially made.” Fleischmann maintains a permanent warehouse for extra stock materials and operates an e-commerce site. “The e-commerce site provides my customers with an added layer of convenience,” he says. “Sometimes people have tried something on in the truck and decide to purchase it later. The website will also serve as a destination for customers during the colder months, helping to stabilize an otherwise seasonal business idea.” Stadium Shoes carries products in the active/casual category known as fashion sportswear. Brands include Volley — a popular brand in Australia, Fleishmann says — Gola, GBX, Nine West and Havianas. “Gola are really cool shoes from the UK and Havianas are the premier flip-flop from Brazil,” Fleischmann says. The shop

also offers accessories — including sunglasses, drawstring bags and socks — from designers such as Happy Socks, Socksmith and Jonathan Adler. Fleischmann acknowledges that much of his success is due to support from the Columbia business community. “Starting a business, especially on a shoestring budget, requires you to wear many hats,” he says. “Being a ‘solopreneur’ has only been possible because of other supportive businessminded folks in Columbia.” In addition to owning and operating Stadium Shoes, Fleischmann currently works as the director of annual giving at Columbia College. Fellow Cougars and REDI pitch winners Brynne and Bailye Stansberry own TwoAlity, a collection of clear boots with interchangeable liners. Fleischmann is both a fan and supporter of the brand and carries TwoAlity in the Stadium Shoes truck. The Stansberry twins work with Stadium Shoes on smaller inventory purchases, he says. Fleischmann concedes one of his biggest challenges is educating consumers about the Stadium Shoes truck and its concept. “Sometimes when I am out with the truck, I can see the curiosity in people’s faces, but I can also see a moment of hesitation because they’ve never interfaced with a shoe truck,” he says. “I


have to remind myself to actively encourage them to walk through the truck — even if they aren’t interested in buying and just want to see what a mobile shoe boutique looks like — and that’s OK; that’s part of the fun, just showing people the truck.” The entrepreneur sees a gap in Columbia between national chain footwear stores and high-end or specialty shoe shops. Fleischmann says he hopes Stadium Shoes will fill that niche with accessible, comfortable, affordable and stylish shoes from around the world. “As a boutique, I really want to provide people with a mix of brands they know and trust, and brands that are popular in other parts of the world that they may not have had the pleasure of trying yet,” he says. Fleischmann plans to bring Stadium Shoes to environments and events in which people are on their feet for a long time — tailgaters, sporting events, collegiate affairs or festivals — and offer consumers the convenience of comfortable options that look and feel good. “That’s really what the point of the mobile retail concept, to pop up in places where a traditional brick and mortar may not be able to exist permanently,” he says. “It gives people the chance to have a retail experience like they’ve never had before.”

Follow the Stadium Shoes truck on Twitter @StadiumShoes for upcoming shop dates and locations, and visit www.stadiumshoes.com to learn more about the truck, to schedule an appearance, or to browse and order its inventory.

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CEO ROUNDTABLE

CoMo Law

Attorneys Make A Case For Keeping It Local by SANDY SELBY photos by L.G. PATTERSON

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leven lawyers walked into a conference room … No, it’s not the beginning of a lawyer joke. It was the start of a lively and informative CEO Roundtable discussion at Inside Columbia magazine headquarters, hosted by The Callaway Bank. The attorneys present represented specialties from across the legal spectrum, from environmental policy to real estate, from family law to criminal defense. They came from firms both large and small. But for all their differences, they had one thing in common: they were proud to practice law in Columbia.

THE WAY THINGS ARE Moderator and Inside Columbia’s CEO Publisher Fred Parry began the discussion by asking the group how the legal profession had changed in recent years.

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“It’s crowded,” said Jeff Parshall of Ford, Parshall & Baker. “If you look in the phone book or the Boone County bar roll, and it says, what, 300 plus?” “It’s over 600,” said Dave Knight of Dave Knight Law Offices. “It’s 675 or something like that.” “I don’t think lawyers retire,” Parshall said. Parry asked if that tendency to linger in the profession past the normal retirement age is a new industry trend. “I don’t think so,” said Skip Walther of Walther, Antel & Stamper. “I think most lawyers tend to practice beyond 65 and all judges have to retire at 70, but most of those guys seem to take senior status and continue to try cases. I expect all of us will continue to practice just as the people who came before us. All lawyers in rural areas seem to be older.” Walther went on to explain that fewer

young attorneys are choosing to practice in the rural communities where they grew up. Because of this exodus, the average age of attorneys in rural areas is increasing and those who remain in rural communities are tasked with taking on every kind of case. Aimee Davenport with Evans & Dixon, who specializes in environmental law, agreed that the legal profession has become more crowded. “And because it is more crowded, I see more lawyers specializing and looking for a niche to practice in. I joined Evans & Dixon in the fall last year and the firm came into Columbia to provide more specialty areas because Columbia can start to support this. I’m finding — at least among my peers and younger — I see more specialties.” “I agree,” said Tim Harlan of Harlan, Harlan & Still. “You used to see no one specialize — you couldn’t afford to. I


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CEO ROUNDTABLE think now it’s becoming in some cases mandatory. A lot of things lawyers did 30 years ago are totally gone.” Greg Copeland of The Copeland Law Firm noted that, “Every year for the last 30 years, I’ve narrowed the scope of my practice, and I’m glad I did that. I think that it’s good for clients. I think clients get better and more competent representation when people narrow the focus of their practice instead of being a jack-of-all-trades.” With so many attorneys vying for business, the Roundtable participants report that some are willing to work for less. “I’m told that in St. Louis and Kansas City, people take cases for $45 or $50 an hour because they have to,” Harlan said. “I think that’s a big change.” Harlan cites the emergence of megafirms that take business from smaller

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“Why?” Parry asked. “The lawyers type their own stuff,” Simon said. “They do their own word processing. I think it’s very inefficient but I can’t convince others in our office that it is.” “One thing we haven’t mentioned is the Internet,” said Milt Harper of Harper, Evans, Wade & Netemeyer. “It’s revolutionizing everything. The Internet is driving so much of the business. There are no phone books anymore. You get out of law school and you can set up a law office overnight. You don’t need the legal assistants; all you need is the technology, and if you have the Internet and a good enough website, you’ll have lots of clients. And we’re sitting here having to compete with that. In Columbia, every four years or so this population turns over by about 52 percent. They don’t know who Dave

