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Contemporary Artists & Exhibitions

Issue 13 summer 2018


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InsideArtists


An artwork can be made of many things: paint and pencil, glass and stone, photograph and frame. Not least of all, an artwork is made from the artist; and is a piece of them the same as a limb or part of their personality. In many ways, no matter the subject matter or medium, the artist is ever-present in the work. Sometimes this can be seen physically; in the marks of fingerprints left in clay, or in the expressive brushstrokes on a canvas. Just like a self-portrait, these traces act as a record of the artist, suspended in time. It can also be seen conceptually in the inspirations and influences, in the decisions of colour, form and composition, materiality and display. The thought processes that lead to a final piece can only ever be unique to the person who created it, and as a viewer we get a glimpse into their mind and soul. The artwork is a true extension of the artist.


EDITORS Kieran Austin Toby Oliver Dean COVER IMAGE Miss Aniela Bloom Face, 2016 GiclĂŠe on HahnemĂźhle Pearl Paper 200 x 153 cm PROOF READER Daisy Francome FOLLOW US InsideArtists InsideArtists ONLINE insideartists.co.uk ENQUIRIES info@insideartists.co.uk +44 (0)1273 649 724 Inside Artists is a registered trademark. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or part without permission from the publishers. The magazine can assume no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or illustrations.

"This piece intricately composes hundreds of paintings from art history upon a photographed face as a canvas, telling a multitude of stories of the relationship between humanity and nature in the form of a digital tapestry intended specifically for large-scale viewing. From Flemish Baroque to English landscape including works by Thomas Gainsborough, Angelica Kauffman and Anthony Van Dyck, it meticulously re-utilises the laborious hand of classical artists, taking place in months of digital manipulation in a contemporary remix celebrating European art history." Miss Aniela


Exhibitions 06 New Artist Fair

Interviews 08 Miss Aniela 32 Sharon Griffin

58 Julia Guzman

Artist profiles 14 18 22 24 28 30 38 42 46

Cho, Hui-Chin Andy McIntosh Scott Allen Roberts Beate Tubach Moises Ortiz Michael D Jicha Riccardo Liotta Vlasta Gary Shuaa Ali Al Muftah

50 54 56 64 66 68 72 74

Sara Newman Yongmin Cho Thomas Kosa Kazuya Ozawa Sebastian Magnani Trevor Childs Neelu Patel Hayah Sheps-Avtalion

Artist showcase 76 Adam Binder 78 Leila Godden

Artist exhibitions 86 Upcoming artist exhibitions

80 Vincent Donlin


06 EXHIBITIONS NEW ARTIST FAIR

Martin Turner

Michelle Parsons

New Artist Fair 14 - 16 September 2018 | Old Truman Brewery, London

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ver the last eight years New Artist Fair has established itself as one of the most exciting art calendar events. Returning this September to the iconic Old Truman Brewery in London’s E1 art district, the fair provides artists with the opportunity to join over one hundred new, emerging and recently established artists to showcase their talent to over

started their careers with New Artist Fair have gone on to exhibit with some of the UK’s top galleries; the fair presents an exciting opportunity to spot new talent as they launch their careers. This year sees New Artist Fair partnering with Artfinder and introducing some performance art into the mix from Lithuanian sensation Monika Dirsyte (Meno Nisa Gallery) and others. Several exhibiting artists will also be creating new work live throughout the weekend, giving visitors the

6,000 art lovers, buyers and collectors. New Artist Fair is the original artist-led event which adopts a gallery layout, rather than the booths usually seen at art fairs. The exhibitors have been carefully curated, with both UK and international artists selected for their dynamic work across a wide range of mediums. Many artists who have

chance to watch the exciting process of artworks being created.The fair opens with a private view on Friday 14th September, and is open to all with free entry 12 - 6.30pm on Saturday and Sunday 15 - 16th September. newartistfair.com


NEW ARTIST FAIR EXHIBITIONS 07

Dr Martin Raskovsky

Roo Waterhouse


08 INTERVIEW MISS ANIELA

Miss Aniela

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ine Art photographer Natalie Dybisz creates striking work under the name Miss Aniela. Her powerful images erode the boundaries between art and fashion, depicting contemporary models with classical references inspired by Renaissance painting and Dutch masters. Her expansive vision is brought to life through rich, meticulously constructed sets within stately homes located throughout Europe and the US which see wild elements of nature colliding with the historic interiors. The bold and beautiful costumes and contemporary models connect and react to their surroundings; while digitally created after-effects enhance the hypnagogic quality of the artist’s images, particularly seen in the dream-like worlds of the Surreal Fashion series. These juxtapositions between nature and manmade, the female form and interiors, painterly motifs and digital photography are continuously explored and reconfigured by the photographer as she makes new works. Miss Aniela’s impressive works have been exhibited across the world including the Saatchi Gallery, the Houses of Parliament, and Waldermarsudde Museum in Stockholm. How long have you been creating work as a photographer; has it always been your medium of choice? I first became hooked by the immediacy of the digital photographic medium eleven years ago, and the luxuriously private process that could involve no-one but myself, like a painter working with pixels. I used myself as a model for seven years of self-portraiture before I moved onto other models, and was never sure whether I actually had a passion for the camera, or whether it was my choice of art vessel sheerly through

circumstance. But now, I can say I have a deep passion for being a photographer. The scenes depicted in your work feature figures within elaborate sets, sumptuous lighting and surreal digital elements. Can you tell us some more about your process from idea to final image? When I was less experienced, I would start more with a mood or desire, from which a picture would emerge in a serendipitous way. As I evolved, the more I worked with a team, the


