Page 1

GUIDE TO NEW YORK

SEE THE NEWEST ART GALLERIES

PLAY THE BEST OFF-BROADWAY THEATERS

SHOP RENT YOUR NEXT PARTY OUTFIT!

最佳之地 潇洒购物 游览名胜 MARCH 2018

wheretraveler.com

PROMOTION

Get ready to explore the depths of theatrical innovation at “SpongeBob SquarePants, The Broadway Musical”


March Where New York

4 EDITOR‘S NOTE 6 PUBLISHER’S PICK 64 THE FIX

8

TOP 5

Our favorite ways for spending March in New York.

10 CALENDAR

Flowers, automobiles and the Irish on parade.

14 INSIDER

16 IN THE ‘HOOD All About Harlem

18 ACROSS THE BRIDGE Windsor Terrace, Brooklyn

20 ARTIST HAVENS

Check out these neighborhoods for some cutting-edge art.

22 TOWN OF THEATRICS Thought-provoking plays and musicals not on Broadway. WHERE 中文

24

纽约著名的商店、 博物馆和景点

28 Shows

54 Explore

40 Food

56 Sights

46 Shop

59 Be Well

49 Art

61 Maps

52 Scene

Allan Kaprow, “George Washington Bridge, With Cars” (detail, 1955). For more art on display this month, see p. 49.

COVER PROMOTION A roster of Grammy Award winners, a visionary director and a Tony Award-winning design team align to create a new musical, “SpongeBob SquarePants,” which The New York Times declares is “brilliant!”

COVER IMAGE: JOAN MARCUS. TOC IMAGE: ALLAN KAPROW, “GEORGE WASHINGTON BRIDGE, WITH CARS” (DETAIL,1955), ©ALLAN KAPROW ESTATE, COURTESY PRIVATE COLLECTION OF MICHAEL AND JENNIFER PETERS

Top designer gowns and tuxes you wear—and then give back!


Y O U R T R AV E L I N G C O M P A N I O N S I N C E 19 3 6 ®

March 2018

NEW YORK

I am the opposite of a hoarder. I delight in throwing out old clothes and long-neglected boots: A minimalist closet makes my feng shui soul smile. Which is why I think Rent the Runway, a shop in the Flatiron District that rents out formal and casual outfits from top designers, is a brilliant concept— less stuff in the closets! (see p. 14). On the subject of downsizing, I loved Sonia Weiser’s feature on Off-Broadway theaters (p. 22), which spotlights a group of fine playhouses that show wonderful dramas , comedies and musicals in theaters a little smaller (and less expensive) than Broadway. Not too long ago, art lovers headed straight to Chelsea or the Upper East Side for the city’s top galleries, but artists and their landlords have now expanded to other neighborhoods around town: You can find out where on p. 20. Happy reading!

EDITORI A L & DE SIGN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Lois Anzelowitz Levine EXECUTIVE EDITOR Francis Lewis ASSISTANT EDITOR Daniel Fridman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Rich Fisher, Sonia Weiser,

Arielle Witter ART DIRECTOR Jennifer Keller Vaz

MORRIS VISITOR PUBLICATIONS M V P | CRE ATI V E CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER Haines Wilkerson SENIOR REGIONAL EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Margaret Martin DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY Isaac Arjonilla CREATIVE COORDINATOR Beverly Mandelblatt M V P | PUBLICATION SERV ICE S PUBLICATION SERVICES DIRECTOR Karen Fralick PUBLICATION SERVICES MANAGER Mickey Kibler DIGITAL IMAGING Erik Lewis M V P | M A NUFAC TURING & TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR OF MANUFACTURING Donald Horton Emails for all of the above except contributors: firstname.lastname@morris.com

Lois Anzelowitz Levine Editor, Where New York @wherenewyork

M V P | NE W YORK

25 W. 45th St., Ste. 1203, New York, New York 10036 212.636.2700

#wheretraveler.com

For more great shops, theaters and art galleries around town, visit our Instagram page, @wheretraveler.com connect with us

IN THE WORLD Where is an international network of magazines first published in 1936 and distributed in over 4,000 leading hotels in more than 50 places around the world. Look for us when you visit any of the following cities, or plan ahead for your next trip by visiting us online at wheretraveler.com. UNITED STATES Alaska, Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Charleston, Charlotte, Chicago, Dallas, Indianapolis, Jacksonville/St. Augustine/Amelia Island, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Maui, Miami, Minneapolis/St. Paul, New Orleans, New York, Oahu, Orange County (CA), Orlando, Philadelphia, Phoenix/Scottsdale, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle, St. Louis, Tampa, Tucson, Washington, D.C. ASIA Hong Kong, Macau, Singapore AUSTRALIA Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney CANADA Calgary, Canadian Rockies, Edmonton, Halifax, Muskoka/Parry Sound, Ottawa, Toronto, Vancouver, Victoria, Whistler, Winnipeg EUROPE Berlin, Budapest, Istanbul, London, Madrid, Milan, Moscow, Paris, Rome, St. Petersburg

4

WHE RE I M A R C H 2018

MORRIS COMMUNICATIONS CHAIRMAN William S. Morris III PRESIDENT & CEO William S. Morris IV

Where® magazine is produced by Morris Visitor Publications (MVP), a division of Morris Communications Co., LLC. 725 Broad St., Augusta, GA 30901, morrismedianetwork.com. Where magazine and the logo are registered trademarks of Morris Visitor Publications. Where makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information it publishes, but cannot be held responsible for any consequences arising from errors or omissions. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part strictly prohibited.


Y O U R T R AV E L I N G C O M P A N I O N S I N C E 19 3 6 ®

NEW YORK

PUBLISHER & VICE PRESIDENT, NATIONAL MARKETING

Adeline Tafuri Jurecka REGIONAL VICE PRESIDENT, SALES, EAST Kristen Standish A DV ERTISING & CIRCUL ATION VICE PRESIDENT SALES DEVELOPMENT

Lauren Alperin Meirowitz 212.716.2774 DIRECTOR OF CLIENT SERVICES Maria Pavlovets 212.636.2759 MARKETING & SPECIAL EVENTS MANAGER

Gabrielle Santo 212.716.8572 ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Dawn Stout 212.636.2780, Charna West 212.636.2709 CLIENT RELATIONS MANAGER Dyxa Cubi 212.716.8571 SALES ASSISTANT Natalie Colon MARKETING EDITOR Farah Lopez MARKETING DESIGNER Carrie Donahue M V P | E X ECUTI V E PRESIDENT Donna W. Kessler CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Dennis Kelly VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS Angela E. Allen

Kerry Butler, left, and Erika Henningsen in the Broadway production of “Mean Girls.”

March brings not only the beginning of

DIGITAL OPERATIONS MANAGER Richard H. Brashear II DIRECTOR OF CIRCULATION Scott Ferguson M V P | N ATION A L SA LE S VICE PRESIDENT, NATIONAL INTEGRATED SALES Rebekah Valberg DIRECTOR OF NATIONAL SALES Liza Meneades MANAGER, NATIONAL INTEGRATED SALES David Gately

warmer weather, but the start of the spring season on Broadway, and this year, we have lots to look forward to!

Emails for all of the above: firstname.lastname@morris.com

two little girls have been counting the minutes). “Summer: The Donna Summer Musical” will have us dancing in our seats, just as “Escape to Margaritaville” will have us looking for that lime and salt. Finally, “Mean Girls” moves from screen to stage, with previews beginning March 12. Watch your back! MORRIS COMMUNICATIONS CHAIRMAN William S. Morris III PRESIDENT & CEO William S. Morris IV

Adeline Tafuri Jurecka Publisher, Where New York

6

WHE RE I M A R C H 2018

Where® magazine is produced by Morris Visitor Publications (MVP), a division of Morris Communications Co., LLC. 725 Broad St., Augusta, GA 30901, morrismedianetwork.com. Where magazine and the logo are registered trademarks of Morris Visitor Publications. Where makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information it publishes, but cannot be held responsible for any consequences arising from errors or omissions. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part strictly prohibited.

PHOTO: SCENE FROM BROADWAY’S “MEAN GIRLS,” ©2017 JOAN MARCUS

Disney’s “Frozen” opens this month (my


PHOTO CREDIT GOES HERE

MARCH 2018


NEW YORK

1

Spring Thaw

Let “Frozen”(left), Disney’s hot new Broadway musical, warm you up. 2

March Madness

Cheer on college basketball’s best teams from the Big 10, Big East and ACC at Barclays Center and Madison Square Garden.

National Noodle Month

Sate your cravings for pasta, ramen, lo mein, pad thai and pho in NYC’s ethnic eateries. 4

Populism

Journey to the American heartland at the Whitney Museum’s major exhibition of Grant Wood’s art. 5

Women’s History Month

Celebrate female achievements at the New-York Historical Society’s Center for Women’s History.

PHOTO: PATTI MURIN AS ANNA AND JOHN RIDDLE AS HANS IN ‘FROZEN,” DEEN VAN MEER

3


March 3-April 22

The Orchid Show The 16th annual edition of this show inside the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory at the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx features rare and iconic specimens. Thousands of orchids—in a myriad of shapes and origins—are curated with complexity in a series of installations by renowned floral artist Daniel Ost. Show tours are given Tu-F and orchid-care demonstrations and expert Q&A sessions Sa-Su. On March 17, 24 and 31, the conservatory reopens at 6:30 pm for its 21-and-up Orchid Evenings series, featuring orchid-inspired cocktails, music and dancing. 10

WHE RE I M A R C H 2018

March 8-11

The Armory Show This annual art show at Piers 92 and 94 features more than 200 presentations from leading global art galleries, artist commissions and public programs, and includes 27 galleries presenting solo or dual-artist works created specifically for this event. Kids 12 and under get in for free with an adult.

PHOTOS: THE ARMORY SHOW 2017, COURTESY BFA; DENDROBIUM AT THE ORCHID SHOW, COURTESY NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN

March at a Glance


Downton Abbey: The Exhibition Through April 2

Guests average 60 to 90 minutes exploring the post-Edwardian beauty of this collection of galleries mirroring scenery from the hit TV show, on extended view at 218 W. 57th St.

The Poetry Brothel March 6

A rotating cast of poets perform public readings and improvisations during a night of burlesque and live music at the House of Yes in Bushwick, Brooklyn.

Coffee & Tea Festival March 10-11

More than 100 exhibitors pour tastings and showcase coffees and teas for the 13th straight year at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint.

Queens World Film Festival March 15-25

March 3

Tibet House US Benefit Concert Legendary American composer and Tibet House US founding member Philip Glass headlines the 31st annual evening of performances at Carnegie Hall to benefit the preservation of Tibetan culture. Fellow performers include Resistance Revival Chorus, The Patti Smith Band, Blood Orange, Stephin Merritt, Angel Olsen and several others. The night begins at 7:30 pm with a separately ticketed gala and caps off with an invocation by monks from the Drepung Gomang Monastery. 12

WHE RE I M A R C H 2018

March 17

St. Patrick’s Day Parade Grab a great spot on Fifth Ave. early in the morning to get the best view of this year’s parade, which begins at 11 am and runs between 44th & 79th sts., concluding at 5 pm.

Catch more than 180 local and foreign films at the Zukor Theatre inside Kaufman Astoria Studios and at the Museum of the Moving Image in Astoria, Queens.

Opening Day at Citi Field March 29

Play ball! The Mets open their 2018 regular season at 1:10 pm against the St. Louis Cardinals.

New York International Auto Show March 30-April 8

The Jacob K. Javits Convention Center hosts more than 1,000 cars and trucks at North America’s first, largest and mostattended auto show.

PHOTOS: MONKS PERFORMING AN INVOCATION AT THE TIBET HOUSE US 2017 BENEFIT CONCERT, JASON KEMPIN/GETTY IMAGES; NYC ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE, COURTESY NYC ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE

IN MARCH


SHOP

DRESS UP TIME Rent yourself some fancy duds while in town!

Travelers unprepared for something special to wear have an ally in Rent the Runway, which provides everything from casual to glitzy women’s apparel. Originally a pop-up shop, demand led to the flagship store opening in the Flatiron District last year. Starting at $30 and covering all price points, RTR carries outerwear, dresses and accessories from over 500 designers. Same-day rentals with last-minute gown fittings solve any eleventh-hour emergency. Plus, a personal stylist can curate a selection of looks based on your event. Another benefit is the unlimited subscription service, which includes free shipping and returns. “Subscribers come in to swap their pieces, and walk out with a new outfit on,” says Becky Leader, RTR’s VP of Retail and Customer Experience. “It’s an incredible asset for traveling, since you can save on checking a bag. Just pack your staples, then visit us to outfit your entire trip.” 14

WHE RE I M A R C H 2018

Jack Silver Formal Wear, Inc.

A wide range of styles, for new and vintage tuxedos and custom-made garments, with tailoring to accommodate all shapes and sizes.

Abe’s Formal Wear

With over 15 years of service, Abe’s maintains a wide selection of the latest formalwear styles, with alterations on rentals done while you wait.

The Black Tux

Too busy to go out hunting? The Black Tux offers online fittings and delivery right to the hotel room. Orders at least five days in advance. For more great places to rent clothes in the city, visit wheretraveler.com

PHOTOS: RENT THE RUNWAY, COURTESY OF RENT THE RUNWAY; MAN IN TUX, COURTESY THE BLACK TUX

Rent the Runway


Celebrity Chef Marcus Samuelsson elevates soul food at Red Rooster along with weekly live music; deemed the “queen of soul food,” Sylvia’s has been a staple visited by presidents and celebrities since 1962. Where a jazz club once stood, Clay serves an upscale farm-totable menu.  Red Rooster 310 Lenox Ave., 212.792.9001  Sylvia's 328 Malcolm X Blvd., 212.996.0660  Clay 553 Manhattan Ave., 212.729.1850

Fashion designers pay homage to the rich cultural history of the Harlem Renaissance at Flamekeepers Hat Club and Harlem Haberdashery. Trunk Show Designer Consignment curates high-fashion items and gives them a second life at the sleek boutique.

 Flamekeepers Hat Club 273 W. 121st St., 212.531.3542

 Harlem Haberdashery

245 Lenox Ave.,646.707.0070

 Trunk Show Designer Consignment 275-277 W. 113th St., 212.662.0009

Corner Social draws a diverse millennial crowd for nightly drink specials and a bangin’ brunch. The cozy 67 Orange Street is Harlem's best-kept secret, offering sophisticated cocktails and a small food menu. Barawine offers an eclectic menu and an extensive wine list, featuring 25 wines by the glass.  Corner Social 321 Lenox Ave., 212.510.8552  67 Orange Street 2082 Frederick Douglass Blvd., 212.662.2030  Barawine 200 Lenox Ave., 646.756.4154

The iconic Apollo Theater honors the contributions of African-American artists with live performances and theater history tours. The Studio Museum is the nexus for the exchange of ideas from artists of African descent and the National Jazz Museum is committed to keeping jazz present and thriving.  Apollo Theater 253 W. 125th St., 212.531.5305

 Studio Museum in Harlem (closed for revovations until early Spring) 144 W. 125th St., 212.864.4500

Flamekeepers Hat Club, duck

 National Jazz Museum 58 W. 129th St.,

confit at Clay restaurant;

212.348.8300

[From bottom] Hat display at

Harlem Haberdashery showcases custom clothing and photos of Harlem legends on the walls.

16

WHE RE I M A R C H 2018

For more things to do in Harlem, go to wheretraveler.com

PHOTOS: FLAMEKEEPERS HAT CLUB, COURTESY FLAMEKEEPERS HAT CLUB; CLAY RESTAURANT, ©JASON GREENSPAN; HARLEM HABERDASHERY, ©DRIELY VIEIRA

FIND THE BEST AROUND HARLEM WEST 125TH / FARAH LOPEZ


WIN NER

9

T O N Y A W A R D S® I N C L U D I N G

B E S T

M U S I C A L

WIN NER

9

T O N Y A W A R D S® I N C L U D I N G

B E S T

M U S I C A L

THE FUNNIEST MUSICAL OF ALL TIME THE FUNNIEST

‘‘ ‘‘

’’

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY JESS CAGLE

EUGENE O’NEILL THEATRE

.

BOOKOFMORMONBROADWAY.COM

MUSICAL OF ALL TIME. Disfrute del espactáculo en español. Divirta-se com o show em português.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY JESS CAGLE

EUGENE O’NEILL THEATRE

BOOKOFMORMONBROADWAY.COM

Disfrute del espactáculo en español. Divirta-se com o show em português.

’’


ACROSS THE BRIDGE FIND THE BEST IN WINDSOR TERRACE, BROOKLYN / FARAH LOPEZ

 Butterfunk Chicken

1295 Prospect Ave., 917.909.0421 (homey soul-food joint, with sweet lemonade, fried chicken and live music)  Le Paddock 1235 Prospect Ave., 718.435.0921 (French cuisine and pizza in a casual, wood-accented space)

These homespun shops are filled with everyday treasures and obscure paraphernalia from old maps to rare books.

 Windsor Place Antiques 1624 10th Ave.,

718.986.7615 (small store with curated vintage items)

 Argyle Yarn Shop

288 Prospect Park West, 347.227.7799 (family-owned with ample yarn varieties)  Terrace Books 242 Prospect Park West, 718.788.3475 (new, used and rare books) [Clockwise from bottom] Green-Wood Cemetery;

Windsor Terrace has a nofuss attitude when it comes to local watering holes. These bars offer great Brooklyn-brewed beers and cocktails, as well as full menus, to recharge after a day of exploring.

 The Double Windsor

210 Prospect Park West, 347.725.3479 (hipster bar with rotating drafts and hearty fare)  La Loba Cantina 709 Church Ave., 347.295.1141 (Mexican eatery with a vintage vibe)  The Adirondack 1241 Prospect Ave., 718.871.0100 (cozy bar with a cabin motif and traditional cocktails)

The once blue-collar neighborhood has been revived with ample opportunities to stroll in its parks and gardens and even take a horseback ride.