MILT HARPER Harper, Evans, Wade & Netemeyer

TOM SCHNEIDER Jones, Schneider & Stephens

ROBERT HOLLIS Van Matre, Harrison, Hollis, Taylor & Bacon

B. DANIEL SIMON Brown, Willbrand, Simon, Powell & Lewis

GREG COPELAND The Copeland Law Firm

DAVE KNIGHT Dave Knight Law Offices

SKIP WALTHER Walther, Antel & Stamper

AIMEE DAVENPORT Evans & Dixon

JEFF PARSHALL Ford, Parshall & Baker

Hosted By: GARY MEYERPETER The Callaway Bank

TIM HARLAN Harlan, Harlan & Still

ADAM PATCHETT Bush & Patchett

Moderated By: FRED PARRY Inside Columbia’s CEO magazine

ROUNDTABLE ROLL CALL

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firms by offering to handle all of a client’s legal needs. “You deal with the tax lawyer, the real estate lawyer, the documentdrafting lawyer, the transaction lawyer,” he said. “Before long, you end up dealing with four or five lawyers on the other side and you never know really who they are.” With so many practicing lawyers out there, there must be a growing need for legal assistants, right? Wrong, according to Dan Simon of Brown, Willbrand, Simon, Powell & Lewis. “I couldn’t get by without my legal assistant,” he said, “but the young lawyers in our office could probably never use one. And so what used to be a very cherished job as a legal secretary or assistant is something that’s going the way of the dinosaurs. One of the real big St. Louis firms just offered every legal assistant in the firm an early retirement buy-out. They’re going to get rid of all of them.”

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Knight is, or Milt Harper or Dan Simon. They don’t know and don’t care. They’re on the Internet looking. That’s how they’re choosing you. If you’re a good marketer, you can be very successful.” “You know what I think it all boils down to?” Knight asked. “We’re losing the idea of being professionals … and I’m the one guy sitting here without a tie! I think that we should be at least on the level of the doctors. I feel that that’s eroding. There’s less camaraderie than there used to be. We used to know who did good or bad and now it’s hard to figure out.”

“The Internet is driving so much of the business. There are no phone books anymore. You get out of law school and you can set up a law office overnight.” — Milt Harper “The economic downturn of 2008 caused a lot of law firms to lay off lawyers, caused a lot of lawyers to hang out their own shingles,” Walther said. “You’ve got an awful lot of attorneys who aren’t associates at any of the firms. So much of what I got out of being an associate was learning from senior attorneys how to practice law, and not just the technical aspects, but the professional aspects. A lot of young lawyers don’t have the luxury of mentors like that.” Copeland says civility can go a long way in the legal profession. “I think that when I deal with other attorneys in town, it’s always civil. It’s a rare bird that the guy is a jackass, because it doesn’t help the case and it certainly doesn’t help the client. If I have a case against Jeff, if we can talk, we can cut through a lot of crap and save the client a pantload of money. The civility among attorneys — it’s good for us, we live a little longer and the client’s bills are a little less.” SUMMER 2014

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CEO ROUNDTABLE

AFTER THE RECESSION Parry followed up on Walther’s comment about the economic downturn, and asked the group if there were other ways the legal profession had been affected by the recession. Adam Patchett of Bush & Patchett recalled a 2008 job interview. “In 2008 was when I came to work for Bill Powell and when I interviewed with him, he told me they did absolutely zero litigation. And I came in and my first day was a mechanics lien litigation and I did that for about 2½ years, maybe even three years. I never aspired to be a litigator, but I had to be for a little while.” Parshall said his firm’s litigation business was relatively unaffected by the economy, although he saw larger firms laying off people when the recession hit. “If litigation wasn’t affected, certainly real estate was,” Walther said. Knight agreed. “The lawyers, by our own negligence, have let real estate get away from us. All you have to do is look at the abstracts of titles and if you go back through there, I guarantee you, starting in 1931 when the Depression hit, you had quiet title suit after quiet title suit, and you hardly have one now because you just insure over. But the lawyers needed work and they were spending their time doing that. And that’s a good example of how when the economy is going down, you find something to do.” The group was interested in hearing what Robert Hollis of Van Matre, Harrison, Hollis, Taylor & Bacon had to say on the subject, since his specialty is real estate. “From 2004 — when I started — to 2008, it was fun,” Hollis said. “We were buying and developing and that’s what I did.” But, he said, things went south quickly for some of his clients. “I was helping them interpret the contact we had written for them the first time because now they were in default. So we were dealing with foreclosures and bankruptcy and litigation. My practice changed drastically.” 50

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Local attorneys discuss how their industry has changed in the past decade. Clockwise from top left: Tim Harlan noted the emergence of impersonal mega-firms that have taken business away from small, traditional firms; Jeff Parshall cited the growing number of practicing attorneys in the Columbia market; Milt Harper believes many people now choose an attorney based on the attractiveness of the attorney’s website rather than reputation and recommendations.

A LITTLE FREE ADVICE Parry asked the group to offer their best advice to Columbia’s business owners. Walther didn’t hesitate in his response. “Employment issues,” he said. “Wage-andhour laws. A lot of employers don’t pay overtime when they ought to. There are boutique agencies in the legal profession where class-action lawsuits are being filed against large employers on wage-andhour law claims, which can be extremely lucrative for those boutique firms. Then you’ve got the Family Medical Leave Act issues. All those are important to big employers because that’s a potentially

huge liability for them.” But, Harlan said, “those aren’t the moneymakers, in general. People aren’t out doing wage-and-hour cases for Dairy Queen not paying 10 cents an hour for uniforms.” Patchett said he’s keeping a close eye on the Affordable Care Act for his clients. “Most of my clients are concerned about Obamacare and other restrictions like that,” he said. “I had a few clients who have been paying attention to the number of employees. We represent a lot of contractors that during the winter months may not have very many employees and


during the summer, they may have a lot. We look at the definitions of who actually is an employee for purposes like that.” Davenport recommends that her fellow attorneys look locally first when they’re referring clients to a specialist. “Look to see if the specialty area is here in town first. We’ve got new areas we can assist in, and any area you may not feel comfortable in, like environment or intellectual property, banking and lending, bankruptcy. It’s important to keep our money here and in the community.” Hollis offered advice to business owners and property owners, specifically those in the downtown area. “I would encourage them to pay attention to the decisions being made by the current City Council and city administration. The specific issue is that land uses are going to be more restrictive and it’s going to apply to everyone. I would encourage all property owners to pay attention.”

“Look to see if the specialty area is here in town first...It’s important to keep our money here and in the community.” — Aimee Davenport Tom Schneider of Jones, Schneider & Stephens added: “I would just generically tell them to call earlier rather than later. Don’t wait until it’s a problem, and usually you can be better off.” Patchett agreed. “I would encourage local business owners who have a legal issue or legal concern to reach out to their local attorney early,” he said. “I know we talked about the Internet earlier, but I’ve had a few people call and come in to the office with some form that they’ve found on the Internet with a real estate contract that’s in Montana and pieced it together and maybe already executed it, and now we’re at the end of the process trying to clean everything up. If you have an issue, reach out to your local attorney.” SUMMER 2014

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Support Our Locally Owned Restaurants When you dine at local restaurants, you help support small-business owners who spend their dollars in the community. These dollars help keep our neighbors gainfully employed; the cycle continues as employees spend their wages on local arts, culture and other areas of the economy. Eating local pays BIG dividends for Columbia!

