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Through the Eagle’s Eye Innovative Approaches to Building A Media Arts Program Through the Eagle’s Eye is a curriculum guide to support teachers and administrators in building innovative and academically challenging media arts programs. This guide was produced by Four Directions Charter School and In Progress, which have successfully implemented media arts curriculum for students since 1991. This guide was produced as part of Four Direction’s Federal Charter Schools program, which is funded through the Minnesota Department of Education and the United States Department of Education. The guide is available at no charge by writing to Four Directions Charter School at the address listed below, or you may download this curriculum from either of these websites listed below: Four Directions Charter School 1113 West Broadway Minneapolis, Minnesota 55411 www.fourdirectionsschool.org/eagles.htm In Progress 262 4th Street East, Suite 501 Saint Paul, Mn 55101 www.in-progress.org to go directly to the curriculum downloads go to the site below: http://www.in-progress.org/ee/index.php/InProgress/04curriculum

Four Directions Charter School provides culturally based education that is the foundation of life-long learning for American Indian students.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Preface

page 4

Three Models For Media Arts Learning

page 7

Building A Media Arts Program

page 19

Media Arts In The Classroom

page 23

Building A Peer Mentor Program

page 27

Introduction to Curriculum

page 33

Unit One:

Course Introduction

page 41

Unit Two:

Camera & Tripod Operation

page 45

Unit Three:

EQ Care & Protocols

page 59

Unit Four:

The Language of Video

page 69

Unit Five:

Introduction to Critical Viewing

page 85

Unit Six:

Introduction to Sound

page 97

Unit Seven:

The Art of The Interview

page 107

Unit Eight

Ideas In Action

page 121

Unit Nine:

Production In Action

page 143

Unit Ten:

Introduction to Editing

page 161

Unit Eleven:

Independent Projects

page 175

Media Arts Resources

page 205

Partner Contact Information

page 217

Contributors

page 219

Acknowledgements

page 223

Supplemental Media Resources

page 224

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Preface

PLEASE USE THIS SPACE TO TAKE NOTES

Through the Eagle’s Eye promotes new ways of thinking about how technology, peer education, and the arts can be used together to create exciting, academically challenging experiences for high school students. This curriculum guide provides tools for teachers and administrators to introduce video production activities and offers several suggestions to successfully implement a media arts program tailored to a school’s needs and resources. Through the Eagle’s Eye showcases three unique examples of media arts programs that have been developed and implemented in diverse educational settings. It provides step-by-step instructions about how to build your own media arts or peer mentorship program. Also included is a sample video arts curriculum that includes lesson plans, handouts, and examples of student artwork. Four Directions Charter School and In Progress, a non-profit arts organization, developed this model. It is based on fourteen years of program development derived from media arts activities. When the collaboration began, video storytelling within education was rarely possible because It was an expensive and time consuming activity. However, Four Directions’ Director Ronald Buckanaga saw the potential of using video as a means to engage students in their education. He found a strong media arts partner with In Progress; over time, they built what is now a nationally recognized model for media arts education.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Preface Through The Eagle’s Eye places students at the center of the project-based learning process. By creating their own stories, students gain confidence in their personal learning and teaching potential. By presenting their works to the public, they demonstrate their gifts as artists, storytellers and video producers, which validates their academic and creative talents. This process inevitably leads to increased student attendance and academic performance. In 2003, Four Directions Charter School was given the opportunity to model its media arts program at two other Minnesota charter schools. Each site modeled and adapted the video arts curriculum presented later in this guide. Each school integrated a media arts curriculum that utilized existing resources and personnel. Each brought the unique characteristics of their own school environment into the adaptation of the curriculum. Lastly, each laid a foundation for the growth of media arts education that reflects a long-term commitment to improving student engagement and achievement.

At Four Directions Charter School, students take cameras out into the community as part of their creative production process. Here, students Curtis Fohrenkam and Sasha Weyaus travel to the White Earth Reservation to collect video footage for their videos. Since 1991, Four Directions has held summer video workshops in which students can earn English, Social Studies and Arts credits while producing videos.

Building new program models can be expensive, time-consuming, and generally overwhelming. This guide introduces a series of steps that begin with small activities, utilizes existing resources, and includes others in the brainstorming and planning process. Our hope is that the information within will help other educators find practical and effective ways to introduce media arts education to their students and schools. Through The Eagle’s Eye also includes contributions from students, teachers, and artists. In particular, we would like to acknowledge the reflections of those students who put forth their experiences as peer mentors in writing to help express the power and potential of this program.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Four Directions Charter School In 1991, Four Directions began as an alternative Indian Education Program for the Minneapolis School District; in the Fall of 1999, it became a charter school. Located in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Four Directions Charter School currently serves 90 students per year in grades 8-12. Since its inception, Four Directions Charter School has attended to the needs of Native American students and has achieved positive results, including increased graduation rates and improved standardized test scores. A core component of Four Directions’ curriculum is its Media Arts Program, which encourages the use of a variety of media in culturally relevant ways to engage students and help improve their academic achievement. To help teachers develop curriculum that employs the media arts, Four Directions also provides a rigorous and supportive professional development program. Four Directions has found that integrating media arts into core academic areas effectively deepens students’ understanding of and engagement with subject matter and helps them demonstrate their comprehension of the subject taught.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Three Models For Media Arts Learning

Within this chapter, three unique models for media arts education are presented. For Four Directions Charter School, the goal is to financially maintain and refine an already extensive media arts model. For El Colegio Charter School and the High School for Recording Arts, the goals are mutual: to align existing staff and resources to implement a basic program model. Each are working to build staff and equipment resources to meet the potential of their unique models.

Four Directions Charter School History Four Directions first introduced video arts to students in 1991, when it was an alternative program of the Minneapolis School District. The program was an immediate “hit” amongst students at the school; thus, a summer media experience became a yearly tradition. In the Fall of 2001, Four Directions received a multi-year Federal Discretionary grant to support the development of a comprehensive media arts curriculum for the school. The grant award opened the door for Four Directions to hire staff, purchase equipment resources, and create coursework that actively engages students in their own learning process. In 2001, there were not many professional educators who specialized in curriculum development and implementation in the field of digital media arts. The school also wanted to build on the foundation of storytelling and cultural preservation established in its summer program. In order to accomplish this, Four Directions created a partnership with a local arts agency, In Progress, which had the artistic, technical and curriculum experts necessary to supplement the initiative. The two groups worked together for three years to build a media program that offered an array of classes, mentorships and enrichment activities. Staff received extensive in-service training, and students were slowly integrated as peer instructors.

Summary of Existing Resources Today, Four Directions has a solid media arts program that offers classes for students with introductory to advanced skills in digital photography, video, sound, and graphic design. Specific course offerings change quarterly to meet the needs and interests of the student body. Emphasis continues to be placed on storytelling, which provides opportunities for young people to share their personal interests. Much of the work created in this setting is deeply personal. The students’ works provoke their audiences to acknowledge the struggles young people face and to value the beauty of family and tradition within Native American communities. Coursework • 15 media arts classes per year • 6 multimedia courses per year • 1 summer immersion workshop in video and photography Personnel • • • •

One full-time staff person - Media Arts Instructor One part-time staff - Technology Instructor Three part-time supplemental staff--two media artists, one music artist Six peer educators per year

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Three Models For Media Arts Learning Four Directions Charter School

(continued)

Equipment Resources • Media Arts lab equipped with twelve eMac computers with multimedia software that includes iPhoto, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe In-Design, iMovie, and Final Cut Pro. The lab also includes four flatbed scanners and two color inkjet printers. • Music lab equipped with 4 computers with multimedia software including Garageband, MBox, and Reason Adaptec Toast. This lab also includes microphones, sound-reducing headphones, and USB keyboards. • Technology lab equipped with ten multimedia PC’s with multimedia software that includes Dreamweaver, Adobe Photoshop and MovieMaker. • Introductory production equipment that includes ten Olympus D395 Digital Photo Cameras (3 MB), ten Canon Mini DV 1-chip video cameras, and four basic tripods. • Advanced production equipment that includes one Sony Mavica (8 MB) digital photo camera, one Canon GL1 3-chip video camera, four professional micro phones, two bogen tripods, and two iBook laptops. Other Related Costs • Production supplies that include the ongoing replenishment of “AA” batteries, mini dv tapes, ink cartridges, and paper. • Exhibition supplies that include frames, mattes, and matte boards. • Field excursions that include the use of school vans, admission fees, and other related travel costs.

Summary of Coursework Offered Four Directions Charter School offers five courses per trimester, as well as specialized mentorships, and summer immersion workshops. Course offerings change according to the needs and abilities of the students being served. Coursework is also evaluated each trimester to ensure the interests of students are reflected. This often results in new course development that provides interesting and challenging lessons for students. Listed below are the main courses offered within the media arts program.

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Photography • Introduction to Digital Photography • Intermediate Digital Photography • Native Americans in the History of Photography • Portraiture

Video • Introduction to Video Arts • Intermediate Video • Documentary Video • Native American Film History • The Narrative Form • Video Storytelling • Collaborations

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Three Models For Media Arts Learning Four Directions Charter School

(continued)

Graphic Arts • Introduction to Graphic Design • Intermediate Graphic Design • Yearbook

Music • Garageband Basics • Introduction to MBox & the Electronic Studio • Introduction to Music Theory • Mentorship

Technology • Introduction to Computer Language • Introduction to Basic Applications • Web Page Design • Introduction to Movie Maker • Digital Photography and the PC

Speciality • The Digital Portfolio • Peer Education • Professional Media Applications • Summer Immersion Workshops • Field Excursions

Strategy for Program Continuation Four Directions Peer Mentorship courses have been very popular with students. The school is presently strategizing funding opportunities in order to build and expand this component throughout the school curricula. Four Directions Charter School has traditionally focused fundraising efforts on state and federal sources, but is also looking towards private sponsorship in support of its media arts program.

Telling stories through video help students become comfortable with their understanding of the world they live in; this translates into greater self-confidence. At Four Directions Charter School, sisters Patti and Angela DuFault team up to produce a video in honor of their father.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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El Colegio student, Christian Avilla takes photographs for a class assignment

El Colegio Charter School El Colegio, a high school that opened in the Fall of 2000, is committed to changing the traditional high school experience. El Colegio serves a diverse group of 85 students. The school’s major areas of focus include the arts, environment, and technology; in addition, all subject areas emphasize bilingualism in Spanish and English. The students work with advisors to develop educational goals consistent with Minnesota’s Graduation Standards, and they engage in all subjects through project-based learning opportunities. The majority of the students at El Colegio are Latino, but the school aims to serve high school students from all cultures. This school serves young men and women seeking an educational program that is highly individualized. Students are also typically interested in pursuing post-secondary education and ready to take responsibility for their own high school education. El Colegio strives to increase the high school graduation rate for students of color and prepare them for college.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Three Models For Media Arts Learning El Colegio Charter School History El Colegio Charter School has a strong tradition of visual arts and theater education. Core instructors at the school have been influential in building a sound foundation for media arts education. A media arts lab is in development, and students at the school now have many opportunities to explore digital photography through the use of iPhoto and Adobe Photoshop. In addition, theater and screenwriting courses are offered each year and are supplemented by school arts residencies. The school also has a progressive PC technology lab where students can hone their word processing and software applications skills. The groundwork for establishing a comprehensive media arts program is well on its way--administrators and staff are developing a process to build their technical resources. During El Colegio’s collaboration with Four Directions Charter School’s Peer Mentor program, weekly conversations took place about El Colegio staff’s desire to create a learning environment in which students and teachers would receive guided mentorship from the Arts instructor and a core group of peer mentors. This vision provided for access for all students and support for educators as they integrated media arts activities with core academic classes.

Summary of Existing Resources Three obstacles exist in the implementation of this model. The first is equipment. The existing media lab needs a lot of upgrading and lacks production tools such as digital photo and video cameras. The second obstacle is the structure of the school’s program, which requires the Arts instructor to teach a full schedule of classes--this leaves little time for collaboration with other staff. The third obstacle is staff time. To successfully develop and implement a peer mentor program, staff time is required. Below we have outlined the existing resources that El Colegio Charter School has already established and a strategy for expanding those resources to better support a permanent Media Arts program. Coursework • Three Digital Photography classes per year • Three Theater/Screenwriting classes per year • One Video Arts residency per year Personnel • One full-time staff member--Arts Instructor • One full-time staff member--Theater/Language Arts Instructor • One contracted Video Arts Consultant Equipment Resources • Media Arts lab equipped with eight eMac computers with multimedia software that in cludes iPhoto, Adobe Photoshop, and iMovie. The lab also includes one flatbed scanner and one color inkjet printer.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Three Models For Media Arts Learning El Colegio Charter School

(continued)

Equipment Resources (continued) • Technology lab equipped with ten multimedia PC’s that do not currently have any multimedia software. • Introductory Production equipment that includes two Olympus D395 Digital Photo Cam eras. • A Fine Arts gallery that has ample space for exhibition. Other Related Costs • Production supplies that include the ongoing replenishment of “AA” batteries, ink cartridges, and paper. • Exhibition supplies that include frames, mattes, and matte boards.

At El Colegio Charter School, students use digital photo and video cameras to create expressive artistic works. Here, Arts instructor Renato Lombardi speaks to students about the relationship between visual language and the art of photography.

Strategy for Program Expansion Listed below is a series of expansion strategies El Colegio Charter School will pursue over the next three years. Coursework Expansion Goal To increase student access to media arts creation both within and outside a classroom setting.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

Proposed Actions • Increase core course offerings to include one Peer Education course and one Introduction to Video Arts course • Provide ongoing, supervised access to media arts by configuring the existing lab to provide basic media courses for two hours each day and supervised lab time for three hours each day • Develop a Peer Mentor program that provides well-trained media assistants available to help classroom teachers integrate creative media production into core academic areas and peer educators available to help students who request guidance with independent projects

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Three Models For Media Arts Learning El Colegio Charter School

(continued)

Personnel Expansion The current El Colegio staff will support program expansion. However, the proposed changes place greater responsibility on core teaching staff, the Project-Based Learning instructor, and the Arts instructor.

Proposed Actions • Staff will assume additional short-term classroom responsibilities • The Project-Based Learning instructor will oversee peer mentorships • Classroom teachers will revise the current curriculum to include at least one media arts project per year • The Arts instructor will limit traditional course offerings to two hours per day and serve as the Media Arts teacher, Peer Mentor coordinator and supervise the Media Arts lab

Resource Development El Colegio Charter School will build resources with available funds and, when possible, through special fundraising activities.

Proposed Actions The school will build resources according to the following priority: • Upgrade the existing computers in the Media Arts lab with increased memory and upgraded operating and applications software, purchase one multimedia computer with a CD/DVD burner, and repair or remove computers that are nonfunctioning • Purchase ten digital photo cameras and ten digital video cameras

With any Media Arts curriculum, writing is essential. Here, student Leslie Ramirez writes about a photo series she is about to create. In order to check out a camera, she must first complete a project proposal that outlines her artistic vision.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Dream Team Coordinator - Tomas Leal mentoring his student “Lady Red”

High School For Recording Arts In 1996, the High School for Recording Arts (HSRA) originated as a pilot program developed by Studio 4, a professional music production studio. In 1997, Studio 4 developed a relationship with the St. Paul Family Learning Center, Independent School District #4019, and Designs for Learning; with the support of these organizations, HSRA developed the program so it could exist independently. In 1998, the High School for Recording Arts became a charter school sponsored by the St. Paul School District. HSRA began with 15 students, and through word of mouth, enrollment has increased to 130 students. HSRA’s students’ time is split between individual learning in core academic areas, instruction in major areas of the music industry, and developing and mastering production and performance skills in the recording studio. Each day, students must complete the work in their core classes before they are permitted to use the recording studios. Thus, the recording studio motivates students to make their academic work a priority.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Three Models For Media Arts Learning High School For Recording Arts History The High School For Recording Arts is a project-based program in which students engage in an interdisciplinary set of core academic skills including Math, Language Arts, Music, Media Arts, Social Studies, Science, and Technology. HSRA already has in place a nationally recognized model for electronic music education. In the past, the school strove to expand their focus to include media arts, but with limited success. Money, staff, and an expanding student population has left the media arts in the background. When Four Directions Charter School’s Peer Mentoring program first modeled video arts courses at HSRA, peer mentors worked with instructional staff to adapt a more traditional classroom model of instruction to an academic program based on student-initiated projects. HSRA’s individualized approach to student-initiated learning worked well with the Peer Mentoring program’s media arts instruction. Over the course of two years, HSRA developed a program structure known as the “Dream Team” that they are now implementing. In this initiative, a core group of students train as experts in different aspects of Media Arts instruction. Instead of every student learning the technical aspects of production, a smaller group serves as technicians for collaborative projects. At a school in which music collaboratives and high-end production values are the primary focus, the concept of a “Dream Team” is an excellent fit.

Summary of Existing Resources The first steps have already taken place in establishing this program. The school has hired a trained media specialist, purchased high-end production tools, and is in the process of identifying potential Dream Team members. On the following pages, we have outlined the High School For Recording Arts’ existing resources and a strategy for expanding those resources to better support a permanent Media Arts program. Coursework

• Twelve Multimedia Arts courses offered yearly

• Four Video Arts mentorships per year

Personnel

• One full-time staff member--Media Director

• One part-time staff member--Media Arts Specialist

Equipment Resources • Media Arts lab equipped with over twenty eMac computers with multi-media software that includes iPhoto, Adobe Photoshop, and iMovie. The lab also contains scanners, printers, and other ancillary computer equipment. This lab is available to students for independent media projects. • One fully-equipped G5 with a DVD burner and professional-grade software for use with the Media Arts program. This computer comes with one 500-gigabyte external storage device and one USB flatbed scanner. Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Three Models For Media Arts Learning High School For Recording Arts

(continued)

Equipment Resources (continued) • One 6-megabyte Nikon Digital Camera and one Canon 2-Chip Elura mini- DV video camera. • Fully-equipped and staffed music labs and studio space for student use for electronic music creation. • One multi-media lab, supervised by the school’s Media Director, that provides tools for guided projects in web design, computer animation and digital photography. Other Related Costs • Production supplies that include the ongoing replenishment of “AA” batteries, video tapes, paper and ink cartridges

Strategy for Program Expansion Listed below is a series of expansion strategies that the High School For Recording Arts will pursue over the next three years. Coursework Expansion Goal To increase student access to media arts creation both within and outside a classroom setting.

Proposed Actions • Increase core course offerings to include one introductory Video Arts course and one Introductory Digital Photography course

• Year-long Dream Team training for six to eight 10th grade students that includes specific and thorough technical training

At High School For Recording Arts, students work with professional production equipment primarily on collaborative projects. The school’s philosophy is to expose students to real-life business situations and provide them with tools that match what they will find in the music industry. Here, student Marquita Lowe acts as the cinematographer for a music video production.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Three Models For Media Arts Learning High School For Recording Arts (continued) Coursework Expansion - Proposed Actions (continued)

• Design and implement a Project Proposal form for students and staff to complete. The proposal’s purpose is to • Help the “Dream Team” coordinator schedule the use of equipment and team members, • Provide documentation for student performance and follow-through on requested projects, • Encourage thorough explanation of proposed project, • Introduce “Dream Team” members to their responsibilities related to a project, and • Develop a specific assessment tool for the Dream Team Coordinator to evaluate project success and student performance. Personnel Expansion The current High School for Recording Arts staff will support its program expansion. However, in order for the Dream Team concept to fully meet the needs of student and staff, it will require some extended expansion and oversight.

Proposed Actions Long-term expansion requirements include • Extending the part-time Media Arts Specialist to a full-time position that will entail assuming full responsibility for coordinating, supervising, and training the Dream Team and • Evaluation and coordination meetings to be held weekly between the HSRA Media Arts director, the Music Director and the Dream Team Coordinator

Resource Development The High School For Recording Arts has made a clear commitment to building the Dream Team program. In order accomplish this, HSRA will need to continue developing its resources. Proposed Actions Long-term expansion requirements include • The purchase of professional design and movie making soft ware and equipment, • The development of a video production studio equipped with high-end professional video equipment, switchers, and editors, and • A designated classroom for use by the Dream Team to plan and implement media project Students work to bring their music and movie making skills together. Here, proposals

students, Marquita Lowe, Duvelle Montgomery and Dawahn Littlen collaborate to create a music video.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Caroline Buckanaga documenting a Peer Mentor Presentation

Striving To Be the Best Trying to be the best peer mentor is harder than it seems--it takes a lot of knowledge, patience, and humility to do the work. When you’re trying to be the best, you need to do things on time, help others with their work, and try to make things perfect. You need to set a good example for other peer mentors and your students. The best mentors set goals for their students that aren’t too easy and aren’t too difficult, and the students have to reach to meet those expectations--that’s how they learn and grow. To set attainable goals, teachers need to figure out what their students already know and can do and how to support them during the process. Sometimes, learning how to do something new is frustrating for students and they’ll want to give up, so the best mentors also need to know how to encourage discouraged students. When I teach people what I know, I learn more about media arts from the students as they learn. Sometimes, students will make mistakes and I’ll learn a new way to do something when I help them correct it. Other times, they’ll figure out how to do something on their own in a way I hadn’t even thought of trying. The best mentors need to be open to learning new things and not feel threatened when it happens. It’s hard trying to be the best peer mentor because when your students get frustrated, discouraged, or show you a different way to do something, sometimes you doubt your ability as a teacher and creative individual. But when you think about it, no single mentor is the best because we’re all learning from our students, and we’re all growing as artists.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

- Caroline Buckanaga / Peer Mentor, Four Directions Charter School

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Building A Media Arts Program One of the most difficult aspects of building a Media Arts program is acquiring the resources needed for long-term maintenance. Some of the best programs began with one video camera, a VCR, a monitor, and a couple of cables. A vision, combined with staff and students’ enthusiasm, helps media programs develop into permanent aspects of a school’s curriculum. It is best to start small. Utilize your existing resources and educate fellow administrators to the costs involved in making a long-term commitment to Media Arts education.

Step One: Set Goals What do you expect to achieve by introducing the media arts into your school’s curriculum? Be specific. Do not be afraid to dream big, but at the same time, be practical. Align your vision with available resources and don’t over-commit yourself or others. The best programs focus on the quality of instruction, solid assessment, and a slow, well-planned expansion.

Step Two: Inventory Existing Resources What resources already exist at your school? How many computers are available to you? What software can they support? Are there any existing video or photo cameras at the school? What are they used for? Could they be made available to you for use with a new class? Aligning the physical resources can be an overwhelming task, especially if you are not sure how to begin.

Step Three: Identify Staffing Needs Who will teach the class(es) to be offered? Does s/he have any experience working with technology or in the arts? Are there any students who have an interest and the ability to implement a program? At this stage, there are many difficult questions to ask yourself. It may be necessary to pair an experienced educator with a media technician or an enthusiastic and technologically-savvy student. Be creative and open to new teaching partnerships.

Step Four: Strategize Long Term Solutions Once you initiate your first media course, you will immediately notice both the deficiencies and possibilities. Work with staff and administrators to brainstorm ways in which the program can be supported. Make a list of what works and what doesn’t. Meet with key staff to continue the brainstorming process. Do not take on more than you and/or others can reasonably handle. Most importantly, match your expectations to your available resources. Once you establish a basic structure for a Media Arts program, you may wish to research grant opportunities, local donations and/or parent or community support to expand your resources.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 19


Building A Media Arts Program

Brainstorming Use this page to brainstorm. In each category, write down ideas, questions and concerns. Use this as a template to initiate your strategic planning process.

1) What are your goals? What will students gain from using digital media in the classroom?

2) What equipment resources are presently available to your school for use in a Media Arts program?

3) Who might be interested in leading media arts instruction? Who can help with technical troubleshooting?

4) Restate your goal from Question One, giving thoughtful consideration to what known resources are available.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Building A Media Arts Program

Planning Use this page to list five steps you will take to introduce media arts to students: Step #1

Step #2

Step #3

Step #4

Step #5

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Peer Mentors Kimberly Crowell, Nicole Stone and Jami Headbird recording vocals at the High School for Recording Arts

I Am An Artist To be a photographer is to capture a special moment when it happens. You must be able to use any type of camera as a tool to speak from your heart. You must take great photos without hesitation. A photographer takes photos that have something greater to be read by others, because even a three-year old can take just a picture. It is the thought behind the picture that makes the photograph and helps create its meaning. Most of my artwork has people in it; I like taking photos of people more than natural environments. By photographing people, my photos seem to carry more meaning than if they hadn’t been there. What I like about my media classes is that I write about every picture--I have to do this before my teachers will print it. That helps all of us because most professional photographers have to write about their work. It also helps us to improve our critical thinking skills--we have to understand what our artwork means to be able to explain it. The next step in my artistic development is college because I want to see what else I can learn. I want to show my teachers who taught me that I never gave up on what I do best. I will use my photography in the future the same way I do now: to make more pictures, show them off, and use the pictures and the process it took to create them to teach other students. I want to learn more about getting my work out into the public to show kids my age they can do great things if they put their mind to it. I want to achieve all I can in photography because someday, I want to be a professional photographer who takes pictures of superstars.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

- Kimberly Crowell / Peer Mentor, Four Directions Charter School

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Media Arts In The Classroom

Over the past two years, Four Directions Charter School has partnered with the High School for Recording Arts (HSRA) and El Colegio Charter School to introduce Through the Eagle’s Eye to faculty and students. Because each school’s design is unique, the curriculum and our approach to teaching it needed to be adapted. Whether teaching video or photography, a set of common objectives needed to be met for students to successfully demonstrate their knowledge of the respective art form. In compliance with the Minnesota State Arts standards, we developed a series of activities and projects to help students demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the media arts. In working with each school, our goal was to model the process of implementing a media arts curriculum, excite students about learning media arts, and build confidence and skills within those who were given the task of continuing instruction. In terms of the coursework that we used, our goal was to teach students the process of producing artwork from idea to presentation. Composition skills were reinforced throughout the process, and we frequently moved back and forth within the standards’ components to ensure that all participating students were also successfully achieving these objectives. In doing so, we introduced the following components:

• • • • • • • • •

Formal elements and principles Vocabulary Sequencing techniques Styles Technical applications Planning Editing and principles of revision Software applications Critique

• Presentation

Teaching & Learning Video Production A critical aspect of engaging new media arts students is to encourage them to speak freely about and through their artwork. As an introductory course, each student participating in the program produced a video piece for which they chose the topic. Below is an overview of the approach taken to introduce video production. We encourage those interested in using this guide to borrow and/or adapt all or part of the suggested outline we present here. Introductions It was very important that mentors and students immediately got to know and build trust with each other. At each school, we introduced mentors to students over pizza and sharing their artwork. Each peer mentor brought a portfolio that demonstrated his or her specific expertise in a chosen media form and samples of his or her artwork. Then the mentors focused their attention on their students -- in some cases, listening to music or poems, or quietly observing presentations and hands-on demonstrations.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Media Arts In The Classroom

Exercises Introductory exercises provided opportunities to assess student ability and for peer mentors to establish themselves as knowledgeable and competent instructors. Exercises were designed to introduce students to the technical operation of equipment, media arts vocabulary, and creative expression. Peer mentors were assigned students with whom to work. Mentors assessed student performance during the exercises with large group critiques of completed works. Critiques were focused on acknowledging positive achievements and identifying areas that needed improvement.

Viewing Because many of the students had not been formally introduced to media production, a variety of video works were identified for viewing. This helped broaden students’ understanding of storytelling style and process. It also helped to introduce point of view, content development, and production values. Viewing sessions began with helping students feel comfortable expressing informed opinions about what they were seeing and interpreting. At first, they held informal discussions, then they were given written assignments, and finally they held formal critique sessions. Viewing took place with other hands-on activities so students had time to develop a critical vocabulary to support and enhance their production skills.

Working in pairs builds students’ collaborative skills. Here, students Julian Weyaus and Angelo Blackfeather review an exercise they will later present to the rest of their class.