 Kensington Stables

51 Caton Pl., 718.972.4588 (pony rides, lessons and trail rides daily)

 Green-Wood Cemetery 500 25th St.,

718.768.7300 (national historic landmark cemetery with sprawling landscapes)

 Prospect Park Bandshell 95 Prospect Park

West, 718.965.8951 (variety of open-air entertainment most are free to the public)

roasted carrots and pistachios at Krupa Grocery; the bar at La Loba Cantina; interior of Windsor Place

18

WHE RE I M A R C H 2018

For more things to do in Windsor Terrace, go to

wheretraveler.com

PHOTOS: GREEN-WOOD CEMETERY, ART PRESSON; KRUPA GROCERY, COURTESY KRUPA GROCERY; LA LOBA CANTINA, COURTESY LA LOBA CANTINA

Sandwiched between Green-Wood Cemetery and Prospect Park lies Brooklyn's quiet Windsor Terrace district with an uncomplicated food scene full of gems.  Krupa Grocery 231 Prospect Park West, 718.709.7098 (cozy staple, serving breakfast gnocchi)


PROMOTION

Where to Go This month’s top picks for shopping, attractions and more

AVENUE Q New York’s longest running musical comedy and winner of the 2004 Tony Award® Triple Crown, Avenue Q is still the funniest, freshest show in NYC! This laugh-out-loud musical tells the timeless story of a college grad named Princeton, whose big dreams but tiny bank account land him all the way on Avenue Q. Follow Princeton and his neighbors as they struggle to find jobs, dates and their life’s “Purpose.” 340 W. 50th St., 212.239.6200, AvenueQ.com

SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS: THE BROADWAY MUSICAL

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC ENCOUNTER: OCEAN ODYSSEY This ground-breaking entertainment experience uses cutting-edge technology to transport you on an underwater journey, giving you access to rarely witnessed moments in nature. Dive into an ocean of fun without getting wet! Times Square, 226 W. 44th St., natgeoencounter.com

A roster of Grammy® Award winners, a visionary director and Tony® Award-winning design team align to bring to life the beloved Nickelodeon series with humor, heart and pure theatricality. The New York Times declares it’s “Brilliant!” Get ready to explore the depths of theatrical innovation. Palace Theatre, 1564 Broadway, 877.250.2929, SpongeBobBroadway.com

TOP OF THE ROCK With sweeping, unobstructed views of Central Park and Manhattan’s midtown and downtown skyscrapers, the view from the Top of the Rock is truly one-of-a-kind. The three-tiered observation deck on the 67th, 69th and 70th floors offer an unforgettable experience including a panoramic, 360-degree breathtaking cityscape on the 70th floor of the Rock Center Observation Deck. Reserve your tickets and plan your visit today. Open daily. 30 Rockefeller Plaza, 877.692.7625, topoftherocknyc.com

WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART Don’t miss Grant Wood: American Gothic and Other Fables on view March 2–June 10. Wood’s American Gothic is one of the most recognizable paintings in 20th century American art. Witness this masterpiece along with the full range of the artist’s work. 99 Gansevoort St., 212.570.3600, whitney.org


Artist Havens These neighborhoods haven’t just become hipster enclaves, they are also the siren song for hot new artists making an impact. IT IS NO SECRET THAT NYC is home to some of the world’s best galleries. Manhattan neighborhoods like Chelsea and Midtown have long been known as destinations for art lovers seeking out both retrospectives and new works from local and international painters, sculptors and others. Over the past several years, though, places like Manhattan’s Lower East Side and, in Brooklyn, Bushwick, Red Hook and Williamburg, have seen a spike in artist populations and their exhibitors. Visit these neighborhoods for some of the most innovative art galleries in the Big Apple. 20

WHE RE I M A R C H 2018

PHOTO CREDIT GOES HERE

By Arielle Witter


PHOTOS: IRI AND TOSHI MARUKI, “THE HIROSHIMA PANELS,” PIONEER WORKS, NEW YORK, ©PIONEER WORKS; THE CITY RELIQUARY, COURTESY THE CITY RELIQUARY; SCOTT TRELEAVEN, “UNTITLED,” (SARRACENIA/WRITING DESK), 2017, UNIQUE COLLAGE FROM ANALOG 35MM PHOTOGRAPHS, IN ARTIST FRAME, IMAGE COURTESY THE ARTIST AND INVISIBLE-EXPORTS

BUSHWICK, BROOKLYN With a parent gallery in Brussels, CLEARING is an innovative artistic space that can be found in this northern Brooklyn neighborhood. Like its European counterpart, this stateside location dedicates itself to showcasing the artwork of contemporary young artists from across the globe. Artists featured in this gallery include Daniel Dewar and Grégory Gicquel, whose “Rosa Aurora Rosa,” which was created out of the duo’s exploration of bidets, sinks and soap dishes, is a work of marble in varying shades of pink. Also in Bushwick is Signal, which, in 2012, was officially transformed from rug storage space into an art gallery. Opened by friends Kyle Jacques and Alexander Johns, Signal is dedicated to showcasing works by emerging artists, while also providing spaces for nontraditional art forms, like performance art. Signal also plays host to annual local events, including Bushwick’s Art Book & Zine Fair, usually held in July.

RED HOOK, BROOKLYN Bringing thought-provoking art to Red Hook, Pioneer Works is an experimental and interdisciplinary production space that can be found in this seaside-like Brooklyn neighborhood. The gallery strives to push boundaries in order to create a provocative cultural environment for its visitors. Upcoming Pioneer Works exhibits, adhering to the gallery’s tradition of showcasing mixed-media and other works, range from

a televisual, performative display to this month’s six colossal light works by New York-based artist Anthony McCall.

WILLIAMSBURG, BROOKLYN Unlike other NYC-based galleries, The City Reliquary bridges the gap between past and present by celebrating the artistic history that makes up the creative city it calls home. Its origins date back to 2002, when founder Dave Herman transformed his apartment on the corner of Grand and Havemeyer Streets into an interactive window display. Since those humble beginnings, The City Reliquary has moved to Metropolitan Avenue and today houses a smorgasbord of exhibits that tell the story of New York City through odd and engaging artifacts.

THE LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN Invisible-Exports, previously located on Orchard Street, is another city art hub that is home to works, always innovative and sometimes controversial, created by a variety of contemporary artists. Since moving to its Eldridge Street location in 2013, the art space has showcased conceptual pieces that have an alternative cultural flair. Cutting-edge art aficionados and traditional art lovers alike can all appreciate the work on display. Currently on view is an exhibit by modernist Scott Treleaven, with collages of his own photographs, and text paintings and new ceramics by American visual artist Cary Leibowitz.

A RT FO R A RT ’ S S A K E

[Facing page] “The Hiroshima Panels,” Iri and Toshi Maruki, a recent installation at Pioneer Works. [Top] Permanent exhibit at The City Reliquary. [Above] Scott Treleaven, “untitled,” unique collage from analog 35mm photographs, on display at Invisible-Exports.

21


Performances fill this city, not only on the Great White Way, but elsewhere, with exciting works, both classic and innovative. By Sonia Weiser

22

WHE RE I M A R C H 2018

If you’re craving theater in New York, your first instinct may be to hightail it over to Times Square and see what play or musical still has a few open seats. But Broadway isn’t the only option for live entertainment—Off-Broadway shows are no less worthy of your attention. The productions can be mesmerizing, inventive and just as moving as their more expensive counterparts. And don’t forget: Off-Broadway is where “Hamilton” and “The Band’s Visit” both got their start. La MaMa Since the 1960s, La MaMa has been a laboratory for untraditional productions from emerging and established artists. Initially a single, subterranean theater,

La MaMa now holds programming in its three-building campus, including theatrical productions, educational series, readings and visual-art exhibitions. This month, La MaMa presents the climate-change-centric “Extreme Whether” and “Distant Observer: Tokyo/New York Correspondence,” a collaboration between two playwrights and developed in Tokyo. Tickets for performances are $25 at most. Barrow Street Theatre Immersive theater continues to have its moment with the Tooting Arts Club production of Stephen Sondheim’s “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street” at the Barrow Street Theatre in the West Village. Rather than

PHOTO: JO LAMPERT IN “THE LUCKY ONES,” CADE MARTIN, COURTESY ARS NOVA

A Town of Theatrics


PHOTOS: BABA BRINKMAN IN “RAP GUIDE TO CONSCIOUSNESS,” DARREN LEE COLE; CAROLEE CARMELLO AND HUGH PANARO IN “SWEENEY TODD: THE DEMON BARBER OF FLEET STREET,” ©2017 JOAN MARCUS

placing the action in a traditional venue, the play is staged within an exact replica of the London pie shop Harrington’s—the site of the show’s first run in 2014. You can even get an on-site “pie and mash” dinner before the performance begins. Fair warning though: Not only is “Sweeney Todd” bloody, this production is also not cheap. Partial-view seats start at $55, and the optional pre-performance meal costs $22.50. Daryl Roth Theatre Originally the site of the Union Square Savings Bank, the Daryl Roth Theatre is now the current residence for “In & Of Itself,” a one man show written by and starring magician Derek DelGaudio. Opening last April, “In & Of Itself” has extended its initial 10-week run three times, thanks to DelGaudio’s power to amaze even the most jaded of audience members. If DelGaudio’s name doesn’t ring a bell, you may recognize that of the executive producer: Neil Patrick Harris. SoHo Playhouse Once the site of General George Washington’s headquarters, the building was transformed into a theater in the 1920s before coming under the direction of Edward Albee in the 1960s. Now, the SoHo Playhouse is host to both long-running, weekly shows and limited engagements. In March, two award-winning, one-person productions take the stage: “Nanette,” from the Australian comedian Hannah Gadsby, and “Rap Guide to Consciousness,” from the Canadian rapper, playwright and educator Baba Brinkman. This month also marks the final performances of “Broad Comedy,” the highly acclaimed, all-female, weekly musical parody show. 59E59 Home to three theaters, 59E59 hosts a steady stream of national and international works, providing a platform for nonprofit theater companies to showcase their talents. With performances six nights per week and 50 weeks out of the year, 59E59 has multiple plays overlapping in March, all of which feature small casts and boundarypushing plots with subjects ranging from love to race to religion to art itself. The Public For over 60 years, The Public has maintained its status as one of the city’s greatest cultural institutions, and this

year is no different. The original home to Lin- Manuel Miranda’s “Hamilton,” the East Village multistage theater boasts incredible star power in front of and behind its curtains, as well as in its more intimate cabaretstyle venue, Joe’s Pub. Between the two spaces, there’s at least one performance nearly every night this month, including the new play “Kings,” written by Sarah Burgess and directed by Thomas Kail (who also directed “Hamilton”), about a lobbyist in Washington; and “The Low Road,” from award-winning playwright Bruce Norris and director Michael Greif. Ars Nova This month, Ars Nova, a Hell’s Kitchen nonprofit theater space, presents the world premiere of “The Lucky Ones,” a musical by Sarah Gancher and indierock duo The Bengsons (Abigail Nessen Bengson and Shaun McClain Bengson). Directed by Anne Kauffman, the play explores the themes of family, faith and love to the soundtrack of indie folk-rock and stars a cast from both stage and screen. Tickets range from $25 to $65, depending on date and ordering method; the show is presented by Ars Nova but housed at the Connelly Theater in the East Village. Clearly, there is plenty to see around town besides shows on the Great White Way. And even better news: Many of these shows may be available at discount prices at the four TKTS booths around the city. Curtains up!

(Facing page) Jo Lampert performing in Ars Nova’s “The Lucky Ones.” (Top) Carolee Carmello and Hugh Panaro, who recenty starred in “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street” at the Barrow Street Theatre. (Above) Baba Brinkman in “Rap Guide to Consciousness” at the SoHo Playhouse.

23


WHERE NOW

时尚购物 顶级珠宝、配饰和服装。

The White Company (白色公司) 这家英国时尚生活品牌 经营男女服装、床单、 香水和餐具, 均以纯 白色为背景装点。155

Fifth Ave., 646.741.8777, us.thewhitecompany.com

Furla (芙拉) 驻足 Furla (芙拉), 在这家奢华意大利配饰 商店, 挑选一款心仪的 时尚皮包, 或是一双摩 登皮鞋。

645 Fifth Ave., 212.572.9945, us.furla.com

Wempe (维姆普) 在这座城市最著名的豪 华珠宝供应商的旗舰店 购物,这里占据 Fifth Avenue (第五大道) 约一 半的街区, 具有足够的空 间容纳 Rolex (劳力士) 和 Patek Philippe (百达 翡丽) 展厅。

The Eight Senses 最近一位时尚评论家写到, The Eight Senses 这家女装精品 店经营“低调而实用”的设计 商品。 这家用最简洁的色彩和 石头图案装饰的旗舰店经营简约 时尚的商品。 414 W. Broadway,

646.850.0770, theeightsenses.com

Stuart Weitzman (斯图尔特·韦茨曼) 在颁奖季的红毯上, 经常可见 Stuart Weitzman 优雅而舒适的衣 履: Jessica Alba (杰西卡· 奥尔芭) 和 Blake Lively (布莱克· 莱弗利) 等明星都曾穿过 Stuart Weitzman (斯图尔特·韦茨曼) 的性感凉鞋、靴子以及抢眼的 细高跟鞋。

The White Company (白色公司)

625 Madison Ave., 212.750.2555, stuartweitzman.com

700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000, wempe.com

The RealReal 如果您正在寻找奢侈品 寄售, 这家位于 Wooster Street (伍斯特大街), 经 营 Chanel (香奈儿) 和 Cartier (卡地亚) 等顶级设 计师品牌的各种八九成新 服装、珠宝和配饰的商店 一定可以满足您的心愿。 80 Wooster St., 212.203.8386, therealreal.com

Stephen F 这家瑞典男装设计品 牌 (入围去年国际新星大 赛决赛) 打造了得体而精 美的优质男装。 36 Little W. 12th St., 212.633.9100, stephen-f.com 24

WHE RE I M A R C H 2018

Furla (芙拉)

Stuart Weitzman (斯图尔特 ·韦茨曼)

Wempe (维姆普)


WHERE NOW

博物馆和名胜古迹 从世界顶尖艺术博物馆到闻名全球的壮观名胜古迹,应有尽有

Museum of Arts and Design (艺术设计博物馆) 除欣赏 精湛无 比的设计和工 艺之外, 游客还可在其 中一个 Open Studio (开放 展室) 观察艺术家的 创作过程。 2 Columbus Circle, 212.299.7777, madmuseum.org The Metropolitan Museum of Art (大都会艺术博物馆) 埃及神庙真品、罗马雕塑 和 Vincent van Gogh (文 森特·梵高) 的艺术品只是 这座宏伟博物馆里众多藏 品的一小部分。 1000 Fifth Ave., 212.535.7710, metmuseum.org Whitney Museum of American Art (惠特尼美国艺术博物馆) 自 2015 年搬到 Renzo Piano(伦佐·皮亚诺) 设计的馆址以来, 该博物馆 内无价的艺术品及其设计 本身都备受推崇。 99 Gansevoort St., 212.570.3600, whitney.org

Museum of Modern Art (现代艺术博物馆) 自博物馆于 1929 年开馆以 来, 从 Pablo Picasso (巴勃罗·毕加索) 到 Andy Warhol (安迪·沃霍尔), 他 们的作品一直在挑战 着人们定义艺术的方式。 11 W. 53rd St., 212.708.9400, moma.org

American Museum of Natural History (美国自然史博物馆) 这里的恐龙化石藏品、 哺乳动物厅和两栖动物 厅闻名遐迩。Central

Park West, at W. 79th St., 212.769.5100, amnh.org

26

WHE RE I M A R C H 2018

Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum (无畏号海空博物馆)

在 The view from Top of the Rock (巨石之巅) 上观看到的景色

Top of the Rock (巨石之巅) 位于 Rockefeller Center (洛克 菲勒中心 ) 顶部的观景 台距离地面 70 多层高, 游客可在此观览全景。 30 Rockefeller Plz., 877.692.7625, topoftherocknyc.com

The Metropolitan Museum of Art (大都会艺术博物馆) 里的希腊和罗马艺术画廊

Guggenheim Museum (古根海姆博物馆) Frank Lloyd Wright’s (弗兰 克·劳埃德·赖特) 设计的 螺旋式地标性建筑, 现代

和当代艺术作品尽在其中, 同时还举办临时展览。

1071 Fifth Ave., 212.423.3500, guggenheim.org

Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum (无畏号海空博物馆) USS 无畏号航空母舰堪称 国家历史地标, 它停 靠在 Hudson River (哈 德逊河)上, 从中可以进入 几个甲板。 Pier 86, 12th Ave., 212.245.0072, intrepidmuseum.org

One World Observatory (观景台) 站在西半球最高建筑顶部的三层室内观景台上, 极目远眺, 壮丽景致一览无遗。游客可搭乘电 梯上至 102 层, 电梯里的时移显示屏上介绍着 Manhattan Island (曼哈顿岛) 从十六世纪至今 的发展历程。 One World Trade Center, 285 Fulton St., 844.696.1776, oneworldobservatory.com


W H E R E N E W Y O R K M A R C H 2 018

Shows

SE ARCH THE CIT Y / For more listings, see wheretraveler.com/new-york-cit y

Master of the House Music lovers can experience the wizardry of conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin six times this month. As the new music director of The Metropolitan Opera (p. 39), Nézet-Séguin, pictured in the opera house’s gilded and plush auditorium, takes up the baton to lead Richard Strauss’ monumental “Elektra” (March 1, 5, 9 12 and 17)—a score that he has described as “so rich and so complex.” Rich and complex, too, are Sergey Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 2 and Michel van der Aa’s Violin Concerto, which the maestro, who is also music director of The Philadelphia Orchestra, conducts when that orchestra performs on March 13 at Carnegie Hall (p. 38).

(In previews, opens March 25) Subtitled “A Gay Fantasia on National Themes,” Tony Kushner’s epic two-part play returns to Broadway for the first time since 1993 in a National Theatre of Great Britain production starring Andrew Garfield and Nathan Lane. Neil Simon Theatre, 250 W. 52nd St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. CAROUSEL

(In previews, opens April 12) (2 hrs 45 mins) Rodgers & Hammerstein’s tragic musical about the romance between a carnival barker and an innocent young woman features a lush, memorable score. Imperial Theatre, 249 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. CHILDREN OF A LESSER GOD

(Previews begin March 22, opens April 11) (2 hrs 35 mins) A new speech teacher at a school for the deaf falls in

28 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018

love with a withdrawn and angry 26-year-old student, who refuses to speak. The revival of Mark Medoff’s Tony Award-winning Best Play of 1980 stars Joshua Jackson and Lauren Ridloff. Studio 54, 254 W. 54th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. ESCAPE TO MARGARITAVILLE

(In previews, opens March 15) The songs of Jimmy Buffett— think: “Come Monday,” “Volcano” and “Cheeseburger in Paradise”—infuse this musical comedy cocktail set in a tropical paradise, where the sun is hot and the drinks are frosty. Marquis Theatre, 210 W. 46th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. FROZEN

(In previews, opens March 22) Disney’s 2013 Oscar-winning feature, the most successful animated movie of all time, is now a full-length stage work, featuring the original songs (including “Let It Go”), plus new songs and story material.

St. James Theatre, 246 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 866.870.2717. HARRY POTTER AND THE CURSED CHILD

(Previews begin March 16, opens April 22) Harry Potter is all grown-up in this eighth story in the Harry Potter series, the first to be presented onstage. The play is presented in two parts, which can be seen in order on the same day (matinee and evening), on two consecutive evenings or separately. Lyric Theatre, 213 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves. THE ICEMAN COMETH

(Previews begin March 22, opens April 26) (3 hrs 50 mins) Eugene O’Neill’s harrowing tale of the drunks, prostitutes, radicals and dreamers who hang out at Harry Hope’s lastchance saloon stars Denzel Washington. Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, 242 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200.

LOBBY HERO

(Previews begin March 1, opens March 26) The lobby of a Manhattan apartment building is the setting for Kenneth Lonergan’s play about a murder investigation involving a security guard, his boss, a rookie cop and her unpredictable partner. Michael Cera, Chris Evans, Brian Tyree Henry and Bel Powley star. The Hayes Theater, 240 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. MEAN GIRLS

(Previews begin March 12, opens April 8) Tina Fey has written the book for the new musical, adapted from her screenplay for the 2004 movie of the same name about popularity among teenagers in an Illinois high school. August Wilson Theatre, 245 W. 52nd St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave. MY FAIR LADY

(Previews begin March 15, opens April 19) The classic 1956 Lerner & Loewe musical,

PHOTO: YANNICK NÉZET-SÉGUIN, JONATHAN TICHLER / METROPOLITAN OPERA

BROADWAY OPENINGS

ANGELS IN AMERICA


Shows based on George Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion,” returns in a new production directed by Tony Award winner Bartlett Sher and featuring a 29-piece orchestra. Vivian Beaumont Theater at Lincoln Center, 150 W. 65th St., btw btw Broadway & Amsterdam Ave., 212.239.6200. ROCKTOPIA

(Previews begin March 20, opens March 27, closes April 29) (2 hrs 15 mins) Mozart, Handel and Beethoven share the stage with the music of Queen, Journey and U2 in the concert show, featuring vocalists, a five-piece rock band, a choir of 40 and an orchestra of 20. Broadway Theatre, 1681 Broadway, btw W. 52nd & W. 53rd sts., 212.239.6200. SUMMER: THE DONNA SUMMER MUSICAL

(Previews begin March 28, opens April 23) Donna Summer owned the airwaves and the disco dance floor in the 1970s. The new musical uses more than 20 of the hit songs that made her an international star to tell the backstory of her life. LuntFontanne Theatre, 205 W. 46th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. THREE TALL WOMEN

(In previews, opens March 29) In Edward Albee’s 1994 Pulitzer Prize-winning play, an autocratic woman in her 90s (Glenda Jackson) ruminates on her long life, attended by a cynical 52-year-old caretaker (Laurie Metcalf) and visited by a 26-year-old representative of a law firm (Alison Pill). John Golden Theatre, 252 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. TRAVESTIES

(Previews begin March 29, opens April 24, closes June 17) The Roundabout Theatre Company presents the first Broadway revival of Tom Stoppard’s Tony Awardwinning Best Play of 1976. While the rest of Europe

29


T:4.2188”

Shows was engulfed in the First World War, neutral Zürich, Switzerland, in 1917 was a hotbed of revolutionary activity, peopled by Bolshevik leader Lenin, avant-garde Irish novelist James Joyce and Dada artist Tristan Tzara. American Airlines Theatre, 227 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.719.1300.