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FROM

CTO THEoMo WORLD

Columbia Businesses Reach Out With An International Impact

by kathy casteel 54

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Columbia isn’t Vegas — what happens in CoMo doesn’t always stay here. And that’s just fine with a handful of Columbia businesses whose homegrown efforts are having an impact in the world. Whether it’s to South America, Africa or India, their reach extends far beyond the confines of the Show-Me State. As the Disney refrain says, it’s a small world after all …

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BUY ONE, GIVE ONE

ABOVE: Optometrist James Gamble conducts eye exams while working at an eye clinic in Chichicastenango, Guatemala. Columbia Eye Consultants has committed to sending an optometrist from the practice to work in the clinic every six months. LEFT: Columbia Eye Consultants launched Kindsight 2020 in April. Left to right: Chris DeRose, Mike Nichols, Jeff Gamble, Rob Bernskoetter and Jim Gamble

BOGO — buy one, get one — is an irresistible attraction to consumers. Columbia Eye Consultants Optometry has taken it up a notch with the Kindsight 2020 program, where customers can “buy one, give one.” When patients buy a pair of glasses at Columbia Eye Consultants, the optometry practice donates a pair of glasses to a patient in Guatemala. The program, launched in April, is an outgrowth of Dr. James Gamble’s 14 years of mission trips to Chichicastenango, Guatemala, where he has provided optometry services to the native Mayan population at a multidisciplinary clinic. “We wanted to find a way to do more,” says Jeff Gamble, who, like his

father, is a CEC optometrist and has also worked in the Chichicastenango clinic. “We provide full services at the clinic and now, with Kindsight 2020, we can provide more products to make a difference in the lives of these people.” The Gambles and their colleagues work with former Columbians John and Sharon Harvey, who founded ASELSI (Association for Equipping the Saints, International) 20 years ago in Guatemala. John, a minister, provides nondenominational Bible training and Sharon, a nurse, runs the Chichicastenango clinic. “There’s a theme in this mission — equip the folks down there and teach them how to perform some of these services,” says Jeff Gamble. “There are

no optometry schools there. We teach the lay people Sharon has chosen and then we also go down there to take care of problem cases.” Every six months, Columbia Eye Consultants will send an optometrist from the practice to work in the Chichicastenango clinic, where they will see 40 to 60 patients a day. Each doctor in the five-man practice is committed to make the trip once every two years. Money for those trips and equipment donations comes from a separate office account the practice funds with a portion of CEC revenue. “We just decided to take a percentage of revenue to fund this effort,” Gamble says. “Over the years, we’ve been asked to sponsor golf tournaments or softball teams. Instead, we’re taking our marketing money and putting it into something that really matters.” Kindsight 2020 is a 501(c)(3) organization. CEC has partnered with lens laboratories and frame makers to supply discontinued models and overruns to the program. “Sometimes, it doesn’t have to be perfect,” Gamble says. “Some of these people are functionally blind. They can’t work anymore because they can’t see, and they’re so poor, they can’t even afford a $1 pair of readers. So these glasses mean the difference between having a job or not — that’s a real economic impact.” The doctors at Columbia Eye Consultants — James Gamble, Michael Nichols, Rob Bernskoetter, Jeff Gamble and Christopher DeRose — believe the Kindsight 2020 program is making a clear difference from 2,300 miles away. “And it’s so neat,” Gamble adds, “because it’s homegrown.” www.kindsight2020.org


KEEPING ART ALIVE

From its quiet confines on Ninth Street, Mustard Seed Fair Trade brings you the world. The nonprofit boutique offers handcrafted items from 68 vendors in 58 countries, an eclectic collection of jewelry, apparel and gifts that originated in 10,000 villages from around the globe. All products are fair trade, says Executive Director Crystal Midkiff, produced and sold in a manner that complies with the requirements of the Fair Trade Federation to meet a standard of treatment, compensation and environmentally sustainable practices. “We promote sustainability for artisans and farmers living in developing countries through the direct marketing of their goods,” Midkiff says. “We’re working to alleviate poverty in those nations.” Mustard Seed deals directly with individual artisans when procuring its inventory. “I like to deal one-on-one with the artists,” Midkiff says. “I know what Columbians are looking for, and by working with artists from

around the globe, we’re able to sell more of their products.” Sales are the end goal for Mustard Seed’s suppliers, primarily women in rural areas. “There is essentially no other form of income for these people,” Midkiff says. “The money these women make helps pay for schooling, nutrition and clean water. If they’re bringing in an income for their family, their children can go to school rather than go to work. We source from a large number of small communities, which allows us have a greater global impact.” The artisans use a variety of elements in the work — recycled newspapers and other paper products, homegrown textiles and seeds, grasses and shells. “So they are also preserving their environment,” she says. “It keeps the art alive.” Vendors must undergo a validation process before Mustard Seed considers selling their products, Midkiff says. Transactions must fit with the Fair Trade Federation’s 12 principles of fair trade. The three-month verification process involves worker

recommendations, gathering stories from the villages and authenticating the sourcing of raw materials. There are challenges in dealing with an overseas supply chain, Midkiff says. Language, sizing and supply can become difficult issues; maintaining product quality is paramount to the store and its vendors’ success. “You have to be aggressive — buy a lot and buy often,” she says. “It’s tricky to predict the market.” The unique products have found a market in Columbia. The store, which opened in 2008, has evolved its inventory as business has grown. “In retail, 16 percent annual growth is unheard of,” Midkiff notes. “Last Christmas, our sales were up 49 percent over 2012.” “We’re a nonprofit, so we’re just covering our overhead right now — paying rent and keeping the lights on,” Midkiff says. “Any surplus goes back into the mission.” The mission will expand eventually to a scholarship fund and assistance with equipment for producers such as sewing machines. By next year, plans call for an online store to sell signature items. www.mustardseedfairtrade.org

The artists and products of Mustard Seed Fair Trade hail from 58 countries. All merchandise complies with the standards of the Fair Trade Federation.

PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

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PAYING IT FORWARD The old adage says, “Give a man a fish and he eats for a day; teach a man to fish and he eats for a lifetime.” Today’s small-business reality mandates the helpful go one step further — invest in that fisherman and watch his business grow. That’s the model Humanity for Children is pursuing through its microfinancing projects in East Africa. Headquartered in Columbia, Humanity for Children is an international organization dedicated to improving quality of life for children in Rwanda, Kenya and Tanzania. That quality of life depends on the children’s parents finding work or the means to get a business off the ground. Microloans offer the financial resources needed to create small profitable businesses within the community. “These loans are not handouts,” says Executive Director Kathryn Hamilton Morgan. “They’re a ‘hand up’ — shortterm loans that are repaid, with interest, so that others in the village can use that money again to begin other new businesses. Because they recycle the money over and over, families and entire villages get a chance to improve their standard of living.” Morgan, a real estate agent with House of Brokers, volunteers her services as do all stateside Humanity for Children workers. “There is no paid staff in the U.S.; only those working in East Africa get paid,” she says. Morgan is a Fulton native who became involved with Humanity for Children when it began in 2006 while she was living in Seattle with her husband, architect Brian Morgan. When the family decided to move back to mid-Missouri, Morgan moved the organization as well. Humanity for Children’s microfinancing projects run the gamut of small businesses — beekeeping, a hair salon, crafting cooperatives, welder’s training, marketing agricultural crops and raising livestock. Communities form local cooperatives and applicants submit their business plans to the co-op. Loans can be as little as $250 or as much as $2,500. The cooperatives charge interest on the loans — currently about 5 percent — that goes back into the co-op account to grow the amount available for other startups. Those who start livestock operations must also give the purchased animal’s first offspring to a neighbor to help build additional herds. “They pay it forward,” Morgan says. “We’ve had great results so far. Out of 20 projects, only one has been unsuccessful.” Most of the financed startups are located in Rwanda; the exception was a loan to purchase a corn milling and hulling machine for a group of Masai women in Tanzania, 58

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ABOVE: Humanity for Children Executive Director Kathryn Morgan at a Masai market in Tanzania. RIGHT: Humanity for Children volunteers Graeme Cave (left) and Kathy Ritter (right) discuss the poultry business with micro-loan recipient Alphonsine and her children in Rwanda. ON THE COVER: Kathryn Morgan visits with children in Kihere, Rwanda. recipients of Humanity for Children’s largest loan to date. “We debated the ethics of loaning money for such a project,” Morgan says. “Would this change their culture? But they came to us with the idea for two years in a row. They really wanted to do it and it has worked out really well.” Women usually provide a good return on investment for the microfinancing projects, Morgan says. Humanity for Children’s first micro-loan went to a woman who used the $250 loan to buy chickens and start a poultry and egg business. She has earned enough to buy a house and send her children to school. “Many of these projects are headed by women, and they are accountable,” she says. “These startup businesses help women contribute to their families in a way they haven’t before — it changes the dynamic.” As the mother of two young children, Morgan’s travels to Africa are on hiatus; she last visited in 2007 and 2008. Her executive director duties are more administrative these days, she says, making arrangements for volunteers such as the group that left Missouri in early June. The volunteers visit the charity’s various projects, pitching in where needed and offering advice when asked. “Mainly, though, we just listen,” Morgan says. “Our lives are so different from theirs. They know their community and culture, what works and doesn’t work. We’ve learned so much from them.” Humanity for Children encompasses five efforts: microfinancing, school-to-school partnerships, church-tochurch partnerships, medical clinics and education assistance. www.humanityforchildren.org


LEFT: The Climate Foundation’s booth at the Reinvent The Toilet Challenge Fair: India featured a carbonizer manufactured by MFA Oil’s AgFuel Energy Systems. ABOVE: Dustin Dover (back center) of AgFuel Energy Systems with the Climate Foundation team at the Reinvent The Toilet Challenge Fair: India.

REINVENTING THE TOILET When the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation took on the Third World problem of waste disposal and sanitation, who knew that part of the solution might be lurking in a southwest Missouri manufacturing plant? ClearStak did. The Woodstock, Conn., environmental engineering company manufactures electric components for the multifuel furnaces produced by MFA Oil’s AgFuel Energy Systems. When the Climate Foundation called on ClearStak to join its team in the Gates Foundation’s Reinvent The Toilet Challenge, the engineers knew just where to go to buy a carbonizer. AgFuel Energy Systems, formed in 2011 by Columbiabased MFA Oil Co., is a furnace manufacturer that offers high-capacity, multifuel furnaces used in agricultural, commercial and industrial heating. The furnace the Climate Foundation purchased was modified by ClearStak to burn human waste as a component of the biochar reactor the team demonstrated in March at the Reinvent The Toilet Fair: India. The fair featured 40 exhibitors promoting innovative products and solutions for waste disposal. “Our was the only working prototype at the fair,” says Dustin Dover, AgFuel director of operations. “We had a working model to show how a biochar reactor actually works.” The reactor processes solid human waste in three

stages. A dryer lowers the moisture content of the material, which then moves to the carbonizer — AgFuel’s modified furnace. The carbonizer pyrolyzes the waste, releasing half the carbon as syngas suitable as a free energy source while charring the remainder. Above the carbonizer, a catalyst cleans the exhaust by oxidizing gases. Heat from the carbonizer and catalyst passes through an internal heat exchanger to produce electrical energy to power the belt dryer and augers. The sterile biochar produced by the process can be used for odor filtration. “It’s a lot like charcoal,” Dover says. Added to soil, biochar attracts and retains moisture as it enriches the earth. Poor sanitation is a killer. According to the Gates Foundation, the lack of basic facilities contributes to 2.2 million deaths around the world each year, primarily in undeveloped countries where the resources to build and maintain sewer infrastructure are scarce. The Climate Foundation team’s village-scale biochar reactor can serve a population of 2,000 to 5,000; the cost of the system is about $80,000, Dover says. The system will undergo field tests in Nairobi, Kenya, later this summer, Dover says, to make it more sustainable in operating off the power grid. “Our goal is to provide the solution.” www.agfuel.com SUMMER 2014

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p wer up

MID-MISSOURI MOVES INTO ALTERNATIVE ENERGY by KATHY CASTEEL

Energy issues are heating up again this summer as states get their first look at new emission guidelines the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is proposing — regulations meant to cut carbon pollution from fossil-fueled power plants by 30 percent from 2005 levels by the year 2030. Some mid-Missourians will be ready when those calls go out for alternative energy sources. Here’s a roundup of what’s going on in the local energy sector. SUMMER 2014

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wind E

ver wonder why a windmill popped up on the edge of the University of Missouri campus? Mizzou installed the wind turbine near the corner of Stadium Boulevard and Champions Drive in 2012. The turbine has three blades, each 16 feet long, connected to a generator that produces electricity as wind spins the turbine. Mounted atop a 98-foot steel pole that tilts down for maintenance, the turbine has a maximum power generation rating of 20 kilowatts. Electricity generated goes into the MU electric power distribution grid for campus use, says Karlan Seville, communications manager for the vice chancellor of operations and interim MU sustainability office coordinator. When generating at design level, the turbine will provide enough electricity to power the maintenance facility adjacent to the turbine.