Planning First-time video producers typically reject any form of written planning; this is often because they have difficulty articulating a process they have not fully completed. Theories developed through critical viewing sessions and practiced exercises do not adequately prepare them for the original thinking required to plan a video project. We have provided written planning guides in Section II of this guide to help guide this process. However, you may wish to plan a discussion or a brainstorming session.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Media Arts In The Classroom

Production Students who do not adequately plan rarely succeed with their production goals. Within the peer mentor model, we often assigned mentors to student production groups to help them troubleshoot problems. Often, students forget to charge batteries, bring tapes, props, attain acting talent, etc. The excitement to videotape supersedes the storytelling process. Be prepared for students to repeat the production process 2-3 times before they have enough footage to edit.

Editing is where a video comes to life. As transitions, titles, and sound are interwoven with production footage, the video takes on its final form. Here, student Burton Warrior works on a music video about life in the cities.

Editing Editing is the revision process through which a video is reinvented. An idea, particularly for new media artists, evolves from initial concept through completion. When students are introduced to the editing process, they begin to see a greater dimension to video storytelling. Through the layering of images and sounds, students are challenged to expand upon original concepts and recreate anew. It is an exciting time, as students are reaching the final stages of project completion. Presentation It is important for students to present their finished artwork. Usually, the most effective means for beginning video students to share their work is through informal classroom presentation and feedback. If the presentation is too formal, some students may lose confidence in their abilities. Once students become more familiar with the production process, a multitude of exhibition opportunities will arise, including community exhibits, film festivals, and website publications.

Sasha Weyaus assists music instructor Phil Winden in demonstrating electronic music software to her peers. Involving students in all aspects of the learning process is a key aspect of Four Direction’s education model.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Jami Headbird preparing for class at High School for Recording Arts

Being a Peer Mentor Being a peer mentor means To help other kids like me tell their stories. It means a lot to me that I helped other students learn How to express themselves. You can see their stories in their artwork- The photos they take and the movies they make- The stories that belong to them. The most important aspect of being a peer mentor Is to be confident in yourself-Don’t give up, because it can get frustrating. Have good attendance. Be respectful, Be open-minded, And share your ideas. Listen and be heard, too. Be kind and friendly.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

- Jami Headbird / Peer Mentor, Four Directions Charter School

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Building a Peer Mentor Program

In many ways, media arts education takes a traditional learning environment and stands it on its head. No longer is the teacher the only one who stands up and shares information and knowledge--traditional lectures and presentation often give way to activities and discussion. Students often know more about the technology being taught than the teacher, and as the boundaries of the artform evolve and as technology advances, the students’ engagement in the process and ownership of the product increases. When we first began modeling media arts learning at the High School for Recording Arts, students delivered instruction and provided individualized, one-on-one guidance. At the time, we were not considering this aspect of the program to influence or guide our partner schools. Through this process, we discovered that engaging students in teaching others added energy and vibrancy to the educational experience. Students accepted their roles as peer mentors with the understanding that their teachers believed in their ability to share their knowledge. They were honored and challenged to demonstrate their abilities in a manner that had concrete results–fellow students learning from them. Allowing instructors and students to lead and support one another powerfully influences academic success. Peer learning supports instructors’ ability to guide students and motivate them to learn. Teachers determine the success of peer learning by how it is incorporated into the classroom. Thus, organized peer-learning activities give students many opportunities to practice higher order thinking skills, leadership and teamwork. In this section, we provide you with some general steps to introduce a peer mentor program to your school.

Overview Peer mentors receive vigorous training in technical instruction, curriculum development, and presentation. Our students created resumés and biographies, presented at local and national conferences, and taught other instructors how to make videos and photographic works. They worked in small groups to discuss issues, conduct project assignments, give presentations and develop and take their own tests. Through this process, we discovered that students began to take greater ownership over their own education as they progressed in the Peer Mentoring program. As they took on greater leadership roles, they began to notice more professional opportunities for themselves and others. Suddenly, students that were struggling to finish high school were now setting goals for college. In addition, many now consider working in the field of education as a valuable and attainable goal.

Creative production is a primary focus for peer mentor training. Students in the program are expected to set a good example by producing their own video work. Here, Tiana LaPointe video tapes a documentary on the Pine Ridge Reservation.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Building a Peer Mentor Program Step One: Imagining the Possibilities The first step in building a Peer Mentor program is to define your goals and objectives for the program. To get started, ask yourself some questions about what roles you foresee students fulfilling. Will they demonstrate equipment use? Critique each other’s work? Check out media equipment? Supervise a computer lab? Students can assume many of the traditional leadership roles that educators typically perform in the classroom. When given the training and time to develop, the students often excel beyond imagination.

Action Write a brief description of a Peer Mentorship program’s benefits for your school and its students. Be honest, and remember that a good mentor program maintains a balance between the needs of the mentors and the needs of those being mentored.

Step Two: Identifying Mentor Characteristics Step Two requires you to begin identifying what is needed from a peer mentor. Some criteria that we used in developing this program were as follows: •

Strong attendance

Respectful attitude towards staff and students

Willing to accept criticism in a mature manner

Intermediate- to advanced-level media student

Trustworthy

“C” average or better in class

Students that are motivated to learn often make the best mentors. Above, Jayson Annette is working hard on planning a video about his role as a music mentor.

Though we did not always strictly adhere to these criteria in individual cases, it was helpful for students and staff to have a concrete list of expectations. We found that straight “A” students usually did not have an automatic interest in the program. More often than not, students that were previously low achievers found peer mentorship to be a positive reason to attend school regularly and do better in their classes.

Action Draft a list of expectations you have for peer mentors. It is important to keep in mind how your school already honors leadership. Your list of mentor characteristics should also reflect the values of your school.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Building a Peer Mentor Program

Step Three: Building the Framework It’s time to ask yourself some more questions. How will this type of program take shape? What kind of administrative support will be needed to accomplish your goals? What incentives can be provided to students that step forward as leaders? Remember that anything is possible, but you must keep in mind the needs of your mentors and those whom your students will mentor. For schools that already have a project-based learning program in place, peer mentorship easily counts towards a service-learning credit. For those in more traditional academic environments, a Peer Mentor program can be assessed and graded like any other course. If the rigor and expectations are high enough, you may be able to provide students with an English or Social Studies credit.

Action Begin drafting a curriculum outline for a Peer Mentor program at your school. List the goals and objectives of your program and outline the course structure. Also list the anticipated outcomes. Lastly, thoroughly describe how your program will prepare students to meet state and federal graduation standards.

Involving students in developing your peer mentor program is as important as involving teachers and administrators. Here, students Tiana LaPointe and Keisha Little Cloud prepare a presentation about their roles as peer mentors for an annual Indian Education conference.

Step Four: Planning with Key Decision Makers Always include key decision makers in the planning process. They will be instrumental in either supporting or thwarting your efforts to establish peer mentorship as a permanent part of your school’s curricular framework. Make sure you also include the students in the planning process. If the mentorship program does not reflect their interests, the program will be difficult to implement and sustain.

Action Formalize Steps One through Three in writing. Be brief and to the point. Draft a list of technical needs (i.e. classroom space, scheduling, roles, responsibilities of key instructors, etc.). Organize a brainstorming session to refine the idea. You must be receptive to other people’s input and willing to adapt and revise.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Building a Peer Mentor Program

Step Five: Training If peer mentors are to be effective in the classroom, training is essential. Those selected to participate will require a minimum of forty hours of instruction that includes lesson plan and assessment development, formal presentation, classroom protocol, and disciplinary procedures.

Action Identify the educator who will oversee peer training and work with him or her to develop a course curriculum that integrates fundamental teaching strategies with the core media arts concepts and processes that peer mentors will be expected to know. Introduce the mentor team to the process of critique and evaluation. Set up mock presentations through which the mentors can demonstrate their mentor abilities in a safe and guided setting. The most difficult element for peer mentors to overcome is communicating frustration in a productive manner. By practicing within the mentor group, they will quickly learn how to present themselves professionally to fellow peers.

Students at Four Directions Charter School participated in a 12-week training program in order to qualify as peer mentors. Students learned how to develop and present lessons, draft assessment tools and lead others by example. Here, artist Anna Sherwood instructs a group on how to prepare for their first mock presentation.

Step Six: Practice Once peer mentors have successfully proven their abilities in mock training sessions, they should be ready to work as professionals within other classroom settings. Again, the classroom educator plays a key role in facilitating peer education. Mentors will need room to succeed and fail. This must be done without jeopardizing the education of other students in the classroom. Through our pilot program, we found that one 9-week course was sufficient time for students to become comfortable in their roles as peer mentors. However, other students may need more or less time.

Action Work directly with the classroom educator to prepare course curriculum that reflects the peer mentors’ contributions. If you are working with an existing curriculum, you may expand on established learner outcomes, as peer mentorship typically accelerates classroom lesson completion. You will also need to include time for peer performance evaluations. If consistently provided, evaluation becomes a means for peer mentors to assess how their own improvement positively affects overall student achievement. This ultimately becomes a driving force to establish peer education within the framework of any instructional model.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Building a Peer Mentor Program

Step Seven: Evaluate & Revise Program evaluation is another important element to implement a successful Peer Mentor program. Evaluation should include input from students, peer mentors, the classroom educator, and administrators and staff.

Action Prepare an independent tool for each component. If resources are slim, informal observation combined with group de-briefing sessions will work. With this, however, a strict review of overall student performance is essential. If student performance is not improving, peer mentorship is not working. Thus, it is critical that evaluation and revision occur on a formal and informal level.

Step Eight: Repeat & Expand Once you have determined the strengths and weaknesses of your peer mentor component, you are ready to repeat and perhaps expand your efforts.

Action Bring key individuals together to discuss necessary revisions, brainstorm, and plan together. At this stage, leadership takes place by consensus. By fine-tuning the program with the input of key individuals, the program will succeed with little effort.

Once peer mentors have successfully completed on “hands-on” teaching course, they become more independent and able to guide other students through their creative production activities. Here, peer mentor Jami Headbird reviews another student’s video project to help him with his final editing decisions.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 31


Artist, Historian, Storyteller & Mentor My name is Tiana LaPointe. I’m a fifteen-year old Lakota from the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota. In 2003, I began work on a feature-length video documentary entitled “Keepers of the Stronghold Dream.” It is a documentary about the Lakota people’s fight to protect sacred burial sites on the Pine Ridge Reservation. The video also explains the history related to a virtually unknown massacre on what is now known as the Badlands. During this massacre, the Oglala, Lakota, Peyote and other groups of Native Americans were thrown into ravines, persecuted, and murdered for practicing the Ghost Dance that they used to pray for a new and better life. Since I began making videos, I have learned that no matter who you are or what you are interested in, you do have something to say. If you work hard at it, you can show people what you believe is important in the world. This can give people a different perspective on those things that are most important to you. I believe it is easier to help people understand you when you use video to tell your story. I also believe that you don’t have to be the most creative person in the world to produce amazing artwork-- you just need to be knowledgeable and believe in what you have to say. Since becoming a peer mentor, my artwork has changed because I have had a chance to use more technologically advanced cameras and tripods. I also learned that you remember 90% of what you teach and 40% of what you are taught. By teaching others, I have become a stronger artist and student. I know how to say what I want people to understand and have a way to say it.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

- Tiana LaPointe / Peer Mentor, Four Directions Charter School

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Introduction To Curriculum Overview The following pages contain a series of lessons, exercises, and assessments to help introduce students to video arts creation. Each unit has been presented in a format that can readily be revised by those who use it. The guide’s materials include tried and true tools that have been successfully used by teachers, peer mentors, and students. The guide is geared for instructors who do not have an existing Media Arts program in their schools and are primarily working with beginning-level students. The curriculum was written with grades 9-12 in mind, but the language and content may be modified for younger students. This guide is available at no cost. Materials are available for download from Four Directions’ website at www.fourdirectionsschool.org/eagles.htm. There are also a limited number of soft-bound copies available. If you would like to receive a soft-bound copy of the guide, contact Four Directions Charter School at the address listed on page 211.

Course Structure In this guide you will find eleven lesson plans that contain vocabulary, handouts, and assessment tools. Whenever possible and practical, each packet should be followed in the order presented in this guide. The resources contained in this section include • Lesson plans and assessment strategies, • Vocabulary and general principles, • Video production handouts and tutorials, • Assessment tools, • PowerPoint presentations, and • Student-produced examples.

Goal Students will know how to produce, present and speak about video artworks by actively creating their own works.

Objectives Students will participate in a series of exercises, group projects and critique sessions that will introduce them to the following skills and knowledge: • Vocabulary • Technical production • Diligence and responsibility • Collaboration & teamwork • Story development • Planning & organization • Leadership • Software applications • Informal analysis • Critique • Presentation

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Introduction To Curriculum

Adaptation This guide is intended to act as a foundation for introducing video arts creation to students. The curriculum provides fundamental guidelines and principles required to establish a solid foundation for producing critically driven media works. Read each unit carefully, and feel free to modify materials to suit your school’s and students’ needs and the media arts resources available to you. You may also wish to change the titles of lessons or focus exercises around specific topics of interests. Through the Eagle’s Eye will help provide students with a process for producing video works without dictating content. Lessons provide many opportunities for students to develop their artistic style while instilling an appreciation for diverse approaches to the storytelling process.

Estimated Length of Course Through the Eagle’s Eye is presented as a twelve-week course. Each session lasts 50 minutes. The unit can be easily modified to a nine-week course or a six-week block schedule. We advise modifying the public service announcement activity by changing it to a large group project, and identifying strict production boundaries for the Independent Project (i.e., a three-minute video with a maximum of three set ups, etc.) What is ultimately important is that if the course is restructured, you closely review state standards (such as those listed below) to ensure all goals and objectives are being adequately met.

Student Achievements and State Standards Whether in a simple image or through a complex set of movements and sounds, when students produce their own stories, they begin to initiate their own learning. They set the stage for exploring subject matter that is familiar, important, and engaging. They want to explore and investigate, and they feel strongly about their potential to speak with authority. They use important academic tools to create their vision. The media arts is a unique tool that engages students’ higher level thinking skills in

• • • • • • • •

Research & investigation, Creative & technical writing, Organization & editing, Critique & revision, Cooperation & teamwork, Troubleshooting techniques, Aesthetic applications, & Creative expression.

Student Tony Wind is editing a video about cars. At this stage, Tony has already put to use each of the higher level thinking skills listed to the left.

The experience of producing a photograph or video also provides young adults with a unique opportunity to explore what they are interested in learning and speak creatively about what they know and discover.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Introduction To Curriculum

The media arts is also a great tool for enhancing learning in other subject areas including Social Studies, Science, and English/Language Arts. Using photography and video to demonstrate understanding is both an innovative and effective means to engage students as participants in their own education and to assess their learning. In May of 2003, the Minnesota Legislature adopted new academic standards in the Arts for grades Kindergarten through Twelve. The Arts are identified as one of the five core subject areas required for statewide accountability, along with English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies. Through the Eagle’s Eye is designed to assist schools in developing coursework that meets these requirements. We have identified and summarized those areas on the following pages—for more detailed information regarding these standards, please visit the Minnesota Department of Education’s website at http://education.state.mn.us/html/intro_standards_ arts.htm.

In the state of Minnesota, students are required to demonstrate knowledge in at least one art form. Here, Cliff Bahma demonstrates his ability to plan and organize a video production.

Standard: Analysis and Interpretation The student will understand and apply the artistic process to analyze, interpret, and evaluate art works in at least one of the three arts areas required by a school from the following: Dance, Media Arts, Music, Theater, and Visual Arts.

Under this standard, students will • Demonstrate how the components of media arts—which include elements, principles, vocabulary, structures, styles, and technical skills—are used to define a work; • Support their personal responses to media arts pieces using the afore mentioned components; • Express their understanding of the similarities and differences between the structures and styles of media arts; • Demonstrate their understanding of how the choice of standards affects the criticism of a media arts piece; • Select their own standards for critiquing media arts works and be able to articulate their response using those standards; • Express their understanding of the connection between media arts and other non-media arts disciplines such as Math, Science or History; and • Analyze and interpret media art through its historical, cultural, and/or social contexts.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Introduction To Curriculum

Standard: Creation and Performance The student will understand and use artistic processes to create original or perform existing works of art in at least one of the three arts areas required by a school from the following: Dance, Media Arts, Music, Theater, and Visual Arts. As an elective, the student may understand and use artistic processes to create original or perform existing works of art in another art form or creative writing.

Under this standard, students will • Demonstrate how the components of media arts—which include elements, principles, vocabulary, structures, styles, and technical skills—are used to define a work of media art; • Express their understanding of how the cultural, historical, and/or social contexts influence the creation of media arts; • Use artistic processes in media arts to create a complex work or several pieces; • Determine, make decisions, and articulate artistic intent for work in media arts; • Make choices based on considerations of audience and occasion for media arts pieces; and • Revise work in media arts using multiple sources of critique and feedback. For further information regarding Minnesota Standards for Graduation in the Arts, please visit their website at http://education.state.mn.us/html/intro_standards_arts.htm

Video arts production allows for students to explore many aspects of both the creative thinking process and performance. Here, students Nicole Stone, Kimberly Crowell and Jami Headbird work on producing a song they will later incorporate into the soundtrack of a video project they are working on.

Handouts Through The Eagle’s Eye provides all the necessary handouts for each unit. You are welcome to adapt the handouts as needed or bring in new materials as they add to expanding upon the core curriculum. Handouts include vocabulary, assignments, quizzes and resource management tools.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Introduction To Curriculum

Equipment The equipment you use will depend on what you can actually access. Each unit specifies in greater detail what will be needed. The following tools are recommended with the understanding that you may be starting with far more less than what is specified below: • Ten video cameras with charged battery or A/C plug-in • Two tripods • A television monitor or video projector with RCA cables • A microphones, audio cables and accessories • Ten multimedia computers with compliment video editing software • Three 4-6 pin firewire cables

Viewing Material There are several viewing tools that have been provided on DVD for use in implementing the Through The Eagle’s Eye curriculum. We have listed below supplemental materials, but again encourage you to find viewing materials and presentations that are representative of your student population:

Sample Video Works

Sample DVD of student video works that includes ten videos that vary in film style and content. All works were created by Native American youth from Four Directions Charter School. We suggest that the instructor and peer mentors review the DVD prior to the course to determine which works will be of greatest interest.

PowerPoint Presentations

Overview: Through The Eagle’s Eye - Innovative Approaches to Teaching the Media Arts Equipment Care & Protocols The Language of Video Sound Elements, Microphones & The Art of Interviewing Project Planning Production In Action Editing Basics

Assignment Samples:

Video Walk Elements, Compositions & Movement Sound Stories Sample Audio Pieces - Spoken Word & Song

Preparation Teaching video production requires a greater amount of planning than many classes. Equipment must be organized daily, batteries need to be charged, and equipment should be checked for malfunction. Typical prep time for a video course is 30 to 50 minutes. If time is limited, the instructor may wish to delegate technical prep mentors or an educational assistant.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 37


Introduction To Curriculum

Role of Peer Mentors Included within each lesson plan is a small statement on the role of peer mentors in delivering the unit. Peer mentors can take on a variety of roles within the instructional process. It can begin as simply as having students available who can oversee equipment use and inventory. More advanced students may be able to assist or lead presentations and demonstrations. Others may lead groups through hands-on production activities. Whatever you decide, we encourage you to include young people in as many levels of class instruction as you and they can reasonably manage. Again, start slow and build upon your successes. We recommend that initial class size not exceed ten students and five peer mentors. This allows one mentor per two students and will give the instructor and students the opportunity to get familiar with the complexity of managing production equipment, peer instruction, and a new hands-on curriculum.

Process Through The Eagle’s Eye includes eleven units. Each unit suggests a specific process. We recommend that you initially follow this plan, but take thorough notes regarding your specific successes and failures. Upon completion of the course, revise and change the process as is best for your particular school setting.

Assessments Within each unit we have provided a simple grading structure to assist you in tracking student performance. We have also included keys to quizzes and criteria for grading assignments and projects. We have left many of the assessment tools broadly defined and suggest that instructors add criteria as they implement each unit.

Grading Summary Breakdown

Points

Assignments

1450

36

%

Presentations / Observations

900

24

%

Quizzes

150

4

%

Participation

635

16

%

865

20

%

4000

100

%

Attendance

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

% of Grade

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Introduction To Curriculum Unit Summary #

Title

Purpose

# of class periods

Possible Points

01

Course Introduction

To prepare students for course and grading expectations

1

50

02

Camera Operation & Tripod Use

To introduce basic technical language, history, and production concepts

2

100

03

Equipment Care & Protocols

To prepare students for their responsibilities in regards to equipment care

1

50

04

The Language of Video

To teach students basic elements, principles, and language used in video production

4

200

05

Introduction to Critical Viewing

To help students develop the skills to identify general film styles and deconstruct videos

2

150

06

Introduction to Sound

To guide students in learning different types of sound elements and how to integrate them to create meaning

4

250

07

The Art of the Interview

To teach students how to conduct an interview with high quality image and sound values

4

200

08

Turning Ideas Into Action

To teach students to articulate and develop an idea through brainstorming images, sounds, props, etc.

7

600

09

Video Production In Action

To assist students in developing skills in project direction, camera work, and collaboration

10

600

10

Introduction to Editing

To teach students basic editing terminology, structures and processes

10

650

11

Independent Projects

To guide students in demonstrating a working knowledge of the video creation and presentation process

15

1150

TOTAL ESTIMATED SESSIONS AND POINTS

60

4000

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 39


Peer mentor Nicole Auginash instructing fellow student Shawnee Seelye

The Challenges of Mentoring Others Being a peer mentor means being able to go to other schools and teach other people what you know. You can help them create movies and photo series and show them how to edit their video footage and photos. As a peer mentor, I try to set a good example for kids to show them what it means to be a good student. It has taught me the importance of being on time and respectful to others. The hardest part of teaching was that I wasn’t ready to speak in front of other kids. The first time I ever spoke in public was at a charter school conference with my teacher and other students. It was scary because I did not know anyone at the conference, and there were a lot of people there. Before I became a peer mentor, I had never formally presented anything, but now I can speak in public. Being a peer mentor has also improved the quality of my artwork. I learned how to work with I-Movie, I-Photo, and Adobe Photoshop software. Knowing this software has helped me develop my own skills and become a stronger teacher.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

-Nicole Auginash / Peer Mentors, Four Directions Charter School

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit One

Course Introduction

LESSON PLAN Purpose

This unit will provide students with an understanding of what will be expected from them to successfully participate in this course.

Goal The student will understand the fundamental expectations regarding course outcomes, class participation, and grading.

Objectives The student will • Review the course syllabus, • Understand expectations for completing assignments, • Know how their videos and other coursework will be graded, • Understand expected classroom procedures, and • Understand how their course grade is determined.

Estimated Length of Session The instructor should plan one hour or class session for this lesson.

Handouts The following handouts are recommended: • “Course Overview: Course Description & Grading” • “Course Overview: Basic Rules of Conduct”

Equipment The following equipment is recommended: • Television monitor or video projector • DVD player with appropriate connection cables • Extension cord and/or multistrips as needed

Viewing Material The following media may be used to compliment a live demonstration or lecture: • Sample DVD of student created artwork

Preparation A peer mentor should be assigned to prepare the TV monitor or video projector, DVD player, and viewing selections. The instructor should oversee the duplication of handouts.

Role of Peer Mentors Depending on their levels of skill and experience, peer mentors are often able to present a majority of the information in this lesson. The instructor may observe students’ and mentors’ performance and provide input as needed.

Process The following steps should be taken to present course information: • Hold an informal discussion of student experiences in video arts classes • Present the overview of course expectations and grading policies • Present the overview of classroom procedures • Deliver a presentation of student-produced video works (one to three pieces)

Assessments The following assessment strategies are recommended for this lesson: • Informal observation of student comments and questions Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit One

Course Introduction

OVERVIEW: Course Description & Grading Course Instructors: ________________________________________________________________________ (List Name/s of Course Instructor/s) Peer Mentors: ____________________________________________________________________________ (List Names of Peer Mentors)

Introduction to Video will familiarize students with video camera techniques, story planning, and production concepts. Students will learn how to operate a camera and how to tell their own stories through this unique medium. The course includes hands-on production, computer editing, critical viewing sessions, written assignments, readings, group discussion, and tests.

Grading Summary Breakdown

Points

Assignments

% of Grade

1450

36

%

Presentations / Observations

900

24

%

Quizzes

150

4

%

Participation

635

16

%

865

20

%

4000

100

%

Attendance

This course is broken into a series of 11 units. Each unit requires some reading, an exercise, and a handson demonstration or quiz. As part of this course, you will also complete a short video on a topic of your choice. Unit #

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

Unit Description

Points

Unit

01

Course Introduction

Unit

02

Camera & Tripod Use

Unit

03

Equipment Care & Protocols

Unit

04

Language of Video

200

Unit

05

Introduction to Critical Viewing

150

Unit

06

Introduction to Sound

250

Unit

07

The Art of the Interview

200

Unit

08

Production Planning

600

Unit

09

Production In Action

600

Unit

10

Introduction to Editing

650

Unit

11

Independent Projects

1150

Total Points Possible

4000

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

50 100 50


Unit One

Course Introduction

OVERVIEW: Basic Rules of Conduct (revise to meet the specific needs of your classroom)

1)

Listen

2)

Be respectful

3)

No running or rough-housing

4)

No taking equipment without permission

5)

No swearing

6)

No violence

7)

No climbing on the playground equipment

8)

Use indoor voices

9)

No eating, drinking, or chewing gum during class

10)

No use of outside electronic devices (i.e., Walkmans, iPods, portable games, cell phones, etc.)

No clutter or piling up of papers

11)

12)

The door to the classroom should remain shut and students are expected to stay in class during class time (this helps cut down on possible theft is-

sues.)

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 43


Unit One

Course Introduction

GRADING SUMMARY Participation

40 points

Responded verbally to video works Asked questions about the course Listened attentively Responded knowledgeably when asked a question Attendance

10 points Total Possible Points for This Unit

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

50 Points


Unit One

Course Introduction

NOTES & OBSERVATIONS Use this space to write additional notes, things to remember, and to recommend changes to implement in the future as you repeat this lesson. Remember: every classroom is unique, and every student is individual. Following the precise order of instruction is far less important than achieving the lesson’s intended goal. This is an opportunity to make this lesson your own.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 45


Peer Mentor Kesiha Little Cloud prepares her lesson plan.

Keisha Little Cloud / Digital Artist & Mentor Hi, my name is Keisha LittleCloud. I attend Four Directions Charter School, and I’m sixteen years old. My mother is from Rosebud, South Dakota, and my father is from Pine Ridge, South Dakota. I was born in South Dakota, but I grew up in Minneapolis. I got into video and photography production at Four Directions. I’ve been doing video and photography for about two years now. I’ve made two videos so far. My first video was an experimental piece entitled “Native American Artwork.” To complete it, I interviewed artists and found out their opinions about their work. I also worked on a video over the summer with a friend of mine. The video was entitled “Four Directions Charter School: Summer 2003,” which was a documentary video. This video was about students’ experiences during summer school and how they liked it. The video show a little bit about what happened over the summer and the programs that took place. For my next masterpiece, which is in production right now, I’m working on a video about sexually transmitted diseases and their effects on the Native American community. It’s going to be a documentary-narrative piece. I’m in Four Directions’ Peer Mentor program. Basically, we students learn how to teach video and photo production to students at other schools. All of us are learning valuable skills, and it’s a chance for me to pass my knowledge on to others who are willing to learn.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

- Keisha Little Cloud / Peer Mentor, Four Directions Charter School

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Two

Camera & Tripod Operation

LESSON PLAN Purpose This unit will provide students with a working knowledge of how a video camera and tripod work. This session should be fun, playful, and informative.

Goal The student will understand how to operate a video camera and tripod.

Objectives The student will • Identify the basic parts and functions of a video camera, • Demonstrate how to charge and replace a battery, • Demonstrate the correct placement of a video tape into the camera, • Demonstrate how to hold the camera professionally, and • Demonstrate how to use a tripod in a professional manner.