MISS ANIELA INTERVIEW 09

Pokerface, 2015, Giclée on Hahnemühle Pearl Paper, 99 x 108 cm


10 INTERVIEW MISS ANIELA

White Witch Awakening, 2014, Giclée on Hahnemühle Pearl Paper, 83 x 124cm

more specific storyboarded vision was needed. But some images are more compositionally planned than others, and I enjoy spontaneity, such as an unexpected pose or moving the light for a dramatic change. I shoot as much material as time allows, then comb through to find the images that move me. The post-production could be anything from a tweak, to full-blown surrealism. I always try to ‘listen’ to the image and not add too little or too much.
 Fine art and fashion collide in your work, with the two disciplines coming together perfectly to express your unique point of view. How has fashion played its part in your career as an artist; is it something you’ve always worked with or did you find it slowly seeping into your practice? Early on, it seemed that fashion could be the most obvious visual commodity into which to translate

my love for femininity and colour. It took me a while to realise I was more interested in fashion as costume, as a form of visual installation to take and elevate fashion beyond the disposable pages of a magazine, into standalone works of art that could be timelessly hung and enjoyed. It has been a challenge to find stylists, makeup and hair artists that can help rather than hinder this process of creating fine-art rather than fashion, and I am fortunate now to have excellent solid, talented team members who have stood the test of time. Surreal Fashion is a real celebration of this; can you tell us more about the project? Surreal Fashion began with a desire to make something more than a fashion photo, something that would stand out from the crowd and hark back to the age of laborious craft in art history.


MISS ANIELA INTERVIEW 11

The Governess, 2015, Giclée on Hahnemühle Pearl Paper, 97 x 113 cm


12 INTERVIEW MISS ANIELA

Away with the Canaries, 2013, Giclée on Hahnemühle Pearl Paper, 96 x 115 cm

It is a way of celebrating my love for costume and history, and for stately houses through England, Europe and the US, that I use to stage the photos. ‘White Witch Awakening’ and ‘The Governess’ are shot all in-camera, using the taxidermy collection of Aynhoe Park and the 500-year old golden gilt of the Elizabeth Room in Belvoir Castle. Sometimes I will direct inserting pieces of classical art, or a stock photo from nature. ‘Swan Lake’, shot in The Ruins ballroom of Seattle, is fused with the sea of the Big Sur to create an almost sculptural surrealism. Whilst most images take only a couple days’ postproduction, my Faces series (including ‘Bloom

Face’, cover image) take months to collage a face with hundreds of paintings from art history, a form of digital tapestry that blends ancient and contemporary in intricate detail specially for large scale viewing. I want my viewers to be able to lose themselves in the detail of my work. All my works I produce as limited edition prints with accompanying certificates, from small size through to XXL. I have selected a paper that most closely reproduces the style of the works, a 320gsm fine-art (Hahnemühle) paper for rigidity and longevity, with a Pearl surface finish which avoids dulling the intense colour palette of these works. I am fortunate my works have sold


MISS ANIELA INTERVIEW 13

Swan Lake, 2014, Giclée on Hahnemühle Pearl Paper, 100 x 100 cm

worldwide to collectors and luxury venues and we have recently been commissioned to fill an entire hotel! Having worked on the series over the last seven years, what direction do you see Surreal Fashion going as you move forward? I am still producing new images for the series, but slowing down as I begin other projects of work. We are now working on putting together

Surreal Fashion as a fine-art book which I have long anticipated, with accompanying exhibitions: ‘Timeless Tales’ joint show is currently showing at CultureInside Gallery in Luxembourg, 3 May - 9 June. missaniela.com contact@missaniela.com


14 ARTIST PROFILE CHO, HUI-CHIN

The sugar-coated lust III 2017, oil and acrylic on linen, 150 x 150 cm

Cho, Hui-Chin

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deas of sugar-coated intimacy and unconscious desires are running themes through Cho, hui-Chin’s work, as she uses paint and sculpture to explore how the artificial figures that she depicts could create authentic evocations. Recurring motifs in her paintings include figurative iconography; particularly bubble-like babies which merge with her abstract compositions as an attempt to understand the existence inbetween life and death. Working in acrylic and oil, she also applies materials such as leather to the canvas, alluding to a fetish for tactile materials, while symbolising creatures as life which once existed.

The process of creating new work is a form of personal therapy for the artist; by surfacing elements of romance, sexuality, and the concern for cultural identity, her practice is an attempt to discover solace. Born in Taiwan, Hui-Chin currently lives and works in London, having attended Slade School of Fine Art. This year she will begin undertaking an MA in painting at Royal College of Art, with an upcoming solo exhibition taking place at Soka Art Center in Taiwan. chin.art info@chohuichin.com


CHO, HUI-CHIN ARTIST PROFILE 15

Floating on a luminous depth, 2017, acrylic, oil, leather on canvas, 183 x 127 cm


16 ARTIST PROFILE CHO, HUI-CHIN

A spoonful of utopia, 2018, oil, acrylic, leather on linens, 300 x 150 & 300 x 150 cm


CHO, HUI-CHIN ARTIST PROFILE 17

Antecedents of being, 2017, oil, acrylic, leather on wooden board, 98 x 98 cm


18 ARTIST PROFILE ANDY MCINTOSH

Andy McIntosh

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etal, wood, concrete and paint collide and combine in Andy McIntosh’s intriguing works which explore the possibilities for recycling and renewal in found objects and scrap. His unique sculptural language has been created through self-invented techniques and constant experimentation. Having launched his art career as a conventional landscape painter, in 2005 McIntosh made the decision to forgo brushes and paint on canvas. He began combing scrap yards and beaches for discarded remnants; using their suggested narrative to create artworks which approached the problem of commercial waste culture through