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PHOTO COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI/MADELINE BEYER

AMEREN MISSOURI, owner of the Callaway nuclear plant and supplier of natural gas to Columbia and Ashland, has added wind power to its generation portfolio by purchasing energy from Horizon Wind’s Pioneer Prairie Wind Farm in Mitchell County, Iowa. It generates enough electricity to serve 26,000 homes, says Ameren spokesman Kent Martin. THE CITY OF COLUMBIA began purchasing wind power from the Bluegrass Ridge Wind Farm near King City in 2007. In 2013, wind power from Blue Ridge accounted for 1.18 percent of the city’s electric portfolio, according to Columbia Water & Light. The Crystal Lake III Wind Energy Center located in Hancock County, Iowa, also provides wind energy to the city. In 2013, the city sold more than half of its Crystal Lake megawatts to the University of Missouri.


solar PHOTOS COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI/MADELINE BEYER ABOVE: Contractors install solar thermal tubes on the roof of the MU power plant. RIGHT: The photovoltaic panel array on the roof of the MU power plant is available to MU students and faculty to see and learn firsthand about local solar technology applications. BELOW: An artist’s rendering of the solar farm at Ameren Missouri’s O’Fallon Renewable Energy Center

A

meren Missouri broke ground in April on the state’s largest utility-scale solar energy center. Located in St. Charles County, the O’Fallon Renewable Energy Center will generate 5.7 megawatts when completed, says spokesman Kent Martin. The solar farm, with 19,000 solar panels and covering almost 19 acres, is scheduled to go online by the end of this year. “The solar center will provide us with a diversification of energy sources that is critical to our goal of delivering safe, reliable and affordable energy,” Martin says. “Ameren Missouri is building this solar center now to take advantage of market prices and government incentives that will lower our customers’ costs by 30 percent,” he adds. “In addition, it provides Ameren Missouri and its customers with a carbon-free energy resource, helps us meet the Missouri Renewable Energy Standard and reduces the need to purchase out-of-state Renewable Energy Credits. Martin says the O’Fallon solar farm is the first of several solar facilities Ameren Missouri plans to build in future years. IN COLUMBIA, the University of Missouri installed a solar photovoltaic system on the roof of the biomass receiving building at the MU power plant in 2012. Rated to produce up to 34 kilowatts of electrical energy, the solar grid consists of 144 photovoltaic modules (panels) that collect the solar energy and convert it to electricity that flows to the MU electric distribution grid. Another solar project at MU springs from a feasibility study for the Missouri Department of Natural Resources that found solar thermal technology to be a viable option in Missouri. Researchers also determined that evacuated tube collectors are most suitable for Columbia’s local climate. A solar thermal project nearing completion will use evacuated heat tube technology to collect heat from the sun to heat water used in the power plant for steam energy. THE CITY OF COLUMBIA has a lease agreement with Nebraskabased Free Power Co Inc. for the electricity generated from photovoltaic modules at the COLT Railroad’s Transload Facility. In 2013, the Free Power solar projects — rated at 0.33 megawatts — produced 424.29 megawatt hours, which is 0.04 percent of Columbia’s electric portfolio. IN 2012, 3M CORP. began manufacturing 3M Ultra Barrier solar film in its Columbia plant. The lightweight, flexible thin film replaces glass on high-efficiency, flexible photovoltaic modules of solar panels. 3M has greatly expanded its manufacturing capabilities in its renewable energy division to supply key products for commercial scale production.

COURTESY OF AMEREN MISSOURI

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methane

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olumbia generates electricity from methane gas produced by decaying waste in the city landfill. In 2013, the landfill gas plant produced 13,326 megawatt hours of energy, or 1.12 percent of the city’s energy portfolio. As gas production increases, Columbia Water & Light estimates electric production could grow to more than 2 percent of its energy portfolio. IN MARYLAND HEIGHTS, Ameren Missouri operates one of the largest landfill trash-to-energy facilities in the United States. The center generates enough energy for 10,000 average-sized homes annually, spokesman Kent Martin says. State-of-the-art turbine technology generates approximately 15 megawatts of renewable electricity by burning methane.

PHOTO COURTESY OF AMEREN MISSOURI ABOVE: Ameren Missouri produces energy from methane gas at its Maryland Heights Renewable Energy Center.

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“We believe feedstock development will be important as cellulosic advanced biofuels technology develops.” Next-generation ethanol plants using cellulosic feedstock — plant waste material — have opened in Florida, Mississippi, Iowa and Kansas. MFA Oil is watching the progress of these facilities, Wilmes says, because “if they work, cellulosic ethanol provides greater value for farmers. We’re trying to better serve our farmer members by creating value for them in the market with a revenue stream and stability in energy.” IN AUDRAIN COUNTY, startup biomass producer Enginuity Worldwide LLC is setting up in its new home in the Missouri Plant Science Center. Funded by a $500,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Enginuity moved into the 28,000-square-foot Mexico facility in March to manufacture its eCARB biomass fuel and prepare for a test burn with the Columbia power plant this summer. “We’ll run firing tests for boiler

biomass

PHOTO COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI/MADELINE BEYER

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he emerging biomass renewable energy industry offers a way to generate power from cellulosic material such as grasses, wood, corn stover, wheat stubble and other fuels. In 2011, MFA Oil Co. partnered with Aloterra Energy LLC, a solid biofuels producer in Ohio, to form MFA Oil Biomass LLC and expand its role in the renewable energy market. The farmer-owned cooperative secured $14.6 million from the federal Biomass Crop Assistance Program to pay farmers to grow the perennial grass Miscanthus giganteus in mid-Missouri, southwest Missouri and northeast Arkansas. Construction continues on a $1.8 million expansion of a facility in Aurora to process miscanthus for industrial use, says Jared Wilmes, director of biomass operations for MFA Oil. The company is exploring other uses for the grass, he says, which may prove more valuable in industrial use than in power generation. “We’re still heading down the renewable energy path,” Wilmes says.

effects and emissions tests,” says Nancy Heimann, president and CEO. “We’ve already done a lot of material-handling tests for compatibility.” Enginuity’s eCARB fuel comes in a multitude of shapes and sizes — from pellets to briquettes to logs — to accommodate current equipment in power plants. The company claims power producers may add eCARB biomass to their fuel mix without retooling or purchasing new equipment. “We’ve engineered the fuel to meet the needs of the equipment,” Heimann says. Besides the test burn in Columbia, Enginuity is negotiating with other power producers in a five-state region, Heimann says. “It’s not unexpected that we will be conducting multiple tests in the fall,” she says. “After that, we’ll be looking to take the next step with longterm agreements to manufacture and deliver the fuel.” THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI has burned biomass in its power plant since 2006, mixing different wood chips, miscanthus and corn stover with coal. In 2013, a 100 percent biomass boiler went online, consuming more than 100,000 tons annually of waste wood biomass from various sources in Missouri. The university’s supply contract with Foster Brothers Wood Products of Auxvasse sets a precedent for sustainable biomass procurement, says spokeswoman Karlan Seville. Wood waste from manufacturing comprises up to 90 percent of the biomass boiler fuel; the remaining 10 percent, Seville says, is harvested from managed forests in accordance with the Missouri Woody Biomass Harvesting Best Management Practices Manual.