Estimated Length of Session The instructor should plan two hours or class sessions for this lesson. If this is your first time presenting information or you are incorporating peer mentors in the process, you should extend the lesson by one additional class session. • Session One: “History of the Camera and Camera/Tripod Overview • Session Two: Camera & Tripod Demonstration (assignment and quiz)

Handouts The following handouts are recommended: • • • • •

“Technical Overview: History of Video Cameras” “Technical Overview: Camera Terms & Use” “Technical Overview: Tripod Terms & Use” “Assignment: Demonstration of the Camera & Tripod” “Quiz: Video Camera & Tripod Knowledge”

Equipment The following equipment is recommended: • A video camera with charged battery or A/C plug-in • A tripod • A television monitor or video projector • A set of RCA cables (for connection between video camera and monitor) • A video tape • Additional video cameras and tapes for student use (one camera for every two students) • Extension cords and/or multistrips as needed

Viewing Material No viewing materials are required for this session.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Two

Camera & Tripod Operation

LESSON PLAN (continued) Preparation Assign a peer mentor to prepare the equipment, charge batteries, and set up the monitor or video projector for the live demonstration. This requires approximately one hour. The instructor should oversee the duplication of handouts, worksheets, and quizzes.

Role of Peer Mentors Depending on their levels of skill and experience, peer mentors are often able to present a majority of the information in this lesson. The instructor may choose to give the introductory lecture regarding history and pricing of cameras. Peer mentors may lead the rest of the lesson. The instructor may then observe students’ and mentors’ performance and provide input as needed.

Process The following steps should be taken to demonstrate video camera and tripod use: • Deliver the introductory lecture on the history and pricing of the video camera • Present the overview of video camera parts and buttons (including how to replace/ charge batteries and how to hold a camera professionally) • Present the overview of the tripod terms and set up procedures • Hand out the small group demonstration assignment on camera use and operation • Give the written quiz on camera operation and tripod use

Assessments The following assessment strategies are recommended for this lesson: • Informal observation (student participation) • Successful completion by all group members of the “Demonstration” quiz

page 48

Through the Eagle’s Eye

(Note: students should not move to the next lesson without proper demonstration of camera operation) • Successful completion of the “Video Camera & Tripod Knowledge” quiz (Note: students must complete the quiz with at least 90% correct before proceeding to the next lesson)

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Two

Camera & Tripod Operation

TECHNICAL OVERVIEW: History of the Video Camera Video cameras come in many different styles and formats; this is due to a consistently changing world of technology. Listed below are some of the formats that have developed over the years:

Large Format Magnetic Tape Cameras One of the first video camera formats, both the cameras and tapes were large and bulky in size. Following this format were the 3⁄4-inch and Beta-format cameras. These formats are still used within the industry for studio-based shoots. The quality of image is high, but because of their bulkiness, new forms of technology are replacing these formats. In the 1990’s, the cost of a Betacam or 3/4-inch camera often began at $40,000.

S-VHS, VHS and C-VHS Cameras VHS cameras were the first consumer-brand cameras to be produced. These cameras are still frequently used, but they are now also considered to be bulky. The image quality is poor--sometimes it is fuzzy with color-correction problems. S-VHS technology came out shortly afterwards; this type of camera provides a better quality of image. C-VHS cameras offer the same consumer quality as a VHS camera, but they are more compact and easier to use. All of these technologies are being phased out and are difficult to repair or replace. In the 1990’s, standard VHS cameras typically cost under $1,000.

8mm/Hi8/Digital 8 Cameras These cameras came out in the mid-1990’s and provide a high-quality image in a compact, lightweight case. “Hi8 technology” refers to a high-quality magnetic tape. Digital 8 cameras function as 8-millimeter cameras, but they allow for the direct exchange of video images to a computer—this makes video easier to edit. These cameras are still commonly available for purchase at a typical cost of under $500.

Mini DV Cameras Currently, Mini DV cameras are the most commonly sold brand of video camera on the market. They offer high quality images at a reasonable price. The most common consumer Mini DV camera is the 1-chip camera, which provides excellent image quality in outdoor lighting. 3-chip cameras provide a stronger quality image in low light levels, but they cost more. The most significant difference between the Mini DV cameras and other video cameras is that all Mini DV cameras are equipped with a FireWire port that allows for the direct transfer of images from the camera to the computer. These cameras vary in price from $300 to $15,000.

DVD & HD Cameras There are a number of these new types of video cameras that are just now hitting the market. HD cameras are compatible to modern television technologies. These cameras are still relatively expensive, but they will become the industry standard within the next three years. You may wish to consider purchasing a consumer-end DVD camera for under $500; these will record your video directly to a DVD for easy transfer to a computer.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 49


Unit Two

Camera & Tripod Operation

TECHNICAL OVERVIEW: Video Camera Terms & Use Understanding your video camera’s functions and buttons will help you discover the more imaginative aspects of video art creation. Take the time to learn the many functions your video camera offers, review the manual, and most importantly, make time to experiment. The following list will be a basic reference guide as you prepare to use your video camera.

A/C Adaptors When shooting indoors in a stationary position, adaptors are an excellent power source. They usually plug into any wall outlet and connect by cable to the video camera. A/C units provide a consistent source of power and eliminate concerns over battery life.

Batteries Depending on the video camera being used, the battery size will differ. A new battery will typically last up to two hours without recharging. However, as the battery ages, the amount of power it is able to hold decreases. Typically, the batteries are recharged by connecting them to an A/C adaptor unit. Under normal use, expect your camera’s battery to last about two years.

On/Off Switch The “on/off” switch may be located almost anywhere on the video camera. Most of the time, you will find it towards the rear of the video camera. Carefully examine your camera to find the “on/off” switch on your camera.

Playback Mode Most video cameras also function as video playback devices or VCR’s. This usually requires you to turn a switch to make your video camera run in “camera mode.” Review your manual for specific instructions or simply look closely at your camera to find the “VCR/Camera” switch.

Tape Format Video cameras are manufactured in many different formats. Your video camera may take standard VHS, C-VHS, S-VHS, 8 mm, Hi-8, 3⁄4-inch, Beta, Mini DV or DVD. Each format varies in picture quality, afford ability and ease of handling. Again, check your manual or the camera itself for specific the tape format your camera will accept.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Two

Camera & Tripod Operation

TECHNICAL OVERVIEW: Video Camera Terms & Use

(continued)

Stop/Eject Button Review your camera for the “Stop/Eject” button—it is usually found towards the rear of the camera, near the door that houses the videotape. Typically, the batteries or A/C adapter must be in place before the eject button will work, but the power does not usually have to be “on” for the tape door to open.

Tape Insertion When you look inside the video camera door, you should see two wheel mechanisms. When you insert the videotape into the camera, make sure you face the wheel placements on the videotape so that they face the wheel placements in the camera. If placed correctly, the camera door should easily close. Close the camera door slowly and carefully--do not try to force the videotape in. If the tape does not easily fit, there is probably a reason for that.

Camera Lens The lens gathers light, shadow and color information and transfers that information to your videotape. The lens functions in much the same way as the human eye, and it is important to keep both clean and free from smudges or dust. If the lens becomes scratched, the camera will be permanently damaged. That’s why you should always protect the lens with a lens cap.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 51


Unit Two

Camera & Tripod Operation

TECHNICAL OVERVIEW: Tripod Terms & Use The word “tripod” refers to a three-legged stand. Media artists use tripods to ensure a steady, fluid image. Tripods should be used whenever possible. Even though cameras are tiny and portable, it is difficult to get a steady image without the use of a tripod. Common terms associated with most tripods are listed below.

Legs There are three legs on a tripod. Most have latches located towards the base of the legs that allow you to raise the tripod six-eight feet higher than its three-foot base. It is important to note that the average height for a tripod is even with the chest, or upper third, of the main subject.

Quick-Release Tripod Plate Cameras are typically mounted onto tripods with a detachable clip that allows the camera operator to detach the camera if necessary for quick movement to a new location. Some tripods do not come with a removable clip; this may be desirable if you have concerns about the clip being lost or misplaced.

Plate Lock The plate lock firmly secures the camera, allowing the camera operator to tip the camera on its side without having to remove the camera. Photographers typically use a plate lock when they want to vertically frame their subject.

Pan Lock The pan lock function secures the camera on the tripod to reduce the likelihood of any unintended movement.

Tripod Handle The tripod handle is primarily used to position the camera or direct a panning or tilting movement.

Column Lever Located directly below the tripod mount, the column lever allows the camera operator to raise the tripod up to eighteen inches. This is a helpful function if the camera person needs to maneuver the tripod quickly.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Two

Camera & Tripod Operation

ASSIGNMENT: Camera & Tripod Demonstration You will work in pairs to complete this assignment. Each partner must be able to demonstrate all of the above camera and tripod functions to a peer mentor or instructor before proceeding to the next lesson. This is not a graded assignment, but you must successfully complete all fifteen skills above before you are allowed to use a video camera for all future project exercises and assignments. Demonstrate your ability to do the following:

1) Remove and place the camera battery into the camera

2) Charge the battery

3) Turn the video camera “on”

4) Label a videotape

5) Insert a videotape

6) Eject a videotape

7) Demonstrate two ways to use the LCD panel

8) Demonstrate the use of the eyepiece

9) Demonstrate the use of the “Zoom In” and “Zoom Out” button

10) Demonstrate the use of the manual focus feature

11) Demonstrate how to hold the camera professionally

12) Demonstrate the proper set up of the tripod

13) Demonstrate properly mounting the camera on the tripod

14) Demonstrate the use of setting levels

15) Adjust the height of the tripod to a standard range

16) Demonstrate the use of panning and tilting functions

Name: ___________________________________________ Name: ___________________________________________ Possible Points:

25

Points Earned:

___

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Two

Camera & Tripod Operation

QUIZ: Video Camera & Tripod Knowledge Name five buttons on the video camera: 1. __________________________________

4. ____________________________

2. __________________________________

5. ____________________________

3. __________________________________

What is a tripod? What is it used for? _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

What is the purpose of the “zoom” button? _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

What is a camera lens? _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

What do you use a video camera for? _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

page 54

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

25

Through the Eagle’s Eye

Points Earned:

___

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Two

Camera & Tripod Operation

QUIZ Key: Video Camera & Tripod Knowledge Name five buttons on the video camera: Depending on the camera, there may be more than one correct answer. 1. stop / eject

4. play / rewind / fast forward

2. record

5. menu/ digital effects

3. zoom

-- 1 point per correct answer = 5 points total

What is a tripod? What is it used for? A “tripod” is a three-legged stand. We use tripods to ensure a steady, fluid image.

-- 5 points per correct answer

What is the purpose of the “zoom” button? The zoom button magnifies the object in front of the camera. By “zooming in” towards the subject matter, the image appears to increase in size or fill the frame.

-- 5 points per correct answer

What is a camera lens? The lens functions in much the same way as the human eye, gathering light, shadow and color information. The lens then translates that information (with help from other camera functions) to your videotape. -- 5 points per correct answer

What do you use a video camera for? This question may have multiple correct answers. To create a story; to capture video images; to witness an event; to document history; to entertain; to collect video images, etc.

-- 10 points per correct answer

Possible Points: 25 Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 55


Unit Two GRADING SUMMARY Assignment: Camera & Tripod Demonstration Completed each of the listed tasks accurately Completed each task with noted respect and care to the equipment

16 points 9 points

Quiz: Video Camera & Tripod Knowledge

25 points

Participation

30 points

Responded verbally to video works Asked questions about the course Listened attentively Responded knowledgeably when asked a question Attendance

20 points Total Possible Points for This Unit

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

100 Points


Unit Two

Camera & Tripod Operation

NOTES & OBSERVATIONS Use this space to write additional notes, things to remember, and to recommend changes to implement in the future as you repeat this lesson. Remember: every classroom is unique, and every student is individual. Following the precise order of instruction is far less important than achieving the lesson’s intended goal. This is an opportunity to make this lesson your own.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 57


Curtis Fohrenkam / Video Artist & Mentor My name is Curtis Fohrenkam, and I’m an eighteen year-old male Fond du lac Band member of the Minnesota Chippewa tribe. I grew on the north side of Minneapolis. This is my graduating year, but I’m a little behind. It may take me some time to get my diploma, but I won’t settle for anything less! I think that if a person really puts his mind to something, he can achieve it. I’m involved with the Media Arts program at Four Directions. I stay involved as a peer mentor the best as I can. I enjoy working with the program because I’m able to teach others to speak their minds on any subject they want through video. Video really caught my eye when I was introduced to it. At this point, I’ve completed four or five videos. Some of the pieces have been about my nephew, and others have been about Native American culture and history. One video that I am really proud of describes important treaty rights. I have another piece about our land rights; it’s called, “You Still Take.” Down the road, I’m not sure what I’ll do with video, but I hope to keep using it to teach my people about their rights as Native Americans.

page 58

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Three

Equipment Care & Protocols

LESSON PLAN Purpose This unit will prepare students to use the video camera, both in and out of school settings. Keep in mind that school administrators may dictate how equipment is utilized at your school as well as for student use outside of the school day. It is important that this lesson directly follows Unit Two, as the information is interconnected.

Goal The student will understand his or her responsibility for the care and proper checkout of video equipment.

Objectives The student will • Know how to properly care for the video camera (do’s & don’ts), • Understand how to keep the camera safe from theft, • Know his/her responsibility regarding the camera’s care and safe keeping, and • Know how to report technical problems, loss or theft.

Estimated Length of Session The instructor should plan one hour or one class session for this lesson. If this is your first time presenting information or you are incorporating peer mentors in the process, you should extend the lesson by one additional class session.

Handouts The following handouts are recommended:

• • • • • •

“Resource Management: Equipment Policies & Procedures” “Resource Management: Parent Letter” “Resource Management Permission Form” “Resource Management: Overnight Check-Out Form” “Resource Management: Delinquency Notice” “Quiz: Equipment Care & Check-out Procedures”

Equipment The following equipment is recommended: • A video camera with charged battery or A/C plug-in • A tripod • Camera and tripod bags • A television monitor or video projector • A DVD player • A set of RCA cords (for connecting the DVD player to the monitor)

• Extension cords and/or multistrips as needed

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Three

Equipment Care & Protocols

LESSON PLAN (continued) Viewing Material The following media may be used to compliment a live demonstration or lecture: • PowerPoint presentation: “The Do’s and Don’ts of Camera Care”

Preparation Assign a peer mentor to prepare the equipment, charge batteries, set up a computer with the PowerPoint presentation, and set up a video monitor or projector. This requires approximately one and one-half hours. The instructor should oversee the duplication of handouts, forms, and the quiz.

Role of Peer Mentors Depending on their levels of skill and experience, peer mentors are often able to present a majority of the information in this lesson. If peer mentors are new to presenting information, the instructor should present the PowerPoint lecture. Mentors may facilitate the large group discussion by sharing their experiences checking out equipment.

Process The following steps should be followed when introducing equipment care and check out procedures: • Show the PowerPoint presentation, “Equipment Care & Check-out Procedures” • Hold a group discussion about details related to equipment care • Present the overview and discussion about the “Parent Letter” & “Permission Form” • Assign a deadline for returning the signed forms (within two to five days) • Present the overview and discussion about the” Overnight Check-out Form” • Present the overview and discussion about the “Delinquency Notice” • Give the written quiz on “Camera Care and Checkout Procedures”

Assessments The following assessment strategies are recommended for this lesson: • Informal observation (student participation) • Completion of quiz, “Equipment Care & Checkout Procedures” • Term-long tracking of the number of delinquency notices given to individual students

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Three

Equipment Care & Protocols

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: Parent Letter (revise for specific needs) Date: _________________________________ To:

Parents of Media Arts Students

From: Media Arts Instructor, __________________________ (Name of School)

We are sending this note out to all parents and guardians of students who are enrolled in the video arts course at our school. The video course being offered at this school is unique; students have opportunities to learn advanced creative and technology-based tools to tell their own stories. The course provides students with the opportunity to check out equipment so they can collect stories outside of the typical school day. This is an exciting opportunity for the school, staff and the students, but it also raises a couple of concerns. The equipment we check out to students is expensive--generally, a video camera costs $500. We have concerns that this equipment on loan to the student may be lost or stolen, as it has happened occasionally in the past. We also want to make sure that family members understand why their children may be bringing an expensive piece of equipment into the home. We are asking that you review the enclosed Permission Form with your child and give permission for him or her to check out equipment for this class. You will not be held responsible for replacing the equipment, but we do want to make sure that you are aware of the reasons these items are entering your homes and the conditions for check out we have requested from our students. Thank you for taking the time to read this. I’m looking forward to meeting you in person soon! Sincerely,

Teacher’s typed name Media Arts Instructor, __________________________ (Name of School) (Note: Course instructors should modify and personalize this letter for the specific needs of your school community).

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 61


Unit Three

Equipment Care & Protocols

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: The Permission Form I, ___________________________________ (student name), promise to take the best possible care of any equipment checked out to me for use through ____________________________________________ (school name[s]). By signing my initials next to each of the following items, I am showing that I understand the rules regarding checkout and that I promise to take the precautions listed below every time a piece of media equipment is placed in my care. ____

I will check the equipment out only with the course instructor or a designated peer mentor.

____

I will sign a form requesting the equipment for any overnight checkout.

____

I will not leave the equipment unattended at any time while it is checked out to me.

____

I will not throw, toss, or in any way mishandle the equipment.

____

I will not loan the equipment to anyone. If I need help to photograph something, I may allow another person to help me, but I promise not to let the equipment out of my sight.

____

I will only photograph school-appropriate material (i.e., no swearing, no illegal activity, etc.)

____

If I take equipment into any home, I will keep it with me (i.e., next to where I sleep or in a safe, secure space.)

____

If I damage or lose the equipment, I will report it immediately to the course instructor or a designated mentor. I also understand that I may be asked to work for the camera’s

replacement by volunteering at the school.

____

I will charge all batteries (if required) before returning the equipment.

____

I will return the equipment at the agreed-upon time (designated on the overnight checkout form.)

____

If I am ill or cannot attend school and have any equipment in my possession, I will call the school and notify the course instructor or a designated peer mentor.

I agree to the terms listed above, and I fully understand that any violation of these rules may result in the loss of equipment use privileges.

page 62

__________________________________________

_____________________

Student Signature

Date

__________________________________________ Parent/Guardian Signature

_____________________ Date

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Three

Equipment Care & Protocols

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: The Overnight Checkout Form

Name: ___________________________________________ Telephone: ___________________________________________ Equipment Requested: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ What you will videotape (be specific and ready to show your planning documents): ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Date Needed: ___________________________________________

Date to be returned: _____________________________________

I promise to take good care of the equipment while it is in my possession. I will return it as requested, and I promise to keep it safe and protect it from theft. If something happens to the equipment while it is in my care, I will immediately report it.

__________________________________________ Student Signature

_____________________ Date

__________________________________________ Signature of Authorized Personnel

_____________________ Date

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 63


Unit Three

Equipment Care & Protocols

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: The Delinquency Notice This is a reminder that you were late in returning equipment to the media arts program or that you did not take proper care of the equipment while it was in your possession. If this happens three times during the school year, you will lose your checkout privileges. If you cannot return the equipment as scheduled, you should call the school and leave a message for the course instructor or a designated peer mentor. If you do not follow check-in procedures, it will count as a delinquent return.

_________ date

1st delinquent return

_________ date

2nd delinquent return

_________ date

3rd delinquent return (If this box has been checked, you have lost your checkout privileges for the rest of this academic term.)

I have read the above statement and will make sure that equipment is returned on time to the Media Arts program for all future checkouts.

page 64

__________________________________________ Student Signature

_____________________ Date

__________________________________________

_____________________

Parent/Guardian Signature

Date

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Three

Equipment Care & Protocols

QUIZ: Equipment Care & Checkout Procedures List five things you shouldn’t do while equipment is in your care: 1. ____________________________________________________________________________ 2. ____________________________________________________________________________ 3. ____________________________________________________________________________ 4. ____________________________________________________________________________ 5. ____________________________________________________________________________ List five things you should do while equipment is in your care: 1. ____________________________________________________________________________ 2. ____________________________________________________________________________ 3. ____________________________________________________________________________ 4. ____________________________________________________________________________ 5. ____________________________________________________________________________

To whom do you return equipment at the beginning of class? Circle all that apply. a. Course Instructor b. School secretary c. Classmate d. Peer Mentor that has been assigned to supervise equipment e. No one

What is the proper action to take if you cannot come to school and are unable to return equipment? Circle one. A. Go back to sleep and not worry about it. B. Make up a wild story that no one will believe but will make everyone laugh and forget that I returned the equipment late. C. Return the equipment the following day and explain what happened. D. Call the school and speak with or leave a message summarizing my situation to an instructor or a designated peer mentor. E. Send the equipment back to the school with a trusted friend. What should you do if the equipment you checked out is not working properly? Please explain. _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

25

Points Earned:

___

Through the Eagle’s Eye ~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 65


Unit Three

Equipment Care & Protocols

QUIZ KEY: Equipment Care & Checkout Procedures Please note that there are multiple correct answers to this quiz. Use this key only as a guide. List five things you shouldn’t do while equipment is in your care: 1. Drop it 2. Let someone else borrow it 3. Leave it unattended 4. Get it wet 5. Eat while using it

-- 5 points per correct answer

List five things you should do while equipment is in your care: 1. Keep it on your body or in your hands 2. Keep it dry and free from dust and dirt 3. Use it 4. Protect it from theft 5. Charge the battery

-- 5 points per correct answer

To whom do you return equipment at the beginning of class? a. Course Instructor

-- 5 points per correct answer

What is the proper action to take if you cannot come to school and are unable to return equipment? D. Call the school and speak with or leave a message summarizing my situation to an instructor or a designated peer mentor.

-- 5 points per correct answer

What should you do if the equipment you checked out is not working properly? Please explain. The error should be reported directly to the course instructor and a note placed on the equipment stating the specific problem.

-- 5 points per correct answer

Possible Points: 25

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Through the Eagle’s Eye ~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Three

Equipment Care & Protocols

GRADING SUMMARY Quiz: Video Camera & Tripod Knowledge

25 points

Participation

15 points

Responded verbally to video works Asked questions about the course Listened attentively Responded knowledgeably when asked a question Attendance

10 points Total Possible Points for This Unit

50 Points

NOTES & OBSERVATIONS Use this space to write additional notes, things to remember, and to recommend changes to implement in the future as you repeat this lesson. Remember: every classroom is unique, and every student is individual. Following the precise order of instruction is far less important than achieving the lesson’s intended goal. This is an opportunity to make this lesson your own.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 67


Nicole Auginash / Digital Artist & Mentor My name is Nicole. In my spare time, I like to make scrapbooks of my friends and family. I also go to the mall and movies whenever I get a chance. I live with my mother and one older sister; I also have one younger brother whom I haven’t met yet. This summer, I went to California with my friend and met my dad’s dad. It’s crazy, because when I met my grandfather, it felt like I’d known him for years. For Spring Break 2005, my family and I are going to California to stay with my grandpa for a week. Since I was in Kindergarten, I attended Heart of the Earth Survival School. This year, I decided to go to Four Directions. I like this school better than my old school because I have opportunities to do many different things here, like work with computers.

page 68

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Four

The Language of Video

LESSON PLAN

Purpose This lesson will Introduce students to the basic elements, principles, and language used in video production.

Goal The student will know the meaning and relationships between the core elements of a video, including image, sound, text, and sequence.

Objectives The student will • Use basic video terms and vocabulary when describing their own video work, • Demonstrate knowledge of terms when using a video camera, • Use elements to convey meaning through video production, and • Demonstrate basic knowledge of and proficiency with a video camera.

Estimated Length of Session The instructor should plan four sessions or four class sessions for this lesson. If this is your first time presenting information or you are incorporating peer mentors in the process, you should extend the lesson by one additional class session.

Handouts The following handouts are recommended: • “Vocabulary: Primary Elements of the Art Form”

• • • •

“Assignment: Video Scavenger Hunt” “Assignment: Compositional Device” “Quiz: Do You Know Your Terms?” “Resource Management: Classroom Equipment Checkout Form”

Equipment The following equipment is recommended: • A video camera with charged battery or A/C plug-in • A tripod • A television monitor or video projector • A set of RCA cables (for connection between the video camera and monitor) • A video tape • Additional video cameras and tapes for student use (one camera for every two students) • Extension cords and/or multistrips as needed

Viewing Material The following media may be used to compliment a live demonstration or lecture: • PowerPoint presentation: “Video Arts Vocabulary” • Student Video Example: “Video Scavenger Hunt” • Student Example: “Compositional Devices” Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 69


Unit Four

The Language of Video

LESSON PLAN (continued)

Preparation Assign a peer mentor to prepare the equipment, charge batteries, set up a computer with the PowerPoint presentation, and set up a video monitor or projector. Additional video cameras should be prepared with batteries charged and a class checkout system in place. This requires approximately one hour for set up and testing. The instructor should oversee the duplication of handouts, assignments, and the quiz.

Role of Peer Mentors If you have an experienced peer mentor in your group, encourage him or her to present the PowerPoint lecture. Otherwise, at this point in time, the peer mentors should be able to lead or assist with the group demonstration. Peer mentors should also help students complete assignments and should actively participate in the critique process. This will take some of the pressure off of other students that may not be initially comfortable having their assignments talked about in front of others. Peer mentors may also be encouraged to grade quizzes if they follow a key and their work is supervised and reviewed by the course instructor.

Process The following steps should be followed when introducing video vocabulary: • Show the PowerPoint presentation, “Video Arts Vocabulary” • Give the group demonstration, “Compositions, Angles, & Movement” • Hand out the assignment, “Video Scavenger Hunt” • Hold a critique session on the “Video Scavenger Hunt” assignment • Hand out the assignment: “Elements, Compositions & Movement”

• Hold a critique session on the “Elements, Compositions & Movement” assignment • Give the quiz, “Do You Know Your Terms?” • Two student produced samples of the hands-on exercises may screened and discussed if desired.

Assessments The following assessment strategies are recommended for this lesson: • Informal observation (student participation) • Critique of video assignments • Successful completion of the quiz, “Do You Know Your Terms?” (Note: Students should complete the quiz with at least 85% or more correct)

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Four

The Language of Video

VOCABULARY: Primary Elements of the Art Form

Most media pieces are created from a series of creative, technical and aesthetic elements that work together to communicate a message or idea. The following list, though not inclusive, represents the most common elements of this medium.

Sound What we hear in terms of language, our natural environments, conscious sounds we create and manipulate, and internal life sounds.

Image What we see in our natural and created environments. An image is what we choose to view within a given frame of reference.

Text What we recognize as language in our society. This includes both written and spoken words and applies to most languages.

Sequence How we arrange images, sounds and text to expand or change the interpretation of a media work.

Formal Elements Color / Shape / Texture / Line These basic elements shape the message and aesthetic value of the images produced -- make sure to consider these elements when creating your images. Illustrated below are some good examples of these formal elements.

color

shape

texture

line

Light and Shadow Always be aware of the quality of light available when making a video or taking a photograph. Often, shadows or darkened areas can emphasize important aspects of images. When collecting images, always know where the source of light is located. If photographed into the light, subject matter may appear shadowed or poorly defined. If the light is blocked by another object (such as a tree), the image may appear with streaked shadows. When you understand how light and contrast work, you will be able to create dramatic effects in your art. On the next page some examples of the good use of light and shadow are illustrated.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Four

The Language of Video

VOCABULARY: Primary Elements of the Art Form (continued)

reflection

shadow

light & shadow

refraction

Compositions Long Shot An image captured from far away that usually includes the entire subject matter within the camera frame. This shot is usually used to introduce a setting or environment (sometimes known as an “establishing shot.”) Abbreviation: LS

Mid-Shot This type of composition usually includes the subject matter from the waist up and is often used to introduce the subject to the audience. Informally, the mid-shot is considered to be a “safe-yet-friendly” distance that is similar to the length between two people shaking hands. Abbreviation: MS

Close-up This type of shot is taken close to the subject and is often used to show emotion. The most common composition of a close-up is also called a ”head and shoulders shot,” which refers to a person photographed from the shoulders and up with a minimum amount of space shown above the head. Abbreviation: CU

Extreme Close-up This is an even closer image, revealing absolute detail in the image. When photographing a person, s/he may feel uncomfortable because an extreme-close up often reveals more than with which the subject matter is comfortable. Abbreviation: ECU

long shot

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

mid shot

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

close up

extreme close up


Unit Four

The Language of Video

VOCABULARY: Primary Elements of the Art Form (continued)

High Angle -Extreme

High Angle - Subtle

Low Angel - Extreme

Low Angle - Simple

High Angle The camera is placed high and looks down at the subject. This angle often makes the subject appear smaller than it is. In American culture, the use of this angle indicates that the subject being viewed by the camera is vulnerable and without power--this relates to the idea of a parent looking down at a child.

