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76 ARTIST INTERVIEW Laura Carter

Laura Carter

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ines of different viewpoints run across Laura Carter’s photographs; skylines, shorelines, lines from tracks in snow and towering tree trunks. She considers each space and how it is experienced differently by each individual, questioning laws of geometry in which horizon lines are established as a boundary, and yet full of possibilities. Her practice is a physical exploration of our perceptions of subject matter, through an experimental approach to her medium in terms of how a photograph establishes as an object. Based in Bath, Carter’s photographs have been exhibited in the UK, including at the OXO Tower in London. She has been shortlisted for this year’s Royal Arts Prize with ‘2.42 Miles’, a series of landscapes taken at her personal eye level.

Tell us about your journey using photography; has it always been your main medium? I had always been sketching and painting in my spare time and first became hooked by the beauty of the digital photographic medium six years ago. I found it during my fine art studies; it became a private process that could involve no one but myself and the landscape always as my subject. But it was in my final year of my diploma that I decided to take it a bit more seriously and study photography at Bath Spa University. During my later studies, I noticed that my photographic style became much more particular in terms of subject and I was producing work which followed the theme of the landscape but with the confidence to explore it further whether that be in an abstract, experimental form or as large format images of technical practice. Since only just recently graduating as a Bachelor of Photography from Bath Spa University, I have

noticed that it has cemented my artistic style and given me the confidence in my practice to continue creating and showcasing my work. You speak of photography in relation to painting; can you explain a bit more about this and how it informs your practice? During my degree studies I found that my passion for American Abstract Expressionism heavily began to influence my photographic work. My landscape practice took on themes relevant to the work of modern artists such as Mark Rothko, with simplified fields of colour similar to Rothko’s ‘Multiform’ work. Much like the ideas that surround such painting works, I’ve always thought photographs do not depict complete reality, only a fraction of reality. The same moment can never be reproduced. I feel like my minimalist landscape approach allows the viewer to explore what is important about an image, instead of having it right in front of them. My experimental

Profile for Inside Artists

Inside Artists - Issue 15  

The power of nature is all around us, affecting our lives as humans in strange and unexpected ways. Sometimes physical, sometimes profound,...

Inside Artists - Issue 15  

The power of nature is all around us, affecting our lives as humans in strange and unexpected ways. Sometimes physical, sometimes profound,...

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