Miscanthus giganteus

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

faces behind the

places Get to know the people behind local businesses.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

faces behind the

places

Mid-Missouri Reproductive Medicine and Surgery, Inc. Gil Wilshire, MD Dr. Gil Wilshire specializes in infertility, endocrinology and special female surgery. He has been practicing with Mid-Missouri Reproductive Medicine and Surgery, Inc. for eight years. Dr. Wilshire purchased the practice from Dr. Larry Penney in 2008 and attributes much of his knowledge and experience to lessons learned from Dr. Penney as a mentor. From a young age, Dr. Wilshire knew he wanted to be a surgeon. It was at age five he discovered his passion. “My first

successful case was the repair of my Bugs Bunny toy,” he says. According to Dr. Wilshire, his parents instilled in him a strong work ethic that he believes has led him to find success. As a result, others describe Dr. Wilshire as undaunted and he says the biggest lesson he’s learned in his practice is that he has never regretted being thorough. Today, Mid-Missouri Reproductive Medicine and Surgery is the premiere center for reproductive health in Mid-

Missouri. Dr. Wilshire is a Board Certified Specialist who is committed to providing patients with the highest quality of care. Dr. Wilshire enjoys working with his knowledgeable and professional team, saying, “My team is fantastic and we strive every day to be the absolute best at what we do!” In his spare time, Dr. Wilshire enjoys fishing and recovering from Jiu-Jitsu training.

1506 E. Broadway, Suite 220 • 573-443-4511 • www.MissouriFertility.com SUMMER 2014

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faces behind the

places

The Missouri Bank II

David Paul, Andy Cofer, Rob Volker & Lauren Berube The Missouri Bank II is a full service community bank that was originally founded in 1891 in Smithton, Mo., when 48 Smithton citizens banded together to open the bank by investing their own money. The Columbia branch is the newest addition to The Missouri Bank II and entered the Columbia market in 2007. While the bank has multiple locations, each one maintains community-based focus and attention. “We pride ourselves on knowing all of our customers by name, and making everyone feel like they are our only customer,” Lauren Berube, Customer Service Specialist, says. “All of our lending decisions are made internally

and by the people you see in the bank on a regular basis.” With more than 40 years of combined banking experience, each member of The Missouri Bank II works with their clients to make his or her financial dreams come true. Recently, The Missouri Bank II leased space to Cornerstone Mortgage (NMLS # 223109) in The Missouri Bank II’s Columbia location in order to increase the bank’s available services to clients. Cornerstone Mortgage, Inc. is a full service mortgage lender that was founded in 1995 and maintains its headquarters in St. Louis. The Cornerstone representative joining The Missouri Bank II’s

Columbia office has more than 20 years of experience in the mortgage industry. The Missouri Bank II is committed to providing clients with the latest technology and security and the highest quality customer service. From personal to business needs, The Missouri Bank II is ready to help, saying “Come bank with us!” David Paul, Cornerstone Mortgage NMLS #423684 Andy Cofer, Vice President NMLS #1177402 Rob Volker, President/CEO NMLS #603210 Equal Housing Lender Member FDIC

2500 Range Line Street • 573-777-1000 • www.mymissouribank.com SUMMER 2014

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faces behind the

places

Columbia Allergy and Asthma Specialists Marcy Markes Columbia Allergy and Asthma Specialists is Columbia’s trusted source for the evaluation and care of patients with allergies, asthma and sinus/respiratory diseases. Nurse Practitioner Marcy Markes has been with CAAS for seven years and attributes her success to hard work, determination, long hours, family and friend support and the need to continually move forward. The perseverance to succeed and an instinct to care for others was instilled in Markes from a young age. There was never a question about whether Markes would go to college; to the single mother who raised

her, there was no other option. “I never realized her struggles until I was an adult and I think I got her stubbornness to keep moving forward no matter what,” Markes says. “All three of us graduated from college thanks to her.” It was in college that Markes found a mentor who inspired her to move forward in the medical field — Dr. Elizabeth Geden, now retired Associate Dean of the Sinclair School of Nursing at the University of Missouri. “She saw more in me than I saw in myself,” Markes says. And while she says not many people

realize that being a woman and owning a medical practice, but not being a doctor, has its challenges, those challenges can be met. “No matter what you have faced, if you want to succeed and you keep focused, even in rough times, you can,” she says. “Do not give up, just keep moving forward. Taking care of people is the easy part. Always doing the right thing in business is the key to success. Your word and your character shines in your business’s success.” Outside of the office, Markes enjoys watching her son play baseball and spending time at the beach.

1601 E. Broadway, Suite 250 • 573-777-4700 • www.breatheeasyandlivefree.com SUMMER 2014

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faces behind the

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dents unlimited Marc LaFerriere According to Marc LaFerriere, he stumbled into the automotive care industry by chance. He had taken a temporary position with Dents Unlimited in Springfield, MO, while trying to figure out his career path. The job led LaFerriere to discover the opportunities available to him in the industry, at which point LaFerriere says he never looked back. Twelve years later, LaFerriere attributes his success of owning his location of Dents Unlimited to a firm commitment to customer satisfaction, employee acquisition and retention and a strong work ethic. “We have a

dedicated crew that cares about quality and a job well done,” LaFerriere says. “Looking at repairs and associated customer relations from the customer and employee perspective creates long-term customers and employees and drives extensive referral business.” LaFerriere takes care to view all aspects of Dents Unlimited from the perspective of his customers and employees. “In doing so I have acquired dedicated and long term customers and employees,” he says. “I will bend over backwards to ensure customers have an excellent experience, leave the business knowing

we care about their business, the quality of the repairs performed, and the desire for their repeat business for all services we offer.” Family is very important to LaFerriere. He attributes his strong work ethic and attention to detail to his father. Outside of work, LaFerriere enjoys spending time with his family and children. LaFerriere also enjoys hunting and fishing. He takes any opportunity he can to see live music performances and says most people don’t know he spent several years living on the road, following the Grateful Dead and other artists around.