BROADWAY

ALADDIN

(2 hrs 20 mins) Disney Theatrical Productions’ musical comedy is an exotic magic carpet ride, filled with romance, special effects and the Academy Award-winning songs from the 1992 animated feature. New Amsterdam Theatre, 214 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 866.870.2717. ANASTASIA

BEAUTIFUL–THE CAROLE KING MUSICAL (2 hrs 20 mins)

The show chronicles the rise of the singer/songwriter, from her early days as Carole Klein, an aspiring composer from Brooklyn, to her international success as Carole King, a top-of-the-charts sensation. Stephen Sondheim Theatre, 124 W. 43rd St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.239.6200.

T:8.5625”

(2 hrs 25 mins) In the familyfriendly musical, a mysterious young Russian woman with amnesia travels to 1920s Paris in search of her family and identity. Is she Grand Duchess Anastasia, the sole surviving daughter of the slain czar? Broadhurst Theatre, 235 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200.

“A magical

Broadway musical with

BRAINS, HEART and COURAGE.” Time Magazine

THE BOOK OF MORMON

(2 hrs 30 mins) Two Mormon boys are on a mission to save souls in Africa in the irreverent, Tony Award-winning musical comedy that only Trey Parker and Matt Stone, the creators of Comedy Central’s “South Park,” could dream up. Eugene O’Neill Theatre, 230 W. 49th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929.

30 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018

Gershwin Theatre, 222 W. 51st St.

For more information: WickedtheMusical.com Audio translations available in 7 languages.


Shows A BRONX TALE

(2 hrs 10 mins) Chazz Palminteri has written the book for the musical, the original doo-wop score is by Alan Menken and Glenn Slater, and Robert De Niro co-directs with Jerry Zaks. Longacre Theatre, 220 W. 48th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. CHICAGO

(2 hrs 30 mins) Two alluring jailbirds attain stardom while singing about sex and corruption. Ambassador Theatre, 219 W. 49th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. COME FROM AWAY

WINNER! BEST MUSICAL ALL ACROSS NORTH AMERICA

(1 hr 40 mins, no intermission) On Sept. 11, 2001, 38 commercial airplanes were diverted to Gander, Newfoundland. How the passengers and the town adjusted to a changed world on Sept. 12 is at the heart of this upbeat musical. Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, 236 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. DEAR EVAN HANSEN

(2 hrs 30 mins) In the critically acclaimed musical, Evan, a socially awkward high-school senior, goes from outsider to cool guy when he fabricates emails between himself and a classmate who committed suicide. Winner of the 2017 Tony Award for Best Musical. Music Box Theatre, 239 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. FARINELLI AND THE KING

COME FROM AWAY

Irene Sankoff Christopher Ashley

Book, Music and Lyrics by Directed by

and

David Hein

THE REMARKABLE TRUE STORY NOW ON BROADWAY

HAMILTON

TELECHARGE.COM (212) 239-6200

O Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, 236 W. 45 TH STREET I COMEFROMAWAY.COM

(Closes March 25) (2 hrs 15 mins) Three-time Tony Award winner Mark Rylance is King Philippe V of Spain in Claire van Kampen’s play with music. The king, an incurable insomniac, falls under the spell of Farinelli, a celebrated castrato with a hypnotic voice. Belasco Theatre, 111 W. 44th St., btw Sixth Ave. & Broadway, 212.239.6200.

OFFICIAL AIRLINE

(2 hrs 45 mins) America’s past is told through the

31


Shows hip-hop sounds of today in Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Pulitzer Prize-winning musical about political mastermind Alexander Hamilton. Richard Rodgers Theatre, 226 W. 46th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. HELLO, DOLLY!

(2 hrs 35 mins) The revival of the 1964 musical comedy stars Bernadette Peters. Shubert Theatre, 225 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. JOHN LITHGOW: STORIES BY HEART

(Closes March 4) (2 hrs) John Lithgow weaves a personal narrative about his family and career while bringing to life classic short stories by Ring Lardner and P.G. Wodehouse. American Airlines Theatre, 227 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.719.1300. KINKY BOOTS

(2 hrs 20 mins) Shoes make the man, and the drag queen, in the Tony Award-winning musical about acceptance, forgiveness and high heels. Music and lyrics are by pop icon Cyndi Lauper, and the book is by Harvey Fierstein. Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 302 W. 45th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 877.250.2929. THE LION KING

(2 hrs 30 mins) Theatergoers of all ages sing along at the runaway hit stage version of Disney’s beloved animated movie. The show is now in its 21st year on Broadway. Minskoff Theatre, 200 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 866.870.2717. ONCE ON THIS ISLAND

(1 hr 30 mins, no intermission) The revival of the 1990 musical takes place on an idyllic Caribbean island devastated by a great storm. A peasant girl from one side of the island falls in love with a wealthy boy from the other side of the island. Will true love win out over cultural differences?

32 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018


T:4.1875”

WINNER 6 TONY AWARDS

®

INCLUDING

Circle in the Square Theatre, 235 W. 50th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. THE PARISIAN WOMAN

(Closes March 11) (1 hr 30 mins, no intermission) An ambitious socialite (Uma Thurman) in an open marriage maneuvers her way through a changing political landscape in the new play by Beau Willimon (“House of Cards”), set in Washington, D.C., after the 2016 election. Hudson Theatre, 139-141 W. 44th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 855.801.5876. T:4.1875”

BEST MUSICAL

Shows

THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA

Music Box Theatre, 239 W. 45th St. • Telecharge.com • 212-239-6200 • DearEvanHansen.com

@DearEvanHansen

Journey to the past.

THE PLAY THAT GOES WRONG

WhereMag__August2017.indd

VAN HANSEN:ADS:POST TONYS:133546_DEH_WhereMag__August2017:133546_DEH_WhereMag__August2017.indd

Pg Specs

Sprd Specs

Print / User Info

Fonts

Bleed None Trim 4.1875” x 4.1875” Safety None

Bleed Sprd 4.1875” x 4.1875” Trim Sprd 4.1875” x 4.1875” Safety Sprd 4.1875” x 4.1875”

Printed at None

Shubert (Regular), Berthold Akzidenz Grotesk (Condensed, Bold)

Gutter None

Print/Export Time 6-26-2017 1:04 PM

(2 hrs 30 mins) Broadway’s longest-running musical, featuring a score by Andrew Lloyd Webber, tells the tragic story of a disfigured composer who falls in love with a young soprano, whisking her away to his mysterious chambers beneath the Paris Opera House. Majestic Theatre, 247 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200.

Visual Artist Jesse Eisenberg Previous Artist Srichawla Saroop

(2 hrs) Everything that could comically go wrong Page (includ#1 ing the Tony Award-winning set) does when the Cornley InksSociety Approvals Polytechnic Drama Cyan CD Jay puts on a 1920s murder mysMagenta CW None Yellow tery. Lyceum Theatre, 149 W. AD Gerri Black Studio45th SaroopSt., btw Sixth & Seventh Used Swatches Acct Kara aves., 212.239.6200. Black Proofrd Joe F.

C=100 M=0 Y=0 K=0 C=0 M=100 Y=0 K=0 SCHOOL OF ROCK C=0 M=0 Y=100 K=0 C=15 M=100 Y=100 K=0 (2 hrs 30 mins) It’s only rock C=75 M=5 Y=100 K=0 Y=10 K=0 ‘n’ roll, but the kidsC=100 at aM=90 presGRAY @ 60% PMSlove 178 C 4it tigious prep school DEH Light Blue when their wannabe-rockDEH Medium Blue DEH Dark Blue star substitute teacher turns Mastercard Orange (165 C) Mastercard them into a rock band in Red (2035 C) Mastercard Yellow (1375 C)

Prod Steve

van_4C.psd (CMYK; 6054 ppi; Studio:DEAR EVAN HANSEN:ART:BROADWAY:4C:DEH BROADWAY ART FINAL-Evan_4C.psd) (Studio:DEAR EVAN HANSEN:ART:BROADWAY:4C:Title Treatment:3Line:DEH-logo vector_LB.MB.WH.ai) DEAR EVAN HANSEN:ART:BROADWAY:4C:Social:DEH_Social_Icons.eps)

the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical, with a book by Julian Ad Slug Fellowes. WinterPrint Garden Theatre, 1634 Broadway, btw W. 50th & W. 51st sts., 212.239.6200. SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS

Te l e c h a r g e . co m o r 2 1 2 - 2 3 9 - 6 2 0 0 O B r o a d h u r s t T h e a t r e , 2 3 5 We s t 4 4 t h S t r e e t A N A S TA S I A B RO A DWAY. C O M

2)),&,$/$,5/,1(

(2 hrs 30 mins) When the undersea world of Bikini Bottom is threatened with extinction, SpongeBob SquarePants

33


Shows comes to its rescue in the family-friendly musical comedy based on the Nickelodeon TV program. The score features original songs by pop and rock royalty. Palace Theatre, 1564 Broadway, at W. 47th St., 877.250.2929. SPRINGSTEEN ON BROADWAY

(2 hrs, no intermission) “The Boss” makes his Broadway debut in a solo acoustic show. Walter Kerr Theatre, 219 W. 48th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave. WAITRESS

(2 hrs 30 mins) A waitress, with an exceptional talent for baking, dreams of opening her own pie shop, but a loveless marriage and unexpected pregnancy threaten to hold her back. Sara Bareilles has written the score for the musical. Brooks Atkinson Theatre, 256 W. 47th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. WICKED

(2 hrs 45 mins) Based on the book by Gregory Maguire, this hit musical—a prequel to “The Wizard of Oz”—imagines Oz as a land of strife, where a young, green-hued girl named Elphaba is branded the Wicked Witch of the West. Gershwin Theatre, 222 W. 51st St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929.

OFF-BROADWAY+ BEYOND

ADMISSIONS

(In previews, opens March 12, closes April 29) The headmaster of a private school and his admissions-director wife have diversified the student body of their previously conservative institution. But will their progressive values stand firm when their only son aspires to an Ivy League university? Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater at Lincoln Center, 150 W. 65th St., btw Broadway & Amsterdam Ave., 212.239.6200. AVENUE Q

(2 hrs 15 mins) People and puppets live together on a fic-

34 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018


T:4.2188”

Shows titious New York City block in this uproarious Tony Awardwinning musical for adults. New World Stages, Stage 3, 340 W. 50th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.239.6200. CRUEL INTENTIONS: THE MUSICAL

Photo: Zachary Maxwell Stertz

T:4.1875”

(Closes March 16) (1 hr 45 mins) Step-siblings play the cruelest game of all, love, when they set out to destroy an innocent young girl in this musical stage adaptation of the 1999 cult movie. The score consists of pop and rock hits from the 1990s. (Le) Poisson Rouge, 158 Bleecker St., btw Thompson & Sullivan sts., 212.505.3474.

Stephen Sondheim Theatre 124 West 43rd Street 212-239-6200 www.BeautifulOnBroadway.com T:4.2188”

« « « « SPONGEBOB SOARS!

WhereMag_ThrdPg4C_Sep017.indd

FUL:ADS:133898_BEAU_WhereMag_ThrdPg4C_Sep017:133898_BEAU_WhereMag_ThrdPg4C_Sep017.indd

Pg Specs

Sprd Specs

Print / User Info

Bleed None Trim 4.2188” x 4.1875” Safety None

Bleed Sprd 4.2188” x 4.1875” Trim Sprd 4.2188” x 4.1875” Safety Sprd 4.2188” x 4.1875”

Printed at None

ITC Franklin Gothic Std (Book Compressed, Demi Extra Compressed)

THE SURPRISE HIT

Print/Export Time 7-19-2017 4:33 PM

Yellow AD JARED Black Studio Saroop GOOD FOR OTTOUsed Swatches Acct Drew/Nicole Black (Closes April 1) A menProofrd Joe F. C=100 M=0 Y=0 K=0 Prod STEVE C=0 M=100 Y=0 K=0 tal health clinic in rural

Visual Artist Jolene Malloy Previous Artist Miles Freyberger

OF THE BROADWAY SEASON!

PALACE THEATRE, 47TH & BROADWAY SpongeBobBroadway.com @SpongeBobBway� ORIGINAL CAST ALBUM AVAILABLE ON MASTERWORKS BROADWAY

C=0 M=0 Y=100 K=0

Connecticut is theC=15 setting forK=0 M=100 Y=100 Y=100 K=0 David Rabb’s new C=75 playM=5about C=100 M=90 Y=10 K=0 an American community GRAY @ 60% 178 C 4 on the knife edge PMS between BEAUT-YLW (0.18.100.0) PSD BLACK breakdown and survival. C=79 M=73 Y=75 K=93 The starry cast features F.2 (0.18.100.0) BEAUT-YLW NOTE-PINK (0.100.0.0) Murray Abraham, Ed Harris, BEAUT-YLW 1 (0.0.100.0) Amy Madigan and Rhea Perlman. Pershing Square Print Ad Slug Signature Center, Alice Griffin Jewel Box Theatre, 480 W. 42nd St., btw Ninth & 10th aves., 212.279.4200. T:4.1875”

THE HUFFINGTON POST 3111_4C.psd (CMYK; 1167 ppi, 1354 ppi; Studio:BEAUTIFUL:ART:BOKEHS:BOKEH_GettyImages-1868683111_4C.psd) ; Studio:BEAUTIFUL:ART:CAROLE:CAROLE_4C.psd) pi; Studio:BEAUTIFUL:ART:TEXT:4C:TEXT_03_4C.psd) (CMYK; 868 ppi; Studio:BEAUTIFUL:ART:LOGOS:SWOP:BEAU_LOGO_GLOW_SWOP.psd) 868 ppi; Studio:BEAUTIFUL:ART:LOGOS:SWOP:BEAU_LOGO_SWOP.psd)

©2018 Viacom Inc. Created by Stephen Hillenburg.

Gutter None

TIME OUTFonts NEW YORK

FLIGHT

(Closes March 25) (1 hr) This original story-telling experience from Glasgow’s Vox Motus is based on Oliver Emanuel’s adaptation of “Hinterland,” a 2012 novel by Caroline Brothers about two orphaned Afghan boys who walk from Kabul to London. Audience members sit in booths, listening to prerecorded voices and sounds #1 while watchingPage miniature models pass by in a rotating diorama. The Heath, Inks McKittrick Approvals Hotel, 530 W. 27th St., btw 10th Cyan CD None & 11th aves., 212.904.1880. Magenta CW None

HANGMEN

(Closes March 7) (2 hrs 15 mins) What’s the second best hangman in England to do on the day hanging is abolished? That’s the starting-off point

35


Shows

Spring Break on

SE ARCH THE CIT Y / For more listings, see wheretraveler.com/new-york-cit y

for Martin McDonagh’s Olivier Award-winning Best Play, now receiving its U.S. premiere. Atlantic Theater Company’s Linda Gross Theater, 336 W. 20th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 866.811.4111. IN THE BODY OF THE WORLD

(Closes March 25) (1 hr 20 mins, no intermission) Writer/ performer/activist Eve Ensler’s uplifting new solo play, taken from her memoir, recounts her physical and spiritual journey after being diagnosed with a life-threatening illness. MTC at New York City Center–Stage 1, 131 W. 55th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.581.1212. JERRY SPRINGER– THE OPERA

(Closes March 11) In the Off-Broadway premiere of the Olivier Award-winning Best Musical, Terrence Mann stars as talk-show host Jerry Springer, who meets his trickiest guest yet—the Devil himself, played by Will Swenson. Expect arias, ballads, lavish production numbers and profanity galore. Pershing Square Signature Center, 480 W. 42nd St., btw Ninth & 10th aves., 212.279.4200. JERSEY BOYS

(2 hrs 30 mins) The Tony Award-winning Best Musical of 2006, which ran on Broadway for 11-plus years, returns to New York. The behind-the-scenes story of pop sensations, Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons, includes the group’s greatest hits, such as “Sherry,” “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” “Walk Like a Man” and “Oh What a Night.” New World Stages, Stage 1, 340 W. 50th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.239.6200. MY BRILLIANT DIVORCE

(March 15-April 8) When a New Yorker is divorced and abandoned by her Brit husband, her hitherto secure life in London is upended. Melissa Gilbert stars in the New York premiere

36 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018

AvenueQ.com

212-239-6200 NEW WORLD STAGES 340 W 50th St (between 8th & 9th Aves.)


Shows of Geraldine Aron’s Olivier Award-nominated play. New Ohio Theatre, 154 Christopher St., btw Greenwich and Washington sts., 866.811.4111. PARTY FACE

(Closes April 8) (1 hr 50 mins) Hayley Mills (“Pollyanna,” “The Parent Trap”) stars in the New York premiere of Isobel Mahon’s comedy. City Center Stage 2, 131 W. 55th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.581.1212. QUEENS

(Closes March 25) Two generations of immigrant women face off in Martyna Majok’s new play, which asks, “What cannot and should not be left behind?” Claire Tow Theater at Lincoln Center, 150 W. 65th St., btw Broadway & Amsterdam Ave., 212.239.6200. RELEVANCE

J��S� G��E�,

“R��I��I��!

W��T A B��, B��D D��I��T I� I� T� E��E� T�� W��L� O�

(Closes March 11) Generations clash when a renowned author and veteran feminist from an earlier era locks horns with social media’s leading cultural critic on race, class and gender. MCC Theater at the Lucille Lortel Theatre, 121 Christopher St. , btw Bleecker & Hudson sts., 866.811.4111. SIGNATURE THEATRE

” BROADWAY’S ONLY BEST PRICE GUARANTEE OnceOnThisIsland.com • Telecharge.com • 212-239-6200 Circle in the Square Theatre, 235 W. 50th St.

The Signature Theatre Company presents new plays and revivals in its permanent home, a state-of-the-art, Frank Gehry-designed multistage venue. Thru March 11: “Edward Albee’s At Home at the Zoo”: “Homelife” and “The Zoo Story.” Pershing Square Signature Center, 480 W. 42nd St., btw Ninth & 10th aves., 212.244.7529. SLEEP NO MORE

(up to 3 hrs) In this immersive, interactive theater piece, mask-wearing audiences wander at will and at their own pace through a 100,000-square-foot environment—an abandoned 1930s luxury hotel—eavesdropping on scenes and characters that conjure up Alfred

37


Shows Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick and Shakespeare’s “Macbeth.” The McKittrick Hotel, 530 W. 27th St., btw 10th & 11th aves., 866.811.4111. YERMA

(March 23-April 21) (2 hrs, no intermission) Australian director and playwright Simon Stone has updated Federico García Lorca’s 1934 play into a parable of modern life, setting it in the internet-surfing blogosphere of today. The lead character is now a blogger and journalist obsessed with her infertility. Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Ave., at E. 67th St., 212.933.5812.