Gullane Beach, 2013, steel, zinc, plaster, plastic & concrete, 59 x 76 cm

postmodern humour. Through this process of reclaiming and repurposing, the finished assemblages contain a variety of materials such as aluminium cans, scrap metal and broken machinery. Recently pieces foraged from nature have also found their way into the artist’s works; with items such as driftwood, acorns and pebbles collected from the wilds of Scotland and arranged to create new landscapes. McIntosh has exhibited widely in Scotland as well as Taiwan and London. He also regularly shows in the SSA and Scottish RSA annual open exhibitions. His commissions include a centre piece for Perth Museum and Art Gallery. andymcintosh.co.uk info@andymcintosh.co.uk


ANDY MCINTOSH ARTIST PROFILE 19

Mars, 2008, aluminium & paint, 65 x 60 cm


20 ARTIST PROFILE ANDY MCINTOSH

Regeneration, 2018, 58 x 48 cm


ANDY MCINTOSH ARTIST PROFILE 21

Lunar Eclipse, 2018, steel, plastic, aluminium& iron, 79 x 52 cm


22 ARTIST PROFILE SCOTT ALLEN ROBERTS

Twilight Library, 2018, acrylic and oil on canvas, 117 x 183 cm

Scott Allen Roberts

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rawing on very personal life experiences, themes of mortality, existentialism and the human condition dominate Scott Allen Roberts’ bold and graphic landscape and figurative work.

The artist’s allegorical works in acrylic and oil on canvas are peppered with symbolic artefacts and gestures, employing the use of reflections, cast shadows, and portals such as windows or doors as a question of where our actual and virtual lives intersect, and how we as a society have blurred the understanding between the two. While the cosmological, ontological, and phenomenological concepts which he explores

may often be considered dark territory, Roberts chooses to question the unknown through provocative, bright and compelling environments; something which can be seen prominently in his current series ‘The Dusk. The Twilight. The Eve’. Although a California native, Roberts now lives and works in New York, creating artworks from his studio in Hudson Valley, as well as a satellite studio in Manhattan. scottallenroberts.com info@scottallenroberts.com


SCOTT ALLEN ROBERTS ARTIST PROFILE 23

Evening Solitude, 2018, Acrylic and oil on canvas, 107 x 92 cm


24 ARTIST PROFILE BEATE TUBACH

Going beyond the veil, 2018, photography, 31 x 47 cm

Beate Tubach

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passion for photography and digital image editing has led to a transformation of Beate Tubach’s work. Primarily a painter, the Zürich-based creates dreamy slices of other-worldly scenes where plants and the natural world interact with mysterious and glamorous protagonists, crowned with flowers and expressive splashes of paint. Combining the two mediums has revealed new depths to the artist’s work, in often unexpected ways, leading to new horizons for the viewer as well as for the artist, who considers herself on

a mission to make known the unknown as both ways of creation –painting and digital photo editing – influence each other in her practice. Tubach has exhibited her work in both group and solo shows across the world. This year has seen her work shown in collaborative exhibitions in New York and Milan. beatetubach.com news@beatetubach.com


BEATE TUBACH ARTIST PROFILE 25

Meta, 2017, acrylic glass print, 50 x 50 cm


26 ARTIST PROFILE BEATE TUBACH

Sara, 2017, ink on photography, 50 x 50 cm


BEATE TUBACH ARTIST PROFILE 27

Kim, 2017, acrylic glass print, 50 x 57 cm


28 ARTIST PROFILE MOISES ORTIZ

Guardians, 2018, acrylic, oil and resin over gold brushed aluminum panels with 2’’ black/gold frame 122 x 183 cm (triptych) (122 x 61 cm) per panel

Moises Ortiz

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he frenetic energy of Moises Ortiz’s mixed media paintings are underlined with an appreciation of shape and form taking inspiration from the Cubist movement. With a creative career which began with the discovery of graffiti art in the early 90s, his work represents the evolution of style inspired by a formal Art education. His multimedia works use acrylic and oil as well as spray paints and resin, applied directly onto Plexiglas, gold brushed aluminium panels or wood, which he also carves and treats with fire, often allowing the natural grains of the wood to shine through the paint.

Although there is a formal design structure behind the artist’s process which can be seen in his specific use of shape and composition, his paintings are also completely emotional and experimental expressions which explore the relationship between immediate interpretation, opinion and judgement. Oritz is an award winning artist, poised to take his art to the next level internationally. He is based in Los Angeles, California. kharma1.com moises@kharma1.com


MOISES ORTIZ ARTIST PROFILE 29

Mutualism, 2017, acrylic, oil and resin painted front and back on 1/2‘’ plexiglass panel with 2’’ aluminum frame, 122 x 122 cm


30 ARTIST PROFILE MICHAEL D JICHA

Guardian Angels, 61 x 51 cm

Sr. St. Jude, 61 x 51 cm

Michael D Jicha

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ichael D Jicha’s ‘Project 1910 – Impressions of Diversity’ series is a contemporary photographic interpretation of Impressionism, Post-Impressionism and Surrealism, taking inspiration from the colours, textures and subject matter of painters such as Magritte and Singer Sargent. Jicha’s process sees him using digital techniques to achieve his wavy, heavily saturated aesthetic post-photograph. By using cloning tools, burning effects and digital brushes he adds texture and

depth, as well as adding colours and drawing over the photographic image. Based in Philadelphia, Jicha has been using photography to create work over the last four decades. After finishing art school he began photographing landscapes, still lifes and portraits, eventually evolving into his current digital practice. micjicphotography.com micjic@aol.com


MICHAEL D JICHA ARTIST PROFILE 31

Rene, 28 x 20 cm


32 INTERVIEW SHARON GRIFFIN

Sharon Griffin

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or sculptor Sharon Griffin the clay with which she creates artworks is an extension of herself as a person. She creates beautiful and haunting forms that appear fragile yet powerful, emanating the whispers of love and loss that are so often felt within humanity. Through the use of fast marks and emotive gestures, her work manifests a sense of both hope and sadness. Based in Telford in the UK, the artist has exhibited regularly across the country in group and solo shows, as well as running a pottery studio alongside her personal practice.