Low Angle The camera is placed low and looks up towards the subject matter. This angle often makes the subject appear larger than it is. In American culture, this angle often causes the audience to view the subject matter in a position of power and/or importance, as if the audience were a child looking upward towards a parent. Camera angles are often used with great subtlety and convey a sense of the subject’s authority or vulnerability to the audience. If used carelessly, the director of the image can accidentally suggest a use or lack of power that they did not intend.

Movement Movement is most often considered when producing videos, but it can also play an important part in how photographs are taken and how the image conveys movement within a single frame. The following list contains some basic terms used in video.

Pan The camera moves horizontally (sideways) from left to right or right to left. Panning is often used to reveal more information about a setting or a situation.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 73


Unit Four

The Language of Video

VOCABULARY: Primary Elements of the Art Form (continued)

Tilt The camera moves vertically (up and/or down) to reveal new information about a setting or a situation.

Zoom The camera magnifies an image by moving from a long shot to a closer shot. Most cameras offer some form of a zoom function. The camera is able to use multiple lenses to magnify an image, making it appear closer than it really is. Beginning photographers often overuse the zoom function, creating chaotic movements or magnifying an image so the slightest movement of the camera causes the image to blur or appear “bumpy.”

Dolly A dolly shot serves a similar purpose as the zoom, except the camera itself physically slides forwards or backwards. By using a dolly shot, the camera operator has greater control over the speed of movement and focusing options. On professional film sets, tracks are laid for a dolly (cart) upon which the camera is placed; this ensures fluid movement. Less expensive options include the use of a steady cam, wheeled tripods, or simply carefully walking with a camera.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Four

The Language of Video

VOCABULARY: Video Scavenger Hunt

This assignment will help strengthen your knowledge of video terms and help you feel more comfortable operating a camera. Work in pairs to videotape each of the following items listed below. You do not need to capture them in order, but you must complete the list. Once you complete this assignment, give it to the instructor or a peer mentor for grading. You and your partner will each receive the same amount of points for this exercise, so make sure you both do similar amounts of work. Take sixteen photographs that illustrate the following compositions, formal elements, movements and angles.

1. A mid-shot of yourself

2. A mid-shot of your partner

3. The use of movement to create confusion

4. A close-up of something beautiful

5. A low angle of something powerful

6. A long shot of a street, alley or hallway

7. An object from three different angles

8. A rough texture

9. Lines

10. A pan to something you like

12. Five different sets of eyes

13. A close-up of a toe with blue sky behind it

14. A tilt-up to show pride

15. A close-up of something gross

11. A high angle to make someone look small

Name: ___________________________________________ Name: ___________________________________________ Possible Points:

25

Points Earned:

___

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 75


Unit Four

The Language of Video

ASSIGNMENT: Elements, Compositions & Movement

You are about to create a fifteen-shot video about life at your school. Your video will be created entirely within the camera (no post-production editing) and must be planned using a pre-production shot list. Within each shot, you must include • One visual formal element, • One movement, and • A composition that can be easily recognized by the viewer. You will have two class sessions to complete your shot list, videotape it, and receive critique. Walk within the school with your video camera, vocabulary, and this worksheet in hand as you plan.

Shot #

Content

Composition

Formal Element

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15

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Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

50

Through the Eagle’s Eye

Points Earned:

___

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

Movement


Unit Four

The Language of Video

QUIZ: Do You Know Your Terms?

Looking at each of the following photographs, identify the composition, camera angle, formal element and describe how light was used.

Composition:

____________________________

Angle:

____________________________

Formal Element: ____________________________ Use of Light:

____________________________

Composition:

____________________________

Angle:

____________________________

Formal Element: ____________________________ Use of Light:

____________________________

Composition:

____________________________

Angle:

____________________________

Formal Element: ____________________________ Use of Light:

____________________________

Composition:

____________________________

Angle:

____________________________

Formal Element: ____________________________ Use of Light:

____________________________

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 77


Unit Four

The Language of Video

QUIZ: Do You Know Your Terms? (continued)

Looking at each of the following photographs, identify the composition, camera angle, formal element and describe how light was used.

Composition:

____________________________

Angle:

____________________________

Formal Element: ____________________________ Use of Light:

____________________________

Composition:

____________________________

Angle:

____________________________

Formal Element: ____________________________ Use of Light:

____________________________

Composition:

____________________________

Angle:

____________________________

Formal Element: ____________________________ Use of Light:

____________________________

Composition:

____________________________

Angle:

____________________________

Formal Element: ____________________________ Use of Light:

page 78

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

50

Through the Eagle’s Eye

Points Earned:

___

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

____________________________


Unit Four

The Language of Video

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: Classroom Equipment Checkout Form

This form will help organize the flow of video equipment when students are performing in-class assignments. You may modify this list as needed for the purpose of your course.

Date:

___________________________________

Equipment Supervisor:

___________________________________

Total Number of Cameras Available for Class:

___________________________________

Equipment Number

Name of Person Responsible

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

Through the Eagle’s Eye

Returned?

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 79


Unit Four

The Language of Video

Rubric: Video Scavenger Hunt The following rubric can be used to grade student performance. Even though working in pairs, each student is responsible for completing each of the fifteen shots. Students should not proceed to additional exercises until they have show proficiency as outlined below.

Student Name:

___________________________________________________________________________

Demonstrated Skill

Criteria

Possible Points

Points Earned

Accurate completion of all fifteen assigned shots

• Understands and uses vocabulary • Effectively uses formal elements, angles, and camera movements when recording a shot

10

Creativity

• Completes at least three shots that demonstrate the ability to use compositions, camera movement, and/or formal elements to add meaning to an image

5

Technical

• Able to turn the camera on and off • Able to insert and remove a video tape • Records each shot for a minimum of five seconds • Holds the camera steadily

5

Teamwork

• Worked with one or more partners to successfully complete exercises • Demonstrated willingness to support and assist others

5

Total Points Earned

Possible Points: 25

page 80

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Four

The Language of Video

Rubric: Elements, Compositions & Movements The following rubric can be used to grade student performance.

Student Name:

___________________________________________________________________________

Demonstrated Skill

Criteria

Possible Points

Accurate completion of the • Uses vocabulary accurately when worksheet completing the worksheet • Demonstrates knowledge of relationships between compositions, formal elements and movement when defining a shot • Effectively uses formal elements, angles, and camera movements when recording each shot

Points Earned 10

Creativity

• Completes at least ten shots that demonstrate the ability to use compositions, camera movement, and/or formal elements to add meaning to an image

5

Technical

• Able to turn the camera on and off • Able to insert and remove a video tape • Records each shot for a minimum of five seconds • Holds the camera steadily • Photographs the assignment in the order it was written

5

Teamwork

• Worked with one or more partners to successfully complete exercises • Demonstrated willingness to support and assist others

5

Total Points Earned

Possible Points: 50

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 81


Unit Four

The Language of Video

Quiz Key: Do You Know Your Terms Students will identify compositions, camera angles, formal elements, and describe how light was presented. Many of the photographs will be difficult for beginning students to discern. Thus, each student may earn up to 8 points per correct answer, with the expectation that students can readily identify three of the four elements accurately. In some cases, there is more than one correct answer Student Name:

___________________________________________________________________________

Questions

Criteria

Possible Points

Points Earned

Photograph 01

Composition: mid-shot Angle: static Formal Element: shape or color Use of Light: even

8

Photograph 02

Composition: long shot Angle: static Formal Element: color or line Use of Light: refracted

8

Photograph 03

Composition: mid-shot Angle: high angle Formal Element: line Use of Light: shadow in foreground

8

Photograph 04

Composition: mid-shot Angle: static Formal Element: pattern or color Use of Light: even

5

Photograph 05

Composition: close-up Angle: static Formal Element: color Use of Light: shadow

8

Photograph 06

Composition: close-up or long shot Angle: high angle Formal Element: pattern, color or line Use of Light: even

8

Photograph 07

Composition: mid-shot Angle: high angle Formal Element: texture or color Use of Light: even

8

Photograph 08

Composition: mid-shot or long shot Angle: static Formal Element: line or color Use of Light: even

8

Total Points Earned Possible Points: 54

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

(the student is expected to earn up to 50 points, additional points may count as extra credit)

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Four

The Language of Video

GRADING SUMMARY Assignment: Video Scavenger Hunt

25 points

Assignment: Elements, Compositions & Movement

50 points

Quiz: Do You Know Your Terms?

50 points

Participation

40 points

Responded verbally to video works Asked questions about the course Listened attentively Responded knowledgeably when asked a question Attendance

35 points Total Possible Points for This Unit

200 points

NOTES & OBSERVATIONS Use this space to write additional notes, things to remember, and to recommend changes to implement in the future as you repeat this lesson. Remember: every classroom is unique, and every student is individual. Following the precise order of instruction is far less important than achieving the lesson’s intended goal. This is an opportunity to make this lesson your own.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 83


Jami Headbird / Digital Artist & Mentor Boozhoo! Jami Headbird nindizhinikaaz. Bangii eta go ninitaa anishinaanbemowin Mide Nibi Ikwe nindigoo. Mukwa indodem. Ashi-niizhwaashwi biboonigizi. Gaawaawaajimekaag nindoonjibaa. Gabikaang nindayen noongom onaabanigiizis o’apii ningii-tibishkaa. Nisayen Billy izhinikaazo. Nimaamaa Shari izhinikaazo. Ninminwendan nimazinaakizige miinawaa nindoozhibii’ige. Mii’iw. Mii’gwech. Hello! My name is Jami Headbird. I only speak a little bit of Ojibwe. My Native American name is Sacred Water Woman. I am from the Bear clan. I am 17 years old. I am from Leech Lake Reservation, but I live in Minneapolis. I was born in the month of March (“hard crust on snow moon”). My brother’s name is Billy. My mom’s name is Shari. I like taking pictures, writing poetry, listening to music, and working with kids. That’s it. Thank you.

page 84

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Five

Introduction to Critical Viewing

LESSON PLAN

Purpose This lesson will introduce students to three primary film styles (also known as “genres”) and introduce fundamental critical viewing skills.

Goal

The student will be able to identify general film styles and apply basic critical viewing skills when watching videos.

Objectives The student will • Know the three basic types of film styles, • Demonstrate knowledge of basic critical viewing vocabulary, and • Apply critical thinking skills.

Estimated Length of Session The instructor should plan two sessions or class sessions for this lesson. If this is your first time presenting information or you are incorporating peer mentors in the process, you should extend the lesson by one additional class session.

Handouts The following handouts are recommended: • “Vocabulary: An Introduction to Film Styles” • “Vocabulary: Becoming a Critical Viewer”

• “Assignment: Critical Viewing in Practice” • “Quiz: Identifying Film Styles”

Equipment The following equipment is recommended: • Television monitor or video projector • DVD player with appropriate connection cables • Extension cords and/or multistrips as needed

Viewing Material The following media may be used to compliment a live demonstration or lecture: • Your choice of DVD of samples of student-created artwork and/or video works

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 85


Unit Five

LESSON PLAN

Introduction to Critical Viewing

(continued)

Preparation A peer mentor should be assigned to preparing the monitor and DVD player. You may also wish to assign a peer mentor o select group works to be viewed. This requires approximately fifteen minuted for set-up and testing. The instructor should oversee the duplication of handouts, assignments, and the quiz.

Role of Peer Mentors Peer mentors should fully participate in the group critical viewing exercise. If you have experienced mentors, then they may lead both sessions. They should also assist students with completing assignments as needed

Process The following steps should be taken when introducing sound elements. Instructors may wish to spend additional time on listening activities as needed. • Give the presentation and hold a discussion about the purpose of viewing and responding to media works • Provide the overview of critical viewing vocabulary, explanation and appropriate use • View a video from the sample DVD and provide group practice in critical viewing • View a video from the sample DVD and give the assignment, “Critical Viewing In Practice”

Assessments The following assessment strategies are recommended for this lesson: • •

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

Informal observation of student participation, particularly during critical viewing assignments Grading the assignment and quiz

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Five

Introduction to Critical Viewing

VOCABULARY: The Language of a Critic

Film Styles Every video artist uses certain approaches to express the stories they have to tell. By using images and sounds in specific patterns or within a context, artists are able to speak to their audience in ways they will understand. Listed below are some of the most commonly recognized video production styles; however, media artists should feel free to mix or adapt different film styles as it suits their story.

Documentary A film that is based on factual information. This style usually includes interviews, pictures and/or historical items.

Narrative A fictional story that is organized so parts relate to each other through a series of casually related events occurring in a specific time and space.

Experimental These types of films focus on a concept and use visual Images and sounds in a non-narrative (nonlinear) manner. This film style often employs images and sounds to represent ideas. Experimental films often emphasize sequence and layering to express the artist’s message.

Criticism In order to become a good video artist, it is important to understand how other videos are made and how the messages within other works are developed. In order to become a critical viewer, you will need to know certain terms that will help you to communicate what you notice as a viewer.

Analysis The process of identifying the elements and processes used by the artist in relationship to the message of the work.

Artist The originator of the media art work; the person who constructs and manipulates the image being viewed.

Audience The viewers of the created work. The audience often has no connection to the artist and brings a unique perspective to the viewing process.

Context All relevant information surrounding a work of art. Context includes information about the artist, the history of the work, the culture(s) that influenced its production, and other artistic styles that may have influenced the creation of the work.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 87


Unit Five

Introduction to Critical Viewing

VOCABULARY: The Language of a Critic

Criticism The process of analyzing and evaluating an artwork; the action of critically viewing an artwork in order to bring meaning to the “reading” of it.

Cultural Contexts The values, traditions, artistic emphasis, languages, etc., of a given culture that heavily influence the creation, presentation, and resulting interpretation of a media artwork. It is important to identify the culture(s) from which the artwork originated as well as the cultural influences of the artist who created the artwork.

Formal Description A detailed objective description of a media artwork and the viewer’s knowledge about it. Formal descriptions typically include references to the use of subject matter, formal elements, physical properties, processes, and styles, as well as contextual information. The formal description should be objective and refrain from personal insights or perspectives.

Historical Contexts History strongly influences the themes and styles of media artwork. Events, fads, values, accessible technology, and social concepts of a time period often have a bearing on the themes and styles within an artistic work.

Interpretation The act of reading or conceptualizing a work of art. Interpretation can vary based on the viewer’s perspective or world view.

Media Artwork Image-based artwork that includes photography, film, video, animation, and/or digital video. A media artwork is constructed with images using of light, contrast, and color, and--in some instances-movement and sound.

Point Of View In media arts, point of view refers to the values, knowledge, opinions, education, etc., that the viewer brings to his or her interpretation of an artwork. The artist carries a point of view when creating the artwork; the viewer’s point of view comes into play when interpreting the artwork. These perspectives may vary greatly or carry great similarities.

Viewer The audience of the created work. The viewer often has no connection to the artist and brings his/her unique perspective to the viewing process.

page 88

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Five

Introduction to Critical Viewing

ASSIGNMENT: Critical Viewing In Practice

You are about to watch a video and describe in detail what you are seeing. This activity is called “deconstucting.” By describing in technical terms what you are seeing and hearing, you will be able to comment more easily on what you think the video work is trying to communicate and how the filmmaker used certain conventions (ways of constructing) to convey his/her message. Pick a video from the sample DVD of youth artist works and answer the following questions.

Title of Video:

_________ __________________________________________

Who do you think is the audience for this video? _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

What was the video about? Describe its primary message. _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

Film style used:

_________________________________________________________

Why do you think the filmmaker chose this film style to convey his/her message? _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 89


Unit Five

Introduction to Critical Viewing

ASSIGNMENT: Critical Viewing In Practice (continued)

Name five examples of how images and sounds were used to convey or enhance its message.

1. _____________________________________________________________________________ 2. _____________________________________________________________________________ 3. _____________________________________________________________________________ 4. _____________________________________________________________________________ 5. _____________________________________________________________________________

What did you like and dislike about the video? What is your opinion of the film? Be specific, and cite examples from the video that illustrate your opinion. _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

Was the filmmaker successful in conveying his/her message? Explain why or why not. Be specific, and cite examples from the video that illustrate your opinion.

_______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

page 90

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

50

Through the Eagle’s Eye

Points Earned:

___

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Five

Introduction to Critical Viewing

QUIZ: Do You Know Your Terms?

Please identify the following definitions. You may select from the words listed an the other side of this page.

TERM

DEFINITION The originator of the media art work; the person who constructs and manipulates the image being viewed. A fictional story that is organized so parts relate to each other through a series of casually related events occurring in a specific time and space. In media arts, this term refers to the values, knowledge, opinions, education, etc., that the viewer brings to his or her interpretation of an artwork. The artist carries a perspective when creating the artwork; the viewer’s perspective comes into play when interpreting the artwork. These perspectives may vary greatly or carry great similarities. The viewers of the created work. These people often have no connection to the artist and bring their unique perspectives to the viewing process. A film that is based on factual information. This style usually includes interviews, pictures and/or historical items. The process of analyzing and evaluating an artwork; the action of critically viewing an artwork in order to bring meaning to the “reading” of it. All relevant information surrounding a work of art. Context includes information about the artist, the history of the work, the culture(s) that influenced its production, and other artistic styles that may have influenced the creation of the work. These types of films focus on a concept and use visual Images and sounds in a nonnarrative (nonlinear) manner. This film style often employs images and sounds to represent ideas. These films often emphasize sequence and layering to express the artist’s message. The process of identifying the elements and processes used by the artist in relationship to the message of the work. Approaches used to express stories. By using images and sounds in specific patterns or within a context, artists are able to speak to their audience in ways they will understand.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 91


Unit Five

Introduction to Critical Viewing

QUIZ: Do You Know Your Terms?

Listed below are the terms identified on the front page of this quiz. Please use them to match up to the appropriate definition.

TERMS

Analysis Artist Audience Context Film Styles Criticism Documentary Experimental Narrative Point of View

page 92

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

50

Through the Eagle’s Eye

Points Earned:

___

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Five

Introduction to Critical Viewing

Rubric: Critical Viewing In Practice - Assignment The following rubric can be used to grade student performance. Student Name:

___________________________________________________________________________

Demonstrated Skill

Criteria

Possible Points

Accuracy

• Understands and uses vocabulary when answering questions

Points Earned 15

Analysis

15 • Cites evidence of how filmic elements are used to convey meaning.

Point of View

• Articulates an opinion using evidence of how film structure and style are used

10

Summary

• Concisely describes the purpose of a video using analytic evidence in support

10

Total Points Earned

Possible Points: 50

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 93


Unit Five

Introduction to Critical Viewing

Quiz Key: Do You Know Your Terms? Students will demonstrate an understanding of critical viewing vocabulary. There is only one correct answer per item. Student Name:

___________________________________________________________________________

Term

Definition

Artist

The originator of the media art work; the person who constructs and manipulates the image being viewed.

5

Narrative

A fictional story that is organized so parts relate to each other through a series of casually related events occurring in a specific time and space.

5

Point of View

This term refers to the values, knowledge, opinions, education, etc., that the viewer brings to his or her interpretation of an artwork. The artist carries a point of view when creating the artwork; the viewer’s point of view comes into play when interpreting the artwork. These perspectives may vary greatly or carry great similarities.

5

Audience

The viewers of the created work. They often have no connection to the artist and bring their unique perspective to the viewing process.

5

Documentary

A story that is based on factual information. This style usually includes interviews, pictures and/or historical items.

5

Criticism

The process of evaluating an artwork; the action of critically viewing an artwork in order to bring meaning to the “reading” of it.

5

Context

All relevant information surrounding a work of art. Context includes information about the artist, the history of the work, the culture(s) that influenced its production, and other artistic styles that may have influenced the creation of the work.

5

Experimental

These types of videos focus on a concept and use visual Images and sounds in a non-narrative (nonlinear) manner. This film style often employs images and sounds to represent ideas. Experimental films often emphasize sequence and layering to express the artist’s message.

5

Analysis

The process of identifying the elements and processes used by the artist in relationship to the message of the work.

5

Film Styles

Approaches used to express stories. By using images and sounds in specific patterns or within a context, artists are able to speak to their audience in ways they will understand.

5

Possible Points

Points Earned

Total Points Earned Possible Points: 50

page 94

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Five

Introduction to Critical Viewing

GRADING SUMMARY Assignment: Critical Viewing In Practice

50 points

Quiz: Do You Know Your Terms?

50 points

Participation

30 points

Responded verbally to video works Asked questions about the course Listened attentively Responded knowledgeably when asked a question Attendance

20 points Total Possible Points for This Unit

150 points

NOTES & OBSERVATIONS Use this space to write additional notes, things to remember, and to recommend changes to implement in the future as you repeat this lesson. Remember: every classroom is unique, and every student is individual. Following the precise order of instruction is far less important than achieving the lesson’s intended goal. This is an opportunity to make this lesson your own.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 95


Victoria Noriega Jackson / Digital Photographer & Mentor Being a mentor caused me to change the way I interact with other people. Before I participated in the Peer Mentoring program, I didn’t really talk to anybody, but now I have a lot of friends. Since I had to teach people whom I didn’t know very well, I was forced to get to know them. As a peer mentor, I had to be positive at all times, no matter what. I learned to deal with everything that my students did, whether it was negative or positive. Being a peer mentor has also helped me improve my artwork. Every time we went to El Colegio Charter School, I would sit and watch how our students created their artwork. I combined some of their ideas together with my own, and my photography improved. When we started to mentor our students, some of them didn’t like it. That may have been because some of them were older than us, and maybe they weren’t comfortable with younger people telling them how to do things. It was frustrating, but it made me think about my own education and the respect that teachers deserve. The best part of being a peer mentor is when a student finishes a photograph, I get to spend time looking at their work and how they improved. I know that I was a part of helping them become better photographers and videographers, and that makes me happy.

page 96

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Six

Introduction to Sound

LESSON PLAN Purpose This lesson will introduce students to various sound elements and provide them with the opportunity to use those elements to create a story.

Goal The student will know the different types of sound elements and how to integrate them to create meaning.

Objectives The student will • Know the five basic types of sound elements, • Demonstrate knowledge of sound elements by integrating them, • Demonstrate imaginative and critical thinking skills, and • Sequence and layer sound images to create meaning.

Estimated Length of Session The instructor should plan four sessions or four class sessions for this lesson. If this is your first time presenting information or you are incorporating peer mentors in the process, you should extend the lesson by one additional class session.

Handouts The following handouts are recommended: • “Vocabulary: Primary Elements of Sound” • “Assignment: Sound Stories”

• “Classroom Tool: Classroom Equipment Checkout Form”

Equipment The following equipment is recommended: • A computer prepared for presenting a PowerPoint lecture • A television monitor or video projector • A set of RCA cables (for connection between the computer and the monitor) • Video cameras and tapes for student use (one camera for every two students) • Extension cords and/or multistrips as needed

Viewing Material The following media may be used to compliment a live demonstration or lecture: • PowerPoint presentation: “Sound Elements, Microphones and the Art of Interviewing” • Sound recording samples: “Four Directions - Stories & Songs” • Student Video Sample - “Sound Stories”

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 97


Unit Six LESSON PLAN

Introduction to Sound

(continued)

Preparation Assign a peer mentor to prepare equipment, charge batteries, and set up a computer with the PowerPoint presentation and a video monitor or projector. Video cameras should be prepared with batteries charged and a class checkout system in place. This requires approximately one hour for setup and testing. The instructor should oversee the duplication of handouts and assignments.

Role of Peer Mentors If you have experienced peer mentors in your group, encourage them to present the PowerPoint lecture. Peer mentors should fully participate in the listening exercises. They should also assist students with completing assignments and participate in the critique process. Again, this will take pressure off of other students who may be uncomfortable having their assignments talked about in front of others.

Process When introducing sound elements, the following steps should be taken. Instructors may wish to spend additional time on listening activities as needed. • Show partial PowerPoint presentation and discussion: “Sound Elements” • Assign listening exercise using “Four Directions - Stories & Songs” sample (have students identify sound elements and discuss how their use in the piece adds meaning) • Give the assignment, “Sound Stories” • Hold a critique session of the “Sound Stories” assignment

Assessments The following assessment strategies are recommended for this lesson: • Informal observation of student participation, particularly during the critique session •

page 98

Through the Eagle’s Eye

Critique of “Sound Stories” assignment

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Six

Introduction to Sound

VOCABULARY: Primary Elements of Sound

When producing your video, it will be important to consider how you will use sound to assist in telling your story. There are four primary forms of sound used in video production that are listed below.

Dialogue This term refers to people talking as in a scripted story (i.e., actors saying lines, interviews, etc.)

Ambient Sound These are the natural sounds encountered in different environments such as room tones (the sound of lights and electrical tools, street sounds, nature sounds, etc.)

Voice-over Narration This term refers to someone’s voice recorded over a series of images. The voice-over narration is most often scripted prior to camera production and recorded in post-production (during video editing.)

Sound Effects This term refers to the noises, street sounds, miscellaneous effects (i.e., dog bark, baby crying, sirens, wind, etc.) that are layered in postproduction to enrich the story being told.

Music This term refers to pre-recorded sound elements also referred to as songs, beats, instrumental tracks, etc., that may be used to enhance the emotional quality of your video. To use music within your video, you must obtain copyright privileges first.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 99


Unit Six

Introduction to Sound

ASSIGNMENT: Sound Stories Working with a partner, you will create a sound story using only your video camera and your imagination. Using a combination of sound types--dialogue, sound effects, music, narration, and ambient noise--you and your partner will construct a short story of your own choosing. For the purpose of this exercise, you are required to keep your story below three minutes in length and you must use at least fifteen different sound elements. Before you check out a video camera, it is important that you thoughtfully plan your story. Use the guidelines below to assist you with your planning.

page 100

Sound Content

Type

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Six

Introduction to Sound

ASSIGNMENT: Sound Stories (continued)

Sound Content

Type

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

__________________________________________________________

_________________

Name:

__________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

100

Points Earned:

___

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 101


Unit Six

Introduction to Sound

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: Classroom Equipment Checkout Form

This form will help organize the flow of video equipment when students are performing in-class assignments. You may modify this list as needed for the purpose of your course.

Date:

___________________________________

Equipment Supervisor:

___________________________________

Total Number of Cameras Available for Class:

___________________________________

Equipment Number

page 102

Name of Person Responsible

Returned?

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Six

Introduction to Sound

Rubric: Sound Stories The following rubric can be used to grade student performance. Students may each receive up to 150 points for the collaborative assignment.