1004 Big Bear Blvd. • 573-817-1200 • www.dentsunlimitedmidmo.com SUMMER 2014

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faces behind the

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the trust company

Polly Reynolds, Kyle Reynolds & Greg Jones The Trust Company specializes in wealth management, specifically investment management along with financial, trust and estate planning and administration. It opened in Columbia on July 2, 2012. Vice President and Trust Officer Polly Reynolds has been with the company for nearly two and a half years. She has a passion for building authentic relationships with her clients. “For them to allow us to know them at a deeper level and earn their respect allows us the opportunity to educate them about their finances and then help shape and execute a plan for them to play out during their life and beyond,” she says. “It is incredibly humbling and rewarding.”

When she’s not working, Polly enjoys spending time with her family (especially her two grandchildren), golfing, reading and being creative. Account Administrator Kyle Reynolds agrees that learning professionalism early on has helped to shape his career and cites Jill Thompson as his influential mentor. “She was my manager at a bank where I worked,” Kyle says. “She taught me how to act and work like a professional.” Most people probably don’t know that Kyle has never dove into a body of water, but do know him to be an authentic and honest person. “Honesty will gain you respect and strengthen relationships,” he says. When not at the office, Kyle enjoys “whoo-

302 Campusview Drive, Suite 207 • 573-876-7000 • www.thetrustco.com

pin’ up on buddies either on the golf course or dart board.” Trust Officer Greg Jones cites his father’s dedication to hard work positively influencing his career and admires Polly’s dedication to building relationships with her clients. “As an estate planning attorney, I worked alongside Polly with mutual clients,” he says. “I admired the work she did developing ongoing relationships with those clients and becoming a trusted advisor on all matters related to the client’s financial success.” Greg has been with The Trust Company for eight months and is an avid Tiger and Cardinals fan who loves craft beer. He enjoys watching and coaching his daughters in swimming, softball and basketball. SUMMER 2014

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DIVIDENDS

ceo at play

THREE QUESTIONS

Ah, sweet summertime … when the livin’ is easy. We asked some busy Columbia business leaders about their plans for the hazy, lazy days to come.

Summertime: ’Tis the season for … BUKOWSKY: Cherry snow cones from Kona Ice with a shot of Appleton rum CHAPDELAINE: Sun, fun, water and quality vacation time with the family. JIMENEZ: Being outside, going running in parks and getting the dog back in shape. MEANS: Biking, boating, golfing and more family time.

What’s on your summer reading list? BUKOWSKY: Jesus > Religion by Jefferson Bethke CHAPDELAINE: The Confession by John Grisham, and The Paleo Solution: The

Original Human Diet by Robb Wolf JIMENEZ: The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are

No Easy Answers by Ben Horowitz, and Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies by Jim Collins and Jerry I. Porras MEANS: I don’t have one. I’m still trying to find time to read anything.

LOOK WHO’S TALKING: What’s your favorite way to beat the heat? BUKOWSKY: A family vacation anywhere north CHAPDELAINE: Sitting in or near the Wilson’s Beach Club pool JIMENEZ: Drinking lots of natural juices MEANS: More time at the Lake

BROCK BUKOWSKY Co-founder & coowner, Veterans United Home Loans

JIM CHAPDELAINE Director of Cross Competency Services, IBM Columbia Delivery Center

LUIS JIMENEZ President & Chief Operations Officer, EternoGen LLC

RICK MEANS President & CEO, Shelter Insurance Cos.

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DIVIDENDS

executive travel

Audiovox Car Connection Elite Series, available at AT&T ($179.99)

Apple iPad mini, available at AT&T (from $329.99)

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Suunto Core watch in deep black, available at Alpine Shop ($400) Beats by Dr. Dre studio headphones, available at AT&T (from $299)

Travel Tech Hit the road with these handy accessories. by NICOLE ENO photos by L.G. PATTERSON

If you’re looking to add a little sophistication to your next trip, these on-the-go gadgets help make traveling a breeze. Whether your travel plans call for planes, trains or automobiles, accessorize your journey with the latest in techno accoutrements. Happy trails!

Timbuk2 iPad kickstand sleeve, available at Alpine Shop ($26.97)

Goal Zero Switch 8 recharger, available at Alpine Shop ($39.99)

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networking

Comedy Night Fundraiser Hosted by Fred DeMarco, the 26th annual Comedy Night fundraiser took place at Déjà Vu on April 24 benefiting Job Point and Assistance League® of Mid-Missouri with more than $35,000 raised. Local comedians set the stage along with Mizzou alumnus and St. Louis performer Joe Marlotti and professional Rex Havens. Job Point is a not-for-profit employment center headquartered in Columbia serving our traditionally disenfranchised community members. Assistance League® of MidMissouri is a nonprofit volunteer service organization whose members identify, develop, implement and fund ongoing philanthropic projects to serve specific needs of children and adults in Columbia. 1. Kathe Milner, Laura Perez Mesa and Cricket Dunn 2. August Nielsen, Orvil Savery, Amy Schultz and Brett Gifford 3. Frank and Liz Aten, Marcia and Dave Machens, Kate and Matt Pitzer (Back) 4. Charles Allen, Rod Kelly, Valerie Shaw, Carolyn Allen 5. Josh and Roxanne Herron 6. Tracey and Sonny Clark 7. Lea Marienfeld, Connie and Jim Loveless 8. Tom Schultz and Fred DeMarco 9. Betsy Vicente and Donna Buchert

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networking

Columbia College Langford Gift Announcement Columbia College recently hosted a leadership gift announcement to celebrate an $111,000 gift from Barry Langford, assistant professor of criminal justice. Langford’s gift will support the Tradition Meets Tomorrow campaign by funding the Mock Trial Award, as well as scholarships for criminal justice and forensic science students. The event also marked the first public appearance by new Columbia College president, Scott Dalrymple. (Photos by Kaci Smart) 1. Brad Stagg, Janet Wright, Mitchell Humphreys and Judy Cunningham 2. Scott Dalrymple and Barry Langford 3. Melissa Montgomery Carberry and June Hurdle 4. Brad Stagg, Lynne Stuver Baker, Scott Dalrymple, Barry Langford, Judy Cunningham, Terry Smith, Mitchell Humphreys, Janet Wright and Jerry Daugherty 5. Melissa Montgomery Carberry, Dale Coe Simons and Susan Davis 6. Dan Scotten and John Yonker 7. Judy Cunningham, Anita Abbott Timmons and Jolene Schulz 8. Ethan Sellers, Brittany Candler, Ross Bridges, Barry Langford, Jared Vessell, Rachel Payton and Jennifer Lampkins