Your relationship with clay has been a lifelong experience; can you tell us about your journey with the material and how you started using it as your medium for creating artworks? This is quite a difficult question to answer as clay has always been a part of my life. I have and always had such pleasure in being outdoors, preferring outside spaces rather than being indoors. As a child, I grew up in a small house and shared a room with my sister. Going outside to play was a way to escape the noise of the house and find quiet spaces to play. Being in nature helped me relax. I could lose myself in outdoor activities, enjoying family woodland walks, fruit picking, exploring the vast Shropshire countryside which was on my doorstep. My favourite game was to dig up my Nan’s garden using old tools from the shed. When I attended Shrewsbury College in the early ‘90s, the pottery rooms were empty so I guess I sought

out quiet spaces even in busy classrooms. After I had completed my Ceramics Degree, I chose a career in Teaching at FE. During this period of my life, I had a family of my own and became a mother of 3. In 2013 I decided it was time to focus on my own work full time. What is your process for creating new work? I like to make work which includes a narrative or story, producing many pieces at a time based upon a theme. I sketch, produce mind maps and use ‘artist journals’. My drawings and research are a direct inspiration for my 3D sculpture. Choosing a piece of text helps me to focus on a starting point. I visit galleries, go to conferences and meet with other artists. In March this year I was lucky enough to see the recent Anselm Kiefer exhibition in Paris. Walking in the Shropshire woodlands are always a source of inspiration. To make the sculptures, I first prepare


SHARON GRIFFIN INTERVIEW 33

Dryad (Dancer in the Woods), 2017, ceramic and found objects, 30 x 10 cm


34 INTERVIEW SHARON GRIFFIN

Wearing Feathers, 2017, ceramic, 40 x 40 cm

and roll out slabs of clay. These slabs are then pieced together to form the basic structure. I then manipulate the clay with my hands and form the features, allowing the surfaces to be pushed and pulled. This is the most enjoyable part for me as I absolutely love to get my hands on clay. Working with clay is so therapeutic.

Child of the Stag and Protector of the Birds, 2017 ceramic and mixed media, 65 x 40 cm

and Christie Brown inspire me through their use of folklore and innovative making techniques. I like to use lyrics, poems, stories and fables, linking the present to the past. Absorbing the world around me also has an impact on how my work develops.

What are your influences and some of the subjects you explore through your work?

You also use found objects within your sculptures; how did you develop your technique of using these items alongside the

Artists who include emotional content in their work are an inspiration, especially those who seem unafraid of revealing part of themselves or their experiences as human beings. Artists such as Kiki Smith, Kathe Kolwitz and Jenny Saville share with us their emotional response to human condition. Ceramic artists such as Susan Halls

clay? How do you feel these elements fit into your work conceptually? My sculpture became quite still and monumental at one point and I wanted to include movement using negative space. In a previous exhibition, I produced 2000 porcelain birds which were hung from branches taken from my garden. I


SHARON GRIFFIN INTERVIEW 35

Midsummer Faun, 2016, ceramic, 35 x 30 cm


36 INTERVIEW SHARON GRIFFIN

Titania's Sister, 2018, ceramic, 50 x 50 cm

wanted the branches to be part of the sculpture, and not just for display purposes. Combining materials, timber and clay together gives reference to nature, bringing parts of the outdoors into the interior. Traditionally as a studio ceramic artist, we are trained to use glazes, clay and kiln firings. The process of mud-sculpture-fire (earth and fire) is the way of a studio potter. I like to deconstruct this tradition and use glazes which don’t necessarily marry or ‘fit’ together, layering oxides, glaze pencils and glazes to help mirror textures found in the natural environment. I see myself as a sculptor who uses clay. Alongside creating artworks you also run a pottery studio; do you feel this also influences your fine art practice? I set up the pottery studio initially as a way to share costs of rental space and to share my knowledge of clay within my community. I love

teaching and feel very saddened to hear of the lack of opportunities within our communities to access ceramics. Clay is an intrinsic part of every culture and should be accessed by anyone who wishes to do so. ‘Throwing a pot’ is fun! Everyone should have a go at least one point in their lives! The Pottery I set up in 2013 has evolved to include around fifteen independent ceramic artists and potters. We are currently setting up a non for profit group which will be a fantastic asset to my community. Can you tell us about some pieces you’ve been working on recently? Do you have any upcoming exhibitions or plans for your work? For the past six months I have been exploring movement, whether this is the appearance of movement through mark making and texture or the actual movement in the form of a kinetic sculpture. My love of mechanics and all things


SHARON GRIFFIN INTERVIEW 37

Oberons Younger Brother, 2017, ceramic and found objects, 65 x 40 cm

vintage has also led me to explore the idea of automata using wire and found objects. This is an ongoing project and I hope to reach a point where I can show my experiments in clay towards the end of 2018. My next solo exhibition will be at Ffin Y Parc in July 2018. In this exhibition I will be focusing on expression and the human form which will include movement and stillness. I will be using the figure and the face as a canvas to project my feelings and

emotions on to. As a sculptor, my work is always evolving as I am constantly seeking out new ways to communicate ideas through clay. I want my clay figures to act as a mirror to those who see them, communicating deeper meaning of expression and emotion. sharongriffinart.com sharongriffin22@gmail.com