DANCE+MUSIC

CARNEGIE HALL

Carnegie Hall’s 2017–2018 season is the venerable concert hall’s 127th. Highlights: March 2: Mitsuko Uchida, piano. March 4: Anne-Sophie Mutter, violin, and Lambert Orkis, piano. March 7: The Music of Led Zeppelin. March 8: Pierre-Laurent Aimard, piano. March 9: The New York Pops. March 13: The Philadelphia Orchestra, conducted by Yannick NézetSéguin, with Janine Jansen, violin. March 21: Standard Time, with Michael Feinstein. March 22: Itzhak Perlman, violin, and Martha Argerich, piano. March 25: The English Consort. March 28-29: Bayerisches Staatsorchester. Seventh Ave., at W. 57th St., 212.247.7800. DISTINGUISHED CONCERTS INTERNATIONAL NEW YORK

The creative producing entity presents diverse programs of music performed by leading musicians. March 17: “Reflections of Light,” featuring Distinguished Concerts Orchestra and Singers. March 25: “Total Vocal,” with Deke Sharon. David Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., at W. 64th St., 212.721.6500. GREAT PERFORMERS

This series showcases the vitality of the classical music

38 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018


Shows SWING BY TONIGHT | �:��PM & �:��PM

212-258-9595 broadway at 60th st. 5th fl. new york, ny jazz.org/dizzys PHOTO BY LAWRENCE SUMULONG

scene. Highlights: March 1 at Alice Tully Hall: Simon Keenlyside, baritone, and Malcolm Martineau, piano. March 19 at David Geffen Hall: Joshua Bell, violin, and Academy of St. Martin in the Fields. March 28 at Alice Tully Hall: Christian Tetzlaff, violin. David Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., at W. 64th St., 212.721.6500 ; Alice Tully Hall, 1941 Broadway, at W. 65th St., 212.721.6500.

“Madama Butterfly.” March 3 (evening), 6, 10 (matinee), 14, 17 (evening): “Semiramide.” March 15, 20, 24 (evening), 27, 31 (matinee): “Così fan tutte.” March 21, 24 (matinee), 28, 31 (evening): “Turandot.” March 22, 26, 30: “Lucia di Lammermoor.” March 29: “Luisa Miller.” Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., btw W. 63rd & W. 64th sts., 212.362.6000.

JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER

A former Shriners Temple, this performing arts venue hosts music, dance and theater events. Highlights: March 2-11: Flamenco Festival. March 21-25: Encores! “Grand Hotel, The Musical.” 131 W. 55th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.581.1212.

The 2017–2018 season is Jazz at Lincoln Center’s 30th season. March 2-3 in the Appel Room: “Rags, Strides and Habaneras,” featuring Dick Hyman, Joey Alexander, Chano Dominguez, Sullivan Fortner, Jared Grimes and Eddie Torres Jr. March 9-10 in the Rose Theater: Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis: “Nursery Song Swing.” March 16-17 in the Rose Theater: Paquito D’Rivera: “To Bird With Strings.” March 23-24: The Swing Collective. March 24 in the Rose Theater: Family Concert: “Who Is Mary Lou Williams?” March 28-29 in the Appel Room: Michael Feinstein: “Celebrating Frank, Dean & Sammy.” Time Warner Center, 10 Columbus Cir., Broadway & W. 60th St., 212.721.6500.

NEW YORK CITY CENTER

PAUL TAYLOR AMERICAN MODERN DANCE

(March 7-25) The legendary American choreographer’s company performs a world premiere by Paul Taylor and world premieres commissioned by Taylor from Doug Varone and Bryan Arias, as well as 13 classics from the repertoire. The Orchestra of St. Luke’s performs live on every program. David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., at W. 63rd St., 212.496.0600.

JOYCE THEATER

THE TOWN HALL

The venue welcomes renowned modern-dance companies from the United States and abroad. Feb. 27March 3: Wayne McGregor: “Autobiography.” March 6-10: Tulsa Ballet. March 14-18: Brian Brooks Dance. March 20-25: Stephen Petronio Company. 175 Eighth Ave., at W. 19th St., 212.242.0800.

“The People’s Concert Hall” boasts an eclectic lineup of performers. Highlights: March 3: Oliver Dragojevic and Zagreb Soloists. March 5: Andrew Lloyd Webber in conversation with Glenn Close. March 10: The Chieftains. March 15: I’m With Her. March 16: Dixie Dregs. March 22: Lucius. March 23: Hater’s Roast: The Shady Tour. March 24: Familia Habichuela: Legendary Musical Dynasties. March 27: National Geographic Live!: “David Guttenfelder/A Rare Look: North Korea to Cuba.” March 29: Cry Cry Cry. 123 W. 43rd St., btw Sixth Ave. & Broadway, 212.840.2824.

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA

The opera company presents its 2017–2018 season, featuring new productions as well as repertory favorites. March 1, 5, 9, 12, 17 (matinee), 23: “Elektra.” March 2, 7, 10 (evening): “La Bohème.” March 3 (matinee), 8, 13, 16:

39


Food minigrow This bustling Midtown lunch spot specializes in bowls of stir-fry made with egg-white noodles, whole-wheat noodles, brown rice or rice noodles, and offers vegetable, protein and housemade sauce options on its customizable menu. Offerings include a bowl (left) made with gluten-free zucchini noodles, dashipoached salmon, slow-cooked tomatoes, roasted broccoli, sesame cucumbers and cashews. B, L & D (daily). 345 Seventh Ave., at W. 29th St., 212.695.5100; and two other NYC locations.

CHELSEA+ MEATPACKING

AROQA

Indian. Eclectic flavors form inventive plates meant for sharing (sunchokes chaat: sweet potato, pomegranate emulsion, bean sprouts, cucumber raita), on a menu that also features chef’s table specialties (kataifi mushrooms: wild mushrooms, saffron croquettes, goat-cheese relish). L & D (daily). 206 Ninth Ave., btw W. 22nd & W. 23rd sts., 646.678.5471. COMPANY

Contemporary Italian.

Renowned baker and James Beard Award winner Jim Lahey offers a menu whose centerpiece is a selection of 10 specialty pizza pies. Menu complements include a variety of wood-fired vegetable dishes and artisanal Vermont cheeses served with local honey. L & D (daily). 230 Ninth Ave., btw W. 24th & W. 25th sts., 212.243.1105.

40 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018

CULL & PISTOL

Seafood. This oyster-lovers’

paradise is tucked deep inside Chelsea Market and is known for its happy hour, with a variety of oysters available for $1 each M-F 4-6 pm. Dinner specialties include lobster ramen and a gargantuan clambake dinner for two. L & D (daily). 75 Ninth Ave., btw W. 15th & W. 16th sts., 646.568.1223. PASTA FLYER

Contemporary Italian. Guests

can match basil pesto, creamy Alfredo, meat ragu or marinara sauce with a choice of five pasta varietals each priced at $8 or less and prepared in under three minutes. Plus, baked eggplant parmigiano, spicy broccoli rabe, and wines offered at $7 per glass. L & D (daily). 510 Sixth Ave., btw W. 13th & W. 14th sts., no phone.

EAST VILLAGE+ LOWER EAST SIDE

BRIGITTE

Contemporary French. French

fare is accented with Brazilian influences at this cozy corner bistro offering a prix fixe dinner for groups of eight or more. D (M-Sa). 37 Canal St., at Ludlow St., 646.649.3378. JAJAJA PLANTAS MEXICANA

Contemporary Mexican. The

menu of traditional Mexican fare—in a cozy, colorful space

with a full tequila and mezcal list—is entirely vegan-friendly, and includes specialties such as the palm carnitas taco: blueberry and flaxseed tortilla, hearts of palm, jackfruit, orange, salsa verde and micro cilantro. L & D (daily). 162 E. Broadway, at Rutgers St., 646.883.5453. MILON

Bengali. This kitchen spe-

cializes in cuisine from Bangladesh and is known for its year-round festive lights and gift-wrapped walls that complement chairs covered in red and white tapestries, resulting in a festive, holiday ambience. L & D (daily). 93 First Ave., btw E. 5th & E. 6th sts., 212.228.4896. MS. YOO

Korean. Floral decorations

festoon the walls, ceiling and gazebo centerpiece of this gastropub, which serves modern takes on Korean fare and offers a sophisticated cocktail program. D (Tu-Sa). 163 Allen St., btw Rivington & Stanton sts., 917.261.2490. SOMTUM DER

Thai. Authentic cuisine from

Northern Thailand, served in hearty portions on a menu of 50-plus items, ranging from tender grilled pork neck to spicy minced catfish salad served alongside sticky co-

conut rice cakes. L & D (daily). 85 Ave. A, btw E. 5th & E. 6th sts., 212.260.8570

FINANCIAL DISTRICT+ LOWER MANHATTAN

CIPRIANI WALL STREET

Italian. Inside a building with

monolithic Greek columns, guests dine on Italian classics—spinach sage ravioli and veal milanese—while sipping signature Bellinis. B, L & D (MF). 55 Wall St., btw William & Hanover sts., 212.699.4099; and several other NYC locations. DELMONICO’S

Steak House. Established in

1837, this historic steak house serves old-world signature dishes, including boneless rib eye, baked Alaska and creamy lobster with cayenne and butter. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). 56 Beaver St., at S. William St., 212.509.1144. NOBU DOWNTOWN

Japanese. Celebrated dishes

on Chef Nobu Matsuhisa’s menu include yellowtail with jalapeño, black cod with miso and bigeye tuna tataki with truffle eryngii mushrooms. L (M-F), D (nightly). 195 Broadway, btw Vesey & Fulton sts., 212.219.0500. NOBU FIFTY SEVEN Japanese. The flagship’s grandiose Uptown sister. L & D (daily). 40 W. 57th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.757.3000.

PHOTO: ZUCCHINI BOWL, COURTESY MINIGROW

RESTAURANTS VARY GREATLY IN NYC, FROM CASUAL, COUNTER-ONLY EATERIES TO FOUR-STAR DESTINATION SPOTS. WITH THAT IN MIND, PLEASE CHECK THE INDIVIDUAL WEBSITES OF RESTAURANTS FOR THE MOST CURRENT PRICE POINTS.


SE ARCH THE CIT Y / For more listings, see wheretraveler.com/new-york-cit y

FLATIRON+GRAMERCY

BABU JI

Contemporary Indian.

This sleek bistro offers a wide-ranging menu that includes Indian street snacks as well as traditional dishes, but guests can sample the gamut on the chef’s tasting menu. D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). 22 E. 13th St., btw University Pl. & Fifth Ave., 212.951.1082. IRVINGTON

Contemporary American.

Seasonal American fare is influenced by Mediterranean ingredients, inside a bright space in the lobby of the W Hotel. Diners can request cold-pressed juices and offthe-menu cocktail creations. B, L & D (daily). 201 Park Ave. So., at E. 11th St., 212.677.0425. KELLOGG’S NYC

Breakfast. This breakfast

pings, plus Pop-Tarts and ice cream sandwiches. “Tried and true” cereal creations include such specialties as Christmas Morning: Frosted Mini-Wheats, cinnamon-roll croutons, crystallized ginger, toasted marshmallows and poached pears. B & L (daily). 31 E. 17th St., btw Park Ave. So. & Broadway, no phone.

elegant, oft-rotating dishes typically inclusive of steak tartare and pâté of slow-roasted duck and anchovies on buttered baguette, from a kitchen that closes at 2 am nightly and opens by 8 am daily. B, L & D (daily). 42 Grove St., btw Bedford & Bleecker sts., 212.255.3590.

white tablecloths, has been family-run since 1941. The cozy spot is known for its genteel service, large tapas menu, seafood paella and guava with cream cheese dessert. L & D (daily). 62 Charles St., at W. 4th St., 212.929.3189.

MURRAY’S CHEESE BAR

MANZO

Charcuterie & Cheese.

Contemporary German.

Italian. The only white table-

cloth restaurant inside the Eataly food hall serves specialty plates prepared by rotating guest chefs, in a red-pillared space with a marble-top bar and an extensive wine list. L & D (daily). 200 Fifth Ave., btw 23rd & 24th sts., 212.229.2180.

GREENWICH+ WEST VILLAGE

BUVETTE

French. Guests sit in a space

designed to emulate a countryside cottage and sample

HARLEM

BIER INTERNATIONAL

Selections from the famed brand’s neighboring gourmet market feature on a menu with plentiful hot plate options, in a dark space with a marble-top bar that faces the cheesemonger’s station. L (F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). 264 Bleecker St., btw Cornelia & Morton sts., 646.476.8882.

Harlem’s first beer garden offers a menu of German sausages and flammkuchen (European-style flatbreads) to pair for dinner with global drafts and local craft brews, in this industrial space with communal seating. Cash only. D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). 2099 Frederick Douglass Blvd., at W. 113th St., 212.280.0944.

SEVILLA RESTAURANT AND BAR

Contemporary American.

Spanish. Open 365 days a

year, this local favorite, with gold leather banquettes and

HARLEM TAVERN

Seafood gumbo, pulled pork and cedar-plank salmon complement nearly 90 brews.

ha T y ne o H

i!

emporium has a DIY cereal bar with more than 30 top-

Food

ur Try O

Shrimply Irres�stible Buffalo Shrimp

N��

33rd & 7th Near Madison Square Garden Order Online originalhooters.com/togo

41


Food D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). 2153 Frederick Douglass Blvd., at W. 116th St., 212.866.4500. KEUR SOKHNA RESTAURANT

Senegalese. Home-style

dishes include slow-roasted beef sandwiches, lamb and peanut-butter stew, braised curried chicken and traditional Senegalese ceebu jën (soupy rice, fish and yuca). B, L & D (daily). 2249 Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd., btw W. 132nd & W. 133rd sts., 212.368.5005. SUSHI INOUE

Japanese. Fresh, simple plates

of sushi, sashimi and other varieties of fish, in a space with traditional Japanese decor and authentic fare, at Harlem’s only Michelin-star restaurant. D (Tu-Su). 646.706.0555.

MURRAY HILL+ MIDTOWN EAST+WEST

DAVIO’S

Steak House. This Northern Italian steak house known for superior service features regionally and seasonally inspired grill-focused cuisine, including Brandt Beef steaks, handmade pasta and fresh seafood, on a menu centered around freshness of ingredients. A $33 three-course prix fixe “executive lunch” menu is on offer M-F, while a $45 prix fixe dinner menu is available nightly. B & D (daily), L (M-F). 447 Lexington Ave., btw E. 44th & E. 45th sts., 212.661.4810. HER NAME IS HAN

Korean. Bibimbap, spicy stir-

fried potato noodles with prawns and green peppers, and marinated pork barbecue ribs are meant for sharing at this homey, brick-walled restaurant. L (M-F), D (nightly). 17 E. 31st St., btw Madison & Fifth aves., 212.779.9990. HOOTERS

Contemporary American.

Comfort food (chicken wings, ribs, burgers) in a bi-level, wood-paneled space with plentiful big-screen TVs, across the street from Madison Square Garden, in

42 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018

the pub-grub brand’s original and only Manhattan location. L & D (daily). 155 W. 33rd St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.695.9580. TÍR NA NÓG

Irish/American. Dishes with

Celtic influences at this homey after-work watering hole —which was named in 2017 by the Irish Pubs Global Federation as North America’s best gastropub for food—inclue Guinness-braised lamb with garlic mashed potatoes. L & D (daily), Brunch (Sa & Su). 315 W. 39th St., btw Eighth & Ninth Aves., 212.760.0072; 254 W. 31st St., at Eighth Ave., 212.630.0249.

ROCKEFELLER CENTER

BILL’S BAR AND BURGER

American. Caramelized

onions, American cheese, a housemade specialty sauce, lettuce, tomato and pickles accompany ground-freshdaily Pat LaFrieda beef on an English muffin, forming the burgery’s most popular sandwich, the Fat Cat. L & D (daily). 22 Ninth Ave., at W. 13th St., 212.414.3003; 16 W. 51st St., btw Fifth Ave. & Rockefeller Plz., 212.705.8510; 85 West St., btw Carlisle & Albany sts., 212.894.3800. IL GATTOPARDO

Italian. Southern Italian

fare—pan-seared veal loin scented with wild fennel pollen from Felitto, with porcini mushrooms and fingerling potatoes—on a menu offering housemade pastas and more than 10 dessert items. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). 13-15 W. 54th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.246.0412. ROCK CENTER CAFÉ

American. Outdoor seating in

warm months and tall-window views of the Rockefeller Center ice-skating rink during the winter set the scene for a menu offering a specialty burger blended in-house with chuck and Black Angus short ribs and an appetizer of

Find the best of the city


Food

NEW YORK’S grandest SHOPPING & DINING

cider-roasted beets served with Humboldt Fog goat cheese, as well as an impressive list of wines. B, L & D (daily). 20 W. 50th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.332.7620.

65 SHOPS including Apple Store, Banana Republic, M•A•C Cosmetics, Swatch, TUMI, vineyard vines, Warby Parker

SOHO+LITTLE ITALY+ NOLITA+CHINATOWN

LUPE’S EAST L.A. KITCHEN

35 DINING OPTIONS including

Mexican. A lengthy menu of

Grand Central Oyster Bar, Great Northern Food Hall, Magnolia Bakery, Michael Jordan’s The Steak House N.Y.C., Shake Shack

California-style Mexican fare, with dishes such as chicken enchiladas mole poblano and chiles rellenos. A housemade traditional dark mole sauce is made with 20 ingredients. B, L & D (daily). 110 Sixth Ave., at Watts St., 212.966.1326.

1 ICONIC DESTINATION

PRINCE STREET PIZZA

Pizza. This NYC staple serves

42ND STREET AT PARK AVENUE GRANDCENTRALTERMINAL.COM

Where v2_Layout 1 2/27/17 9:01 AM Page 1 4 5 6 S 7

an off broadway hit since 1944!

Authentic Neapolitan Cuisine from the landmark restaurant made famous by Frank Sinatra

a variety of square (and conventional) slices, but the longtime crowd favorite is the crispy pepperoni square. Be prepared to stand in line with hungry pizza-lovers for a classic New York Sicilian slice. L & D (daily). 27 Prince St., btw Elizabeth & Mott sts., 212.966.4100. RAOUL’S

French. The nationally

ranked burger is offered off-the-menu as soon as the kitchen opens at 5:30 pm, but only 30 burgers are served nightly, and only at the bar. This Parisian-style bistro also offers a variety of entrées and features its own wines. D (nightly). 180 Prince St., btw Thompson & Sullivan sts., 212.966.3518. SOFIA’S OF LITTLE ITALY

Italian. This amber-walled,

Our only location is

236 W. 56th Street between Broadway and Eighth Avenue

www.patsys.com

(212) 247-3491

family-owned restaurant offers classic pasta recipes made with homemade noodles, rich risotto dishes and tender meats. L & D (daily). 143 Mulberry St., btw Hester & Grand sts., 212.219.9799. WO HOP

Chinese. This subterranean

Cantonese joint is a popular NYC late-night hangout, staying open 24 hours a day and serving roasted duck lo mein, vegetable chow fun

43


Food and other classic dishes. For those seeking less “buzz” and more intimacy, a dining room is available upstairs. B, L & D (daily). 17 Mott St., btw Worth & Mosco sts., 212.962.8617.

THEATER DISTRICT+ HELL’S KITCHEN

HB BURGER

American. Diners enjoy spe-

cialty burgers, housemade sodas, milkshakes, egg creams and housemade ice cream sundae creations. L & D (daily). 127 W. 43rd St., btw Sixth Ave. & Broadway, 212.575.5848. HEARTLAND BREWERY

American. Handcrafted beers

(and beer-centric cocktail concoctions), as well as a hearty steakhouse menu that includes bison burgers and St. Louis-style center-cut pork ribs. L & D (daily). 127 W. 43rd St., btw Broadway & Sixth Ave., 646.366.0235; and two other NYC locations. PATSY’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT

Italian. Open since 1944, this friendly family-run restaurant, a favorite of the late Frank Sinatra, specializes in authentic Neapolitan cuisine. An allday menu includes linguine puttanesca and a trio of ravioli. L & D (daily). 236 W. 56th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.247.3491. SUSHI SEKI

Japanese. More than 20 fresh

cuts of raw fish—at the bar as part of a “mini” omakase (six pieces of nigiri, a hand roll and soba/udon noodles) or during a full dinner experience—in a sleek space on Restaurant Row. D (M-Sa). 365 W. 46th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.262.8880; 208 W. 23rd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.255.5988; 1143 First Ave., btw E. 62nd & E. 63rd sts., 212.371.0238. UTSAV INDIAN BAR & GRILL

Indian. There is a cozy bar and outdoor seating on the lower level and, on the upper level, elegant decor and floor-to-

44 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018

ceiling windows, where you can enjoy savory traditional Indian flavors. Convenient for pre-theater dining. L & D (daily). 1185 Sixth Ave., entrance on W. 46th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.575.2525.