Student Name:

___________________________________________________________________________

Demonstrated Skill

Criteria

Possible Points

Points Earned

Accurate completion • Uses vocabulary accurately when of the worksheet completing the worksheet • Demonstrates knowledge of relationships between different types of sound • Effectively describes how sounds will be sequenced to tell a story

25

Creativity

• Sequences sound elements in a pattern that “tells a story.” The story does not have to be narrative but should evoke emotion • Uses a variety of sound elements to convey the story • Uses elements that are sequenced or patterned to effectively deliver the story

50

Technical

• • • •

50

Teamwork

• Worked with one or more partners to successfully complete exercises • Demonstrated willingness to support and assist others

Clean and audible sound No glitches or unwanted sound bytes No extended patches of unwanted silence Final video follows the outline established in the worksheet

25

Total Points Earned

Possible Points: 150

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 103


Unit Six

Introduction to Sound

GRADING SUMMARY Assignment: Sound Stories

150 points

Participation

50 points

Responded verbally to video works Asked questions about the course Listened attentively Responded knowledgeably when asked a question Attendance

50 points Total Possible Points for This Unit

page 104

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

250 Points


Unit Six

Introduction to Sound

NOTES & OBSERVATIONS Use this space to write additional notes, things to remember, and to recommend changes to implement in the future as you repeat this lesson. Remember: every classroom is unique, and every student is individual. Following the precise order of instruction is far less important than achieving the lesson’s intended goal. This is an opportunity to make this lesson your own.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 105


Kimberly Faith Crowell / Digital Artist & Mentor My name is Kimberly Crowell but you can call me Kim for short. I’m sixteen years old and I go to the Four Directions Charter School. I’m in the 11th grade but I plan to graduate summer 2006. I’ve lived on the south side of Minneapolis since I was a child. I live with my mom and two of my sisters -- I have five sisters and three brothers total. I’ve been through a lot. Before I was five years old, one of my sisters and one of my brothers was taken by their dad, and I haven’t seen them since. Before I turned seven, my mom’s boyfriend got shot and died in front of me. Before I turned eleven, my grandma was sent to a nursing home. Before I turned fourteen, I got shot in my left knee by a so-called friend. Earlier this year, my great-grandfather died of cancer. I guess you could say - life is tough - but there are positive things happening too. I’m a digital photographer and a peer mentor. I’ve been working as an artist since the fall of 2003 and I can see that I’m getting better. I made a video last year and am proud to say it has been seen by many. It was even screened at the Walker Art Center, a major art museum. It was a big deal. I plan to continue taking pictures. My dreams take me to being a famous photographer that will bring me side by side with the “celebs.” I am also interested in nursing. Who knows? Either way, there is a lot to look forward to.

page 106

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Seven

The Art of The Interview

LESSON PLAN

Purpose This lesson will introduce students to standard interviewing techniques while building their skills in the use of microphones.

Goal The student will know how to conduct an interview with high quality production and sound.

Objectives The student will • Know how to use a variety of microphones in diverse interview settings, • Understand how the quality of the production and camera techniques affect an interview, • Understand the different interview techniques and styles, and • Demonstrate imaginative and critical thinking skills.

Estimated Length of Session The instructor should plan four hours or four class sessions for this lesson. If this is your first time presenting information or you are incorporating peer mentors in the process, you should extend the lesson by one additional class session.

Handouts The following handouts are recommended: • “Technical Overview: An Introduction to Microphones”

• • • •

“Technical Overview: Interviewing Techniques” “Technical Overview: Interviewing Styles” “Assignment: The Mock Interview” “Classroom Tool: Classroom Equipment Checkout Form”

Equipment The following equipment is recommended: • A computer set up to present a PowerPoint lecture • A television monitor or video projector • A set of RCA cables (for connecting the computer and monitor) • Video cameras and tapes for student use (one camera for every two students) • Extension cords and/or multistrips as needed

Viewing Material The following media may be used to compliment a live demonstration or lecture: • PowerPoint presentation: “Sound Elements, Microphones, and the Art of Interviewing”

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 107


Unit Seven

The Art of The Interview

LESSON PLAN (continued)

Preparation Assign a peer mentor to prepare equipment, charge batteries and set up a computer with the PowerPoint presentation and a video monitor or projector. Video cameras should be prepared with batteries charged and a class checkout system in place. This requires approximately one hour for set up and testing. The instructor should oversee the duplication of handouts and assignments.

Role of Peer Mentor If you have experienced peer mentors in your group, encourage them to present the PowerPoint lecture. Peer mentors should fully participate in discussions and, at this stage, should be able to present the live demonstration. As peer mentors progress, they will be more confident and able to take on more responsibility for instruction. They should also assist students with completing assignments and participate in the critique process.

Process The following steps should be taken when introducing students to the art of producing a quality interview: • Show a partial PowerPoint presentation on “Sound Elements, Microphones, and the Art of Interviewing” and hold a discussion on “Microphones & Interviewing Techniques” • View sample video interviews and hold a discussion regarding production and sound quality, camera technique, and content • Demonstrate the use of various microphones, how they work, and how to handle them during the interview process • Give the assignment, “The Mock Interview”, and

• Hold a critique session on “The Mock Interview” assignment

Assessments The following assessment strategies are recommended for this lesson: • Informal observation of student participation, particularly during the critique session • A critique of “The Mock Interview” assignment

page 108

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Seven

The Art of The Interview

TECHNICAL OVERVIEW: An Introduction to Microphones

Unidirectional Microphone The unidirectional microphone picks up sound within a narrow channel. In order to do this, the microphone must be directly pointed towards the subject matter and should be used within a standard range of three to six feet. This type of microphone is inexpensive and serves as a good starter microphone. The unidirectional microphone is handheld and is most often used in live performance, talk shows, and live news reporting. The general cost for this microphone is $40-$50.

Omnidirectional Microphone The omnidirectional microphone picks up sound within a wide range (multiple directions). This allows for greater versatility within an interview, because the microphone will pick up multiple people talking without being moved. These microphones still work best within a standard range of three to six feet. Generally, these microphones cost between $40-$150.

Lavaliere Microphone The lavaliere microphone is ideal for interviews that feature one speaker. The audio quality is excellent because the microphone is small and clips onto the subject matter within a very close range to the sound source (for example, it is attached to a collar or lapel with the microphone pointing towards the speaker’s mouth.) Though you can purchase a lavaliere microphone for about $50, we recommend investing in a higher quality lavaliere, which will approximately cost $250. Professional lavaliere microphones can go into the thousands of dollars, especially if they are wireless.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 109


Unit Seven

The Art of The Interview

TECHNICAL OVERVIEW: An Introduction to Microphones (continued)

Shotgun Microphone The shotgun microphone is a professional-level tool for collecting high-quality (low static) sound. The audio range is slightly larger than a standard microphone--from six to ten feet--and the microphone can be attached to a boom pole for an even longer extension. These microphones run on one “AA” battery. The price of a shotgun microphone starts at about $250.

Boom Pole The boom pole acts as an extension for shotgun and other microphones so quality sound may be recorded without the microphone or the sound operator being photographed. Typically, this tool is used for narrative productions or scenes that require a set in which cameras and sound equipment are invisible. Boom pole pricing typically starts at about $100.

Shock Mount The shock mount is an appliance that attaches to the boom pole. It holds the microphone securely in place with elastic bands; this allows for flexible positioning of the microphone. The cost of a shock mount typically starts at $75.

Microphone Cables Most microphones require the use of a detachable XLR (three-pin audio) sound cable. Most consumer level cameras accept a mini-connector, but higher-end cameras may require a secondary XLR connection. Check your camera manual and microphone before purchasing your first microphone cable.

page 110

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Seven

The Art of The Interview

TECHNICAL OVERVIEW: Interviewing Techniques

First and foremost, always LISTEN to what people have to say so you can pick up on particular points that the person makes. By keeping your ears open, you may be able to find some fascinating information about which you can ask follow-up questions. Remember to speak clearly (enunciate), and vary the tone of your voice and the speed of your speech to suit the conversation. Keep the interview visually interesting; before or after the interview, get some insert and cutaway shots of the environment, the person’s hands, any buttons or pins a person is wearing, etc. These shots can be edited in or cut later as appropriate. Zoom in slowly and tastefully on important visuals, which may provide emphasis.

The Interviewee The word “interviewee” may sound strange when you first hear it or say it, but it is often used in reference to the person being interviewed. The interviewee often exhibits different qualities—some people are easy to interview, while others are more difficult. Listed below are some helpful suggestions to help prepare you for different types of interviews:

The Unresponsive Interviewee

Don’t ask the person closed-ended questions (ones that can be answered with a simple “yes” or “no”) unless you have a follow-up question prepared for a “yes” or “no” response. Ask open-ended questions that people can expand upon, i.e., “Tell me about--” or “What do you think about--”. Avoid questions that begin with phrases like “Do you think that--” or “Are you--”; they don’t seem like closed-ended questions, but they will get you little more than a “yes” or “no” answer. Your goal is to get the interviewee to talk to you as much as possible. If you don’t get many or any answers to your questions, cut the interview short and thank the person for his or her time.

The Talker

These types of interviews can be difficult to guide. Keep in mind what kind of information you’re trying to gain from the interview. If the interviewee strays off the topic of conversation, courteously but firmly get the person on the right track--don’t be afraid to redirect the conversation if the person begins talking about things unrelated to the interview. Remember: it’s your interview. Sometimes people need some warm-up time to get into a conversational mode, so don’t cut them off immediately if they don’t quickly come to the point. To indicate at the start that this is a serious interview and not just a taped conversation, try to hint at a time limit by saying something like, “We need a brief, concise statement about the issue.”

The Friendly Interviewee

This type of person may be friendly but has nothing to say that you want or need to hear. Again, keep the person to the subject about which you’re trying to find more information. If s/he can’t provide you with any relevant insights, politely discontinue the interview.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page

111


Unit Seven

The Art of The Interview

TECHNICAL OVERVIEW: Interviewing Techniques

(continued)

The Hostile Interviewee

First of all, you don’t want to give this person any ammunition with which to attack you-don’t ask condescending questions that hint at your own attitude towards this grumpy guy or gal, because you won’t get any or much information if you deliberately anger, bait, frighten or intimidate the person. Keep in mind that there are some people who are hostile to everyone, so it may not be you. Do the best you can with this type of interviewee--courtesy and tact will help you get some information from him or her.

Production Values Ensuring a high quality production is important because it adds credibility to the person being interviewed. When preparing for an interview, always pay attention to the following factors.

Background

The environment in which you place the interviewee will be as important as the story s/he has to tell. Choose your background carefully; it should be a means to accentuate the message of your story.

Lighting

Proper lighting is essential. If the site you choose to videotape is not well lit, your interviewee may be shadowed or over-lit (which will wash out his/her complexion). If there is not enough light for your interview, you may wish to bring a portable light with you. Professional lights are fairly expensive, but you can purchase inexpensive halogen lights that are portable and safe. If you point the light towards a white wall or ceiling, it will illuminate the room enough

for your shoot.

Sound

Whenever possible, use an external microphone to record your interview. Too often there is outside noise (fans, air conditioners, children playing, etc.) that will interfere with the qual- ity of sound. It is almost impossible to repair poor sound quality. Listen to the background noise; if it interferes with the sound quality, move your interview to eliminate the noise. It will help if you use headphones--they will indicate whether or not your external microphone is working properly.

page 112

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Seven

The Art of The Interview

TECHNICAL OVERVIEW: Interviewing Styles

There are several ways to conduct an interview. Make sure you choose a style that compliments the story you are telling. Below are listed some standard interviewing styles and tips to conduct them.

Formal Imagine yourself as a famous newscaster interviewing a past president or famous movie star. This type of interview will often be photographed in a way in which the camera is set in a stationary position, the lighting is strong and even, and the background relates to the story being told.

News Report This style puts the interviewer in front of the camera. This format is less formal and is typically used to record live events.

Walking The walking interview places the camera in the work or life of the interviewee. This method is exciting, though it is sometimes challenging for the camera person. The camera operator must work very hard to hold the camera steady and keep the setting well-composed. Focus can also be difficult to maintain. It sometimes helps to walk through this type of interview before starting so there are no surprises and nothing to trip over.

On the Fly This style of interview is impromptu and often requires a lot of improvisation on the part of the camera person and interviewer. If the interviewer is comfortable with the subject matter and always watching, this style can work, but it is a challenge to do well, considering you must take the environment, interviewees, etc., as they are at the moment. You may end up discarding many of these types of interviews when editing, so be prepared to conduct many interviews in this style.

Confessional This style has become very popular with the onset of reality TV. In this type of interview, the subject has the opportunity to speak freely about a topic. The interviewer or director may set up this shot so that the interviewee is able to speak without anyone else present (thus the term “confessional”) or with assistance from a camera person. These types of interviews are designed to provoke the expression of intimate details and create a sense of secrecy with the audience.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 113


Unit Seven

The Art of The Interview

ASSIGNMENT: The Mock Interview

This assignment will help you develop your skills as an interviewer. Working in pairs, each of you will conduct an interview and be interviewed. The goal of each interview is to create a short piece (three minutes or less) that is interesting, provides some insightful information, and exhibits some level of emotional value. You will use every skill you have learned to this point to achieve this goal. Because you are interviewing your partner, you will need to spend time discussing his/her interests in order to craft the most interesting story possible. Good luck--this is a difficult exercise in art making. Answer the questions below to prepare for each interview.

Interview #1 Name of Interviewee: Location of the interview:

__________________________________

Interview style:

__________________________________

Equipment required:

__________________________________

__________________________________

__________________________________

Describe what information or insight you hope to gain from this interview. _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

List the questions you will ask the interviewee. Remember, questions should be open-ended to allow the interviewee to elaborate on the topic. _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

page 114

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Seven

The Art of The Interview

ASSIGNMENT: The Mock Interview (continued)

Answer the questions below to prepare for each interview.

Interview #2

Name of Interviewee: Location of the interview:

__________________________________

Interview style:

__________________________________

Equipment required:

__________________________________

__________________________________

__________________________________

Describe what information or insight you hope to gain from this interview. _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

List the questions you will ask the interviewee. Remember, questions should be open-ended to allow the interviewee to elaborate on the topic. _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

Name: ___________________________________________ Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

150

Points Earned:

___

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 115


Unit Seven

The Art of The Interview

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: Classroom Equipment Checkout Form

This form will help organize the flow of video equipment when students are performing in-class assignments. You may modify this list as needed for the purpose of your course.

Date:

___________________________________

Equipment Supervisor:

___________________________________

Total Number of Cameras Available for Class:

___________________________________

Equipment Number

page 116

Name of Person Responsible

Returned?

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Seven

The Art of The Interview

Rubric: Mock Interviews The following rubric can be used to grade student performance. Students may each receive up to 150 points for the collaborative assignment.

Student Name:

___________________________________________________________________________

Demonstrated Skill

Criteria

Possible Points

Points Earned

Accurate completion • Uses vocabulary accurately when of the worksheet completing the worksheet • Effectively describes how the style of interview chosen is consistent for the topic and/or person to be interviewed • Prepares questions that encourage the interviewee to answer with specific insight to the topic

50

Creativity

• Uses camera angles, movement, and compositions to accentuate important points within the interview • Interesting and insightful interview content

25

Technical

• Clean and audible sound • Image is steady, well lit, and composed according to the content needs of the video • Final video follows the outline established in the worksheet

50

Teamwork

• Worked with one or more partners to successfully complete exercises • Demonstrated willingness to support and assist others

25

Total Points Earned

Possible Points: 150

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 117


Unit Seven

The Art of The Interview

GRADING SUMMARY Assignment: Mock Interviews

150 points

Participation

30 points

Grouped willingly with a partner Listened attentively Responded knowledgeably when asked a question Attendance

20 points Total Possible Points for This Unit

page 118

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

200 Points


Unit Seven

The Art of The Interview

NOTES & OBSERVATIONS Use this space to write additional notes, things to remember, and to recommend changes to implement in the future as you repeat this lesson. Remember: every classroom is unique, and every student is individual. Following the precise order of instruction is far less important than achieving the lesson’s intended goal. This is an opportunity to make this lesson your own.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 119


Three Years of Training as a Media Artist

My experience with the Peer Mentor program was one of the greatest opportunities that I have encountered yet. The program allowed me to sharpen the skills I already had in media arts, which included video and photo production. I now have three years of experience in both subjects. I had my ups and downs in the program, like days when I just wanted to quit and thought I couldn’t handle it, but there were also many days when I just loved teaching. Being in the classroom is really fun and unpredictable--there’s no other feeling like it in the world. I think that participating in the program has really helped me shape my future and what I want to be. The program helped to build my self-esteem, gave me loads of self-confidence, and helped me to loosen up and just have fun teaching and learning.

page 120

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

LESSON PLAN

Purpose This lesson will introduce students to the process of idea development and brainstorming.

Goal The student will know how to develop and communicate a basic concept for a video, brainstorm content, break down a description through scriptwriting and storyboards.

Objectives The student will • Draft a treatment, • Practice brainstorming visual and audio content, • Brainstorm locations, props, and other production needs, • Draft a script and storyboard, • Identify and secure other team members to help with production needs, and • Pitch the idea for feedback.

Estimated Length of Session The instructor should plan five hours or class sessions for this lesson. If this is your first time presenting information or you are incorporating peer mentors in the process, you should extend the lesson by two additional class sessions. Handouts The following handouts are recommended:

• • • • • • • • •

“Overview: Production Planning” “Vocabulary: Production Planning Terms” “Assignment: Public Service Announcement” “Assignment: Treatment” “Assignment: Brainstorming Worksheet” “Assignment: Scriptwriting” “Assignment: Storyboards” “Assignment: Identifying Your Production Crew & Talent” “Student Presentations: The Pitch”

Equipment The following equipment is recommended: • A computer prepared for presenting a power point lecture • A television monitor or video projector • A set of RCA cables (for connection between computer and monitor) • Video cameras and tapes for student use (one camera for every two students) • Extension cords and/or multistrips as needed.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 121


Unit Eight LESSON PLAN

Turning Ideas Into Action

(continued)

Viewing Material The following media may be used to compliment a live demonstration or lecture: • PowerPoint presentation: “Project Planning Overview”

Preparation A peer mentor should be assigned to setting up a computer with the power point presentation and a video monitor or project. This requires approximately fifteen minutes for set up and testing. The instructor should oversee the duplication of handouts.

Role of Peer Mentors If you have experienced peer mentors in your group, encourage them to present the PowerPoint lecture. Peer mentors should fully participate in discussions and at this stage should be able to lead assignment activities with fellow students. Peer mentors should be actively involved in group critiques and discussions throughout this unit.

Process The following steps should be taken when introducing students to the process of idea development: • Present the overview • Give the PowerPoint presentation and hold a discussion about production planning • Present the production planning terms • Present the assignment, “Producing A Public Service Announcement” • Assign the PSA project summary • Assign the treatment exercise

• • • •

Complete the brainstorming exercise Assign the scriptwriting exercise Assign the storyboards exercise Hold small group presentations and critiques about “The Pitch”

Assessments The following assessment strategies are recommended for this lesson: • Informal observation of student participation, particularly during the critique session • Formal critique of group process (see attached rubric) • Assessment of written assignments • Formal assessment of pitch (see attached rubric)

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

OVERVIEW

Steps to Production Planning

What is Production Planning? Making a video requires that you put your thoughts and ideas--everything that you want your final video to look and sound like--into some form of a planning guide. By organizing your thoughts in writing, you will be able to work efficiently, communicate your ideas to others, and stay on track.

Do You Have to Plan Your Video? When beginning any type of an arts project, it is important to plan well. Professional filmmakers always plan carefully before starting their video or film recording. They do this for two reasons. First, media production is expensive. Secondly, professionals want to make sure that they have control over how their story is told. If you do not take the time to plan before beginning your video taping, you will find that your project will take several days longer to complete.

How Do You Begin Planning a Production? It’s always best to start with a specific topic. If you know what your video is going to be about, you are halfway there. If you’re not sure what type of story you wish to tell, begin by brainstorming. Write down a list of topics that interest you. Once you decide on your topic, it’s time to brainstorm images, words, props, etc. Before you know it, you will be on writing a script, setting up interviews, and drafting your first storyboard. The planning process is hard, especially for those who have never made a video before. Just remember to be patient, trust in the process, and know that it will save you time in the end.

First Steps of Planning: We have included a guide to help you begin the planning process. The guide will take you through the following steps:

• Project Summary

• Treatment

• Brainstorming

• Scripts & Storyboards

• Pitching Your Idea

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

VOCABULARY: Common Terms To Know

Artistic Intent Artistic intent is identified by the values, knowledge, and opinions the videomaker consciously brings to his or her work. The artistic intent can heavily shape the content and perspective of the video work.

Public Service Announcement (PSA) A PSA is a short film or video recording presented that attempts to persuade the audience to take some specific action or adopt a favorable view towards some service, institution, issue, or cause.

Script A script is a written, detailed description of a video that describes both audio and image elements in the sequence they will occur. It is common to arrange the page in columns with all the information relevant to the pictures on the left-hand side (such as camera directions, actions, stage directions) and all information relevant to the sound on the right (such as dialogue, music cues, and natural sounds).

Storyboard The storyboard is the collected series of single pictures, each of which represents a single frame of each shot within a video tape sequence. Emphasis is placed on visual composition, camera angle, camera location, and type of shot (long shot, mid-shot, extreme close-up, close-up). Other factors that need to be included are sound, shot length and types of movement within the frame. Audio and video should be chosen and ordered in such a way as to make a statement that others can understand. In turn, this will determine how and what you want to shoot.

Subject Matter The subject matter refers to your video’s topic. Usually, your subject matter will be a specific person, place or thing.

Target Audience The target audience refers to the people to whom the video maker intends to communicate information. The video should use language and imagery that the targeted audience can readily understand and to which they will respond.

Treatment A treatment is a brief (one page or less) description of your proposed video. The description is concise and to the point, and provides information about the following as it relates to your video.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

ASSIGNMENT: PSA--Project Summary

You are about to work in a group setting to produce a sixty-second video about an important social issue of your choosing. Remember that public service announcements are designed to persuade an audience to take action. The format is designed specifically to be short and to the point. Remember to use sound and image to get your audience’s attention. Also, select a partner with whom you have a good rapport with and who will take responsibility for completing his or her portion of each assignment. Each assignment you complete will prepare you for planning a final video you will produced during the second portion of this class. Be creative and playful. Use you imagination, but back it up with the skills you have learned to date.

Project Title Give your PSA a working title. The title may change later, but if you can come up with something to call your video, it will help you stay focused. ____________________________________________________

Project Members Most video projects require a team of people to help with production. This may include actors, people to help with equipment, props, editing, etc. Don’t be afraid to ask for assistance. List below the members of your production team. ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________

Topic With a word or two, describe what your PSA is about. Example include family, teen hangouts, street violence, etc. ____________________________________________________

Film Style Most videos can be categorized within a genre or film style, like documentary, music video, narrative, comedy, etc. Describe below what style(s) you will use in producing your PSA. ____________________________________________________

Possible Points:

25

Points Earned:

___

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

ASSIGNMENT: PSA--Treatment

A treatment effectively communicates in clear, precise language the purpose of your PSA. The treatment also answers basic questions about the what’s, when’s, who’s, where’s and why’s of your video. To complete your treatment, please answer the following questions in three paragraphs or less. 1. What is the storyline or message of your PSA? 2. Who is your audience? Be specific here. 3. Why is it important for you to make this PSA? 4. Where will your video production take place? In other words where will you be shooting? 5. When do you plan to start shooting your video?

___________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________

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Name:

__________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

25

Through the Eagle’s Eye

Points Earned:

___

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

ASSIGNMENT: PSA--Brainstorming

Brainstorming ideas is an extremely productive means for getting your creative juices flowing. For this project, you are required to brainstorm in two areas--the first includes the technical and aesthetic aspects of your piece, and the second includes the locations, props, actors and other related materials.

#1) Content: Draft a list of images, sounds, music, and possible themes and storylines for your PSA. _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

#2) Environment Draft a complete list of locations, props, wardrobe, actors, and other related material that may be important to your PSA. _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

25

Points Earned:

___

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

ASSIGNMENT: PSA--Scriptwriting

No matter what type of video you make, a script is a useful tool for organizing your ideas. Remember that a script describes in detail what your video will look and sound like from beginning to end. It includes dialogue, narration, use of special effects, and your plot line. Even if you are taking a documentary or experimental approach (for which your content may ultimately vary), it is still important that you plan what you believe your PSA will look and sound like.

(continue on next page) page 128

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

ASSIGNMENT: PSA--Scriptwriting

(continued)

Staple this sheet to the front page and turn into the instructor for grading.

Name:

__________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

25

Points Earned:

___ Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

ASSIGNMENT: PSA--Storyboards

A storyboard is a visual set of instructions that show the compositions and movements you wish to portray in your video. This is a common communication tool used in feature length films and videos. Your storyboard should look similar to a comic strip. If this is your first video, make sure you take additional time to break each scene down into numerous shots. Vary your compositions and movements to add meaning and to make the editing process easier. Below is a sample set of storyboards for your use.

page 130

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

ASSIGNMENT: PSA--Storyboards

(continued)

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________ Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

ASSIGNMENT: PSA--Storyboards

page 132

(continued)

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

50

Through the Eagle’s Eye

Points Earned:

___

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

ASSIGNMENT: Identifying Your Production Crew and Talent

Most video productions require support from others. Below is a list of different positions you may require for your project. Please compete it to the best of your ability. Don’t be afraid to ask classmates or peer mentors to assume one or more roles. If needed, each person may assume up to two roles.

Producer The producer is the coordinator of the video shoot, making sure that crew and talent show up at the right time in the right place with appropriate materials and equipment for their roles. The producer keeps production logs and records the quality of each recorded shot. On large-scale productions, the producer will often supervise sets, manage budgets, and negotiate contractual agreements.

Name: ______________________________________________________________

Director The director leads the creative production of the video shoot. S/he works directly with the camera operator to draft the storyboard, manage the visual content during production, and conduct interviews. The director leads the crew through each shot and requests additional shots as necessary.

Name: ______________________________________________________________

Script Supervisor The script supervisor ensures that all elements of the script are being followed. For small productions, the script supervisor may also be given the duty of locating and coordinating props and wardrobe.

Name: ______________________________________________________________

Cinematographer The camera operator is responsible for all aspects of technical production, ensuring that camera batteries are always charged and that the video camera and tripod are always ready for the shoot. The camera operator also sets up and composes shots as outlined in the shooting script and storyboard.

Name: ______________________________________________________________

Sound Operator This person is in charge of collecting all the sound elements needed for the video. S/he is in charge of the microphones selected for the project and makes decisions as to what microphone should be used in each shooting situation. The sound operator is responsible for ensuring quality sound production during each shoot, making sure that outside noises are kept to a minimum.

Name: ______________________________________________________________

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

ASSIGNMENT: Identifying Your Production Crew & Talent

Talent # 1 Character’s Name: ___________________________________________________________ Role of Character: ____________________________________________________________ Actor Assigned the Role of Talent #1:____________________________________________

Talent # 2 Character’s Name: ___________________________________________________________ Role of Character: ____________________________________________________________ Actor Assigned the Role of Talent #2:____________________________________________

Talent # 3 Character’s Name: __________________________________________________________ Role of Character: ____________________________________________________________ Actor Assigned the Role of Talent #3:____________________________________________

Talent # 4 Character’s Name: ___________________________________________________________ Role of Character: ____________________________________________________________ Actor Assigned the Role of Talent #4:____________________________________________

page 134

Note: Add additional pages as needed.

Name:

__________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

25

Through the Eagle’s Eye

Points Earned:

___

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

(continued)


Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

PRESENTATION: PSA--The Pitch

You are about to present your public service announcement to your fellow classmates. You will work as a team to present your idea and give the group a clear and concise idea of the purpose and vision behind your proposed project. Be prepared to answer questions from your audience. Enthusiasm and knowledge are critical to this exercise. Review your past assignments and prepare the information listed below. Remember that you are a team and that the quality of your team’s performance will rate highly in this exercise. You will have five minutes to present your ideas and ten minutes to receive feedback from the group.

1.

Introduce yourselves.

2.

Present the title and primary message of your PSA.

3.

Describe your target audience.

4.

Explain how you will convey your message to the target audience.

5.

Explain how you will use your creative and technical abilities to convince your audience to take action.

6.

Describe the help you will need from others to begin production (i.e., props, production crew, acting talent, etc.)