38 ARTIST PROFILE RICCARDO LIOTTA

Chromodynamism 001, 2014, acrylic on paper, 23 x 30 cm

Riccardo Liotta

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hile Riccardo Liotta’s early work was influenced by his professional training as an architect - having worked in the field for the last twenty years - his main inspiration has always come from physics and mathematics. His focus recently has increasingly shifted to artwork less reminiscent of buildings and more of particle physics and quantum

abstract artworks consisting of simplified yet very dynamic geometric shapes, lines and segments that convey concepts of movement, velocity, decay and fragmentation, while contemplating the uncertainty of life.

mechanics concepts, as well as mathematical and geometrical principles.

medium of choice, he also works with pencil and pastels, markers and collage, as well as digital techniques to generate patterns, shapes and compositions, and to enhance paintings and drawings.

Referring to his working style as ‘Eigencompositions’, the principles of maths and science collide visually with the theories and techniques of Constructivism, Suprematism, Futurism and Rayonnism. He creates analytical,

Liotta’s practice sees him experimenting with a variety of techniques which allow his work to constantly evolve, becoming less rigid and systematic as he works with fluid and intuitive gestures. While acrylic is often the artist’s

riccardo@riccardoliotta.com


RICCARDO LIOTTA ARTIST PROFILE 39

Chromogeometric fragmented interference (from superimposed reductions) 001 - study 07 2017, acrylic, colored pencil, painted paper, printed trace paper and paper cut-outs on corrugated cardboard, 23 x 18 cm


40 ARTIST PROFILE RICCARDO LIOTTA

(e)astrazione cromogeometrica di me stesso - intermediate phase 001 - derivation 003, 2016 colored pencil, pen, marker and collaged elements over digitally altered drawing on paper, 18 x 16 cm


RICCARDO LIOTTA ARTIST PROFILE 41

Polychropo composition 001 - derivation 006 [002345], 2017 digital alteration of four superimposed mixed-media compositions, 71 x 81 cm


42 ARTIST PROFILE VLASTA GARY

Alena Summer Series, 101 x 152 cm

Vlasta Gary

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nown for her daring and sensual portraits, Vlasta Gary combines the classical visual language of photography with a strong contemporary aesthetic.

Her images, which often feature sun-soaked female protagonists - whether posed and stretching draped in yards of silk, or relaxed and reflective on sandy beaches - illuminate what she refers to as a ‘rare kind of beauty’ through form and movement. Through the use of contrasting black and white, the photographs exude a sense of timelessness as they fall visually somewhere between the present and the past.

Having trained at the prestigious University of the Arts London, Gary is now an award winning artist, photographer and creative director. Recently she has exhibited as part of The Other Art Fair in LA, and at The Stricoff Gallery in New York. vlastagaryphoto.com vlastagaryphoto@gmail.com


VLASTA GARY ARTIST PROFILE 43

To The Sky, 101 x 76 cm


44 ARTIST PROFILE VLASTA GARY

Atonement, 101 x 76 cm


VLASTA GARY ARTIST PROFILE 45

Girl # 1, 101 x 76 cm


46 ARTIST PROFILE SHUAA ALI AL MUFTAH

Contemplation, 2017, mixed media on canvas, 40 x 40 cm

Shuaa Ali Al Muftah

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uxtaposing colours and textures form Shuaa Ali Al Muftah’s paintings, which are rooted in the study of perception and its relationship to emotion.

Taking inspiration from the abstract expressionists, the artist’s process sees her approaching the canvas with no preconception of what the final piece may look like, instead allowing feeling and intuition to determine the direction. Each brushstroke and paint texture is recorded,

whether intense or plain, coarse or smooth, even or inconsistent. This emotive style of painting translates into works which bring an experience of wonder and contemplation to the viewer, in an almost dreamlike state. The artist lives in Qatar in the Middle East and works from there, surrounded by the inspirations of the diverse culture and society. shuaaalmuftah.com shuaa.almuftah@gmail.com


SHUAA ALI AL MUFTAH ARTIST PROFILE 47

Serene, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 90 x 60 cm


48 ARTIST PROFILE SHUAA ALI AL MUFTAH

Tranquil 1, 2018, acrylic on paper, 32 x 24 cm


SHUAA ALI AL MUFTAH ARTIST PROFILE 49

Tranquil 2, 2018, acrylic on paper, 32 x 24 cm


50 ARTIST PROFILE SARA NEWMAN

Swing Dome, 2016, mixed media, 38 x 25 cm

Sara Newman

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maginary worlds are captured within Sara Newman’s intricate glass dome sculptures, using miniature objects and collage to mix the material world with the fantastical.