Lunch: 12 – 2:30pm | Dinner: 5:30 – 10:30pm

VIDA VERDE

Contemporary Mexican. This

expansive, bi-level haunt for modernized Mexican grub (e.g., duck tlayuda; pork belly al pastor skewers) is decorated in vintage color schemes and patterns, and caters to an eclectic post-theater crowd until 4 am W-Su. L & D (daily). 248 W. 55th St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 646.657.0565.

TRIBECA

GRAFFITI EARTH

Contemporary Indian. Persian and Indian-influenced dishes inside Chef/Owner Jehangir Mehta’s elegant 20-seat dining room include shiitake panna cotta with long pepper squid and garlic coconut soup with chickpea caviar. D (Tu-Sa). 190 Church St., at Duane St., 212.542.9440.

1185 Avenue of the Americas. Enter at 46th St. btw 6th & 7th aves | 212.575.2525 | www.utsavny.com

This bi-level restaurant in the heart of Times Square offers an inventive Indian menu, a cozy lounge and lovely outdoor seating.

JUNG SIK

Contemporary Korean. French

and Spanish influences shape the cutting-edge cooking techniques of Michelinstarred, Seoul-born Chef Yim Jung Sik. D (M-Sa). 2 Harrison St., at Hudson St., 212.219.0900. SQUARE DINER

Diner. Traditional, homemade

diner grub—plus Greek specialties—in a vintage, wood-paneled space that mirrors a train car (with outdoor seating, when weather permits) from the outside. B & L (daily), D (M-F). 33 Leonard St., at W. Broadway, 212.925.7188. TETSU

Contemporary Japanese. Three Michelin-starred chef and restaurateur Masa Takayama offers nigiri sushi at his modern robatayaki, where guests can order Chef Masa’s first-ever burger—lamb or beef—off the menu from 5 to 6 pm. D (M-Sa). 78 Leonard

PAELLA, SANGRIA, & FLAN, OH MY!

Serving up the best Spanish food NYC can offer since 1941 in the heart of Greenwich village.

62 CHARLES ST. @ W. 4TH ST. 212.929.3189 | 212.243.9513 sevillarestaurantandbar.com


Food St., btw Broadway & Church St., 212.207.2370.

212.874.2800; and two other NYC locations.

UPPER EAST SIDE+ UPPER WEST SIDE

CHEBURECHNAYA

CHARC

Contemporary French. This 25-

seat charcuterie and wine bar features a rotating menu of meats, cheeses and fish items (paddlefish caviar, bluefish rillettes) served alongside a variety of housemade accompaniments. D (nightly), Brunch (Su). 316 E. 84th St., btw First & Second aves., 646.719.1398. MARLOW BISTRO

Mediterranean. Homemade

squid-ink cavatelli and octopus with French beans, cherry tomatoes, kalamata olives and lemon-potato espuma are specialties on this high-end menu, served in a brick-walled space across from the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). 1018 Amsterdam Ave., at W. 110th St., 212.662.9020.

LUNCH & DINNER DAILY

SANT AMBROEUS

Italian. This famed Italian

culinary brand, known for fine espresso and exquisite pastries in the morning and traditional Italian fare alongside sophisticated lists of wines in the evening, has three upscale restaurant locations in NYC to complement its Italian, Floridian and Long Island outposts and its three Manhattan coffee bars. B, L & D (daily). 1000 Madison Ave., btw E. 77th & E. 78th sts., 212.570.2211; and two other NYC locations. ZUCKER’S BAGELS & SMOKED FISH

Deli. The quintessential NYC

TIMES SQ

127 43 ST AT B’WAY

MIDTOWN W

625 8TH AVE AT 41 ST

HB BURGER

127 43 ST AT B’WAY

EMPIRE STATE

350 5TH AVE AT 34 ST

bagel—hand-rolled and kettle-boiled—is the raison d’être of this popular local eatery, with three outposts in Manhattan. Classic deli sandwiches (hot pastrami or corned beef on artisanal rye with sour pickles and slaw), pastries, smoked fish and deli meats by the pound are also on offer. B, L & D (daily). 273 Columbus Ave., at W. 73rd St.,

THE BOROUGHS

Bukharian/Russian.

Kosher Eastern European specialties—kebabs of ground lamb, lamb ribs, chicken; chebureki (dough patties) stuffed with meat, mushroom, potato, cabbage or veal—in a casual setting in the heart of Queens’ most Russianspeaking neighborhood. B & L (Su-F), D (Sa-Th). 92-09 63rd Dr., btw Whetherole & Austin sts., Rego Park, Queens, 718.897.9080. EVELINA

Italian/Mediterranean.

Inventive plates—blackink acquerello risotto with octopus, soffritto, lemon; grass-fed steak tartare with burrata, crushed truffle, pan carasau—in a dimly lit, brickwalled space with ample bar seating and a menu focused on creative appetizer plates. D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). 211 Dekalb Ave., at Adelphi St., Fort Greene, Brooklyn, 929.298.0209. JOHNNY’S REEF

Seafood. This casual, cash-only, counter-service spot overlooking Long Island Sound from the tip of City Island has been serving deep-fried freshly caught seafood since 1950, and offers outdoor seating when weather permits. L & D (daily). 2 City Island Ave., at Belden St., Bronx, 718.855.2086. LIEBMAN’S DELICATESSEN

Jewish/American. Specialties

include cabbage stuffed with ground beef, rice and sweet-and-sour gravy and Hungarian goulash with egg noodles at this landmark, family-owned deli and restaurant, a kosher New York City institution since 1953 and one of the few remaining Jewish-style delis in the Bronx. B, L & D (daily). 552 W. 235th St., btw Oxford & Johnson aves., Riverdale, Bronx, 718.548.4534.

45


Shop Dyson Demo Store This sleek, futuristic-looking flagship store from the Dyson company allows customers to test various products before purchasing (all products on the premises can be bought at the store). Visitors can test the Dyson Supersonic hair dryer by getting their hair styled at a small in-store salon; test cord-free vacuums with different kinds of dust and debris on various floor types; step into a purification room to see purifiers in action; and more. 640 Fifth Ave., btw 51st & 52nd sts., 646.809.2533.

ALAIN MIKLI

heels and flats. 1198 Madison Ave., btw E. 87th & E. 88th sts., 212.259.0588.

With over 30 years of experience in the eyewear industry, this designer’s boutique boasts comfortable yet stylish prescription eyeglasses and sunglasses, as well as a trained and knowledgeable staff. 575 Madison Ave., btw E. 56th & E. 57th sts., 212.751.6085; and one other NYC location.

This French shoe label offers comfortable, casual footwear, such as sneakers and sporty sandals, for men and women. 1040 Third Ave., btw E. 61st & E. 62nd sts., 212.750.7000; 1089 Madison Ave., at E. 82nd St., 646.422.1000.

MEPHISTO

ASICS 5TH AVENUE

URBAN OPTICAL

The internationally renowned Japanese footwear brand— whose name is a Latin acronym for “a sound mind in a sound body”—carries sneakers, apparel and accessories at its NYC flagship. 579 Fifth Ave., btw 47th & 48th sts., 212.754.3025.

Founded in 1995, this optometry office and eyewear boutique offers eyeglasses, sunglasses and eye exams. 326 Seventh Ave., at 9th St., Park Slope, Brooklyn, 718.832.3513.

GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI DESIGN

A wide array of lingerie, including lace and embroidered bras, underwear and corsets, swimwear, nightwear and accessories for women. 133 Mercer St., btw Spring & Prince sts., 212.965.0229; and several other NYC locations.

Often spotted on the feet of celebrities, this upscale footwear line for women, men and kids features adorned stilettos, sky-high pumps, leather boots, embroidered sandals, leather sneakers and more. 806 Madison Ave., at E. 68th St., 212.650.0455. JACK ROGERS

White walls and black-oak floors make a crisp backdrop for the 12,000-square-foot store’s collection of 100-plus styles of embellished and embroidered leather sandals,

46 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018

APPAREL

AGENT PROVOCATEUR

AGNÈS B

This Paris-based chain carries clothes and accessories with all the signs of chic, arty, classic French style for men, women and children. 1063 Madison Ave., btw E. 80th & E. 81st sts., 212.570.9333; and two other NYC locations.

BURBERRY

The store offers the celebrated Burberry trench coat, along with a collection of cutting-edge clothing and accessories. 9 E. 57th St., btw Fifth & Madison aves., 212.407.7100; and several other NYC locations. THE EIGHT SENSES

An arty, industrial-chic ambience (curved metal racks, exposed silver pipes, stone motifs) serves as the home for this high-quality yet low-maintenance line of women’s clothing. 414 W. Broadway, btw Prince & Spring sts., 646.850.0770. JOE’S JEANS

The American denim line’s SoHo shop offers its signature jeans in a variety of fits, colors, styles and washes, as well as a small selection of clothing and accessories for men, women and children. 77 Mercer St., btw Broome & Spring sts., 212.925.5727. RIGBY & PELLER

This British lingerie and swimwear brand has been a leader in luxury women’s undergarments since 1939. The company has dressed some of the world’s most iconic women, from rock royalty to crowned heads, offering curated collections of masterfully crafted lingerie. The

boutiques create both a luxurious and fun atmosphere for shopping. 1252 Madison Ave., at E. 90th St., 212.860.8366; 1051 Third Ave., at E. 62nd St., 646.395.3885; 104 Fifth Ave., at 16th St., 646.762.0844. THEORY

Classic blazers, suits and skirts in a chic color palette are found in this Meatpacking District store. 40 Gansevoort St., btw Hudson & Greenwich sts., 212.524.6790; and several other NYC locations.

BOOKS

AMAZON

Amazon’s brick-and-mortar locations in NYC sell books exclusively, which are categorized by customer ratings and curators’ assessments. Gadgets, including the electronic personal assistant, Alexa, are also available. The Shops at Columbus Circle, 10 Columbus Cir., btw W. 58th & W. 60th sts.; 7 W. 34th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves. Phone number for both locations: 206.266.2992. BONNIE SLOTNICK COOKBOOKS

This independent bookshop stocks out-of-print and antiquarian cookbooks, along with epicurean literature and obscure treasures that entice foodies. 28 E. 2nd St., btw Second Ave. & Bowery, 212.989.8962.

PHOTO: COURTESY DYSON

ACCESSORIES+ FOOTWEAR


SE ARCH THE CIT Y / For more listings, see wheretraveler.com/new-york-cit y

DRAMA BOOK SHOP

Situated just a few blocks from the Theater District, this store features an extensive selection of play scripts and books on acting, theater, film and other performing arts, and hosts in-store scene readings. 250 W. 40th St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.944.0595. THE MYSTERIOUS BOOKSHOP

Specializing in mystery novels and crime, pulp and noir fiction, as well as rare collectibles and signed first editions. 58 Warren St., btw Church St. & W. Broadway, 212.587.1011. RIZZOLI BOOKSTORE

This iconic bookstore opened in 1964, has wallpaper by Fornasetti and dark wood shelves filled with illustrated art books, plus nonfiction, children’s books and newspapers. 1133 Broadway, at W. 26th St., 212.759.2424. STRAND BOOKSTORE

New, used, out-of-print and rare books are housed in this legendary literary warehouse, which also hosts book signings and readings. 828 Broadway, at E. 12th St., 212.473.1452.

DEPT. STORES+ CENTERS

BARNEYS NEW YORK

Luxe couture for men and women from the world’s top designers. Shoes, accessories, cosmetics and housewares are also stocked. 660 Madison Ave., btw E. 60th & E. 61st sts., 212.826.8900; and several other NYC locations. BERGDORF GOODMAN

Men and women can find designer labels, accessories and cosmetics in this iconic New York department store. 754 Fifth Ave., btw 57th & 58th sts., 212.753.7300, 888.774.2424. BROOKFIELD PLACE

The shopping center brings high-end apparel and accessories brands for men, women and kids, along with

bookstores, beauty shops and dining options. 230 Vesey St., btw West & Liberty sts., 212.978.1698. LORD & TAYLOR

Contemporary and classic clothing and accessories for all ages from over 400 designer brands can be found at the oldest specialty store in the U.S. 424 Fifth Ave., btw 38th & 39th sts., 212.391.3344. MACY’S HERALD SQUARE

The department store spans a full city block with clothing, accessories, cosmetics and fragrances. 151 W. 34th St., btw Broadway & Seventh Ave., 212.695.4400. THE FUR VAULT AT MACY’S Furs for every occasion from top designers can be found at this elegant salon. Services include restyling, storage, cleaning and alterations. Macy’s Herald Square, 151 W. 34th St., 5th fl., btw Broadway & Seventh Ave., 212.494.1227. SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

A luxury department store carrying designer apparel, accessories and home decor, plus cosmetics and fragrances. 611 Fifth Ave., btw 49th & 50th sts., 212.753.4000; Brookfield Place, 230 Vesey St., btw West & Liberty sts., 646.344.6300. THE FUR SALON AT SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

Designer coats, capes and accessories—made from exotic skins, such as python, crocodile and sable—from designers, including Missoni and Zac Posen, plus restyling fur garments. 611 Fifth Ave., 2nd fl., btw 49th & 50th sts., 212.940.4465. SAKS FIFTH AVENUE MEN’S STORE

Saks’ outpost exclusively for designer menswear and apparel also features a monthly rotating brand-collaboration pop-up shop, custom fitting, a barbershop, personal leather footwear fitting and an instore coffee shop. Brookfield Place, 230 Vesey St., btw West & Liberty sts., 212.301.2440.

THE SHOPS AT COLUMBUS CIRCLE

This retail and dining complex features more than 40 stores, the world-class Restaurant and Bar Collection, a parkview atrium and art installations. Time Warner Center, 10 Columbus Cir., btw W. 58th & W. 60th sts., 212.823.6300. WESTFIELD WORLD TRADE CENTER

This shopping center features a stellar lineup of stores, including John Varvatos, L.K. Bennett and Roberto Coin. 185 Greenwich St., btw Vesey & Barclay sts., 212.284.9982.

GIFTS+HOME

DAHESH MUSEUM OF ART GIFT SHOP

Inspired by the museum’s collection of 19th-century art, this store curates designs and objects with both modern and ancient influences, resulting in an eclectic collection of books, jewelry, gifts and apparel. 145 Sixth Ave., btw Dominick & Spring sts., 212.759.0606. JACQUES TORRES CHOCOLATES

One part candy store and one part chocolate factory, this destination is prized for its hot chocolate. 350 Hudson St., at King St., 212.414.2462; and four other NYC locations. MOMA DESIGN STORE

Cutting-edge designs for the home, office and body, along with fun gadgets, toys, jewelry and coffee table books at this store are selected by the discerning eyes of the Museum of Modern Art’s curatorial staff. 44 W 53rd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.767.1050; 81 Spring St., at Crosby St., 646.613.1367. MORRELL & CO.

This shop, adjacent to its sister café and wine bar, specializes in fine wines from around the world. The store also features wine-oriented gifts and accessories. Shipping. 1 Rockefeller Plz., at W. 49th

Shop

St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.688.9370.

JEWELRY

AUDEMARS PIGUET

The Swiss brand offers shoppers elegantly crafted watches in a variety of styles for men and women. 65 E. 57th St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.758.8400. BUCCELLATI

The New York flagship store has three floors of retail space, allowing for a huge selection of timepieces, jewelry, silver and more. 714 Madison Ave., btw E. 63rd & E. 64th Sts., 212.308.2900. CARTIER

The palatial New York location of the French luxury design house offers exquisite jewelry, tableware, objets d’art, antiques and diamonds. 767 Fifth Ave., at 59th St., 212.457.3202; 828 Madison Ave., at E. 69th St., 212.472.6400. HARRY WINSTON

Fine, costly work and superb stones are the trademark of this premier American jeweler. 701 Fifth Ave., at 56th St., 212.399.1000. PIAGET

Luxurious timepieces and jewelry for style-conscious women. The brand’s exclusive Swiss watches in 18-karat gold or platinum are adorned with precious gemstones. 730 Fifth Ave., btw 56th & 57th sts., 212.246.5555. TIFFANY & CO.

The world-famous jewelry store carries diamonds, pearls, gold, silver, sterling flatware, fine timepieces, crystal and more—all of which come wrapped in signature robin’s-egg blue boxes. 727 Fifth Ave., at 57th St., 212.755.8000; and two other NYC locations VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Luxury Parisian jewelry in delicate designs that incorporate nature, including diamond-encrusted dragonfly

47


Shop

SE ARCH THE CIT Y / For more listings, see wheretraveler.com/new-york-cit y

hairpins and multitiered necklaces. 744 Fifth Ave., btw 57th & 58th sts., 212.644.9500. WEMPE JEWELERS

chandise for all 30 pro hockey teams, visits from players and an NHL-themed Starbucks. 1185 Sixth Ave., at W. 47th St., 212.221.6375.

At this flagship store, which stretches half a block, you will find Fifth Avenue’s only official Rolex dealer, which also carries other prestigious brands such as JaegerLeCoultre, Patek Philippe, Chopard and Baume & Mercier, plus a line of jewelry that includes 18-karat gold earrings, brilliant diamond rings, silver charms, pearl necklaces, classic cameos and precious gemstones. 700 Fifth Ave., at 55th St., 212.397.9000.

Selling shirts, sneakers, sweats and sportswear with the trademark swoosh for men, women and children, the store also boasts a huge flipper board with up-to-theminute sports scores and an archive of sports memorabilia—including a National Basketball Association championship trophy. 6 E. 57th St., btw Madison & Fifth aves., 212.891.6453.

SPORTING GOODS+ FAN APPAREL

ADIDAS ORIGINALS

The Adidas offshoot specializes in streetwear and fashionable variations of the brand’s more classic looks. 115 Spring St., btw Mercer & Greene sts., 212.966.0954. BURTON FLAGSHIP STORE

The hip and trusted snowboard apparel company provides warm layers and accessories, as well as tools and tuning. 69 Greene St., btw Broome & Spring sts., 212.966.8070. MODELL’S

Athletic apparel and equipment for men, women and children include swimsuits, hiking boots, figure skates, boxing gloves and more. 234 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.764.7030; and several other NYC locations. NEW YORK RUNNING COMPANY

Educated staffers help patrons find the right sneaker styles to improve performance. The Shops at Columbus Circle, 10 Columbus Cir., 2nd fl, btw. W. 58th & W. 60th sts., 212.823.9626. THE NHL STORE

The National Hockey League flagship store offers apparel, jerseys, footwear and mer-

48 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018

NIKETOWN

PARAGON SPORTING GOODS

This only-in-New-York sports mecca carries equipment and clothing from major brands, including Timberland and Patagonia. 867 Broadway, at E. 18th St., 212.255.8889. REEBOK FITHUB

The brand’s concept stores carry signature athletic apparel, footwear and accessories, and host in-store fitness activities. 420 Fifth Ave., btw 37th & 38th sts., 212.395.9614; 1 Union Sq. West, at E. 14th St., 212.206.7641; 1132 Third Ave., btw E. 66th & E. 67th sts., 212.535.2607. THE TRACK & FIELD STORE

This Brazilian brand’s complete line of fitness apparel and accessories for men, women and children includes Lycra leggings, yoga mats, beach gear and fast-drying jackets, clothes and towels. 997 Madison Ave., at E. 77th St., 212.355.1944.

in Stuy Town specializes in rare and hard-to-find vinyl in genres of punk rock, alternative rock, hip-hop, pop-punk and hardcore. The store also collaborates with artists to stock limited-edition, special-release items. 221 E. 10th St., btw First & Second aves., 917.740.5233. RUDY’S MUSIC

KIDDING AROUND

Fine guitars (vintage, acoustic, electric and bass), plus mandolins, banjos, resonators and amps, fill this store frequented by professional musicians. 461 Broome St., btw Mercer & Greene sts., 212.625.2557.