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

RUBRIC: PSA--Planning Packet

Peer mentors or the instructor(s) may use this rubric as a guide for evaluating students ability to successfully develop and communicate a basic concept for a video, brainstorm content, break a description down through scriptwriting and storyboards. Name: ________________________________________________ Name: ________________________________________________ Demonstrated Skill

Comments

Possible Points

Points Earned

Project Summary • Identifies topic that fits the definition of a PSA • Identifies team members • Identifies a filmic style to be used that furthers the message of the PSA

25

Treatment • Answers questions in writing as they relate to the proposed message • Communicates an understanding of brevity and conciseness

25

Brainstorming • Lists a minimum of ten images that accentuate the message of the proposed PSA • Lists a minimum of ten props, wardrobe items, settings etc., that enhance the message of the proposed video

25

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

RUBRIC: PSA--Planning Packet

Demonstrated Skill

(continued)

Comments

Possible Points

Points Earned

Script • Clearly communicates the content, sequence, and “look” of the proposed PSA • Provides clear direction on character development and dialogue

25

Storyboard • Visually depicts the compositions, movements and angles that will deliver the message of the PSA

50

Identifying Crew & Talent • Has identified ALL key roles required to produce video • Those identified have agreed to participate in the production • Those identified have at least minimum skill in their assigned role

25

Total Points Earned

Possible Points: 175

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

RUBRIC: PSA--Formal Observation of Teamwork

Peer mentors or the instructor(s) may use this rubric as a guide for grading teamwork and productivity. Points have been identified in order to emphasize the importance of collaboration and problem solving to students. Use the rubric below to help you grade this element of the process. Contribution of Ideas Did each partner contribute to the planning process? How? Distribution of Workload Who completed the assignments? How was delegation of tasks determined? Creativity How did the partners exchange ideas? Did both contribute to the creative brainstorming process? Did they incorporate technical and creative skills learned prior to this nit? Positive Critique Did each partner show a willingness to either challenge their partner or build upon an idea presented that was not his or her own? Did s/he do so in a manner that helped to improve the proposed idea? Were partners supportive of one another? Troubleshooting Did the group ever get stalled? If so, how did they work together to move forward? Were they able to problem solve the situation together?

Name: ________________________________________________ Name: ________________________________________________ Demonstrated Skill

Comments

Possible Points

Points Earned

Contribution of ideas

10

Distribution of workload

10

Creativity

10

Positive Critique

10

Troubleshooting

10 Total Points Earned

Possible Points: 50

page 138

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

RUBRIC: PSA--Formal Observation of The Pitch

Peer mentors or the instructor(s) may use this rubric as a guide for grading the quality of this assignment.

Content Did you understand the idea being presented? Were the basic elements of a treatment presented (purpose, target audience, etc.)? Did the presenters seem knowledgeable about their subject matter?

Delivery Was the presentation clear and easy to understand? Were the presenters convincing in explaining how they would persuade their audience to “take action?” Was the presentation interesting and engaging? Did both partners participate in the presentation?

Practicality Were you convinced that the PSA can be produced? Was the concept presented something that can be easily photographed or acted within the team’s given resources? Did they present how they would deliver their message within the time frame of a sixty-second format?

Input Management How did the team handle questions and comments from fellow students and the instructor? Did they argue? Did they shut down? Did they participate in a dialogue? Did either partner take notes?

Name: ________________________________________________ Name: ________________________________________________

Demonstrated Skill

Comments

Possible Points

Points Earned

Content

25

Delivery

25

Practicality

25

Input Management

25 Total Points Earned

Possible Points: 100

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

GRADING SUMMARY Assignment: Project Summary

25 points

Assignment: Treatment

50 points

Assignment: Brainstorming

25 points

Assignment: Scriptwriting

75 points

Assignment: Storyboarding

75 points

Assignment: Identifying Crew and Talent

50 points

Formal Observation: Teamwork

50 points

Presentation: The Pitch

100 points

Participation

50 points

Asked questions about the unit Listened attentively Responded knowledgeably when asked a question Attendance

100 points Total Possible Points for This Unit

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

600 Points

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eight

Turning Ideas Into Action

NOTES & OBSERVATIONS Use this space to write additional notes, things to remember, and to recommend changes to implement in the future as you repeat this lesson. Remember: every classroom is unique, and every student is individual. Following the precise order of instruction is far less important than achieving the lesson’s intended goal. This is an opportunity to make this lesson your own.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 141


Israel Mills / Video, Music Artist & Mentor My name is Israel Mills. My family is from South Dakota, and I am Lakota. My grandfather on my dad’s side of the family lived on Pine Ridge and spoke the language of our tribe. My dad mostly grew up in Pine Ridge, and then he came here in his adulthood. My mother is from Pine Ridge and moved to Minnesota as an adult, too. I take care of my twin nephews after school. I have four sisters and one brother. I am one of the middle kids in my family. I went to Heart of the Earth for a long time and then came to Four Directions Charter School. I have been here since last year, and I seem to like it because I show up at school. I joined the Peer Mentor class because it takes up time--the class ends an hour later than all the other classes. Another media class I like a lot is the music class at Four Directions. It’s cool because I get to listen to many different beats. Hopefully, I will get to make my own beats because I’m not all about the lyrics. Here’s some lyrics I wrote that I do like:

Being quiet means I’m listening And I’m listening most of the time But when I’m not listening I still hear things: I hear all the lies.

I don’t believe ‘em ‘cause I see through them with my eyes.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Nine

Production In Action

LESSON PLAN

Purpose This lesson will provide students with guided practice in producing a video.

Goal The student will know how to work within a group to complete production on the PSA developed in Unit Eight. Objectives The student will work with a partner to • Revise and finalize scripts and storyboards; • Secure crew, locations, actors, and props; • Draft a script breakdown; • Coordinate production logistics; • Complete production; • Participate in a group critique; and • Re-shoot as needed.

Estimated Length of Session The instructor should plan ten to fifteen hours or class sessions for this lesson. If this is your first time presenting information or you are incorporating peer mentors in the process, you should extend the lesson by two additional class sessions.

Handouts The following handouts are recommended: • “Overview: Preparing for Production” • “Vocabulary: Three, Two, One--Action! Terms to Know” • “Assignment: Props List” • “Assignment: Equipment List” • “Assignment: Production Logistics” • “Assignment: Model Release Forms” • “Assignment: Production Logs” • “Student Presentations: Production Critiques”

Equipment The following equipment is recommended: • Video cameras with charged batteries or electric plug-ins • Tripods • A television monitor or video projector • A set of RCA cables (for connection between video camera and monitor) • Video tapes • Microphones, cables, and headphones • Extension cords and/or multistrips as needed

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Nine LESSON PLAN

Production In Action

(continued)

Viewing Material The following media may be used to compliment a live demonstration or lecture: • PowerPoint presentation: “Production In Action”

Preparation A peer mentor should be assigned to setting up a computer with the PowerPoint presentation and a video monitor or project. This requires approximately fifteen minutes for set-up and testing. Another mentor should coordinate production equipment check-outs. The instructor should oversee the duplication of handouts and assignments.

Role of Peer Mentors If you have experienced peer mentors in your group, encourage them to present the PowerPoint lecture. Peer mentors should fully participate in discussions and at this stage should be able to lead assignment activities with fellow students. Peer mentors should be actively involved in group critiques and discussions throughout this unit.

Process The following steps should be taken when introducing students to the art of producing a quality PSA: • Deliver the PowerPoint presentation “Production In Action” and hold a discussion • Present the vocabulary overview • Give a demonstration of narrative in action • Hold a discussion about pitch critiques • Revise and finalize scripts and storyboards

• • • • •

Assign the script breakdown Assign production logistics Assign equipment checklist Assign the PSA production logs Deliver student presentations of video footage critiques and discuss re-shooting if necessary

Assessments The following assessment strategies are recommended for this lesson: • Informal observation of student participation, particularly during critique sessions • Assessment of written assignments • Formal observation of review and critique (see attached rubric)

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Nine

Production In Action

OVERVIEW: Final Steps to Beginning Your Production

So You Think You’re Ready to Start Production? Stop, think about it, and get yourself and your team members organized. This is where most fatal errors occur. As a producer, you have gotten everybody together, the props are in place, the location is ready to go, but someone forgot to charge the battery on the video camera. What now? If you plan carefully and thoughtfully, you are likely to be successful at capturing the ideas you worked so hard to plan without major snags. Problems may still occur, but chances are you will be ready to trouble shoot. Below are listed a series of planning components with which you should be familiar.

Script Breakdown

In a script breakdown, you will take your script and storyboard and convert it into a list of directions for each camera set-up. Each scene detailed in your storyboard is placed in a list and broken down by location.

Logistics

Coordinating logistics (or technical details) is key to good planning. Especially when working with a team, having concrete communication will help to ensure that everything required to produce your PSA.

Model Release Form

Model release forms are a necessary precaution for all broadcast video productions. Anyone appearing on camera (except when documenting a public event) should sign a model release form; this gives the videomaker permission to use their pictures, voices, and/or likenesses in the completed video. The model release form ensures that any person being recorded is aware of the fact and permits the recorded footage to be shown publicly. The model release form helps to protect the videomaker against lawsuits related to invasion of privacy and misrepresentation.

Production Logs

Production logs are typically kept by either the script supervisor or producer. The logs record every shot taken during production. The recorder writes down the quality of sound, camera composition, movement, acting, and compliance to the written script breakdown. By taking thorough notes, you are more likely to capture your intended message without having to reshoot.

Review and Critique

Upon completion of production, it will be important to review footage with key members of the production team. This way, if additional shoots are needed, they can be coordinated before the team moves onto other production acclivities.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Nine

Production In Action

VOCABULARY: Three, Two, One--Action! The director of a video shoot is in charge of managing the crew. There are a common set of terms used in production that will help keep everyone focused and organized. Please review the following terms and use them when producing. Quiet On The Set This command tells the crew that it is time to begin videotaping and everyone’s full attention is needed. If the crew does not respond, the director will repeat this comment as loud as is necessary until s/he has full attention and quiet. Camera Ready The director uses this term to ask the cinematographer if s/he has the camera prepared and in place for the upcoming shot. If the camera is properly prepped, it will be powered “on” and will have a tape in it ready for recording. If the cinematographer is ready, s/he will respond back with the same term. Sound Ready The director uses this term to ask the sound operator if s/he has the microphones properly placed and can clearly identify sound through the headphones. Often, the cinematographer will be expected to comment if the microphone is visible within the camera frame. If the sound operator is ready, s/he will respond back with the same term. Talent Ready The director uses this term to ask if the actors are prepared to act out a scene. Actors will often have questions regarding where and how to move, what emotions they should present, etc. When the actors are ready, they will respond back with the same term. Camera Rolling Once it is clear that everyone on set is ready, the director will say, “Camera rolling.” The cinematographer then hits the record button and after three seconds responds with the same term. Three, two, one--ACTION! With the camera now recording, the director will very clearly say, “Three, two, one--action.” This is the cue to all production members on the set to be silent (outside of the talent.) The director and script supervisor MUST pay careful attention to all action, so they can determine whether or not the “take” (shot) can be used. Cut The director says “cut” when the shot is complete. This tells the crew that they can relax and speak amongst one another. Take 2 This indicates to the crew that the previous shot must be recorded again. The director repeats this process for each take until the shot is captured to the director’s satisfaction. It’s a Wrap Indicates that the entire production has been concluded and the crew can put away equipment and props and move on to the next scene or project. page 146

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Nine

Production In Action

DEMONSTRATION: Narrative Production In Action

This activity is intended to be led by peer mentors with comment and critique from students. The instructor will observe and guide the demonstration as needed. Below are the guidelines for the peer mentor demonstration. Peer mentors will create a short video using the digital video camera. The rules are as follows:

1. You must make your video using ten to fifteen video shots.

2. Your final video cannot be less than one minute nor more three minutes.

3. You will make your video using only live sound. This is an unedited exercise--if you make a mistake, you will have to do the exercise over.

4. You are to finish writing the following sentence:

“Terry walked into the room, sat down at the table, and began writing when . . . .” Students should determine the specific film style (i.e. drama, comedy, romance, horror, etc.) Using a dry erase or chalkboard, the mentors will. translate the completed sentence into ten to fifteen shots for a storyboard. They will describe the visuals using correct video vocabulary (i.e., close-up, panning, tilt, etc.) They will also describe the audio content for each shot (i.e., dialogue, sound effects, etc.) The mentor team will then set up their production, identify each mentor’s role, and demonstrate the production experience for the students. Students may provide feedback and suggestions as guided by the instructor.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Nine

Production In Action

ASSIGNMENT: Script Breakdown

After making script revisions based on critiques from Unit Eight, it is time to break your script down into specific shots. Use the following worksheet to assist you in this process. Be as detailed as possible.

Location:

________________________________________________________________

Shot #

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Shot Description

Camera Composition

Name:

__________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

75

Through the Eagle’s Eye

Points Earned:

___

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

Camera Movement

Sound (Yes/No)


Unit Nine

Production In Action

ASSIGNMENT: Production Logistics

Location #1:

________________________________________________

Call Time:

________________________________________________

Estimated Length of Shoot:

________________________________________________

Crew:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Talent:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Props & Wardrobe:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

________________________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

25

Points Earned:

___

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 149


Unit Nine

Production In Action

ASSIGNMENT: Equipment Checklist

Check off each item with a “yes” or “no” before you go on location to shoot your video. You may or may not need all of the items on the list, but you do not want to leave without having everything you need.

Treatment Script Storyboard Model release forms Props Video camera in case A/C power adaptor Tripod with clip Blank video tape Headphones External microphone with cable

page 150

Name:

__________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

25

Through the Eagle’s Eye

Points Earned:

___

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Nine

Production In Action

ASSIGNMENT: Model Release Form

I give my permission without restriction to _______________________________________________(name of video producer and school) to use my name, likeness, pictures, and/or voice in connection with the video production tentatively titled for broadcast, direct exhibition, and/or any other purpose the videomaker determines. This consent is granted with the understanding that the videomaker has sole discretion to cut and edit the video and/or voice recording as s/he sees fit for use in the above production. I specifically waive my rights of privacy or publicity and or any other rights I may have with respect to such use as my name, likeness, pictures, and/or voice. ____________________________________________ ____________________ Signed Date ____________________________________________ Street Address ____________________________________________ City and Zip Code

____________________________________________ Signature of Parent or Guardian (for those under the age of 18)

Name:

__________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

25

Points Earned:

___

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 151


Unit Nine

Production In Action

ASSIGNMENT: Production Logs

During the video shoot, the script supervisor should take notes regarding the quality of each “take.” Good production logs will make the editing process more efficient.

Location: _____________________________________________________________________ Scene: _______________________________________________________________________

Shot #

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

Take #

Camera Quality

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

Sound Quality

Acting


Unit Nine

Production In Action

ASSIGNMENT: Production Logs (continued)

Location: _____________________________________________________________________ Scene: _______________________________________________________________________

Shot #

Take #

Camera Quality

Sound Quality

Name:

__________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

50

Points Earned:

Acting

___

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 153


Unit Nine

Production In Action

PRESENTATION: Review & Critique

You are about to present five minutes of your best footage to your classmates. After showing your best takes, you will report to the group as to what you felt did and did not work. Your presentation should cover the following:

page 154

1.

Logistics

2.

Cinematography

3.

Sound quality

4.

Location

5.

Crew interaction

6.

How well your video footage matches your original “pitch”

7.

Plans for re-shooting

Name:

__________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

100

Through the Eagle’s Eye

Points Earned:

___

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Nine

Production In Action

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: The Overnight Checkout Form

Name: ___________________________________________ Telephone: ___________________________________________ Equipment Requested: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ What you will videotape? Be specific and ready to show your planning documents. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Date Needed: ___________________________________________

Date to be returned: _____________________________________

I promise to take good care of the equipment while it is in my possession. I will return it as requested, and I promise to keep it safe and protect it from theft. If something happens to the equipment while it is in my care, I will immediately report it.

__________________________________________ Student Signature

_____________________ Date

__________________________________________ Signature of Authorized Personnel

_____________________ Date

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Nine

Production In Action

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: Classroom Equipment Checkout Form

This form will help organize the flow of video equipment when students are performing in-class assignments. You may modify this list as needed for the purpose of your course.

Date:

___________________________________

Equipment Supervisor:

___________________________________

Total Number of Cameras Available for Class:

___________________________________

Equipment Number

Name of Person Responsible

Returned?

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 156


Unit Nine

Production In Action

RUBRIC: PSA--Production Tools Peer mentors or the instructor(s) may use this rubric as a guide for evaluating students ability to work within a group to complete production on the PSA developed in Unit Eight. Name: ________________________________________________ Name: ________________________________________________ Demonstrated Skill

Comments

Possible Points

Points Earned

Script Breakdown • Has a minimum of ten shot descriptions that match previous production materials • Matches description to dialogue and action using media arts vocabulary • Communicates clearly the photographic and sound needs to others (and is easy to understand)

75

Production Logistics • Answers questions in writing as they relate to the proposed production plan • Communicates clearly the specific production procedures that will take place

25

Equipment Checklist • Accurately completed • Used as a preparation tool for  production

25

Model Release Forms • Completed and signed by every person appearing in the video • Signed by parent or guardian for any person appearing under the age of 18

25

Production Logs • Accurately recorded all video shots taken during production • Contains references to quality of each take including performance, camera work, and sound

50

Total Points Earned Total Points Possible: 200

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 157


Unit Nine

Production In Action

RUBRIC: Review & Critique

Peer mentors or the instructor(s) may use this rubric as a guide for grading the quality of the review and critique sessions.

Content Did you understand the presentation? Did the team present a thorough and accurate description of how their production experience unfolded? Did they cover all key aspects of the production process of logistics, sound quality, location, crew, etc? Did the presenters seem knowledgeable about their subject matter?

Delivery Was the presentation clear and easy to understand? Was the presentation interesting and engaging? Did both partners participate in the presentation?

Practicality Were you convinced that the PSA production went the best it could under the circumstances presented? Did they make good use of their production time? Have they made plans for reshooting if necessary?

Input Management How did the team handle questions and comments from fellow students and the instructor? Did they argue? Did they shut down? Did they participate in a dialogue? Did either partner take notes? Name: ________________________________________________ Name: ________________________________________________

Demonstrated Skill

Comments

Possible Points

Points Earned

Content

25

Delivery

25

Practicality

25

Input Management

25 Total Points Earned

Possible Points: 100

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Nine

Production In Action

GRADING SUMMARY Assignment: Script Breakdown

75 points

Assignment: Production Logistics

25 points

Assignment: Equipment Checklist

25 points

Assignment: Model Release Form

25 points

Assignment: Production Logs

50 points

Presentation: Review & Critique

100 points

Participation

50 points

Asked questions about the unit Listened attentively Responded knowledgeably when asked a question Attendance

250 points Total Possible Points for This Unit

600 Points

NOTES & OBSERVATIONS Use this space to write additional notes, things to remember, and to recommend changes to implement in the future as you repeat this lesson. Remember: every classroom is unique, and every student is individual. Following the precise order of instruction is far less important than achieving the lesson’s intended goal. This is an opportunity to make this lesson your own.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 159


Jeanné Peirce / Digital Artist & Mentor My name is Jeanné. I’m nineteen years old and recent graduate of Four Directions Charter School. I’ve been attending school here for the past four years. I’m now preparing to go to college. I have a good grandma and a big brother--my brother’s name is Justin and he is twenty-three years old. I have good friends, too. I’m a good person, but I can also be a tough little girl sometimes. I’ve made a lot of videos and have created a lot of photo while I was a student here. My first video was about the Ojibwe language, but most of my other videos have been about my family. One video I made was about my family that is spread out throughout the United States. In my video I was able to bring all of my family together, something that is hard to do in real life. By making videos, I am able to bring my family together by videotaping their images and voices, telling all their stories. I was a peer mentor for two years. My job was to teach students how to prepare their planning packets so their videos turn out the way they want. I never realized how shy I was until I had to speak in front of other people. I know it’s good to do, but I don’t like it very much. What I do like is helping people edit their videos. I’ve made a lot of videos, and I am very good at editing. I know how to import footage, edit my clips, make titles--pretty much everything. I also think it is easier to work with one student at a time. You get to know him or her better and you can make friends.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Ten

Introduction To Editing

LESSON PLAN

Purpose This lesson will provide students with a basic knowledge of post-production editing techniques.

Goal The student will know how to technically edit video footage

Objectives The student will work in pairs to edit their PSA announcement in iMovie. Each student will demonstrate the ability to • Draft a paper edit, • Capture video footage, • Clip and order shots, • Create title cards, • Select and place transitions, • Select and place special effects, • Record voice-over narration, and • Select and place music.

Estimated Length of Session The instructor should plan ten hours or class sessions for this lesson. If this is your first time presenting information or you are incorporating peer mentors in the process, you should extend the lesson by two additional class sessions.

Handouts The following handouts are recommended: • “Overview: Preparing for Post-Production” • “Vocabulary: Editing Terms” • “Assignment: Paper Edit” • “Assignment: Video Descriptor” • “Presentation: PSA Final Presentation”

Equipment The following equipment is recommended: • Video cameras with charged batteries or electric plug-ins • A television monitor or video projector • RCA cables (for connection between video camera and monitor) • Video tapes • Ten Apple computers with iMovie software

• Extension cords and/or multistrips as needed

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 161


Unit Ten LESSON PLAN

Introduction To Editing

(continued)

Viewing Material The following media may be used to compliment a live demonstration or lecture: • PowerPoint presentation: “An Introduction to Editing Basics”

Preparation A peer mentor should be assigned to setting up a computer with the PowerPoint presentation and a video monitor or projector. This requires approximately fifteen minutes for set-up and testing. Another mentor should coordinate production equipment checkouts. The instructor should oversee the duplication of handouts.

Role of Peer Mentors If you have experienced peer mentors in your group, encourage them to present the PowerPoint lecture. Peer mentors should fully participate in discussions and at this stage should be able to lead assignment activities with fellow students. Peer mentors should be actively involved in group critiques and discussions throughout this unit.

Process The following steps should be taken when introducing students to the art of editing: • Deliver the PowerPoint presentation and hold a discussion about an “Introduction to Editing” • Present the vocabulary overview • Give the assignment for the PSA paper edit • Give the assignment for the PSA editing • Hold the student presentations on the final PSA

Assessments The following assessment strategies are recommended for this lesson: • Informal observation of student participation, particularly during the critique sessions • Assessment of written assignments • Formal observation of Final PSA Presentations (see attached rubric) • Assessment of completed PSA Video

page 162

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Ten

Introduction To Editing

OVERVIEW: Preparing for Post-Production

For some, editing is the most exciting part of the video making process. When you edit, you see your video come into its final stage of development. You’re almost done! There are different ways to edit your video, which are listed below.

In-Camera Editing In this process, the person operating the video camera edits the video while s/he videotapes. This often requires the artist to review footage after each shot and rewind over any unwanted scene. This method is most effective for those who do not have access to other editing services. This form of editing is often “rough” in appearance, as the technical quality is hard to maintain and is generally limited to the use of live sound and effects collected during the video taping process. Tape-To-Tape Editing This term refers to two VCR’s connected and operated by a remote control board. This type of editing is often used in schools and community cable stations. The process for editing on an offline system allows for two or more tracks of audio, one line of video, and limited effects. Tape-to-tape editing offers limited choices and requires an intermediate level of technical expertise. Also, each time a tape is edited to another tape, some quality is lost due to duplication.

Digital Editing Digital editing allows for multiple sound tracks, titling, special effects, and transitions to be used. By far, this is the most time-efficient and practical way to edit. The only equipment required to digitally edit a video is a computer, a digital video camera, some cables, and editing software. In this unit, we will be introducing iMovie editing software. However, there are many excellent software programs in both PC and Mac formats.

Video editing happens almost daily in classes at Four Directions Charter School. Here, student Nicole Blackwolf edits a video about the effects of abuse on children as her daughter watches in the background.

We will not be going into detailed explanation of technical editing process in your handouts. Please refer to your reference manual in iMovie (located in the “help” menu that appears at the top center of your computer screen once iMovie has been launched.) You may also need to refer to your video camera’s operating manual for specifics regarding importing video footage.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 163


Unit Ten

Introduction To Editing

VOCABULARY: Editing Terms Listed below are some basic terms that are common to most video editing software. Many of the terms found below were quoted directly or modified from the iMovie Help guide. Illustrated below is the content page. To access the iMovie Help Guide, launch your iMovie software and click on the “Help” menu. The following pdf file will appear, providing thorough, easy to understand information.

iMovie Software This software is provided free with any iMac, eMac, iBook or G3/-4/-5 computer. This software is easy to learn and use and is relatively free from technical problems. It is an excellent tool for introducing basic editing concepts and comes with an excellent reference manual and tutorial. DV Bridge A DV bridge is used to transfer data from a video camera or VCR that does not have DV or digital video capabilities. It is a good source for bridging old equipment with newer technology. The cost of such a drive is usually about $150-$300. Import Importing (also referred to as “capturing”) is the process of transferring image data from the mini-DV camera to the computer. Using a firewire or USB 2 cable (a cable with a high transfer rate), video images may be transferred from the camera to the computer. Gigabyte Gigabytes are data storage units. Most new computers now come with hard drives with storage capacities of 40-80 gigabytes. Importing data requires significant drive space. When importing data, you should only transfer the video footage you expect to use. Keep in mind that one gigabyte is used for approximately every three minutes of video. Video Clip Once a video tape has been imported into iMovie, you are able to move to a clip pane where you will see your imported clip. Each clip represents a section of video footage. Once you have imported your footage, you can then clips of video segments into smaller clips that are free from technical errors or mistakes.

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~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Ten

Introduction To Editing

VOCABULARY: Editing Terms

(continued)

Render Whenever a significant change is made to an image, rendering occurs. When you render a clip, each frame of the video (typically thirty frames for every second of video) must be recreated. The faster the processor on your computer, the faster rendering occurs. Rendering happens any time a video clip is modified, such as when you create a transition between scenes or add title text over video. Transition Transitions are used to move one clip onto another. As stated in the iMovie manual, transitions permit you “to have clips fade in or out, dissolve into another clip, push one scene aside as the new scene enters, and so on.” Transitions smooth the cuts between clips, add visual appeal, and can provide a professional touch to your film. You can add a transition between any two clips. You can also choose the type and duration of your transitions as well as select and change them later.

Special Effects Special effects change the visual look and feel of an image, allowing you to transform a color clip to black and white, blur an image, or slow or speed up clips. Special effects features render an existing clip, which changes every frame of the image. They are often used to alter an audience’s emotional response to the video.

Titles and Credits The iMovie manual states, “Movies often open with film titles, credits, and other textual information that appear on the screen. iMovie allows you to add a variety of text to your movie. You can add titles that appear over a black or colored background or that appear over the moving images of a clip. You can add subtitles, instructional text, labeling, section titles, cast and crew lists, and much more. Your text can enter and disappear on screen using flashy motions, slow scrolls, bounces, cartwheels, flying or drifting text, and many other choices. Adding special titles is a fun way to add visual interest and a professional touch to home videos or other video projects.”

Sound Tracks When editing a video, you are able to stack sounds onto tracks. This allows you to layer any number of sounds over one another. As we learned in Unit Six, there are different types of sound that include dialogue, ambient sound, voice-over narration, sound effects, and music. In the editing process, you can place sounds on different tracks so that dialogue, effects, and music can all play simultaneously.

Paper edits are explained on the following page.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 165


Unit Ten

Introduction To Editing

ASSIGNMENT: Paper Edit A paper edit describes how you will order your video. This step will assist you in preparing for the technical editing process. It will save you time and will help you identify footage you may need to shoot prior to the editing process. The paper edit is different from the production log in that you list each shot, not in the order it appears on the footage tape, but in the order it will appear in the final video. Also include titles, credits, and special effects you are trying to achieve in your paper edit.

Shot #

from the production log

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

Description

of the shot’s content

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

Image Effects

any special image effects you will use

Sound Effects

any additional sound elements that will be added to the shot


Unit Ten

Introduction To Editing

ASSIGNMENT: Paper Edit

Shot #

from the production log

(continued)

Description

Image Effects

of the shot’s content

any special image effects you will use

Sound Effects

any additional sound elements that will be added to the shot

Upon completion of your paper edit, you may begin to edit your video footage.