A fascination with model villages has been one of the artist’s main inspirations as she plays with scale; experimenting with a combination of upcycled trinkets, paper elements, insects, minature figures and household items. The playful works are peppered with visual puns and touches of the surreal as butterflies become sails for boats, and antlers act as slopes for microscopic

skiers. Newman’s work is informed by her background in interior design, which has seen her working with Interior Folk, Studio Proof, HBA and Tregulland & Co. to produce commissioned work for hotel projects. Based in Canterbury in the UK, the artist will be showing work this June at Show Off Gallery in Kent. Alongside her personal work she also creates bespoke pieces as commissions. saranewmandesign.com mail@saranewmandesign.com


SARA NEWMAN ARTIST PROFILE 51

Winter Dome, 2018, mixed media, 31 x 17 cm


52 ARTIST PROFILE SARA NEWMAN

Edison Dome, 2016, mixed media, 38 x 25 cm


SARA NEWMAN ARTIST PROFILE 53

Downhill Dome, 2017, mixed media, 50 x 25 cm


54 ARTIST PROFILE YONGMIN CHO

MCA, 2017, oil on canvas, 76 x 61 cm

Sunshine in Met Museum, 2018, oil on canvas, 101 x 76 cm

Yongmin Cho

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eople and places are observed as deconstructed forms and blocks of colour in Yongmin Cho’s paintings as he strives to make the ordinary extra-ordinary once again.

Working with oil, moments in time are captured upon the canvas; created to embody the beauty and appreciation of the conditions that will never be met again. The artist considers every aspect of a moment; the shapes and colours of the location, the posture of the people within the scene, the light and weather; recognising that each passing juncture is built from unique complexities that can never be replicated in the

same way again, however ordinary they may appear. Based in Chicago where he studied at School of Art Institute of Chicago, Cho has his first solo show last year at 062gallery in Zhou B Art Center. He has also exhibited work in group shows across the states, including the Other Art Fair in LA. yongmincho.com dydals1188@gmail.com


YONGMIN CHO ARTIST PROFILE 55

Wall St, 2017, oil on canvas, 142 x 106 cm


56 ARTIST PROFILE THOMAS KOSA

Smoke Elephant, 2017, photograph, 40 x 50 cm

Thomas Kosa

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ramatic swirls of coloured vapours fill Thomas Kosa’s artworks, formed into familiar shapes such as animals, musical instruments and scenes from nature. The project first began for the photographer in 2009, although a return to the series last year saw him exploring ways of creating more complex images. Kosa’s process sees him using multiple lights and theatrical coloured gels to capture each element

of the final piece, often experimenting with new ways of manipulating the smoke such as introducing sound waves to the set. After taking multiple images of the fragile smoke streams he blends them together digitally using Photoshop, the layers coming together to build a scene, object or abstract composition. thomaskosaphotography.com tk@thomaskosaphotography.com


THOMAS KOSA ARTIST PROFILE 57

Number 49, 2015, photograph, 50 x 40 cm


58 INTERVIEW JULIA AURORA GUZMAN

Julia Aurora Guzman

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ateriality is a key aspect of Julia Aurora Guzman’s artworks, as she uses mixed medias such as metal, coral stone, wood, wax, mesh, and thread to create compositions which are constructed to settle between the material’s logic and her own. Her sculptures and installations play with scale and respond to ubiquitous support systems found in architectural and institutional methods of display, examining their labour and re-contextualizing particular mechanisms. Originally from Santo Domingo, Guzman has had regular solo and group exhibitions in California, where she studied at the San Francisco Art Institute. She is currently based in Amsterdam in The Netherlands. What are your influences and inspirations for creating work? I’m inspired by creating relationships in space, finding a meditative quality in the act of creating and a materials’ individuality. I’m interested in support systems in different scales; from architecture, to pedestals, to words, to feelings, and architecture as the thoughtful making of space. Other influences include Museology, poetry, language and tombs - I like the relationship of architecture being minimised in scale, closer to the human body and becoming self-applauding yet useless. They’re infrastructures that represent a person for a longer time that a person is actually alive. It reflects immortality while reserving a space for a body that is no longer present.

Before starting a new installation work, do you usually have the place where it will be shown in mind? Is each piece site-specific or can they be adapted to different surroundings? Not necessarily, it depends on the project. I often create installations that don’t have a specific space in mind besides their place of creation. However, I create particular conditions that can be adapted if these were to be moved. In the case of ‘How to Stand’, my latest solo exhibit at Mamey Galeria, Santo Domingo, the totality of the installation was site specific and really appropriated the proportions, dimensions, elements and history of the gallery – it consisted of an architectural intervention that was evident in the three largest pieces; however, their smaller siblings carried the same genes but


JULIA AURORA GUZMAN INTERVIEW 59

Holder, 2016, metal, coral stone & wax, 30.5 x 7.5 x 15.5 cm


60 INTERVIEW JULIA AURORA GUZMAN

Cascada de Campo, 2017, metal, coral stone plexi-glass and acrylic paint, 134 x 43.5 x 33 cm

were independent to the space and can still be adapted to different surroundings. Your installations often incorporate many different materials; do you have a preferred medium when it comes to constructing the sculptural elements? Somewhat, as I like to think of myself as an attentive material listener and collaborator. By acknowledging the history and language that a material already portrays by itself, I’m attracted to their different qualities and reactions. My process of fabricating an object or constructing a sculptural element is led by a concept, a feeling, an intuitive manipulation and a meticulous experimentation. The installations

Cascada de Campo (close up), 2017, metal, coral stone plexi-glass and acrylic paint, 134 x 43.5 x 33 cm

often juxtapose rawness and refinement, and amorphous objects against calculated structures; features that can be found in all kinds of materials! It’s quite open-ended. I do have a slight inclination for bees-wax; it is fleshy, flexible, friendly, and vulnerable. And I do love being able to make spatial drawings with clean cut metal. Shape and form are important aspects of your work; can you tell us more about your process for translating your conceptual ideas into the visual, through the physical sculptural objects? Is this something that evolves as the artwork is constructed, or do you usually have a clear idea of how a piece will look from conception?