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ADVERTISING INDEX 1839 Taphouse................................................... 52 360 Health.......................................................... 37 A-1 Party & Event Rental...................................17 Accounting Plus..................................................19 Anytime Fitness..................................................19 Ashland Industrial Park.................................... 32 Boone County National Bank......................... 72 Central Trust....................................................... 39 CenturyLink........................................................... 9 Cevet Tree Service............................................. 78 Coley’s American Bistro.................................. 53 Columbia Landcare........................................... 83 Columbia Water & Light....................................11 Creative Surroundings...................................... 35 D&M Sound...........................................................3 Dakota Group....................................................4,5 Downtown Appliance........................................21 Hawthorn Bank..................................................84 Image Technologies.......................................... 32 Johnston Paint....................................................43 Landmark Bank.....................................................2 Las Margaritas................................................... 53 Les Bourgeois Vineyards................................. 22 Macadoodles.......................................................15 Maly Commercial Realty................................. 76 Moresource Inc..................................................47 Osaka.................................................................... 52 Ozark Mountain Biscuit Co............................. 53 Precision Construction Services.....................41 Postal & Sign Express.......................................80 Riback DKB......................................................... 39 Room 38.............................................................. 53 Senior Marketing Specialists.......................... 35 Southside Pizza & Pub...................................... 52 Starr Properties..................................................45 Stifel Nicolaus....................................................45 Straight Line Striping........................................ 35 Tech Electronic....................................................15 The Callaway Bank.......................................13, 31 The District.........................................................49 Tiger Court Reporting.......................................43 Timberlake Engineering................................... 78 UMB.........................................................................7 Watertower Place.............................................. 74 Williams Keepers................................................11 Winter-Dent........................................................ 51

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PUBLISHER’S NOTE

T

Town & Gown Reaches A New Peak

his year, the University of calls home. Missouri celebrates its 175th Inside Columbia magazine recently anniversary. The first public hosted a group of local business and civic institution of higher education leaders for a discussion of community west of the Mississippi River issues. One of the topics covered at this got its start, in part, from luncheon was the current state of affairs the toil of 900 Boone Countians who at the University of Missouri. There was shared a common vision and ambitious universal agreement among this group that goal of bringing scholarly endeavors to “town and gown” relationships in Columbia Columbia. Few could have imagined the have never been stronger than they are now. eventual impact of this institution with That’s a bold statement when you consider breakthroughs in medicine, the top-notch caliber of agriculture and technology. the leaders who have led The founders most likely both entities over the years. did not have grand visions It’s also a well-deserved of this university producing and fitting compliment such a vast array of captains for the university’s current of industry, political figures, leadership. authors, entertainers and To their credit, other American icons. The University President Tim goal was simply to make Wolfe and MU Chancellor Columbia and Boone R. Bowen Loftin recognize County a better place the role that a healthy to live by providing its community plays in the “For nearly citizens with educational success of a university. opportunities. No doubt, In their relatively short two centuries, the founders would be tenures, both have made Columbia has proud of the university and magnanimous gestures to grown and what it has become. connect and engage with prospered because For nearly two the citizens of Columbia. of the success of centuries, Columbia has Granted, Columbia is Tim the university.” grown and prospered Wolfe’s hometown, but it’s – Fred Parry because of the success of still pretty clear that neither the university. One might of these gentlemen is simply safely assume that a sleepy, passing through on the way little town in rural Missouri would have to bigger and better things. Both share a incompatible interests with a thriving genuine interest in making Columbia a academic center teeming with tens of better place to live, work and do business. thousands of young adults nine months of Tim Wolfe brings the experience the year. Yet the two entities have found of a successful CEO from the business a way to peacefully coexist through good world. While giving strong support to the times and bad. Columbia would not be academic mission of the university, he what it is today without the University of holds his colleagues to a higher standard Missouri flagship campus. In like manner, of excellence using performance-based the University of Missouri would not be funding and real-world metrics to measure the institution it is today without the city it results. His matter-of-fact approach is

effective and the relationships he is building will pay dividends for years to come. Wolfe has a masterful way of balancing the sometimes divergent interests of both the Missouri General Assembly and the businesses that eventually will be hiring Missouri graduates. Although he might object to this characterization, R. Bowen Loftin is a charismatic leader. Decisive and insightful, Loftin has been able to forge effective relationships with the Mizzou student body and local community leaders. He understands the holistic effect of every decision he makes. In addition to scholarly credentials, his charm and demeanor impresses donors, politicians and business leaders alike. Mizzou could not have made a better hire. What I appreciate most about Wolfe and Loftin is their shared vision for the university and for Columbia. Their individual styles and attributes complement each other, which will be critical in helping them achieve their ambitious agendas. They have the ability to divide and conquer or they can tag-team for maximum efficiency. Columbia has much to gain from strong leadership at the university. Admittedly, there have been times in our history when the gears of our economic engine were not turning in the same direction. This is not one of those times. The potential that exists in transferring technology from the academic lab to local startup business is more than promising for the community. The opportunity to grow the university’s influence around the state also benefits this city. Serving the citizens of Missouri for 175 years is a great accomplishment and a significant milestone. Let us use the occasion to celebrate the bond our community shares with this great institution. Happy birthday, Mizzou! SUMMER 2014

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CLOSING QUOTES

What Columbia’s Business People And Community Leaders Are Saying

“Sometimes Americans just want to try to fix things when maybe they should just listen more to what the locals think is best for their community.” — Humanity for Children Executive Director Kathryn Morgan on dealing with decision-makers in East Africa

“When you’re owned by a farmer cooperative, you always have to keep in mind who you serve.” — Jared Wilmes, director of biomass operations for MFA Oil Biomass, on how the cooperative weighs decisions about energy projects

“God bless ’em and God bless the University of Missouri for bringing them here.” — Attorney Dave Knight at the CEO Roundtable on Columbia’s surging student population

“I don’t think lawyers retire.”

— Attorney Jeff Parshall at the CEO Roundtable

“Well, we don’t have to lift heavy objects.”

— Attorney Greg Copeland at the CEO Roundtable

“When people ask me what they can do, I say ‘work on the next election.’ ” — Attorney Robert Hollis at the CEO Roundtable with advice for business owners unhappy with City Council decisions

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INSIDE COLUMBIA’S CEO OutFront Communications, LLC 47 E. Broadway Columbia, MO 65203

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Inside Columbia's CEO Summer 2014  

Meet some Columbia businesses that are reaching out and impacting lives half a world away.

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