Name:

__________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

100

Points Earned:

___

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 167


Unit Ten

Introduction To Editing

ASSIGNMENT: Video Descriptor

Write a short paragraph that accurately describes the video you’ve completed. Think of it as part of a description you might read about for a movie when renting a video.

page 168

Name:

__________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

50

Through the Eagle’s Eye

Points Earned:

___

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Ten

Introduction To Editing

PRESENTATION: PSA Final Presentation

You are about to present your final PSA to your classmates. After showing your best takes, you will report to the group as to what changed about your video since you came up with the idea. Your presentation should cover the following:

1. The original purpose of the video

2. Changes that took place through the course of production

3. Artistic quality of the final piece

4. Effectiveness of the video

Name:

__________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

50

Points Earned:

___

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 169


Unit Ten Introduction To Editing

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: Classroom Equipment Checkout Form

This form will help organize the flow of video equipment when students are performing in-class assignments. You may modify this list as needed for the purpose of your course.

Date:

___________________________________

Equipment Supervisor:

___________________________________

Total Number of Cameras Available for Class:

___________________________________

Equipment Number

page 170

Name of Person Responsible

Returned?

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Ten

Introduction To Editing

RUBRIC: PSA--Editing Tools Peer mentors or the instructor(s) may use this rubric as a guide for evaluating students ability to successfully utilize post-production editing techniques.

Name: ________________________________________________ Name: ________________________________________________

Demonstrated Skill

Comments

Possible Points

Points Earned

Paper Edit • Completed worksheet matches the completed video, shot for shot, describing all pertinent content including images, sounds, titles, etc. • Uses terms and vocabulary in proper context when describing editing choices

75

Video Descriptor • Clearly summarizes the PSA announcement • Includes information regarding message, style, and the artists’ point of view

25

Total Points Earned Total Points Possible: 200

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 171


Unit Ten

Introduction To Editing

RUBRIC: Formal Observation--PSA Final Presentation

Peer mentors or the instructor(s) may use this rubric as a guide for grading the quality of the review and critique session.

Content Was the final PSA presented representative of the project’s treatment? Did the piece make sense?

Delivery Was the PSA clear and easy to understand? Was it interesting to watch? Was its message effective?

Aesthetics & Creativity How did the video look and sound? Was it original? Did it use the formal elements in a creative manner that furthered the message of the video?

Input Management How did the team handle questions and comments from fellow students and the instructor? Did they argue? Did they shut down? Did they participate in a dialogue? Did either partner take notes?

Name: ________________________________________________ Name: ________________________________________________

Demonstrated Skill

Comments

Possible Points

Points Earned

Content

100

Delivery

75

Aesthetics & Creativity

75

Input Management

50 Total Points Earned

Total Possible Points: 300

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Ten

Introduction To Editing

GRADING SUMMARY Assignment: Paper Edit

75 points

Assignment: Video Descriptor

25 points

Formal Observation: PSA Presentation

300 points

Participation

100 points

Asked questions about the unit Listened attentively Responded knowledgeably when asked a question Attendance

150 points Total Possible Points for This Unit

650 Points

NOTES & OBSERVATIONS Use this space to write additional notes, things to remember, and to recommend changes to implement in the future as you repeat this lesson. Remember: every classroom is unique, and every student is individual. Following the precise order of instruction is far less important than achieving the lesson’s intended goal. This is an opportunity to make this lesson your own.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 173


Herme Garcia / Technology Expert & Mentor My name is Herme and I’ve lived in Minneapolis all my life. I work for two bike shops, and I’m a peer mentor for Four Directions Charter School. I’ve been going to this school for 4 years. Last year, I built a computer, and I’m currently taking a computer class. I have been learning about media arts for a year, and that’s how I became skilled in Adobe Photoshop, iPhoto, iMovie, Microsoft Word and Power Point. I made a video about taking a computer apart and putting it back together. I’m only 17, and when I’m done with school I want to attend Minneapolis Community and Technical College. I’m more of a technical guy than I am an artist. I like taking things apart and putting them back together--it’s what I’m good at. As a peer mentor, I was responsible for checking out and maintaining the equipment. It would get confusing at times, having to know where everything was at and who had it. But we got by, and I didn’t lose anything. I’m also good at troubleshooting computer problems. I was the person that was called on to fix the computers when they broke down and install software. I like that I am good at what I do. It’s important for me to set a good example for others and to do the best that I can.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

LESSON PLAN

Purpose This lesson will provide students with the opportunity to express themselves creatively through the art of video.

Goal

The student will create an expressive story through the art of video.

Objectives The student will create a short video demonstrating his/her ability to apply the skills learned in Units 2-10. In competing this unit, the student will demonstrate the ability to • Write a treatment, • Brainstorm, • Write a script and storyboard, • Conduct interviews (if applicable to the project idea), • Draft a script breakdown, • Select and work with a production and talent team, • Coordinate logistics, • Supervise camera production, • Complete production logs, • Complete a paper edit, • Complete all post-production through iMovie editing, and • Actively participate in critique sessions.

Estimated Length of Session The instructor should plan fifteen hours or class sessions for this lesson. If this is your first time presenting information or you are incorporating peer mentors in the process, you should extend the lesson by two additional class sessions.

Handouts The following handouts are recommended: • “Assignment: Production Packet” • “Student Presentations: Final Critiques”

Equipment The following equipment is recommended: • Video cameras with charged batteries or electric plug-ins • Tripods • Microphones, cables, and headphones • A television monitor or video projector • A set of RCA cables (for connection between video camera and monitor) • Video tapes • Ten Apple computers with iMovie software • Extension cords and/or multistrips as needed

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 175


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

LESSON PLAN

(continued)

Viewing Material No viewing materials are required for this session.

Preparation A peer mentor should be assigned to coordinating production equipment check-outs. Another mentor should be in charge of presentation needs. The instructor should oversee the duplication of handouts.

Role of Peer Mentors If you have experienced peer mentors in your group, encourage them to present the power point lecture. Peer mentors should fully participate in discussions and at this stage should be able to support students in assignment activities. Peer mentors should be actively involved in group critiques and discussions throughout this unit.

Process The following steps should be taken when introducing students to the art of producing a quality interview: • Hold a discussion about final project expectations • Give the assignment for producing your own video • Hold the final student video presentations

Assessments The following assessment strategies are recommended for this lesson: • Informal observation (student participation

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

• Assessment of written production packet • Formal observation of final presentations (see attached rubric) • Assessment of completed video

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET: Project Summary

You are about to produce a video short (five to ten minutes in length) about a school-appropriate topic of your choice. The following packet will help you to organize your thoughts and plan effectively. You will be graded on this packet, so it is important that you complete it to the best of your abilities.

Your Name ___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Project Title Give your video a working title. The title may change later, but if you can come up with something to call your video, it will help you stay focused. ____________________________________________________

Project Members Most video projects require a team of people to help with production. This may include actors, people to help with equipment, props, editing, etc. Don’t be afraid to ask for assistance. List below the members of your production team. ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________

Topic With a word or two, describe what your video is about. Example include family, teen hangouts, street violence, etc. ____________________________________________________

Film Style Most videos can be categorized within a genre or film style, like documentary, music video, narrative, comedy, etc. Describe below what style(s) you will use in producing your video. ____________________________________________________

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 177


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET: Treatment

A treatment effectively communicates in clear, precise language the purpose of your video. The treatment also answers basic questions about the what’s, when’s, who’s, where’s and why’s. To complete your treatment, please answer the following questions in three paragraphs or less. 1.

What is the storyline or message of your video?

2.

Who is your audience? Be specific here.

3.

Why is it important for you to make this video?

4.

Where will your video production take place? In other words where will you shoot it?

5.

When do you plan to start shooting your video?

_______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

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~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET: Brainstorming

Brainstorming ideas is an extremely productive means for getting your creative juices flowing. For this project you are required to brainstorm in two areas - the first being the technical and aesthetic aspects of your piece, and the second having to do with locations, props, actors and other related materials.

Brainstorming ideas is an extremely productive means for getting your creative juices flowing. For this project, you are required to brainstorm in two areas--the first includes the technical and aesthetic aspects of your piece, and the second includes the locations, props, actors and other related materials.

#1) Content: Draft a list of images, sounds, music, and possible themes and storylines for your video. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________

#2) Environment Draft a complete list of locations, props, wardrobe, actors, and other related material that may be important to your video. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 179


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET: Scriptwriting No matter what type of video you make, a script is a useful tool for organizing your ideas. Remember that a script describes in detail what your video will look and sound like from beginning to end. It includes dialogue, narration, use of special effects, and your plot line. Even if you are taking a documentary or experimental approach, it is still important that you plan what you believe your video will look and sound like.

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~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

(continue on next page)


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET: Scriptwriting

(continued)

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

(continue on next page)

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Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET: Storyboards

A storyboard is a visual set of instructions that show the compositions and movements you wish to portray in your video. This is a common communication tool used in feature length films and videos. Your storyboard should look similar to a comic strip. Make sure you take additional time to break each scene down into numerous shots. Vary your compositions and movements to add meaning and to make the editing process easier. Below is a sample set of storyboards for your use.

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Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET: Storyboards

(continued)

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________ Through the Eagle’s Eye ~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eleven

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PRODUCTION PACKET: Storyboards

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(continued)

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Composition: _______________________________ Movement: _______________________________ Sound: _______________________________

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET: Identifying Your Production Crew

Most video productions require support from others. Below is a list of different positions you may require for your project. Please compete it to the best of your ability. Don’t be afraid to ask classmates or peer mentors to assume one or more roles. If needed, each person may assume up to two roles.

Producer The producer is the coordinator of the video shoot, making sure that crew and talent show up at the right time in the right place with appropriate materials and equipment for their roles. The producer keeps production logs and records the quality of each recorded shot. On large-scale productions, the producer will often supervise sets, manage budgets, and negotiate contractual agreements.

Name: ______________________________________________________________

Director The director leads the creative production of the video shoot. S/he works directly with the camera operator to draft the storyboard, manage the visual content during production, and conduct interviews. The director leads the crew through each shot and requests additional shots as necessary.

Name: ______________________________________________________________

Script Supervisor The script supervisor ensures that all elements of the script are being followed. For small productions, the script supervisor may also be given the duty of locating and coordinating props and wardrobe.

Name: ______________________________________________________________

Cinematographer The camera operator is responsible for all aspects of technical production, ensuring that camera batteries are always charged and that the video camera and tripod are always ready for the shoot. The camera operator also sets up and composes shots as outlined in the shooting script and storyboard.

Name: ______________________________________________________________

Sound Operator This person is in charge of collecting all the sound elements needed for the video. S/he is in charge of the microphones selected for the project and makes decisions as to what microphone should be used in each shooting situation. The sound operator is responsible for ensuring quality sound production during each shoot, making sure that outside noises are kept to a minimum.

Name: ______________________________________________________________

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET: Identifying Talent

Talent # 1 Character’s Name: ___________________________________________________________ Role of Character: ____________________________________________________________ Actor Assigned the Role of Talent #1:____________________________________________

Talent # 2 Character’s Name: ___________________________________________________________ Role of Character: ____________________________________________________________ Actor Assigned the Role of Talent #2:____________________________________________

Talent # 3 Character’s Name: __________________________________________________________ Role of Character: ____________________________________________________________ Actor Assigned the Role of Talent #3:____________________________________________

Talent # 3 Character’s Name: __________________________________________________________ Role of Character: ____________________________________________________________ Actor Assigned the Role of Talent #3:____________________________________________

Talent # 5 Character’s Name: ___________________________________________________________ Role of Character: ____________________________________________________________ Actor Assigned the Role of Talent #5:____________________________________________

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

Note: Add additional pages as needed

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET: Interview Planning

Answer the questions below to prepare for each interview.

Interview #1 Name of Interviewee: Location of the interview:

__________________________________

Interview style:

__________________________________

Equipment required:

__________________________________

__________________________________

__________________________________

Describe what information or insight you hope to gain from this interview. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________

List the questions you will ask the interviewee. Remember, questions should be open-ended to allow the interviewee to elaborate on the topic. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET: Script Breakdown

After making script revisions, it is time to break down your script into specific shots. Use the following worksheet to assist you in this process. Be as detailed as possible. Location:

Shot #

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

________________________________________________________________

Shot Description

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

Camera Composition

Camera Movement

Sound (Yes/No)


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET: Production Logistics

Location #1:

_________________________________________________________________________________

Call Time:

_________________________________________________________________________________

Estimated Length of Shoot:

_________________________________________________________________________________

Crew:

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

Talent:

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

Props and Wardrobe:

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET: Equipment Checklist

Check off each item with a “yes” or “no” before you go on location to shoot your video. You may or may not need all of the items on the list, but you do not want to leave without having everything you need.

Treatment Script Storyboard Model release forms Props Video camera in case A/C power adaptor Tripod with clip Blank video tape Headphones External microphone with cable

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~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET: Model Release Form

I give my permission without restriction to _______________________________________________ (name of video producer and school) to use my name, likeness, pictures, and/or voice in connection with the video production tentatively titled for broadcast, direct exhibition, and/or any other purpose the videomaker determines. This consent is granted with the understanding that the videomaker has sole discretion to cut and edit the video and/or voice recording as s/he sees fit for use in the above production. I specifically waive my rights of privacy or publicity and or any other rights I may have with respect to such use as my name, likeness, pictures, and/or voice. ____________________________________________ ____________________ Signed Date ____________________________________________ Street Address ____________________________________________ City and Zip Code

____________________________________________ Signature of Parent or Guardian (for those under the age of 18)

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET

Production Logs

During the video shoot, the script supervisor should take notes regarding the quality of each “take.” Good production logs will make the editing process more efficient.

Location: _____________________________________________________________________ Scene: _______________________________________________________________________

Shot #

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

Take #

Camera Quality

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

Sound Quality

Acting


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET: Paper Edit Shot #

from the production log

Description

of the shot’s content

Image Effects

any special image effects you will use

Through the Eagle’s Eye

Sound Effects

any additional sound elements that will be added to the shot

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET: Video Descriptor & Artist Biography

Video Descriptor Write a short paragraph that accurately describes the video you’ve completed. Think of it as part of a description you might read about for a movie when renting a video.

Artist Biography Write a short paragraph that describes the person you are and your artwork.

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~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

PRODUCTION PACKET: Final Presentation

You are about to present your final video to your classmates. After showing your video, you will report to the group what changed about your video since you first came up with the idea. Your presentation should cover the following:

1.

The original purpose of the video

2.

Changes that took place through the course of production

3.

Artistic quality of the final piece

4.

Effectiveness of the video

Name:

__________________________________

Name:

__________________________________

Possible Points:

800

Points Earned:

___

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: Classroom Equipment Checkout Form

This form will help organize the flow of video equipment when students are performing in-class assignments. You may modify this list as needed for the purpose of your course.

Date:

___________________________________

Equipment Supervisor:

___________________________________

Total Number of Cameras Available for Class:

___________________________________

Equipment Number

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Name of Person Responsible

Returned?

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

____________

__________________________________________

_____________

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: The Overnight Checkout Form

Name: ___________________________________________ Telephone: ___________________________________________ Equipment Requested: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ What you will videotape? Be specific and ready to show your planning documents. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Date Needed: ___________________________________________

Date to be returned: _____________________________________

I promise to take good care of the equipment while it is in my possession. I will return it as requested, and I promise to keep it safe and protect it from theft. If something happens to the equipment while it is in my care, I will immediately report it.

__________________________________________ Student Signature

_____________________ Date

__________________________________________ Signature of Authorized Personnel

_____________________ Date

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

RUBRIC: Independent Video Unit Completion

Peer mentors or instructor may use this rubric as a guide for evaluating students ability to successfully complete production and post-production planning. Name: ________________________________________________ Demonstrated Skill

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Comments

Possible Points

Points Earned

Project Summary • Identifies topic of the student’s choice • Identifies team members • Identifies a filmic style to be used that furthers the message of the topic

5

Treatment • Answers questions in writing as they relate to the proposed story or theme • Communicates an understanding of the topic and its audience

25

Brainstorming • Lists a minimum of ten images that accentuate the topic’s message • Lists a minimum of ten props, wardrobe items, settings etc., that enhance the message of the proposed video

10

Script • Clearly communicates the content, sequence, and “look” of the proposed topic • Provides clear direction on character development and dialogue

50

Storyboard • Visually depicts the compositions, movements and angles that will deliver the message of the video

50

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

RUBRIC: Independent Video Unit Completion (continued)

Demonstrated Skill

Comments

Possible Points

Points Earned

Identifying Crew & Talent • Has identified ALL key roles required to produce video • Those identified have agreed to participate in the production • Those identified have at least minimum skill in their assigned role

15

Script Breakdown • Has a minimum of ten shot descriptions that match previous production materials • Matches description to dialogue and action using media arts vocabulary • Communicates clearly the photographic and sound needs to others (and is easy to understand)

50

Production Logistics • Answers questions in writing as they relate to the proposed production plan • Communicates clearly the specific production procedures that will take place

25

Equipment Checklist • Accurately completed • Used as a preparation tool for  production

10

Model Release Forms • Completed and signed by every person appearing in the video • Signed by parent or guardian for any person appearing under the age of 18

10

Production Logs • Accurately recorded all video shots taken during production • Contains references to quality of each take including performance, camera work, and sound

50

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

RUBRIC

Grading - Unit Completion

Demonstrated Skill

Comments

Possible Points

Points Earned

Paper Edit • Completed worksheet matches the completed video, shot for shot, describing all pertinent content including images, sounds, titles, etc. • Uses terms and vocabulary in proper context when describing editing choices

50

Video Descriptor • Clearly summarizes the video • Includes information regarding message, style, and the artist’s point of view

25

Artist Biography • Clearly communicates the maker’s background as a video maker and how s/he artistically approaches the process of making video artwork

25

Total Points Earned:

Total Possible Points:

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

400

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

RUBRIC

Completed Independent Video Project

Peer mentors or the instructor(s) may use this rubric as a guide for grading the quality of the review and critique session.

Content Was the final video presented representative of the project’s treatment? Did the piece make sense?

Delivery Was the video clear and easy to understand? Was it interesting to watch? Was its message effective?

Aesthetics & Creativity How did the video look and sound? Was it original? Did it use the formal elements in a creative manner that furthered the message of the video?

Input Management How did the team handle questions and comments from fellow students and the instructor? Did they argue? Did they shut down? Did they participate in a dialogue? Did either partner take notes?

Name: ________________________________________________

Demonstrated Skill

Comments

Possible Points

Points Earned

Content

100

Delivery

100

Aesthetics & Creativity

100

Input Management

50 Total Points Earned

Total Possible Points:

350

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

GRADING SUMMARY Production Packet: Assignment: Project Summary

5 points

Assignment: Treatment

25 points

Assignment: Brainstorming

10 points

Assignment: Script

50 points

Assignment: Storyboard

50 points

Assignment: Identifying Crew & Talent

15 points

Assignment: Script Breakdown

50 points

Assignment: Production Logistics

25 points

Assignment: Equipment Checklist

10 points

Assignment: Model Release Form

10 points

Assignment: Production Logs

50 points

Assignment: Paper Edit

50 points

Assignment: Video Descriptor

25 points

Assignment: Artist Biography

25 points

Formal Observation: Independent Video Presentation & Critique Content

100 points

Delivery

100 points

Aesthetics

100 points

Input Management

50 points

Participation

200 points

Asked questions about the unit Listened attentively Responded knowledgeably when asked a question Attendance

200 points Total Possible Points for This Unit

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

1150 Points


Unit Eleven

Independent Projects

NOTES & OBSERVATIONS Use this space to write additional notes, things to remember, and to recommend changes to implement in the future as you repeat this lesson. Remember: every classroom is unique, and every student is individual. Following the precise order of instruction is far less important than achieving the lesson’s intended goal. This is an opportunity to make this lesson your own.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

page 203


Caroline Buckanaga / Digital Artist & Mentor

My name is Caroline Buckanaga, and I have been making videos since I was seven years old. I’ve made about five videos and have taken lots of pictures. One of my videos is about some of the mistakes I’ve made in my life and what I’ve done to change my life for the better. It was an inspiring video that showed my family how sorry I am for what I’ve done. When they see it, some people have told me that it took courage to make that video and own up to my mistakes. I began Four Directions’ Peer Mentoring class when I was fourteen. It was really fun, but I couldn’t take the pressure and responsibility all the time, so sometimes I had to take a break from the program. I love to teach people things, but I hate talking alone in front of a group of people. I am only fifteen, and I am learning to teach anyone who wants to learn. I enjoy teaching and I love leading. Lots of people say I am a good leader; maybe that’s because I’m courageous. Making videos gives me the opportunity to speak about what most people don’t want to hear. My videos challenges people to see the abuse that happens everyday, almost everywhere. I see how destructive we can be towards one another, and I make videos with the hope that people might want to change.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Media Arts Resources

As part of the Through The Eagle’s Eye curriculum, we are providing a series of resources on DVD for use in the classroom. They include a selection of 13 student produced video shorts (provided on DISC One); 7 powerpoint presentations; three examples of video exercises produced by students; student produced spoken word and music samples; and pdf files of each curriculum unit.

Student Created Video Works The students of Four Directions Charter School have a long tradition of creating boldly honest and personal works. Many of their pieces reveal stories told from deep within their hearts. This tradition is part of what has made the media arts program at their school so strong and well loved. The pieces offered as part of this guide, reflect a variety of topics, filmic styles and levels of experience. They will help you as instructors and mentors to set product expectations. They should also help your students determine realistic possibilities for their own video topics. We ask that as you view these works with your students that you ask them to watch respectfully and listen intently to the stories. As is with all youth, they may not fully appreciate these stories until they have produced their own. But hopefully it will unlock their inhibitions and help them to see the power of their own storytelling skills. Most video pieces vary from 3-10 minutes in length and were produced by youth ages 15-18 years in age. Below is a short guide to introducing each video. Videos should be shown a few at a time and previewed so that you are prepared to answer any questions that arise. For those of you looking for additional youth videos to view we encourage you to visit the In Progress website (www.in-progress.org ), Current TV website (www.currenttv.org) or the Listen Up Network (www.lisetnup.org). Below is a short description of each work. Hear Our Voices This video was produced by four students that wanted to create a context for viewing this compilation. Hear Our Voices uses rhythmic patterns of still imagery as well as special effects, voice over and music to bring attention to their message. Film Style: Experimental – video poetry. Produced by: Clifford Bahma, Caroline Buckanaga, Shawnee Seelye, and Sasha Weyaus. running time: 2:23 minutes For You: Your Eagle’s Cry Has Been Heard This video was produced as a wake-up call for those who have never heard of the political prisoner Leonard Peltier. For You uses voice-over narration, photographs and video recreations to tell this important set of information. Film Style: documentary – short (PSA style) Produced by: Shawnee Seelye running time: 1:56 minutes Treaty of 1854 This video uses historical photographs and voice-over to educate others on the Treaty of 1854. The documentary summarizes 13 articles that define the land and water rights of six Minnesota-based Ojibwe Nations. The producer created this video because he believes that in order for Native Americans to legally preserve their land rights, they must be educated in how those rights came to be under federal negotiations. Film Style: documentary Produced by: Curtis Fohrenkam running time: 2:42 minutes Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Media Arts Resources

Student Created Video Works (continued)

Keepers of The Stronghold Dream This documentary uses a variety of techniques to tell the story of the Two Bulls family, that have dedicated their lives to protecting sacred lands. The video recounts a tragic massacre, an ongoing battle with the federal government, and the relentless efforts of this family to protect the bones of their ancestors. Film Style: documentary Produced by: Tiana LaPointe running time: 12:12 minutes Spirit of the Jingle Dress This video mixes digital photography, text, imagery and voice to tell the story of the jingle dress, a sacred symbol for many Ojibwe. This video incorporates the artist’s skills as a digital photographer to illustrate the beauty of the jingle dress and their story. Film Style: documentary Produced by: Melinda Jones running time: 3:38 minutes A New Day In A New Life A New Day In A New Life provides insight into the life of a new born baby. The maker uses primarily photographs and voice –over narration to honor this child born with heart problems. She used video as a means to honor the strongest person she knows. In doing so, she tells the story of this infant’s strength, her views and her love of life. Film Style: documentary (family portrait) Produced by: Nicole Auginash running time: 4:58 minutes Gwayako-Bimaadizi (Live a Proper Life)

This video poem was created by a mentor and instructor

who wanted to brush up on her photography and video skills. She completed a video poetry assignment alongside her students and in doing so, created a strong and powerful video work. Here the maker took photographs of land and sky, carefully using formal elements with sequence to create a quiet rhythm to the story being shared. The message of the maker is to let others know that though she is taking a new path in her life, she will take with her the lessons of her loved ones. Film Style: experimental (video poem) Produced by: Niibin Headbird running time: 3:16 minutes Child Abuse Child Abuse is a docu-drama about the effects of physical and verbal abuse on children. The video tells a story about a little girl who watches her brother suffer the effects of years of abuse and neglect. The video uses researched statistics to send the point home that child abuse is an epidemic that has severe consequences. This video will work well as an example of an expanded PSA announcement. Film Style: docu-drama Produced by: Nikki Blackwolf running time: 3:00 minutes

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Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Media Arts Resources

Student Created Video Works (continued)

I Know But I’m Sorry This video is a raw self portrait of a young woman’s struggle for understanding. It is powerful, not because of it’s use of technique but because of its honest heartfelt cry for understanding and love. By using family photographs, re-enacted scenes, and voice-over, this young producer makes a powerful statement about what it means to be young and make mistakes. Film Style: documentary (self-portrait) Produced by: Caroline Buckanaga running time: 3:31 minutes Bag-o-sen-dam Bag-o-sen-dam portrays the struggles of a young woman to stay true to the way of her culture. She also takes the opportunity to present to her audience some of the most Ojibwe terms she knows as she is learning her traditional language. Film Style: experimental (self-portrait) Produced by: Jami Headbird running time: 3:14 minutes How Could We Live Like This? This experimental video challenges all Native Americans to look within, respect their traditional ways and ensure all children are well cared for and listened to. It also serves as a poetic statement about the struggles, difference and deep connections between Native Americans that live in the cities and those that live on reservations. Film Style: experimental (video poem) Produced by: Sasha Weyaus & Melinda Jones running time: 4:32 minutes Down & Out: Living On The Rez This video uses comic storytelling techniques to examine a young man’s interest in gangs. The video demonstrates the hard choices made by young men, wanting to belong to gangs while knowing that the price may ultimately cost them everything. Film Style: narrative Produced by: Julian Weyaus running time: 4:42 minutes From War Pony to Warrior This narrative short was produced in spontaneous fashion with actors improvising lines and writing narration after they completed their camera production work. Though rough around the edges, this video gets many laughs around the reservation, as it is well known that every young man’s desire, is to win big and trade in that old “rez car” for something new. Film Style: narrative Produced by: Sebastian Rodriguez & Curtis Fohrenkam running time: 4:42 minutes

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Media Arts Resources

Power Point Presentations The power point presentations are intended to assist instructors and mentors in introducing specific units. Each presentation provides basic information that students will need to know as they begin to learn the art of video production. Each lesson plan indicates when a powerpoint presentation should be used. Presentations were originally created by students and later formatted for use in this curriculum. A summary of the presentations are listed below. Presentation #01 - Curriculum Overview The Curriculum Overview is intended to be used as an introduction to demonstrators and educators interested in establishing their own media arts program. The overview provides a short introduction to The Through The Eagle’s Eye curriculum model and may be modified for the particular needs of your teaching environment. Presentation #02 - Equipment Care & Protocols This presentation works well with Unit Three. It provides general instructions for how to care for available resources and what students need to know in terms of their responsibilities for equipment care. Presentation #03 - The Language of Video The Language of Video (unit 4) introduces basic terms commonly used in the video making process. The presentation provides photo illustrations and is a helpful tool for showing how these terms should be used. Once familiar with this material, instructors may wish to replace the powerpoint presentation with live demonstrations of terms. Presentation #04 - Sound Elements, Microphones & The Art of Interviewing You may wish to use this presentation in place of the handouts provided in Unit Six & Seven. Sound Elements & Microphones provides a basic overview of sound and interviewing terms. It also illustrates a number of microphones that are commonly used in video productions. Presentation #05 - Planning Your Video Production This presentation is intended to introduce students to the important role of project planning. Used as a compliment to Unit Eight, Planning Your Video Production goes through the sequential steps of preparing for a video shoot. Presentation #06 - Planning Your Video Production This presentation extends that of #05, by introducing on-site planning tools that help new producers with field production. The presentation is short and specifically identifies a process for preparing for the physical aspects of video production activities. Presentation #07- Editing Basics Editing Basics provides a very basic overview of the editing process. The presentation should be expanded upon with hands-on demonstrations and individualized supervision.