JULIA AURORA GUZMAN INTERVIEW 61

Medio Arco en su Casa, 2017, coral stone, 145 x 12 x 33 cm


62 INTERVIEW JULIA AURORA GUZMAN

How to Stand Column Series, 2017, mixed media - acrylic mesh, fabric, duracal & thread

I would say that it depends on the project and piece, but in general I have a few different ways of creating. With a concept in mind, I sketch insatiably until I reach an interpretation that triggers my desire to see it in a physical manner. Having a material in hand that really inspires me, and wanting to see it activated in different ways, I start to experiment and then extract a concept from the dialogue we just had. Sometimes I create a list of features or characteristics I’m looking for in a piece, then mix and match from that list. Eventually, these processes turn out to be maquettes for larger or more strictly calculated works. Of course, taking a specific project in hand, I take into consideration the overall accessibility and affordability of my process, so that might dictate the order of the practice. All around, while translating an idea to a shape, it’s inevitable for me to make a relationship between the sculptural body and my human body’s senses and scale.

Are there any pieces you’re currently working on? Do you have any upcoming exhibitions? I’ve recently moved to Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and this time of transition and change has triggered a different, more introverted type of awareness in me. I’m talking more to myself in my work rather than talking to ‘others’. I’m paying exclusive attention to my core inclinations and putting my external inspirations on hold; I don’t want to hang up on them - they’re still important to me, but I’m having an important conversation with myself on the other line. How can I represent Julia as a concept rather than ‘something else’, in materials and in abstract form? This series, and continuous process, will be exhibited this fall 2018 in Amsterdam, NL. juliaurora.com juliaurora@gmail.com


JULIA AURORA GUZMAN INTERVIEW 63

Absent in a Spiral, 2017, metal, mahogany wood, coral stone, 107 x 67.5 x 84.5 cm


64 ARTIST PROFILE KAZUYA OZAWA

Paradise, 2018, acrylic and collage on plastic board, 33 x 33 cm

Kazuya Ozawa

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ombining collage with vibrant painted elements, Japanese artist Kazuya Ozawa’s exuberant works feature animals, figures and still life compositions amongst bold primary colours and abstract arrangements of splintered cut-outs. As a completely self-taught artist, Ozawa’s practice began as a result of using visual imagery to create songs while following a singing career. The process of creating artworks became a

powerful experience for him, finding it connected him to childhood memories as he explored the tiny fragmented worlds that emerged in paint. Now based in New York, Ozawa creates work from his apartment building’s garage. Inspired by the natural world around him, the sound of birds singing are a constant companion to his creative development. ozaart.com american927@gmail.com


KAZUYA OZAWA ARTIST PROFILE 65

Thanks, 2018, acrylic and collage on canvas, 46 x 35 cm


66 ARTIST PROFILE SEBASTIAN MAGNANI

Foxylady, 2018, photography

Sebastian Magnani

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even years ago Sebastian Magnani decided to turn his passion for photography into a profession, creating portraits, still life work and personal fine art projects.

His latest body of work is focused on capturing portraits of taxidermy as a single printed photograph. The project explores human relationships to death and decay, using the taxidermy as artefacts of living creatures that ‘survive’ through time. The objects are manipulated with highly saturated bold colours

against a contrasting background, changing the figure, which has never existed in this state, to something historic and unique. Based in Zurich, Switzerland, the photographer gained widespread attention for his ‘Underdogs’ and ‘Undercats’ series, which feature anthropomorphic portraits and dogs and cats. Images from this project were published in newspapers, magazines, websites and tv-shows around the globe. sebastianmagnani.com contact@sebastianmagnani.com


SEBASTIAN MAGNANI ARTIST PROFILE 67

Jay, 2016, photography


68 ARTIST PROFILE TREVOR CHILDS

No.5, 2016, 60 x 40 cm

Damoclese of the Big Blue, 2018 acrylic on canvas, 150 x 100 cm

Trevor Childs

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lifetime spent observing and experiencing the interplay of nature and technology has been pivotal in Trevor Childs’ artistic practice, with the fusion of manmade and the natural acting as the underlying concept of his imagery. Articles in books and news items are collated to be used as reference and inspiration for new works, while the artist’s process for creating new work sees him incorporating a range of multimedia, from photography, print and paint to sculpture. Through amplified, altered and

saturated colours, heightened textures and abstract elements we are given a different viewpoint of nature to observe than what is usually seen. Through his artistic talent, Childs has created a body of work which showcases his relationship with environmental concerns. Based in the UK, Childs has won awards for his work, which have been exhibited around the world, with pieces held in corporate and private collections. trevorchildsart.com info@trevorchildsart.com


TREVOR CHILDS ARTIST PROFILE 69

Observation, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 150 x 100 cm


70 ARTIST PROFILE TREVOR CHILDS

Sundown, 2018, 25 x 76 cm


TREVOR CHILDS ARTIST PROFILE 71


72 ARTIST PROFILE NEELU PATEL

Shreenathji Gwal Swaroop Pichvai Painting, 2012, recycled newspapers pulp and colors on bourd, 112 x 72 cm

Neelu Patel

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eelu Patel creates her papier-mâché artworks with the environment in mind, recycling small pieces of newspaper which would otherwise be wasted as scrap; painting them into new sculptural formations. Taking inspiration from the impermanence of life and the precious moments that make up our existence, Patel nurtures this idea through her artworks. She has been using papier-mâché

as her main medium since the late 80s, and continues to develop her techniques. Based in Ahmadabad, India , Patel has had many exhibitions in India as well as the UK. Her latest exhibition ‘Music from the Silent Flute’ celebrates her work while investigating the serious issue of environment preservation. The artist is also the owner of Mukhote Creative Art Foundation, Ahmedabad, Gujarat India. creativesneelu.com neelupatel1973@gmail.com