This family-owned store specializes in toys, costumes, clothes and games for children of all ages. The 15th St. location boasts a Victorian design and mobile toy train traveling throughout the shop. 60 W. 15th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.645.6337; Grand Central Terminal, 42nd St. Passage, E. 42nd St., at Park Ave., 212.972.8697.

STEINWAY & SONS

The finest pianos in the world are sold here—and borrowed for concert use by some of the world’s greatest pianists. 1133 Sixth Ave., btw W. 43rd & W. 44th sts., 800.783.4692. T-MOBILE TIMES SQUARE

The wireless provider’s flagship store in Times Square sells internet devices, tablets, accessories and cellphones powered by iOS, Android, Windows Phone and Blackberry operating systems. 1535 Broadway, at W. 46th St., 646.350.4645.

TOYS+GAMES

ACORN

A treasure chest full of handcrafted wooden and battery-free toys, handmade Waldorf dolls, costumes, dollhouses, animal figurines, furniture and mobiles from around the world. 323 Atlantic Ave., btw Hoyt & Smith sts., Boerum Hill, Brooklyn, 718.522.3760.

TECH+MUSIC

AMERICAN GIRL PLACE NEW YORK

An edgy selection of LPs, CDs and DVDs, as well as rare recordings, vintage vinyls, accessories and apparel. 210 Thompson St., btw Bleecker & W. 3rd sts., 212.254.1100.

In addition to the popular historical and contemporary doll collection, the store sells doll accessories, matching doll-and-girl clothing and a line of books. Within the store are a restaurant, a doll hair salon and a personal shopper service. 75 Rockefeller Plz., 877.247.5223.

GENERATION RECORDS

LIMITED TO ONE RECORD SHOP

This brand-new record shop

DISNEY STORE

A blue pixie dust trail winds through the theme park’s magical NYC retail store, which boasts an extensive collection of merchandise and Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse products. 1540 Broadway, btw W. 45th & W. 46th sts., 212.626.2910.

KIDROBOT

Collectible and limited-edition toys, art and apparel reflect urban culture and street fashion. 118 Prince St., btw Greene & Wooster sts., 212.966.6688. THE LEGO STORE

An 8-foot tall Statue of Liberty and NYC street scenes built from mini Legos inspire kids to create designs of their own. 200 Fifth Ave., btw 23rd & 24th sts., 212.255.3217; 620 Fifth Ave., at 50th St., 212.245.5973. MARY ARNOLD TOYS

This old-fashioned toy storecarries all the newest and latest toys, as well as classic favorites. 1178 Lexington Ave., btw E. 80th & E. 81st sts., 212.744.8510. NINTENDO® WORLD

An interactive gaming paradise that features Nintendo Wii kiosks, branded merchandise and all the latest video games. 10 Rockefeller Plz., at W. 48th St., 646.459.0800. TEICH TOYS & BOOKS

Children’s books, toy taxis, puzzle games, brew-it-yourself root beer kits, kites, magic tools and more. 573 Hudson St., at W. 11th St., 212.924.2232.


Art Hauser & Wirth The gallery, located in London, Zürich, Hong Kong and New York, presents “Allan Kaprow. New York Paintings” in its Upper East Side town PHOTO: ALLAN KAPROW, “GEORGE WASHINGTON BRIDGE, WITH CARS (DETAIL),” 1955, ©ALLAN KAPROW ESTATE, COURTESY PRIVATE COLLECTION OF MICHAEL AND JENNIFER PETERS

house, thru April 7. This is the first local exhibit in six decades to examine the early work of the American artist (1927–2006). Included in the show is Kaprow’s “George Washington Bridge, With Cars” (detail, 1955, left), which uses bold, expressionist gestures to convey a slice of everyday life in the big city. Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm. 32 E. 69th St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.794.4970.

ART GALLERIES

COMPANY

The contemporary art gallery represents Yve Laris Cohen, Barbara Hammer, Raúl de Nieves, Troy Michie and Cajsa von Zeipel. Thru March 11: “Paroikia: Kostis Velonis, Angelo Plessas, Zoë Paul, Allyson Vieira.” March 25-May 6: “Jonathan Lyndon Chase: Quiet Storm.” Open W-Su noon-6 pm. 88 Eldridge St., 5th fl., btw Hester & Grand sts., 646.756.4547. GALERIE LELONG

The gallery represents contemporary midcareer and established artists from the United States, Europe, Latin America, Asia and Australia, including Jaume Plensa, Cildo Meireles and Yoko Ono. Thru March 31: “Mildred Thompson: Radiation Explorations and Magnetic Fields.” Open Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm. 528 W. 26th St., btw 10th & 11th aves., 212.315.0470. HANS P. KRAUS JR. FINE PHOTOGRAPHS

Nineteenth- and early 20th-century pioneers of photography, such as William Henry Fox Talbot, Julia Margaret Cameron, Hill & Adamson and Edward Steichen. Thru March 16: “Facing the Camera,” a group exhibition of portraits by Lewis Carroll, Nadar, Adam

Fuss and Vera Lutter, among others. Open M-F noon-6 pm, and by appointment. 962 Park Ave., at E. 82nd St., 212.794.2064. LYLES & KING

Mira Schor, Phillip Birch and Chris Hood are among the contemporary artists represented by this young Lower East Side gallery, a 1,500foot subterranean space. Thru March 18: “Mi Kafchin: Between Nights.” March 23April 22: “Borden Capalino.” Open W-Su 11 am-6 pm. 106 Forsyth St., at Broome St., 646.484.5478. METRO PICTURES GALLERY

Paintings, sculpture, drawings, mixed media and installations by international contemporary artists, including Robert Longo, Tony Oursler and Cindy Sherman. March 3-April 14: “Oliver Laric: Year of the Dog.” Open Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm. 519 W. 24th St., btw 10th & 11th aves., 212.206.7100. MICHAEL ROSENFELD GALLERY

Specializing in 20th- and 21st-century American art, including African-American and abstract art. Thru March 24: “Michael Goldberg: End to End, the 1950s & 2000s.” Open Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm, and by appointment. 100 11th Ave., at W. 19th St., 212.247.0082.

ART MUSEUMS

AMERICAN FOLK ART MUSEUM

The museum’s permanent collection and temporary exhibits specialize in works created by self-taught American artists dating from the 18th century to today. Open Tu-Th, Sa 11:30 am-7 pm, F noon-7:30 pm, Su noon-6 pm. Free. 2 Lincoln Sq., Columbus Ave., at W. 66th St., 212.595.9533. BROOKLYN MUSEUM

Ancient Egyptian and contemporary American art, among other specialties, are housed in a 560,000-square-foot Beaux Arts building. Open W 11 am-6 pm, Th 11 am-10 pm, F-Su 11 am-6 pm. 200 Eastern Pkwy., at Washington Ave., Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, 718.638.5000. COOPER HEWITT

Located in the former residence of industrialist Andrew Carnegie, this Smithsonian museum uses groundbreaking technology to create interactive exhibits on historic and contemporary design. Open M-F, Su 10 am-6 pm, Sa 10 am-9 pm. 2 E. 91st St., at Fifth Ave., 212.849.8400. THE FRICK COLLECTION

One of the world’s most magnificent collections of old-master paintings, fur-

nishings and decorative arts fills the former residence of industrialist Henry Clay Frick. Open Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. Children under 10 are not admitted. 1 E. 70th St., at Fifth Ave., 212.288.0700. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM

One of the most significant architectural icons of the 20th century, Frank Lloyd Wright’s famous structure is the repository for a world-class permanent collection and temporary exhibitions. Open M-W, F, Su 10 am-5:45 pm, Sa 10 am-7:45 pm. 1071 Fifth Ave., at 89th St., 212.423.3500. THE JEWISH MUSEUM

Archaeological artifacts, ceremonial objects, photographs, works on paper and art exhibitions explore Jewish diversity and culture. Open Sa-Tu 11 am-5:45 pm, Th 11 am-8 pm, F 11 am-4 pm. 1109 Fifth Ave., at 92nd St., 212.423.3200. THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

Greek and Roman galleries; vast fashion holdings; instruments of historical, technical and social importance; and renowned collections of American, European and Far Eastern fine and decorative art fill this encyclopedic museum, which represents more than 5,000 years of artistic endeavor from every corner

49


Art

SE ARCH THE CIT Y / For more listings, see wheretraveler.com/new-york-cit y

of the world. Open Su-Th 10 am-5:30 pm, F-Sa 10 am-9 pm. Admission to the main building includes same-day admission to the museum’s two annexes: The Met Cloisters and The Met Breuer. 1000 Fifth Ave., at 82nd St., 212.535.7710. THE MORGAN LIBRARY & MUSEUM

Initially the private library of financier J. Pierpont Morgan, the facility now hosts temporary exhibitions in addition to being a research library and museum containing rare and priceless books, manuscripts, drawings and prints. Open Tu-Th 10:30 am-5 pm, F 10:30 am-9 pm, Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. 225 Madison Ave., at E. 36th St., 212.685.0008. MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN

A center for innovative arts and crafts on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. Open Tu-W, F-Su 10 am-6 pm, Th 10 am-9 pm. 2 Columbus Circle, btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.299.7777. MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

One of the world’s greatest repositories of late-19th-, 20th- and 21st-century works of art contains masterpieces by van Gogh, Picasso and Matisse, a sculpture garden and an extensive film collection. Open M-Th, Sa-Su 10:30 am-5:30 pm, F 10:30 am-8 pm. 11 W. 53rd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.708.9400. NEUE GALERIE NEW YORK

The elegant townhouse museum is dedicated to 20th-century German and Austrian fine and decorative art and design by Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Otto Dix and others. Open Th-M 11 am-6 pm. 1048 Fifth Ave., at 86th St., 212.628.6200. NEW MUSEUM

Contemporary cutting-edge art in a variety of mediums by American and international artists. Open Tu-W, F-Su 11 am-6 pm, Th 11 am-9 pm.

50 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018

235 Bowery, btw Rivington & Stanton sts., 212.219.1222. WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

Indoor galleries and outdoor spaces are devoted to temporary exhibitions and a renowned permanent collection of American art. Open M, W-Th, Su 10:30 am-6 pm, F-Sa 10:30 am-10 pm. 99 Gansevoort St., btw Washington & West sts., 212.570.3600.

AUCTION HOUSES

CHRISTIE’S

A prestigious auctioneer of fine art and antiques since the 18th century. March 1: Postwar and Contemporary Art. March 20: Fine Chinese Paintings. March 21: South Asian Modern + Contemporary Art; Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Works of Art. March 22: The Classic Age of Chinese Ceramics–The Linyushanren Collection, Part III; The Studio of the Clear Garden: Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art. March 22-23: Fine Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art. 20 Rockefeller Plz., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.636.2000. DOYLE NEW YORK

The auction house sells fine art, jewelry, furniture and more. March 7: Doyle at Home. March 13: Fine Paintings. March 19: Asian Works of Art. March 20: Provident Loan Society: Jewelry, Watches, Silverware and Coins. 175 E. 87th St., btw Third & Lexington aves., 212.427.2730. SOTHEBY’S

Fine art and collectibles go on the block at this longstanding auction house. March 2: Contemporary Curated. March 5: To Live With Art: Property From the Jerome and Ellen Stern Collection. March 19: Modern and Contemporary South Asian Art. March 20: Ming: Luminous Dawn of Empire; Jingyatang: Treasures of

Chinese Buddhist Sculpture; Kangxi: The Jie Rui Tang Collection; Inspired: Chinese Art From the Collection of Gerson and Judith Leiber. March 21: Important Chinese Art. March 22: The Richard R. and Magdalena Ernst Collection of Himalayan Art; Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Works of Art; The Chew Family Collection of Chinese Paintings and Calligraphy. March 23: Fine Classical Chinese Paintings and Calligraphy. March 24: Saturday at Sotheby’s: Asian Art. March 28: American Art. 1334 York Ave., at E. 72nd St., 212.606.7000.

and the latest design ideas for kitchen and bath, floor coverings, outdoor furnishings, lighting and accessories. Open Th 10 am-6 pm (trade and VIP ticket holders only), F-Sa 10 am-6 pm (open to all), Su 10 am-5 pm (open to all). Pier 92 & 94, 12th Ave., at W. 55th St., 800.677.6278. THE ARMORY SHOW

(March 8-11) Devoted exclusively to modern and contemporary art, this prestigious, annual event is a showcase for international exhibitors. Open Th-Sa noon-8 pm, Su noon-6 pm. Piers 92 & 94, 711 12th Ave., at W. 55th St., 212.645.6440.

SWANN AUCTION GALLERIES

ART ON PAPER

A family-owned auction house specializing in rare and antiquarian books and works on paper. March 1: Vintage Posters. March 8: Early Printed, Medical, Scientific and Travel Books. March 13: 19th- and 20th-Century Prints and Drawings. March 22: Autographs. March 29: Printed and Manuscript African Americana. 104 E. 25th St., btw Lexington & Park aves., 212.254.4710.

(March 8-11) More that 85 galleries from around the world present modern and contemporary artworks, including sculpture, drawing, painting and photography, which use paper as their medium. Open Th 6-10 pm (preview), F-Sa 11 am-7 pm, Su noon-6 pm. Pier 36, 299 South St., at Clinton St.

SPECIAL SHOWS

AFFORDABLE ART FAIR NEW YORK

(March 21-25) International galleries and exhibitors present works—including illustrations, contemporary photographs and paintings by emerging and established artists—priced between $100 and $10,000, with more than half under $5,000. Open W 6-9 pm (private view), Th 11 am-9 pm, F 11-8 pm (free 6-8 pm), Sa 11 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. Metropolitan Pavilion, 125 W. 18th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.255.2003. ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST DESIGN SHOW

(March 22-25) Luxury home furnishings from hundreds of retailers and brands are on display and include one-ofa-kind and custom work, antiques, midcentury furniture

THE ART SHOW

(Feb. 28-March 4) Leading fine art dealers from the United States, who are members of the Art Dealers Association of America (ADAA), show and sell works from the late-19th century through today. Open W-F noon-8 pm, Sa noon-7 pm, Su noon-5 pm. Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Ave., at E. 67th St., 212.488.5550. ASIA WEEK NEW YORK

(March 15-24) Asian art and antiques dealers, auction houses, museums and cultural institutions celebrate Asian art and culture, with exhibitions, lectures, discussions, major auctions and much more. Various locations throughout Manhattan. CLIO ART FAIR

(March 8-11) This curated art fair introduces independent artists, who do not have exclusive NYC gallery representation, to collectors. Open Th 6-9 pm (VIP recep-


Art tion), F-Sa noon-8 pm, Su noon-6 pm. 335 W. 35th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves. COLLECTIVE DESIGN FAIR

(March 9-11) Global emerging and established galleries exhibit works attesting to the diversity of today’s culture. Open F-Sa 11 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. Skylight Clarkson North, 572 Washington St., btw W. Houston and Clarkson sts. INDEPENDENT

(March 9-11) International galleries (many that are “maverick” as opposed to “mainstream”), independent curators, publishers and nonprofit spaces exhibit cutting-edge contemporary art. Open F-Sa noon-7 pm, Su noon-6 pm. Spring Studios, 50 Varick St., btw Beach & Canal sts. NADA NEW YORK

(March 8-11) The New Art Dealers Alliance (NADA) cultivates, supports and advances new voices in contemporary art. The seventh edition of the New York fair features 100 international exhibitors representing 33 cities from 17 countries. Open Th 2-8 pm, F-Sa noon-8 pm, Su noon-6 pm. Skylight Clarkson Sq., 550 Washington St., btw King & W. Houston sts., 212.594.0883. NEW YORK ANTIQUARIAN BOOK FAIR

(March 8-11) Thousands of rare books, manuscripts and maps are exhibited and sold at this expansive and vetted book fair, featuring more than 200 American and international dealers. Open Th 5-9 pm (preview), F noon-8 pm, Sa noon-7 pm, Su noon-5 pm. Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Ave., at E. 67th St., 212.777.5218. VOLTA NY

(March 7-11) A showcase for solo art projects by emerging, trendsetting and rising international contemporary art stars. Open W 6-9 pm (public vernissage), Th-Sa noon-8 pm, Su noon-5 pm. Pier 90, 12th Ave., at W. 50th St.

51


Scene Cook Space Rotating culinary learning experiences—with programming specific to children, families and birthday parties—in an industrial loft with 15-foot ceilings. Classes include Israeli cuisine, pasta 101, doughnut-making, a single-class ayurvedic cooking workshop and a five-week series on building culinary confidence for beginner or intermediate chefs. All sessions end with a sit-down dinner comprising students’ creations. 603 Bergen St., btw Vanderbilt & Carlton aves., Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, 718.230.8400.

BAR MOGA

This dimly lit Greenwich Village cocktail lounge offers a wide variety of Japanese spirits and specialty plates in a space designed to recall a 1920s, Taisho-era jazz bar. 128 W. Houston St., at Sullivan St., 929.399.5853. BAR SIXTYFIVE AT RAINBOW ROOM

NYC’s highest terrace, located atop Rockefeller Plaza, serves elaborate specialty cocktails made by an experienced, renowned bar staff, offers luxe plates such as lobster rolls and caviar, and features breathtaking, panoramic views of the entire city. 30 Rockefeller Plz., 65th fl., btw W. 49th & W. 50th sts., 212.632.5000. BOWERY BEER GARDEN

This classic haven for fans of sports and drinking, with ample outdoor space during warmer months and many TVs indoors showcasing live sporting events, offers a lengthy menu of pub fare and daily specials, such as oysters on the half shell. 93 Bowery, btw Canal & Hester sts., 917.355.6047. THE CROWN

Panoramic, 360-degree views of all five boroughs and New Jersey, from inside an elegant

52 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018

indoor lounge with floor-toceiling windows and a sophisticated cocktail program, or outside on two elegant terraces when weather permits. Hotel 50 Bowery NYC, 50 Bowery, 21st fl., btw Bayard & Canal sts., 646.630.8057. HOME SWEET HOME

Nightly, genre-themed DJs and a dazzling disco ball have kept an eclectic crowd flocking to this subterranean bar for a decade. 131 Chrystie St., btw Broome & Delancey sts., 212.226.5708. UPSTAIRS AT THE KIMBERLY

This year-round terrace atop the Kimberly Hotel, with dazzling views of Midtown and the Chrysler Building, serves elaborate housemade cocktails, high-end wines by the glass and a variety of desserts, including lime vanilla crème brûlée and cappuccino panna cotta. 145 E. 50th St., btw Third & Lexington aves., 212.888.1220.

COMEDY CLUBS

CHICAGO CITY LIMITS

Masters of improvisation take suggestions from the audience during interactive sketch comedy shows and teach novices and intermediates during weekly class series. 46 W. 96th St., Studio 4W, btw Central Park W. & Columbus Ave., 212.888.5233.

COMEDY CELLAR

The Greenwich Village spot is known for unexpected appearances from famed comedians. 117 MacDougal St., btw W. 3rd St. & Minetta Ln., 212.254.3480. UPRIGHT CITIZENS BRIGADE THEATRE

Newcomers and seasoned comics perform improv, sketch and stand-up shows at UCB’s two Manhattan theaters. 153 E. 3rd St., btw aves. B & A, 212.366.9231; 307 W. 26th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.366.9176.

DANCE CLUBS+RAVES

CIELO

Revelers groove to tunes spun by a rotating roster of international DJs at this Meatpacking District hot spot. 18 Little W. 12th St., btw Ninth Ave. & Washington St., 212.645.5700. OUTPUT

A suggested all-black dress code and prohibited use of photography and recording devices set the tone of subtlety at this Brooklyn deep-house and techno club. 74 Wythe Ave., btw N. 11th & N. 12th sts., Williamsburg, Brooklyn, 212.555.1212. UP&DOWN

The buzz at this nightclub hits its peak after 1 am, but the

party goes on all night and always with a variety of DJs. 244 W. 14th St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.242.4411.