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~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography


Media Arts Resources

Sound & Video Samples of Student Assignments Through The Eagle’s Eye also provides three student produced examples of introductory video assignments. Each were completed by beginning level students and correspond to reasonable expectations for your student population. We have included a brief summary of each below: Video Scavenger Hunt (Unit Four) This exercise example provides one possible outcome to the video scavenger hunt. Every student will bring their own unique way of seeing to the creation of this exercise. This is why it is typically experienced as both fun and educational. This video may be used either before or after your students have completed the exercise, but should simply used as a point for comparison. Compositions, Angles, & Movement (Unit Four) This exercise acts as a supplement to Unit Four. A more complex exercise, this is usually a place where students begin to demonstrate their storytelling techniques. The exercise requires students to plan a sequence of shots in an order of their choosing, all based on one topic or theme. The sample provided acts as a “Day in the Life” video, in which the student takes you through a series of shots that step you through her process of getting ready and going to school. Expect students to have varied success at this exercise, and don’t hesitate to have them repeat the exercise if they are unable to complete the assignment the first time as directed in the written assignment. Sound Stories (Unit Six) Sound Stories is a video that is presented on a black screen, illustrating the importance of listening to the subtle sequence and layering of sounds. Again this assignment sample provides just one way of completing the exercise. Students are likely to bring their own creative interests to this activity, which is often fun and challenging. Spoken Word & Song - Student Sound Samples (Unit Six & Seven) In addition to the sound stories exercise, we are also providing a selection of audio stories that can be used to illustrate the power of the individual voice. We have listed each below: 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09

Four Directions Theme - a collaborative music piece Blueberry Pie - by Shawnesha Stillday Basketball - by David “Chubbs” Jourdain Children Are Our Future - by Nikki blackwolf Leonard Peltier - by Angel Tohannie Concrete & Steel - by Curtis Fohrenkam Pollution by Keisha Little Cloud Sister by Jeanné Peirce Heather Jean Casey - by Caroline Buckanaga

Handouts The final supplement to this curriculum is the inclusion of the Through The Eagle’s Eye Curriculum in PDF Format. Each Unit is broken down for easy printing. You are encourage to use these resources, revise and share them with others.

Through the Eagle’s Eye

~ Innovative Approaches to Teaching Video and Photography

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Media Arts Resources

There are many resources available on the web and in print form. We encourage you to research the following groups as needed to help as you continue to build your own media arts program. Also keep in mind that we have provided only a small sampling of what is available.

Media Arts Learning in Minnesota Schools Many schools in Minnesota and throughout the nation have been teaching media arts to students for decades now. Listed below are the schools we are aware of and look to for improving our own skills in program development. Bug-O-Nay-Ge-Shig School is a tribal school located on Leech Lake Reservation in north central Minnesota. Film and video have been a part of the school’s curriculum since the mid-1980’s, and it was one of the first schools to introduce digital photography to its students in the early 1990’s. The school still provides multi-media training and has a significant archive of student produced video works. Contact Mike Schmid for more information. www.bugschool.bia.edu Cass Lake-Bena High School offers video arts activities that are integrated with the school’s Social Studies curriculum. Mike Schmid, also an educator from the Bug-O-Nay-Ge-Shig school, brought his teaching talents here and now offers courses that employ video production as a means for meeting high school Social Studies standards. Contact Mike Schmid for more information. www.clbs.k12.mn.us Cook County High School began introducing video arts to students in 1996 though a partnership with the Grand Marais Arts Colony and In Progress. The school now offers students a video production course and selected arts creation through their Fine Arts program. The video course provides two 9-week units that provide a comprehensive training in video production and editing. The Fine Arts program emphasizes artistic expression and the integration of visual arts principles into the making process. The result has been a successful media program that has helped many graduates firmly establish themselves in post-academic film programs. www.cookcountyschools.org Cook County High School began introducing video arts to students in 1996 though a partnership with the Grand Marais Arts Colony and In Progress. The school now offers students a video production course and selected arts creation through their Fine Arts program. The video course provides two 9-week units that provide a comprehensive training in video production and editing. The Fine Arts program emphasizes artistic expression and the integration of visual arts principles into the making process. The result has been a successful media program that has helped many graduates firmly establish themselves in post-academic film programs. www.cookcountyschools.org Kelliher School is located in rural northern Minnesota and serves a community of 350 people. It first introduced video production activities in 1990 as part of the K-12 Art curriculum. Since that time, the school has developed a school-wide arts and technology curriculum that provides a state-of-the-art media education to its students. It’s worth noting that Kelliher began this initiative with a handful of video cameras and one computer. Now, media creation is at the heart of every technology decision made at the school. Contact Rose Heim for more information. www.kelliher.k12.mn.us

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Media Arts Resources

Perpich Center for the Arts/Arts High School is a comprehensive public school offering innovative coursework focused in six arts areas: Dance, Literary Arts, Media Arts, Music, Theater, and Visual Arts. These areas are combined with an intensive academic program. Their Media Arts program provides college-level training to youth from throughout Minnesota. They also have many media arts resources for teachers available on their website. www.pcae.k12.mn.us/school/ahs.html Red Lake High School began producing videos in 1994. The school takes a very different approach to offering a media arts curriculum to its high school students. Each year, they sponsor an artist-in-residence to work with one group of students. This group works with the local community to create videos for local exhibition. Many of their videos have won national recognition. Contact Diane Schwanz for more information. www.paulbunyan.net/rlschools

Organizations There are many youth media organizations throughout the nation. Their services vary dramatically, but all are worth checking out to see how young people are working with video and photography. We have listed a few of our favorites below: The AjA Project provides educational programs for refugee and underprivileged youth. It has programs in Colombia, along the Thai/Burmese border, and in San Diego; in these programs, participatory photography and writing programs encourage students to write about their experiences as refugees. The AjA Project is committed to transferring the power of knowledge and self-sustainability to youth in struggle. www.ajaproject.org Appalshop has been promoting youth documentary makers since the early 1970’s through the Appalacian Media Institute. They currently support a school residency program in rural Kentucky and a summer documentary video program for youth. They also have video works for sale. www.appalshop. org Aspen Film Fest’s Education Outreach Program annually serves approximately 5,000 children and adults and nineteen schools. Filmfest’s goal is to remedy the extremely limited local access to enriching film opportunities for youth and adults and empower viewers by providing quality viewing experiences and hands-on production opportunities. www.aspenfilm.org Asian Media Access (AMA) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to using media arts as a tool for social betterment. Located in Minneapolis, AMA is one of only five national media organizations devoted to serving Asian-American media needs. Their primary goal is to challenge the traditional isolation of Asian American communities by helping them realize that the media can be an effective and important tool for communication and education. In this spirit, Asian Media Access provide programs and services in three areas: Media Education, Media Production, and Film Exhibition and Distribution. www.amamedia.org

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Media Arts Resources

Organizations

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The Center for Media Literacy (CML) is a nonprofit educational organization that provides leadership, public education, professional development and educational resources nationally. The organization has been working since 1977 to promote and support media literacy education as a framework for accessing, analyzing, evaluating and creating media content. www.medialit.org Downtown Video Center (DCTV) is the most honored independent nonprofit media center in the nation. Its productions reach over 100 million viewers each year. Located in the Chinatown neighborhood of New York City, DCTV provides professionally focused mentorships and travel opportunities for youth living throughout the NYC area. DCTV has a vast archive of video works produced by the young people who have participated in their programs. www.dctvny.org The Educational Video Center is a nonprofit media arts center located in New York City. It is one of the oldest media arts group in the nation and has dedicated itself to creating programs that teach documentary video production and media analysis to youth, educators, and community organizers. www.evc.org Ghetto Film School has served more than 400 students since June 2000, providing programs and workshops to youth from all areas of New York City. Their south Bronx training facilities offers hands-on production and cinema studies courses. www.ghettofilm.org Global Action Project (G.A.P.) provides media arts and leadership training for thousands of young people living in underserved communities, from New York to Croatia to Guatemala to the Middle East and beyond. They provide knowledge, tools, and relationships that help youth create powerful, thoughtprovoking media on local and international issues that concern them. www.global-action.org In Progress is a nonprofit media arts group that has a long history of promoting youth as media artists. The organization works directly with youth, community groups, and schools to develop program models that support the long-term development of media artists. In Progress stresses its commitment to working with rural, migrant, and tribal communities that have extremely limited media production resources. In Progress has a roster of media artists who are available for artist residencies and many galleries that highlight the video and photography work of young media makers. www.in-progress.org Intermedia Arts presents screenings that feature some of the best independent video works produced in Minnesota. They have a Twin Cities-based youth arts program that provides resources to educators working to bring the arts into the classroom. www.intermediarts.org Listen Up is a youth media network that supports the online promotion of youth video makers. If you join the Listen Up network, you will receive emails announcing youth media festival opportunities, conferences, and grant opportunities. Listen Up also features video shorts by youth makers on their website. www.listenup.org

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Media Arts Resources

Organizations

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The National Alliance of Media Arts and Culture (NAMAC) is a nonprofit association whose membership comprises a diverse mix of organizations and individuals dedicated to a common goal: the support and advocacy of independent film, video, audio and online / multimedia arts. NAMAC provides many resources for developing and evaluating youth media programs and holds workshops for educators wishing to learn more about the media education field. www.namac.org New Orleans Video Arts Center (NOVAC) fosters the creation and appreciation of independent, noncommercial video for a public of diverse ages, income levels, and backgrounds. NOVAC accomplishes this mission through school and community educational programming in video production and multimedia techniques, the acclaimed Teen Video Workshop, and the fifteen-year old Louisiana Video Shorts Festival. www.novacvideo.org Phillips Community Television (PCTV) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to empowering youth and communities through media literacy education, media production, and public service. Since PCTV’s inception in 1992, it has enabled inner-city youth, ages 9-18, to create their own television programs, magazines, photography exhibits, web pages, and personal projects focusing on youth, family, and community issues. Located in the Phillips neighborhood of south Minneapolis, PCTV has a strong dedication to community partnerships. www.phillipscommunitytv.org The Saint Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN) provides youth video makers with access, training, and visibility. They offer a variety of video production opportunities including classes, internships, involvement in their teen-produced show “Set It Up,” and more. Their programs encourage creativity, civic engagement, and media awareness. Youth participants use state of the art digital video cameras, non-linear editing systems, and multi-camera television studios at SPNN. Their Educational Channel 16 is devoted to sharing youth-produced videos and educational programming with the broader community in Saint Paul. They also provide in-school residencies and activities. www.spnn.org/youth/index.html Spy Hop Productions is a nonprofit youth media and arts education center founded in 1999. It is located in the historic Art Space district of downtown Salt Lake City, Utah. Their mission is to cultivate the visions and voices of an emerging generation via the big screen, the airwaves, and the world-wide-web. They specialize in educational solutions through the multimedia arts, and remain committed to providing a safe after-school and summertime learning center for underserved youth in grades Kindergarten through 12; closing the digital divide by providing access to the latest technologies; and promoting media literacy, youth leadership, and sense of community. www.spyhop.org Street-Level Youth Media educates Chicago’s inner-city youth in media arts and emerging technologies for use in self-expression, communication, and social change. Street-Level’s programs build critical thinking skills for urban youth who have been historically neglected by the government and mass media. Using video production, computer-generated art, and the Internet, Street-Level’s young people address community issues, access advanced communication technology, and gain inclusion in our information-based society. Street Levels provides residencies, workshops and a variety of special activities for youth makers. www.street-level.org

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Media Arts Resources

Organizations

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Video Machete is a Chicago-based, inter-generational collective of cultural workers. They use multimedia, video production, and alternative press to explore and document the stories and perspectives of communities that are erased and distorted by mainstream media. Video Machete is committed to producing cultural work that addresses real change in our communities and society. Programs include a variety of workshops and residency programs offered on diverse topics throughout the Chicago area. www.videomachete.org The Walker Art Center is better known as a world-renown modern arts center; however, it also offers programs for young media artists. Each spring, the Walker hosts “Girls In The Director’s Chair,” a regional film and video festival featuring works by young women. The Walker also offers highly specialized events and workshops for youth media makers. www.walkerart.org

Funding Sources It is often difficult for a school to carry the full financial burden of building a media arts program. There are numerous foundations and corporations and educational sponsors that support media arts education. We have listed a small sampling of resources below, but we encourage you to search the Internet for funders that meet the specific geographic and population criteria of your school. The Minnesota State Arts Board is a leading organization that helps create a healthy environment for the arts throughout the state of Minnesota. The Arts in Education School Support program provides matching funds to sponsor artist residencies of one week or longer. Any Minnesota public or private non parochial school or nonprofit educational organization may apply for up to 50% of the cost of the residency experience. www.arts.state.mn.us Regional Arts Councils support arts activities conducted by nonprofit arts groups and schools. Depending on what region of the state your school resides in, arts activity grants range from $500 - $7,500. The Regional Arts Councils are funded by the Minnesota Legislature and have been instrumental in introducing new artforms to many Minnesota communities. For additional information about your regional arts council, go to the Minnesota State Arts Board site. www.arts.state.mn.us/racs/index.htm The U.S. Department of Education offers a variety of educational grants to improve student academic success. For those with specific populations of students (i.e., Native American, immigrant, special education, etc.), you may find valuable opportunities for developing your media arts model. The Department of Education also strives to support best practices programs in every core academic area, one of which is the arts. Keep in mind that the Department of Education requires stringent implementation and evaluation practices. Take your time, and involve others in developing your proposal. www.ed.gov National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) promotes the belief that children and youth benefit from an education in the arts. The NEA provides grants primarily to nonprofit arts group with well-established school partners. If you have developed a partnership with a local arts organization, begin talking with them about a potential proposal partnerships. Depending on the scope of the proposed activities, grant amounts vary from $5,000 to $100,000. www.nea.gov

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Media Arts Resources

Production Purchases It is important to research purchase prices before making a substantial investment. We have listed two primary sites that should help you in your search. We recommend that you work with vendors that are familiar with school purchasing and carry reputable consumer ratings. We have listed below two primary websites worth checking out: www.apple.com The Apple website provides educational information, discounts, and professional consultations regarding the purchase of Macintosh computers and Apple-compatible software. www.dealtime.com There are many good purchase comparison guides online. Dealtime.com provides information regarding vendors and pricing.

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Jesse Bruguier / Digital Artist & Mentor My name is Jesse Bruguier, and I attend Four Directions Charter School. I like taking photographs. I especially like taking pictures of cars, people, and the things I come across every day. I like to show others the world that surrounds me and how nicely I can portray it through my photography and video work. I especially like to create artwork for other Native Americans. I like to show them the cars, my family, my neighborhood, and other important things in my life. There aren’t many movies and things out there in which other Natives can see themselves reflected. By making artwork from my point of view, I’m also speaking to an audience that sees things the way I do. I chose to be a Peer Mentor because I thought it would be fun to teach other Native American students. Instead, I worked more with Latinos, which was also a good learning experience. I got to show them how to manipulate their images using Adobe Photoshop and iMovie. It was a lot of fun, and I learned a lot about teaching others.

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Partner Contact Information

Four Directions Charter School serves Native American youth by providing quality education opportunities at its site in north Minneapolis. To inquire about attending the school or to order a copy of Through The Eagle’s Eye, contact Ronald Buckanaga, Program Director, at Four Directions Charter School, 1113 West Broadway, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 55411. Telephone: 612.588.0183 Email: buckanaga@yahoo.com Website: www.fourdirectionsschool.org In Progress is a nonprofit media arts group located in the Lowertown area of Saint Paul. In Progress provided program development, oversight, and instructional expertise for Through The Eagle’s Eye. In Progress is also responsible for developing this guide with its partners cited on this page. To inquire about media education opportunities, ask for Kristine Sorensen, Executive Director, at In Progress, 262 4th Street East, Suite 301, Saint Paul, Minnesota, 55101. Telephone: 651.228.1271 Email: ythmedia@aol.com Website: www.in-progress.org

El Colegio Charter School emphasizes the arts, environment, and technology in addition to core academic learning. The majority of the students at El Colegio are Latino, but the school aims to serve high school students from all cultures. El Colegio participated in modeling media arts activities for its students in Year 2 of Through The Eagle’s Eye. To inquire about their programs, contact David Greenberg, Education Director, at El Colegio Charter School, 4137 Bloomington Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 55407. Telephone: 612.728.5728 Email: david@el-colegio.org Website: www.el-colegio.org High School for Recording Arts (HSRA) provides individualized learning in core academic areas, instruction in major areas of the music industry, and coursework that develops student production and performance skills in the recording studio. HSRA participated in Through The Eagle’s Eye for two years and is now implementing their own media arts program. To inquire about their programs, contact Paula Anderson, Education Director, at 550 Vandalia Street, Saint Paul, Minnesota, 55114. Telephone: 651- 287-0890 Email: paula@hsra.org Website: www.hsra.org The Minnesota Department of Education (MDE) and the United States Department of Education’s Federal Charter Schools Program funded Through The Eagle’s Eye. In an attempt to model and disseminate the best practices to charter schools, MDE continues to provide innovative funding opportunities to schools with exemplary programs. To inquire about possible grant opportunities for your school, check out these web sites: www.uscharterschools.org www.ed.gov www.isbe.net/grants/default.htm www.education.state.mn.us/mde/index.html

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Kelly Mills / Digital Artist & Mentor

My name is Kelly Mills, and I’m in the 11th grade at Four Directions Charter School. I like to take pictures of family and friends and make movies. So far, I’ve created a lot of manipulated pictures and I made a photo montage video about friendship. This summer, I helped a friend make a movie—it was really fun to work on. I’ve been a peer mentor for about a year. Up to this point, I’ve been teaching other students to do create digital photos and videos. I really like to work in photography more than video. I also enjoy helping other students with their media arts projects. My goal is to learn more about photo and video, finish school, and move up in the world.

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Contributors

Ronald Buckanaga is the Director of Four Directions Charter School and the director of the Through The Eagle’s Eye program. Ron has been teaching for more than twenty years and has supported media arts education since the early 1990’s. He obtained his Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from Bemidji State University in 1985 and his Masters in Education from the University of Minnesota in 1990. He is a member of the White Earth Band of Ojibwe.

Jenny Hanson has been teaching web and computer classes at Four Directions for the past year. She provided web design services for this program and is responsible for making Through The Eagle’s Eye available on Four Direction’s website. She is an independent film/video maker and owns her own production company. She has a B.A. in Communications from Augsburg College and an Associate of Science in Sounds Arts from Minneapolis Community & Technical College. She will complete a M.F.A. in New Media from Transart Institute in July of 2007. She had been working with youth for over ten years.

Niibin Dawn Headbird is a Media Arts instructor and artist from Leech Lake Reservation. She started making videos when she was sixteen years old while attending high school at Four Directions. Niibin is a graduate of the University of Minnesota with a Bachelor of Arts degree in American Indian Studies. Niibin worked as a coordinator and Peer Mentor instructor for Through The Eagle’s Eye. She also worked in partnership with In Progress and peer mentors to create the PowerPoint presentations included in this guide.

Tomas Leal is the Video Facilitator at the High School For Recording Arts. He began his career as a digital artist in 1996, participating in a media arts workshop offered by In Progress. Since then, Tomas has gone on to build a career as a professional photographer, music video producer, and media instructor. Tomas has worked for the High School for Recording Arts since 2003 and has been active in developing the Dream Team model featured in Through The Eagle’s Eye.

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Contributors

Renato Lombardi is a musician and multimedia artist from Argentina living and working in the Twin Cities for the last 10 years. He has been involved in different art projects with teenagers throughout Minnesota. Renato is the Fine Arts instructor at El Colegio Charter School and has been instrumental in developing their Media Arts program. He assisted with the oversight of program modeling and developed many mentorship opportunities for students during Through The Eagle’s Eye.

Kate McClure teaches English, Art, and Fishing classes. Her hobbies & interests include writing (creative nonfiction and poetry), reading, home renovation, beading, and fishing/fly tying. Kate obtained her Bachelor of Arts degree from Hamline University in 1996 and obtained her Masters of Fine Arts in Creative Writing from Antioch University-Los Angeles in 2002. Kate was the editor of Through The Eagle’s Eye. She worked with In Progress staff and peer mentors to guide this writing process as well as contributing her own writing.

I. Karon Sherarts is a national consultant in media literacy, media arts, and interdisciplinary learning in diverse settings. Karon holds a M.A. in American Studies and is on the adjunct faculty at Hamline University, where she designs and teaches course to meet emerging needs in media literacy. Ms. Sherarts consults nationally with school districts and state education departments on standards, performance-based assessment, evaluation, and staff development. Karon assisted in developing the foundation for the Through The Eagle’s Eye curriculum guide and mentored students in the writing process.

Anna Sherwood is an accomplished video artist and writer. Anna hails from the state of Alaska but has spent the last six years living and working in the Twin Cities. Anna directed the New Voices Program at the American Indian Center and now works independently as a commercial video producer, artist/educator, and festival coordinator. Anna is a firm supporter of young Indian artists and has dedicated her life’s work to promoting the public voice of indigenous artmakers. She is also a graduate from the University of Minnesota. Anna provided peer mentor training and oversaw video activities with students.

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Contributors

Kristine Sorensen is a media artist and the Executive Director of In Progress, a nonprofit media arts group. She has been working in the field of media arts education since 1988 and has trained young media artists throughout the United States. Kristine has written curriculum, developed multi-year media arts programs, and taught in diverse classroom and community settings. She is responsible for developing and implementing Through The Eagle’s Eye and writing the contents of this guide with peer mentors and project consultants.

Sai Thao is an accomplished media artist who has earned numerous regional and national awards for her video work. She has been a part of In Progress’ activities since she was fourteen years old, when she first began making videos as part of a school residency program. Sai assisted in modeling media arts activities at the High School for Recording Arts and was one of the peer mentor trainers for Through The Eagle’s Eye.

Matthew Vaky graduated from Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh with both a B.F.A. and an M.F.A. in Theatre. He taught acting and directing there for four years as well. He moved to Minneapolis in 1985 and began acting, directing, and writing at various Twin Cities theatres, including The Mixed Blood, Stepping Stone Theatre, Teatro del Pueblo, the Illusion Theatre, and for the Minnesota Fringe Festival. He joined El Colegio Charter School in 2002 and facilitated the modeling of peer mentorship and video arts creation as part of the Through The Eagle’s Eye program.

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Laura Thompson / Digital Artist & Mentor My name is Laura Thompson, and I attend four Directions Charter School. I am fourteen years old, I am Native American, and I like to take pictures and manipulate them. Most of my photography and video works are about family and the pride I have in them and my Native American culture. This year, I produced a video about the everyday things in my life. I also just finished a photo series called Native American Women of Pride. Many of the women I portrayed are from my own family. They aren't the typical heroes you might think of, but they are amazing to me. They are my teachers, my support, and my leaders. I continue to learn from them, and I want others to see the respect I have by honoring them through my art. I joined the peer mentor program so I could learn how to teach others the art of photography. ������������������������ I was surprised when I actually got my courage up to teach. Standing up in front of people- having them watch you and expect things from you is really hard. It makes you nervous- scared you will make a mistake, or you will teach them something wrong. It also makes me proud to think that I have been able to teach other people my own age and do it well. It was great when they asked questions that I could answer. I know now that if I want to, I can teach others.

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Acknowledgements

We would like to acknowledge the important contributions made by our partners, including our peer mentors, partnering schools, media arts instructors and consultants. Without the contributions of the following individuals, this curriculum guide would not have been created.

Peer Mentors Nicole Auginash Christian Avilla Nikki Blackwolf Jesse Bruguier Caroline Buckanaga Kimberly Crowell Curtis Fohrenkam Terrah Eischens Herme Garcia Shayla Guyton Leah Holmes Victoria Jackson-Noriega David Jourdain Tiana LaPointe Melissa Lawson Keisha Little Cloud

Israel Mills Kelly Mills Jose Antonio Maquin Jeanné Peirce Jeremy Quiroa Josh Oliver Jorge Ortiz Joe Peterson Norma Smith Shawnesha Stillday Nicole Stone Nazzah Swenson Laura Thompson Angel Tohannie Mike Warrior

Student Contributors Jayson Annette Clifford Bahma Tamara Bahma Angelo BlackFeather Patti DuFault Angela DuFault Kristina Graham Melinda Jones Dawahn Littlen Marquita Lowe

Martin Mendoza Duvelle Montgomery Leonia “Brittany” Greshan Leslie Ramirez Sebastian Rodriguez Cylicia Roybal Shawnee Seelye Julian Weyaus Sasha Weyaus Tony Wind

Partner School Administrators Paula Anderson, Education Director - High School For Recording Arts David Ellis, Founder - High School For Recording Arts David Greenberg, Education Director - El Colegio Charter School Tony Simmons, Program Director - High School For Recording Arts

Additional Instructors & Consultants Mike Guille - Art Director, Tech Specialist Tracy Hanggi, Educational Assistant - Four Directions Charter School Donte Suttle, Sound Engineer - High School For Recording Arts Phil Winden, Sound Director - High School For Recording Arts

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Supplemental Media Resources on DVD

Disc One - Student Created Video Works

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This DVD may be played in any DVD player or computer with DVD playback capabilities. The DVD may be played in continuous order, or The disc includes thirteen videos produced by students of Four Directions Charter School. Hear Our Voices For You: Your Eagle’s Cry Has Been Heard Treaty of 1854 The Keepers of The Stronghold Dream The Spirit of the Jingle Dress A New Day In A New Life Gwayako-Bimaadizi (Live a Proper Life) Child Abuse I Know But I’m Sorry Bag-o-sen-dam How Could We Live Like This? Down & Out: Living On The Rez From Warpony to Warrior

Disc Two - Media Resources

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This DVD is formatted as external storage and may be read by any computer (PC or MAC) that has DVD-Read capabilities. There are four folders that contain the following files: PDF Folder: includes the: complete guide, curriculum overview, media arts resources, partner contacts and each of the eleven units. All are saved as PDF files and readable by Adobe Acrobat software. Powerpoint Presentations: includes seven presentations that may be viewed on any PC or MAC that runs Microsoft Word with Powerpoint. Sound Samples: Nine sound samples are provided that are saved in aiff format. These files are easily played using iTunes, Real Audio Player, Quick Time or Windows Media Player. Video Assignments: This folder includes three examples of student produced video assignments. Each file is saved as a DV Stream file and may be played using Quicklime or Windows Media Player.

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Through the Eagle’s Eye is a curriculum guide to support teachers and administrators in building innovative and academically challenging media arts programs. This guide was produced by Four Directions Charter School and In Progress, which have successfully implemented media arts curriculum for students since 1991. This guide was produced as part of Four Direction’s Federal Charter Schools program, which is funded through the Minnesota Department of Education and the United States Department of Education. The guide is available at no charge by writing to Four Directions Charter School at the address listed below, or you may download this curriculum from our website.

Four Directions Charter School 1113 West Broadway Minneapolis, Minnesota 55411 www.fourdirectionsschool.org/eagles.htm

In Progress 262 4th Street East, Suite 501 Saint Paul, Mn 55101 www.in-progress.org to go directly to the curriculum downloads go to the site below: http://www.in-progress.org/ee/index.php/InProgress/04curriculum

Four Directions Charter School provides culturally based education that is the foundation of life-long learning for American Indian students.


Through The Eagle's Eye  

Innovative Approaches to Teaching Media Arts Through The Eagle’s Eye is a curriculum guide that supports teachers and administrators in bui...

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