NEELU PATEL ARTIST PROFILE 73

Bindu Chakra, 2016, recycled newspapers coil and colors on canvas, 92 x 72 cm


74 ARTIST PROFILE HAYAH SHEPS-AVTALION

Hayah Sheps-Avtalion

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he potential of photography as a medium is explored by Israeli artist Hayah Sheps-Avtalion, who creates contemplative abstract images using beams of light as her muse and subject matter, inspired by the works of the ‘New Vision’ photographers and the ‘Concrete photography’ genre. The photographer’s process for capturing images sees her opposing the classic documentary role of photography, combining body and camera movements in various rhythms to transform light sources into sculptural forms and ethereal drawn

shapes which fill the dark void-like backgrounds. Having studied photography at Blake College in London and at Bet Berel College in Hamisrasha, Israel, Sheps-Avtalion has exhibited in Tel Aviv in a solo exhibition in 2014 and several group shows since then. Last year she received an honourable mention at the Monochrome Awards, the international black and white photography contest, in the Abstract category. hayahshepsav.com hayah.sheps@gmail.com


HAYAH SHEPS-AVTALION ARTIST PROFILE 75


76 ARTIST SHOWCASE ADAM BINDER

Frog in a Pod, 2018, 35 x 40 x 11 cm

Adam Binder

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ward winning artist Adam Binder is recognised as one of the UK’s leading wildlife sculptors, creating figurative works primarily in bronze. His signature fluid style sees creatures great and small cast with simple lines and flowing forms with earthy, rich patinas that mirror the tones of nature. The artist’s own passion for wildlife is seen throughout his sculpting process as he endeavours to engage with the character and spirit of his subjects, which range from British

birds and small mammals to sea creatures and more exotic animals. He considers the emotional connection of his work as importantly as balance and composition. Binder’s work is collected all over the world and he exhibits regularly across the UK. adambindersculptures.com info@adambindersculptures.com


ADAM BINDER ARTIST SHOWCASE 77

Kingfisher, 2018, 69 x 15 x 15 cm


78 ARTIST SHOWCASE LEILA GODDEN

Sapphire and Umber, 2017, acrylic, 32 x 42cm

Leila Godden

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pecialising in semi-abstract seascapes, Leila Godden’s source of inspiration is her connection with the sea. The vast panorama of changing light, dramatic weather and powerful water is framed by rocks solid with history, yet transient with time and the rhythm of the earth. Her intention is to evoke a memory or sensation personal to you, the viewer. Drawing on her poetic observations of the water, the artist’s paintings are built from a mixture of improvisation and considered responses

to the marks made as they reveal themselves, coaxing the paintings to evolve and settle, until she is completely happy with the finished piece. Godden’s method of working on several paintings simultaneously sees different series of work coming together to explore a similar theme. leilagodden.com leila.godden@btinternet.com


LEILA GODDEN ARTIST SHOWCASE 79

Catching the Moment, 2017, acrylic, 92 x 92cm


80 ARTIST SHOWCASE VINCENT DONLIN

View of Brighton from the roof terrace, 2018, oil on canvas, 60 x 90 cm

Vincent Donlin

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sense of place is an important aspect of Vincent Donlin’s paintings, with his recent works taking him further afield than his adopted city of Brighton, which often acts as a muse for his landscape pieces.

visiting with his wife who grew up there. The rural environment offers a change from the urban spaces he usually paints and provides him with a challenge pictorially.

Whitstable in Kent has seen Donlin's work at the EKAOH festival alongside friend and fellow artist Stephen Postgate. St.Davids, Pembrokeshire in Wales has also provided inspiration for the artist over the last three decades since first

Donlin’s work can be seen at galleries in Brighton and Pembrokeshire.

All of these places have a profound emotional meaning for the artist, and as such he considers his works to be ‘portraits of places’.

vincentdonlin.co.uk vincent1311@btinternet.com


VINCENT DONLIN ARTIST SHOWCASE 81

Clock tower Brighton, 2009, oil on canvas, 104 x 103 cm


82 ARTIST SHOWCASE VINCENT DONLIN

The Geese and the Greys Southover Street, 2010, oil on canvas, 50 x 65 cm

Madeira Terrace Brighton looking west, 2015, oil on canvas, 50 x 60 cm


VINCENT DONLIN ARTIST SHOWCASE 83

Madeira Terrace Steps, 2014, Madeira Terrace Steps, 70 x 50 cm


84 ARTIST SHOWCASE VINCENT DONLIN

Aberiddy, 2018, oil on canvas, 60 x 90 cm

The Oyster Fisheries, 2015, oil on canvas, 60 x 90 cm


VINCENT DONLIN ARTIST SHOWCASE 85

Saint Davids Cathedral, 2010, oil on canvas, 108 x 136 cm

Whitstable from the Oyster Fisheries to the Neptune, 2017, oil on canvas, 25 x 75 cm


86 ARTIST EXHIBITIONS

Upcoming artist exhibitions Adam Binder Moncrieff-Bray Gallery Summer Exhibition Petworth, West Sussex 19 May - 17 June 2018

Andy McIntosh Reuse, Reinvent, Reimagine Gallery 23, Edinburgh 10 - 27 August 2018

Leila Godden Featured Artist, Chalk Gallery, Lewes 2 - 22 July 2018 At The Edge, Kaleidoscope Gallery, Sevenoaks 8 - 18 August 2018

Miss Aniela Timeless Tales CultureInside Gallery, Luxembourg 3 May - 9 June 2018

Sara Newman Sara Newman Design Pop Up The Show Off Gallery, Whitstable 16 - 22 June 2018


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