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RICHARD STARBUCK | INTERVIEW | 23

AN INTERVIEW WITH

RICHARD STARBUCK

S

lick black curtains of hair cascade across and around canvases in Richard Starbuck’s darkly mesmerising mixed media works; hanging with sinister abnormity from household objects or reimagined as strands physically etched into the black pigments of photographic images. While reminiscent of visions of Japanese horror mythology and cinema, such as the cult classic Ring, it is the ominous sense of the unknown that draws the viewer in to contemplate what may lurk beyond the veil. Based in London, the artist has exhibited regularly in the UK and USA. We spoke to him about his work and influences. Although there are specific nods to visions of pop culture horror in your work, you state that it is the psychology of the uncanny that underpins your work; what first drew you to this genre? Since I was young I have always been into UFOs and the paranormal, reading countless books and listening to American radio shows dedicated to the subject. I was so fascinated by the stories and the storytellers behind them that it began to creep into my work. UFOs and the paranormal has long been associated with the uncanny, it’s mysterious, strange and unattainable, this is what I like about it; the ghostly nature of it. As my work has developed I have gone on to explore an interest in the fear

and anxiety that the uncanny causes, playing with materials such as hair. You speak of the hair in your works acting as a sort of cloaking device for the viewer to imagine what may or may not lurk behind; when creating works do you consider a specific narrative for each piece, or are even you unsure of what hides behind the dark? Even though my past works have been more narrative driven I still feed off stories of the supernatural, these latest works are even unknown to me; I’m not sure I want to know what lurks behind the dark. I’m much more interested in that space

Inside Artists | Issue 3  

Art is like the pages of a book Whether the artist has created their own fantasy, drawn from their personal autobiography or left clues for...

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