EXPERIENCES+ ACTIVITIES

BROOKLYN BREAD LAB

This baking laboratory mills its own flour, focuses on ancient grains and teaches novices, intermediates and expert bakers how to master the art of the oven. Classes, helmed by Head Baker Assane Diop of Maison Kayser and Executive Chef Kevin Chun of Harvey at the Williamsburg Hotel, include laminated/puff pastry dough, pâte à choux, pasta and pizza making classes. 201 Moore St., btw White St. & Bushwick Ave., Bushwick, Brooklyn, 718.418.4400. BROOKLYN CIDER HOUSE

Guests use bread as plates at this Basque-influenced cidery, where a full dinner experience includes an immersive cidery tour; self-pouring straight from huge, aged wooden barrels; and a five-course, family-style meal at communal tables. D (Tu-Su). 1100 Flushing Ave., at Varick Ave., Bushwick, Brooklyn, 347.295.0308. EMPIRE PUB CRAWL

A staff of knowledgeable “crawl hosts” lead the way as party tour groups venue-hop

PHOTO: COOK SPACE CLASS, ETHAN COVEY

BARS+LOUNGES+ BREWHOUSES


SE ARCH THE CIT Y / For more listings, see wheretraveler.com/new-york-cit y

top NYC nightspots—including The DL, Vig Bar and The Late Late—over the course of a three-hour expedition that includes four total stops. Drink specials vary by venue, and admission fees are included in the tour price. No phone. empirepubcrawl.com THE NEW YORK NIGHT LIFE

Experience nightlife in the “city that never sleeps” on curated excursions to NYC’s top bars, lounges and clubs. All-inclusive packages include transportation, entrance fees and drinks. 324 W. 47th St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 646.338.0895. SAMSUNG 837

This interactive technology playground and store offers a multitude of experiential sessions, including beginners coding workshops, personal technology training appointments and free 4-D, virtual-reality sessions. 837 Washington St., at W. 13th St., 844.577.6969.

JAZZ+BLUES CLUBS

BLUE NOTE JAZZ CLUB

Major Northeast-U.S.-based hip-hop artists team up with big-band jazz performers, at this intimate, esteemed jazz haven, where the best and brightest have performed, including the late Dizzy Gillespie. 131 W. 3rd St., btw MacDougal St. & Sixth Ave., 212.475.8592.

Seventh Ave. So. & Bleecker St., 212.675.6056. GINNY’S SUPPER CLUB

The glory days of Harlem nightlife are reborn at Chef Marcus Samuelsson’s sleek and stylish subterranean boîte, directly below his trendy restaurant Red Rooster Harlem. 310 Lenox Ave., at W.125th St., 212.792.9001.

The Ramones, Eric Clapton, Red Hot Chili Peppers and Eminem. 17 Irving Pl., btw E. 15th & E. 16th sts., 212.777.6800.

known coaches and players. 48 E. 23rd St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.982.8802.

PIANOS

BARCLAYS CENTER

A former piano store turned chic rock club, this venue draws a hip crowd for live indie rock in a bi-level space. 158 Ludlow St., at Stanton St., 212.505.3733.

Brooklyn’s state-of-the-art entertainment and sports arena is home to the 2017–2018 New York Islanders and Brooklyn Nets. Visit team websites for schedules and tickets. 620 Atlantic Ave., at Flatbush Ave., Park Slope, Brooklyn, 800.745.3000.

LITTLEFIELD

SHRINE

The 6,200-square-foot converted warehouse is part performance venue, part art gallery and part bar. The space hosts comedy shows, jazz performances and other concerts, readings, experimental theater productions and art exhibits, among other events. 622 Degraw St., btw Third & Fourth aves., Gowanus, Brooklyn, no phone.

Patrons groove to several live bands nightly at Harlem’s world-music bar. 2271 Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd., btw W. 133rd & W. 134th sts., 212.690.7807.

POP+ROCK VENUES

APOLLO THEATER

The historic Harlem venue has launched myriad legendary performers, including James Brown, Ella Fitzgerald and Michael Jackson. Every W at 7:30 pm: Amateur Night talent competition. 253 W. 125th St., btw Adam Clayton Powell Jr. & Frederick Douglass blvds., 212.531.5300. BEACON THEATRE

DIZZY’S CLUB COCA-COLA

This classic Upper West Side theater has been revamped to house pop-music concerts and other acts. 2124 Broadway, at W. 74th St., 866.858.0008.

Sleek furnishings, low lighting and talented performers define this intimate club that also boasts a stunning stage backdrop: the glittering Manhattan skyline. Jazz at Lincoln Center, 10 Columbus Cir., Broadway & W. 60th St., 212.258.9595.

The intimate concert venue, a former movie house and Off-Broadway theater, offers general-admission standing room and seating. 127 E. 23rd St., btw Lexington Ave. & Park Ave. So., 212.614.6932.

GRAMERCY THEATRE

Scene

SPORTS: PLAY

CHELSEA PIERS

This multisport, 30-acre waterfront facility features two indoor ice-skating rinks, an indoor swimming pool, a golf driving range, gymnasium, weight-training room, track, batting cages, the largest rock climbing wall in the Northeast and a full-service spa for men and women. W. 23rd St., at the Hudson River, 212.336.6666. CITY ICE PAVILION

NYC’s only rooftop ice-skating venue, sponsored by the New York Rangers, features an enclosed NHL-size rink offering competitive ice hockey league play, open ice hockey sessions, skate rentals, skating sessions and lessons. 47-32 32nd Pl., at Van Dam St., Long Island City, Queens, 718.706.6667. SHAPE UP NYC

FAT CAT

IRVING PLAZA

Burn calories at your own pace during drop-in fitness programs given throughout the five boroughs at various centers. Visit website for schedules and venues. nycgovparks.org/programs/ recreation/shape-up-nyc.

Jazz bands energize this underground billiards hall, which also offers table tennis, foosball, shuffleboard, and massive tables of chess, checkers and backgammon. 75 Christopher St., btw

This 1,025-capacity rock music venue frequently hosts intimate and off-the-cuff, scheduled-last-second performances by major commercial artists, the likes of which have included

This table tennis club features a lounge, pro shop, bar and private room. Visitors can sign up for private and group lessons with internationally

SPIN NEW YORK

SPORTS: WATCH

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN

The entertainment and sporting venue hosts concerts and live events in The Theater at MSG and in its arena, which is home to the 2017–2018 New York Rangers and New York Knicks and a monthly residency by legendary New York musician Billy Joel. Visit team websites for schedules and tickets. Seventh Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 866.858.0008. NEW YORK CITY FC

The five boroughs’ soccer club returns to the Bronx for its fourth Major League Soccer season, helmed by Spanish superstar, team captain and 2016 MLS MVP, David Villa Sánchez. Visit team website for schedule and tickets. Yankee Stadium, 1 E. 161st St., at River Ave., Bronx, 855.776.9232. NEW YORK METS

The 2018 campaign opens at home with a three-game series against the St. Louis Cardinals, March 29, 31 and April 1. Citi Field, 123-01 Roosevelt Ave., at 126th St., Flushing, Queens, 718.507.8499. NEW YORK RED BULLS

Bradley Wright-Phillips, Luis Robles and the two-time Major League Soccer regular season champions take on the 2018 competition at their state-of-the-art soccer arena in New Jersey. Accessible via PATH Train. Visit team website for schedule and tickets. Red Bull Arena, at Cape May St. & Frank E. Rodgers Blvd., Harrison, NJ, 877.727.6223.

53


Explore Liberty Helicopters Sightseeing Tours Choose fom a variety of packages for splendid aerial views of NYC and its surroundings. Flights include The Big Apple (Governors and Ellis islands, the Financial District, One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and more); New York, New York (all of the above, plus Grant’s Tomb, the Palisades of New Jersey and more); and the Aerial Experience (all of the above, plus the skylines of key New Jersey cities and more). 6 E. River Piers, 800.542.9933.

Guests travel in comfort on these passenger trains, stopping at stations throughout the country. Red Cap service is available for those who need assistance. For more information, call Penn Station, Eighth Ave., 800.872.7245. CARS CO.

This chauffeured car service with lime-green automobiles and hybrid engines offers competitive rates to airports, around town or out of town. 800.800.6757. GO AIRLINK NYC/MY SEDAN

Door-to-door shuttles and rides in late-model vans, SUVs and sedans to and from JFK, LaGuardia and Newark terminals. 877.599.8200 GOTHAM DREAM CARS

Car enthusiasts can rent luxury vehicles, such as Lamborghini Spyders and Bentley Continentals, either for personal use or with an instructor on “The Dream Car Tour,” a customizable ride in an exotic sports car. 212.957.4400. GRAND CENTRAL TERMINAL

Trains run on the MetroNorth railroad line to and from this majestic landmark. For schedules and prices, visit mta.info/mnr. Terminal open

54 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018

daily 5:30 am-2 am. Stores: M-F 8 am-8 pm, Sa 10 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. Dining concourse: M-Sa 7 am-9 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. E. 42nd St., btw Lexington & Vanderbilt aves., 212.340.2583. GRAY LINE CITY SIGHTSEEING NEW YORK

Sightseeing tours by bus, boat and helicopter. Tours are available in 11 languages. The company also offers buses to Woodbury Common Premium Outlets seven days a week. Buses leave from the Gray Line New York Visitor Center, 777 Eighth Ave., btw W. 47th & W. 48th sts., 212.445.0848. LONG ISLAND RAIL ROAD

This rail service operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week and takes visitors from Penn Station or Jamaica to more than 100 destinations throughout Long Island. Refreshment carts available near many trains. For pricing and schedules, go to mta. info/lirr or call 511 and say “LIRR” at any time. METRO-NORTH RAILROAD

This railroad line departs from Grand Central Terminal and travels to 120 stations throughout seven counties in New York State. Peakperiod trains run every 20-30 minutes. 212.532.4900.

NJ TRANSIT

This public transportation corporation provides frequent bus and train service to points throughout New Jersey, including Newark Liberty International Airport. Save time and buy tickets and monthly passes for all train, bus routes and light rail lines with NJ TRANSIT Mobile App™, MyTix. 973.275.5555. NYC FERRY

Ferry service along the East River to and from Lower Manhattan and Midtown and parts of Brooklyn and Queens. Vessels offer charging stations, Wi-Fi and concessions. Adult one-way ticket, $2.75. Tickets purchased through the NYC Ferry app, the website or at a ticket vending machine available at ferry landings. ferry.nyc. PENN STATION

City buses and subways converge with commuter rail services to New Jersey and Long Island and national rail services to Chicago, Miami, Washington, D.C. and other destinations. Eighth Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 212.630.6401. PORT AUTHORITY BUS TERMINAL

This bus terminal serves approximately 200,000 passengers on a typical weekday.

625 Eighth Ave., btw W. 40th & W. 42nd sts., 800.221.9903.

TOURS

BEST NEW YORK TOURS

Choose from a wide range of tours by foot, subway or chauffeured luxury vehicle with these tours, which include Brooklyn, Downtown, Midtown and Uptown Manhattan. Four hour minimun for all tours. Schedules/ prices vary. 516.578.9124. BIG APPLE GREETER

Local, multilingual volunteers show tourists New York City on two-to-four-hour jaunts through the city’s neighborhoods on free tours. Excursions are available by foot and subway. Reservations must be made at least four weeks prior to the scheduled visit. For more information, call 212.669.8159. BIG ONION WALKING TOURS

Locals and visitors alike are led through historic New York neighborhoods. Outings last two hours. $25 adults, $20 seniors (65+)/students/ military, $15 students. 888.606.9255. CITYSIGHTS NY

Hop-on, hop-off double-decker bus tours by day and night allow passengers to experience Manhattan from the top (Harlem) to

PHOTO: LIBERTY HELICTOPERS, COURTESY LIBERTY HELICOPTERS

TRANSPORTATION

AMTRAK


Explore the bottom (Battery Park). Frequent departures daily 8 am-6 pm. Prices vary. Visitors Center: 234 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves. (inside the lobby of Madame Tussauds), 212.812.2700.

Best Way

to/ from

Newark Airport

NYC Newark Liberty Int’l Airport Station* NO TRAFFIC. ONLY $13.00. JUST 25 MINUTES. *CONNECT TO AIRTRAIN NEWARK

njtransit.com/ewr

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN ALL-ACCESS TOUR

This sports and entertainment arena tour includes VIP areas, locker rooms and more. Daily 10:30 am-3 pm. $26.95 adults, $18.95 seniors/ students, $17.95 children. Seventh Ave., at W. 33rd St., 866.858.0008. NEW YORK SPORTS TOURS

This tour takes you to key locations from sports history while a guide shares stories of sports-related people, places and events in New York from 1776 to the present. The tour includes more than 30 mini-documentaries that play during the ride. Many tours include the option of a meal at Keens Steakhouse hosted by a noted sports figure. E. 44th St. & Vanderbilt Ave., 212.244.1132. A SLICE OF BROOKLYN BUS TOURS

Tours depart from Manhattan and take visitors to iconic sites around the borough. Tours include the Neighborhood Tour, the Pizza Tour and the Chocolate Tour. 212.913.9917. STATUE CRUISES

1.877.LADYTIX

Ferries carry visitors to the Statue of Liberty National Monument. Packages include admission to the Statue of LIberty and Ellis Island National Immigration Museum. Daily departure times from Battery Park vary. $18.50 adults, $14 seniors (62+), $9 children ages 4-12, under 4 free. Audio tour included. 201.604.2800. TAKE TOURS

This tour company offers dozens of jaunts around the city, including tours of Ellis Island, Grant’s Tomb, Battery Park and many more. 888.428.7255.

55


Sights Sensory Perception Could we humans cope without our senses of sight, hearing, touch, taste and smell? Do the senses interact? “Our Senses: An Immersive Experience,” the exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History (p. 57), explores these questions and more. For example, in the gallery devoted to balance (left), the senses disagree when visitors’ feet feel a flat surface floor that appear to be anything but flat. How body and brain adjust is part of the fun.

DISCOUNTS

NEW YORK CITYPASS

The discount pass provides access to six major attractions at a saving of 40 percent off regular admissions. Passes are sold at participating attractions and are good for nine consecutive days from the first day of use. 888.330.5008.

ATTRACTIONS

AFRICAN BURIAL GROUND NATIONAL MONUMENT

The national historic landmark in Lower Manhattan marks the site where enslaved and free Africans were buried during the 17th and 18th centuries. Visitor center: Open Tu-Sa 10 am-4 pm. Free. 290 Broadway, btw Reade & Duane sts., 212.637.2019. BRONX ZOO

The largest urban zoo in the United States provides natural habitats and environments for its 4,000 species, including snow leopards, lemurs and Western lowland gorillas. Open daily 10 am-4:30 pm. 2300 Southern Blvd., Bronx, 718.220.1500. CASTLE CLINTON NATIONAL MONUMENT

Located in Battery Park, this historic open-air fort was built to defend New York Harbor during the War of 1812 and was renamed Castle Clinton in 1821 to honor former

56 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018

mayor and governor of New York, DeWitt Clinton. Having served as an opera house, immigration center, entertainment complex and aquarium, it now offers guided tours and an exhibit room devoted to key periods in the monument’s history. Castle Clinton is also the departure point for ferries to the Statue of LIberty. Daily 7:45 am-5 pm. Free. Battery Park, southernmost tip of Manhattan, 212.344.7220. DOWNTON ABBEY: THE EXHIBITION

The Emmy Award-winning television show comes to life in an exhibition that transports fans to post-Edwardian England and the iconic country house. Featured are memorable moments from the show’s six seasons and displays devoted to the characters, their clothes and way of life, as well as the social history and culture of the period. Open daily 10 am-8 pm. 218 W. 57th, btw Seventh Ave. & Broadway. EMPIRE STATE BUILDING EXPERIENCE

Wraparound views of New York from the 86th- and 102nd-floor observatories. Open daily 8 am-2 am (last elevator ascends at 1:15 am). Every day, 100 visitors who book in advance can see the sun rise from the 86th-floor

observatory. 350 Fifth Ave., btw 33rd & 34th sts., 212.736.3100. ENCOUNTER: OCEAN ODYSSEY

National Geographic’s immersive experience is an underwater walk-through adventure that takes explorers, young and old, into the depths of the Pacific Ocean, where they come face-to-face with humpback whales, great white sharks, sea lions and other creatures. Open Su-Th 10 am-9 pm, F-Sa 10 am-10 pm (last ticket sold one hour before closing). 226 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 646.308.1337. GREEN-WOOD CEMETERY

New York City’s most famous cemetery, located in Brooklyn, is the bucolic, final resting place of thousands of famous New Yorkers, including Leonard Bernstein, Horace Greeley, “Boss” Tweed and Louis Comfort Tiffany. Gates open daily at 8 am. Free. 25th St. & Fifth Ave., Greenwood Heights, Brooklyn, 718.768.7300. GULLIVER’S GATE

The interactive, miniature world display features more than 300 built-to-scale models of well-known international landscapes and monuments, as well as hundreds of moving model trains, planes

and people from past, present and future. The exhibit covers the globe, from NYC to Latin America to Europe to the Middle East to Asia. Open daily 10 am-8 pm (last entry at 6:30 pm). 216 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.235.2016. HAMILTON GRANGE NATIONAL MEMORIAL

The Federal-style home of Alexander Hamilton (1755– 1804)—a Founding Father of the United States and inspiration for the Broadway musical hit—is in Harlem’s Saint Nicholas Park. The property includes a visitor center, permanent exhibits relating to Hamilton’s life and legacy, historically furnished rooms and landscaped grounds. Open W-Su 9 am-5 pm. Free. 414 W. 141st St., btw St. Nicholas & Convent aves., 646.548.2310. THE HIGH LINE

The 1.45-mile-long elevated park and public promenade offers views of the skyline, plus public art displays. Open daily 7 am-7 pm. Free. Gansevoort to W. 34th sts., btw 10th & 12th aves., 212.500.6035. MADAME TUSSAUDS NEW YORK

The 85,000-square-foot NYC incarnation of the Britishbased wax attraction features lifelike sculptures of sports

PHOTO: “BALANCE” GALLERY IN EXHIBITION “OUR SENSES: AN IMMERSIVE EXPERIENCE,” AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, ©AMNH / R. MICKENS

beneath them, but their eyes see walls and a


Sights legends, political figures, musical icons and entertainment A-listers, plus Ghostbusters: Dimension, Marvel Super Heroes 4-D Experience and Kong: Skull Island, featuring the city’s largest animatronic. Photo ops abound and selfies are encouraged. Open Su-Th 10 am-8 pm, F-Sa 10 am-10 pm. 234 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves. NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN

Lush gardens and walking trails, educational programs and free tours offer an escape from the city. Open Tu-Su 10 am-6 pm. 2900 Southern Blvd., Bronx, 718.817.8700. ONE WORLD OBSERVATORY

The three-level indoor observatory at the top of the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere affords uninterrupted views in every direction. Open daily 9 am-9 pm (last ticket sold at 8:15 pm). One World Trade Center, 285 Fulton St., entrance to the observatory is on West St., at Vesey St., 844.696.1776. STATUE OF LIBERTY

The 151-foot neoclassical statue, designed by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi, was a gift from France to the United States in 1886, and is known worldwide as a symbol of freedom and democracy. Open daily. Free. 212.363.3200. TOP OF THE ROCK

The observation deck at the top of Rockefeller Center welcomes visitors with panoramic vistas some 70 floors above street level. Open daily 8 am-midnight (the last elevator ascends at 11:15 pm). 30 Rockefeller Plz., W. 50th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 877.692.7625.

MUSEUMS

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

Guests explore halls filled with full-scale dinosaur skeletons, fossils, dioramas, artifacts, gems and minerals,

57


Sights

SE ARCH THE CIT Y / For more listings, see wheretraveler.com/new-york-cit y

meteorites and more. The Hayden Planetarium, with its immersive space show, is located in the museum’s Rose Center for Earth and Space. Open daily 10 am-5:45 pm. Central Park West, at W. 79th St., 212.769.5100.

ry. Escorted tours (40 mins) are offered on the hour (last tour at 4 pm). Open Tu-F 10 am-5 pm, Sa-Su noon-5 pm. 34-56 107th St., btw 34th & 37th aves., Corona, Queens, 718.478.8274.

ASIA SOCIETY

The city’s only 19th-century family home that has been preserved intact is steeped in the rich history of Old New York, when the family of prosperous hardware merchant Seabury Tredwell resided there. The furnishings, decorative objects, clothing and personal memorabilia on display are all original. Open Th noon-8 pm, F-M noon-5 pm. 29 E. 4th St., btw Bowery & Lafayette St., 212.777.1089.

Exhibitions, lectures and public events promote understanding among the people and institutions of the United States and Asia. Open Tu-Th, Sa-Su 11 am-6 pm, F 11 am-9 pm. 725 Park Ave., at E. 70th St., 212.288.6400. ELLIS ISLAND NATIONAL MUSEUM OF IMMIGRATION

Millions of immigrants entered the U.S. on this historic island between 1892 and 1954. In addition to viewing artifacts displayed in the museum, visitors seeking their heritage are welcome to consult the archives of the American Family Immigration History Center. Open daily. Free. Ellis Island: 212.363.3200. FRAUNCES TAVERN MUSEUM

General George Washington bade farewell to his officers in 1783 at the end of the Revolutionary War in what is now a museum of Early American history and culture. Open M-F noon-5 pm, Sa-Su 11 am-5 pm. 54 Pearl St., at Broad St., 212.425.1778. INTREPID SEA, AIR & SPACE MUSEUM

Historic aircraft, multimedia presentations, interactive exhibits and flight simulators, plus the guided missile submarine USS Growler, British Airways Concorde and space shuttle Enterprise. Open daily 10 am-5 pm. Pier 86, 12th Ave., at W. 46th St., 212.245.0072. LOUIS ARMSTRONG HOUSE MUSEUM

Extravagantly decorated by his wife, Lucille, the house in which Satchmo lived for nearly 30 years is now a museum dedicated to one of the most influential figures in jazz histo-

58 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018

MERCHANT’S HOUSE MUSEUM

MOUNT VERNON HOTEL MUSEUM & GARDEN

This institution, housed in a 1799 carriage house that became a hotel in 1826, takes visitors back to the days when midtown Manhattan was a country escape for New Yorkers living in the crowded city at the southern tip of the island. Open Tu-Su 11 am-4 pm. 421 E. 61st St., btw First & York aves., 212.838.6878. MUSEUM AT ELDRIDGE STREET

Located in the restored national historic landmark Eldridge Street Synagogue, the museum presents the culture, history and traditions of Jewish immigrants on the Lower East Side. Guided onehour tours are offered on the hour. Open Su-Th 10 am-5 pm, F 10 am-3 pm. 12 Eldridge St., btw Division & Canal sts., 212.219.0302. MUSEUM OF CHINESE IN AMERICA

Artifacts, exhibits, events and archives chronicle the traditions, history, culture and experiences of people of Chinese descent living in the United States. Open Tu-W, F-Su 11 am-6 pm, Th 11 am-9 pm. 215 Centre St., btw Howard & Grand sts., 855.955.6622.

MUSEUM OF SEX

This museum is dedicated to the history, evolution and cultural significance of human sexuality. Open M-Th 10 am-9 pm, F-Sa 10 am-11 pm, Su 11 am-9 pm. 233 Fifth Ave., at 27th St., 212.689.6337. MUSEUM OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK

The permanent exhibition, “New York at Its Core,” is a high-tech look at the city’s 400-year history. Open daily 10 am-6 pm. 1220 Fifth Ave., at 103rd St., 212.534.1672. MUSEUM OF THE MOVING IMAGE

The art, history and technology of film, television and digital media are explored through exhibitions, programs and the nation’s largest permanent collection of moving-image artifacts. Open W-Th 10:30 am-5 pm, F 10:30 am-8 pm, Sa-Su 10:30 am-6 pm. 36-01 35th Ave., at 37th St., Astoria, Queens, 718.777.6888. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF MATHEMATICS

More than 40 interactive exhibits appealing to both calculus stars and beginners in a 20,000-square-foot space. Open daily 10 am-5 pm. 11 E. 26th St., btw Madison & Fifth aves., 212.542.0566. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN

Housed in the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House, this Smithsonian Institution branch promotes appreciation of Native American history, culture, languages and arts. Open M-W, F-Su 10 am-5 pm, Th 10 am-8 pm. Free. 1 Bowling Green, at Broadway, 212.514.3700. NATIONAL SEPTEMBER 11 MEMORIAL & MUSEUM

Within the original footprints of the Twin Towers are two massive pools consisting of 30-foot cascading waterfalls and parapets, on which are inscribed the names of nearly 3,000 victims from

the 9/11 attacks in New York, at the Pentagon and in Pennsylvania, as well as the Feb. 26, 1993, World Trade Center bombing. Memorial: Open daily 7:30 am-9 pm. Free. Museum: Open Su-Th 9 am-8 pm (last entry 6 pm), F-Sa 9 am-9 pm (last entry 7 pm). Museum entrance at 180 Greenwich St., btw Liberty & Fulton sts., 212.266.5211. NEW YORK TRANSIT MUSEUM

Visitors view vintage subway cars, turnstiles, rotating art exhibitions and more in a 1930s subway station in Downtown Brooklyn. (There is an annex in Manhattan’s Grand Central Terminal.) Open Tu-F 10 am-4 pm, Sa-Su 11 am-5 pm. Boerum Pl. & Schermerhorn St., Brooklyn Heights, Brooklyn, 718.694.1600. NEW-YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM & LIBRARY

Documents, photographs and other works of art focus on the rich history of New York City and New York State. Open Tu-Th, Sa 10 am-6 pm, F 10 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. 170 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (W. 77th St.), 212.873.3400. THE PALEY CENTER FOR MEDIA

This institution focuses on the social impact of media technology. In addition to themed programs, more than 150,000 TV and radio shows from the 1950s and beyond are available to be viewed or listened to at private consoles. Open W, F-Su noon-6 pm, Th noon8 pm. 25 W. 52nd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.621.6600. TENEMENT MUSEUM

Visitors can experience late-19th-century and turn-ofthe-20th-century immigrant life on a variety of guided tours of authentically preserved three-room tenement apartments. Tours daily 10 am-6 pm (last tour 5 pm). Visitor Center: 103 Orchard St., btw Broome & Delancey sts., 212.982.8420.


Be Well Bamford Haybarn Spa This spa, in 1 Hotel Brooklyn Bridge in DUMBO, Brooklyn, offers 5,000-square-feet of space and nine treatments rooms. Treatments, which span a fusion of Swedish, Indian and Asian therapies, include body scrubs, full-body exfoliations, hot and cold jade stone massages, grooming packages and packages for mothers-to-be. The spa itself is decorated with a rustic sensibility, including hand-carved wooden doors and full-size tree trunks. 60 Furman St., at Doughty St., DUMBO, Brooklyn, 347.696.2530.

BEAUTY/SPAS

AESOP

The Australian skin-care company’s first stand-alone store in New York City carries products from the brand’s extensive collection of skin- and hair-care and fragrance lines. 232 Elizabeth St., btw Prince & E. Houston sts., 212.431.4411; and several other NYC locations. ALIBI NYC SALON

The airy salon invites customers to relax while getting a haircut, color, braiding, sculpting or more. 67 Greene St., Ste. 2, btw Broome & Spring sts., 212.219.2806.

PHOTO: BAMFORD HAYBARN SPA, COURTESY BAMFORD HAYBARN SPA

ANGELO DAVID SALON

Colorist Angelo David developed and offers Couture Hair Extensions & Additions™— customized extensions and additions made from human hair—as well as corrective and volumizing color, cuts, laser hair removal, eyelash extensions and more. 420 Madison Ave., 2nd fl., btw E. 48th & E. 49th sts., 212.883.6620. ANTHONY LEONARD SALON

Owners Anthony Palermo and Leonard Zagami are known for styling such celebrities as Madonna and Naomi Campbell, and can also customize conditioning treatments for both men and women. 532 Madison Ave., at E. 54th St., 212.750.8100.

ANTONIO PRIETO SALON

DERMALOGICA

EVA SCRIVO SALON

The Spanish-born stylist is a favorite of supermodels and beauty industry insiders; his Chelsea salon offers cuts, corrective color, extensions, retexturing treatments and more. 127 W. 20th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.255.3741.

The brand’s New York flagship offers skin analysis at the Skin Bar, professional skin treatments, plus its full product line. 110 Grand St., btw Broadway & Mercer St., 212.219.9800.

BELLISSIMO HAIR SPA

This national chain offers a number of blowout styles at a range of prices and with a variety of add-ons, such as scalp massage and hair masks. 4 W. 16th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.561.5392; and several other NYC locations.

Stylist and beauty expert Eva Scrivo invites visitors for a high-quality cut, coloring or styling session at one of her spacious salons. Luxurious spa services and makeup application are also available. 139 Fifth Ave., 2nd fl., btw 20th & 21st sts., 212.677.7315; and one other NYC location.

The personable staff at this stylish salon boasts a multicultural clientele that enjoys haircuts, coloring, hair-repair treatments, extensions, special-occasion hairdos, spa parties and eyebrow shaping. 233 Mott St., btw Spring & Prince sts., 212.431.4936. CONTESTA ROCK HAIR

A salon with Italian flavor and a rock soul whose motto is an “underground style,” this international brand offers cuts, styles, highlights and other hair treatments that cater to any artistic expression that men or women want. 535 Hudson St., at Charles St., 212.243.2901. CORNELIA SPA AT THE SURREY

Services at this salon include clarifying facials, hot stone massages, manicures, pedicures, waxing, body polishing, detoxification and more, all inside The Surrey hotel. 20 E. 76th St., btw Madison & Fifth aves., 646.358.3600.

DRYBAR

ELIZABETH ARDEN RED DOOR SPA

At this sumptuous retreat named after the legendary beauty mogul, services include massages and facials, body wraps and scrubs, hairstyling and makeup applications. 663 Fifth Ave., btw 52nd & 53rd sts., 212.546.0200; and several other NYC locations.

THE FOUR SEASONS SPA

Deep tissue and Swedish massages are offered alongside antioxidant full-body scrubs, enzyme peels and Eastern treatments, such as Shiatsu and reflexology. Four Seasons Hotel, 57 E. 57th St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.758.5700. FOX & JANE SALON

ESSIE FLAGSHIP SALON AT SAMUEL SHRIQUI

The salon offers cuts, a number of highlighting options—including balayage—texture treatments, extensions and special-event hairdos. 104 W. 83rd St., btw Columbus & Amsterdam aves., 646.478.7948; and several other NYC locations.

Located in the middle of a hair salon, the famed nail-polish line offers luxurious manicures and pedicures with its whimsically named, fashion-forward and chip-resistant polishes. 35 E. 65th St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.472.6805; and several other NYC locations.

Clients at the relaxed SoHo hair salon receive contemporary cuts, highlights and expert makeup applications. Other services include waxing, manicures, pedicures and up-dos, plus the luxury line of Frédéric Fekkai hair prod-

FRÉDÉRIC FEKKAI SALON

59


Be Well

SE ARCH THE CIT Y / For more listings, see wheretraveler.com/new-york-cit y

ucts is also available. 394 W. Broadway, 2nd fl., btw Broome & Spring sts., 212.888.2600; and several other NYC locations. FRESH

Combining natural ingredients and modern alchemy, this beauty line offers skin, body and hair-care products, as well as fragrances and makeup. 57 Spring St., btw Mulberry & Lafayette sts., 212.925.0099; and several other NYC locations. GREAT JONES SPA

A full-service holistic spa offering luxurious treatments— such as a coconut sugar glow and lemon verbena manicure—beside an indoor waterfall, in hot tubs or the chakra-light steam room. 29 Great Jones St., btw Bowery & Lafayette St., 212.505.3185. GUERLAIN SPA

This luxurious spa features massages, body wraps, hot stone therapy, nail treatments and its exclusive facial massage technique, originally developed at the first Guerlain “Institut de Beauté” in Paris in 1939. Located inside the Plaza hotel. 1 W. 58th St., at Central Park So., 212.759.3000. HAIR ROOM SERVICE BY MICHAEL DUEÑAS

This celebrity stylist, whose clients include Mariah Carey, offers coloring, blowouts and more, in your hotel room. For information and to book an appointment, email info@hairroomservices.com. HALE ORGANIC SALON

This upscale salon prides itself on using products that are free of ammonia and artificial fragrances, as well as being environmentally friendly (the floor is from a salvaged 200-year-old barn). 91 Franklin St., btw Franklin Pl. & Church St., 646.265.5886. HIBBA BEAUTY

Hair removal and shaping is the specialty at this beauty spot, which focuses on

60 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018

threading, waxing (using an in-house mixture) and sugaring based on skin type and sensitivity. Brow reformation and ayurvedic facials are also available. 448 W. Broadway, 2nd fl., btw Prince & W. Houston sts., 212.260.4321; and two other NYC locations. ION STUDIO

Designed with recycled materials, this eco-friendly salon (where everything is recycled, including the hair) offers pocket-friendly cuts and color. 41 Wooster St., at Broome St., 212.343.9060. JULIEN FAREL RESTORE SALON & SPA

A celebrity hairstylist has opened a 10,000-square-foot flagship and developed a “Power Beauty Menu,” which includes under- 60-minute treatments for hair, nails and body. The location also offers a men-only floor dedicated to grooming. 540 Park Ave., at E. 61st St., 212.888.8988. L. RAPHAEL BEAUTY SPA AT FOUR SEASONS HOTEL NEW YORK

Ten treatment rooms, including two luxury couples’ suites, in a pristine 4,500-squarefoot space with a full-service hair salon, a comprehensive menu of facial and body treatments, massages and beauty services, and a boutique retail space. Four Seasons Hotel New York, 57 E. 57th St., 212.350.6420. L’INSTITUT SOTHYS

Modeled after its sister spa in Paris, this 5,000-square-foot facility houses 10 treatment rooms, where a variety of signature and specialty facial treatments, body treatments, manicures and waxing are done. 37 W. 57th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.688.9400. L’OCCITANE

The South of France is the inspiration for the all-natural fragrances and bath, body and skin-care products for men and women found in this

Flatiron flagship. 170 Fifth Ave., at 22nd St., 212.206.8860; and several other NYC locations. NUANSA SPA

This luxury boutique spa offers a menu of more than 20 treatments, including massages specifically for jet-lagged travelers, mothersto-be and couples, as well as facials and body scrubs. 605 Fifth Ave., 5th fl., btw 48th & 49th sts., 212.602.1500. RED MARKET SALON

This chic hair salon specializes in the Parisian technique, balayage, in which highlights are painted onto the hair without the use of foils, resulting in a more free-form look. 13 E. 13th St., 2nd fl., btw University Pl. & Fifth Ave., 212.929.9600. RESCUE SPA

This spa offers a variety of services (skin and body treatments, hair removal, manicures and pedicures, a hair salon) and is best known for its bio-lift facial, which uses noninvasive electric microcurrents for lifting, sculpting and firming the skin. 29 E. 19th St., btw Park Ave. So. & Fifth Ave., 866.772.2766. SEPHORA

The leading European beauty emporium carries a variety of makeup, skin-care and fragrance lines. The Shops at Columbus Circle, 10 Columbus Circle, btw W. 58th & W. 60th sts., 212.823.9383; and several other NYC locations. THE SETAI WALL STREET

Guests rejuvenate with signature facials for men and women, and “suite experiences,” such as a Polynesian Ritual, which includes an oversize marble soaking tub, rain showers and a heated treatment table. 40 Broad St., at Exchange Pl., 212.792.6193. TIMELESS, A MARILYN MONROE SPA

Located inside the Hyatt Times Square, this spa offers massages, beauty treatments,

hairstyling, waxing and manicures in a classy space themed around its celebrity namesake. 135 W. 45th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 646.640.3830.

WELLNESS/ FITNESS CENTERS

CENTER FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF THERAPEUTIC ARTS

Wellness professionals, cancer patients and the general public alike are welcome at this holistic center, which offers master classes and clinical programs and where licensed massage therapists and other healers are on staff. 122 W. 26th St., 7th fl., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.229.1529. HYPE GYM

Amenities at this exclusive gym include indoor and outdoor fitness studios, laundry and towel service, and massage therapy. 480 Second Ave., at E. 27th St., 646.201.9387. ROSENBERG WELLNESS CENTER

Using innovative, nonsurgical techniques, this chiropractic care center offers relief from spinal and joint pain caused by long flights, athletic overexertion and injuries. 635 Madison Ave., btw E. 59th & E. 60th sts., 212.858.0015. TMPL GYM

This high-tech fitness space from gym guru David Barton offers a metabolic studio, virtual-reality spin studio, 30-foot video wall, 25-meter saltwater pool, smart cardio machines and more than 20 group fitness classes. 355 W. 49th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 917.521.6666. 24 HOUR FITNESS

This around-the-clock fitness center includes a lounge, steam room, whirlpool and group classes, an indoor lap pool and classes from strength training to yoga. 225 Fifth Ave., at 27th St., 212.271.1002; and several other NYC locations.


MTA SUBWAY MAP

61


1/2 mi 1000 m

NY Waterway Commuter Ferry CitySightseeing Cruises New York Water Taxi

62 W H E R E I M A R C H 2018 NY Waterway East River Ferry

NY Waterway East River Ferry

New York Water Taxi NY Waterway East River Ferry

MANHATTAN STREET MAP


Greenway Bike Path

Attraction

New York Water Taxi

Staten Island Ferry (Free)

Statue of Liberty National Monument & Ellis Island Immigration Museum

Statue Cruises

NY Waterway Commuter Ferry New York Water Taxi

WTC SITE

TRIBUTE WTC

Governors Island Ferry (Free)

CitySightseeing Cruises

New York Water Taxi

NY Waterway Commuter Ferry NY Waterway East River Ferry

New York Water Taxi Circle Line Downtown Harbor Cruises Zephyr/Shark

New York Water Taxi

NY Waterway East River Ferry

NY Waterway East River Ferry

NY Waterway East River Ferry

Maps

63


WHERE IN NEW YORK

Get up and dance!

For more great dance clubs in the city, visit wheretraveler.com

64

WHE RE I M A R C H 2018

Output This tri-level club in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, has a DJ playing until 6 am on Friday and Saturdays (no entry after 3:45 am). Note the dress code (“Brooklyn is the new black”) and, even better, the cost at the door (“free to reasonable”). Up&Down As the name implies, this übercool club on W.

14th Street has two levels, topshelf DJs and a very buzzy space. The DL First floor: ornately decorated restaurant (check out the Goth chandeliers!), serving innovative American comfort food. Second floor: a loungey, sexy red room. Third floor: dance club, killer views and retractable roof for the warm months.

Lavo Enjoy dinner at the traditional Italian restaurant and then head downstairs to the sleek, dark space adorned with tassel-trimmed drapes, tufted wood panels, LED screens and a raised DJ booth. Cielo Big-name DJs work this electronic-music disco in the Meatpacking District. A sunken

dance floor is surrounded by brown and beige suede banquettes, designed to create a 1970s aesthetic. Haus You can’t get more lavish than Haus, a club that hosts international DJs and offers latenight bottle service, a three-tiered VIP section and a jaw-dropping chandelier dripping with strings of bulbs.

PHOTO: LAVO DANCE FLOOR, COURTESY LAVO

 You are in New York City, so you can, quite literally, dance in the streets (the Elmo character who prances around Times Square has had "dance battles" with visitors), but we also are partial to our real dance clubs: glitzy, retro and, sometimes, with plenty of attitude.


TICKETS AVAILABLE AT ONEWORLDOBSERVATORY.COM

HOW DO YOU GET TO THE TOP OF THE CITY’S TALLEST BUILDING? IN A SKYPOD, OF COURSE.

@ONEWORLDNYC #ONEWORLDVIEW

TAKE THE TRAIN TO THE TOP

TO WORLD TRADE CENTER TO FULTON ST.

TO CHAMBERS ST. TO CORTLANDT ST.

Where New York - March 2018  

Where New York - March 2018

Where New York - March 2018  

Where New York - March 2018