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MAY 15–JUNE 15, 2019 CONTENT

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departments 4

SKYLINE Big happenings around town

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IN STORE Shopping for Father’s Day

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ON EXHIBIT Museums mark 50 years of Gay Pride

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features 10

Good Old Reliable Nathan

On the Cover Nathan Lane has always been a darling of the critics. Right? See p. 10.

Lane, that is. The three-time Tony Award winner is back on Broadway for the 23rd time. But who’s counting?

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Table for Two, With a Side of Drama

David Rockwell designs restaurants with the same razzle-dazzle he brings to his award-winning Broadway sets.

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Eat, Drink and Be Starry Broadway luminaries recommend places where they like to hang.

listings ENTERTAINMENT

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DINING+DRINKING

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SHOPS+SERVICES

30

MUSEUMS+ATTRACTIONS

33

GALLERIES+ANTIQUES

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TRANSPORTATION+TOURS

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information 36 40

NYC STREET MAP SNEAK PEEK: Special dates of note in late June and early July

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MAY

21 4

HOT HAPPENINGS AROUND TOWN by Francis Lewis

This isn’t the first time superstar Pink has brought her Beautiful Trauma World Tour to Madison Square Garden and, if her legions of fans have their way, it may not be the last. Audiences just can’t get enough of the three-time Grammy Award winner’s pop tunes, rock-inflected anthems, dance numbers and aerial acrobatics. | msg.com/madison-square-garden, also May 22

IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

PHOTO: PINK, RYAN AYLSWORTH

May-June skyline


MAY JUNE

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The race is to the swift at the 151st running of the Belmont Stakes, the final jewel in the Triple Crown of thoroughbred racing. And to the victor at Belmont Park on Long Island go the spoils: a silver trophy and a winner’s purse of just under $1 million. belmontstakes.com

APRIL

25 JUNE

PHOTOS: THE GOVERNORS BALL 2018, DAY 1, COURTESY THE GOVERNORS BALL; AARON CURRY, “METNEDARUTH,” 2009/2014, ©THE ARTIST, COURTESY MICHAEL WERNER GALLERY, NEW YORK AND LONDON; PILOBOLUS, MEGAN MOSS FREEMAN; BELMONT STAKES, COURTESY NYRA

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(THRU JUNE 2) The multiplatform Governors Ball Music Festival on Randall’s Island is three days of nonstop rock, hip-hop, pop, electronica and more. governorsball musicfestival.com

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(THRU JUNE 29) Surrealist, poetic, agile, strong and, yes, witty, Pilobolus, the dance theater company, takes up residence in the Joyce Theater for a three-week season of jaw-dropping fun and classic performances. joyce.org

(THRU JUNE 28) New and significant works by international artists launch Frieze Sculpture, an outdoor public art exhibition in Rockefeller Center. rockefellercenter.com INNEWYORK.COM | MAY-JUNE 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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in store

GIFTS FOR DAD by Joni Sweet

“What I want more than anything else for Father’s Day this year would be tickets to see the New York Liberty with my daughter. We really enjoy watching basketball together, especially the WNBA!”—Christopher Persley, father of one, co-organizer of NYC Dads Group “My wife and I have this tradition of gifting one another [with] a day of only parenting joys on Mother’s Day/Father’s Day. That means we get to sleep in, we don’t have to cook or clean up after the kids, we don’t discipline, we don’t put the kids down for naps or to bed, and we don’t change diapers! This year I want to play with my kids, go to the gym, get a massage at Song’s Body Zen Spa in Astoria and sit alone for a while in a coffee shop. I want to spend time with my kids and wife, but only experience the joys of parenting!”—Tyler Moore, father of two, @TidyDad on Instagram “For Father’s Day, I want the Hand Bowl [by] Harry Allen [available from Brooklyn-based gift and home accessories brand Areaware at areaware.com]. It’s just too expensive and silly for me to buy myself, and yet, it’s so cool.”— Joshua David Stein, father of two, host of The Fatherly Podcast

HAND BOWL BY HARRY ALLEN

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IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

Victorinox Victorinox has a gift for every type of dad, whether he identifies as an outdoorsman, an at-home chef, a world traveler or a man about town. The fourth-generation family business’ most legendary product is the Swiss Army Knife—especially if you get it custom-engraved with dad’s initials. But the SoHo store (located in a historic firehouse) also boasts ergonomic steak knives, sleek and functional suitcases, timelessly stylish watches and fragrances. | Victorinox, 99 Wooster St., 212.431.4950

Rhone Is your dad dedicated to staying in shape? Stock his gym bag with activewear from Rhone, which recently opened up shop at Hudson Yards. The premium athletic apparel company is on a mission to revamp men’s fitness clothing from baggy, branded garments that turn guys into walking billboards to durable, streamlined styles that look sharp even outside the gym. The secret sauce to Rhone’s reputable clothes, though, is the silver threads woven into many of the shirts, socks and boxer briefs. They have antimicrobial properties that fight odors for dozens of washes. | Rhone, The Shops & Restaurants at Hudson Yards, 20 Hudson Yards, 917.810.4770

PHOTOS: VICTORINOX PIONEER ALOX GOLD LIMITED EDITION 2019 SWISS ARMY KNIFE, COURTESY VICTORINOX; HAND BOWL BY HARRY ALLEN FROM AREAWARE, COURTESY AREAWARE; RHONE SPRING 19 LIFESTYLE, COURTESY RHONE

Need some inspiration for what to get your dad this year? We asked local dads to tell us what they really want for Father’s Day (June 16). Here’s what they said.


GAY PRIDE by Francis Lewis

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As the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising approaches and the world gathers in New York for a celebration of Pride like no other before it, local museums examine the importance of the movement and gay artists to culture between 1969 and now. (1) IN FOCUS To consider Robert Mapplethorpe, who died of complications from HIV/AIDS in 1989, as an exclusively gay artist is to do him and his photography an injustice. Yet his homosexuality informed every image he took. “Implicit Tensions: Mapplethorpe Now” is a yearlong retrospective in two parts: Part One concludes July 10, Part Two begins July 24. | Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Ave., 212.423.3500 (2) THE HUMAN SIDE OF ACTIVISM “Love & Resistance: Stonewall 50,” on view until July 14, takes an intimate look at the LGBTQ

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IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

civil rights movement, from 1965 to 1975, by means of historic photographs, posters, flyers, ephemera from iconic NYC gay and lesbian bars, and pioneering LGBTQ magazines and publications. | New York Public Library, Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, Fifth Ave., at 42nd St., 917.275.6975 (3) OUT AND PROUD “Art After Stonewall, 1969–1989,” thru July 20, is so ambitious—more than 200 works of art and related materials are on display—it requires two venues: The Leslie-Lohman Museum concentrates on the first decade after Stonewall, the Grey Art Gallery on the second decade. LGBTQ artists featured include Nan Goldin, Lyle Ashton Harris, Catherine Opie and Andy Warhol. | Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, 26 Wooster St., 212.431.2609; Grey Art Gallery, New York University, 100 Washington Square East, 212.998.6780

PHOTOS: ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE, “PICTURES/SELF PORTRAIT,” 1977, SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM NEW YORK. GIFT, THE ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE FOUNDATION 93.4281, ©ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE FOUNDATION. USED BY PERMISSION; “ALL WOMEN’S DANCE” NEW YORK: GAY LIBERATION FRONT, 1970, NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY, MANUSCRIPTS AND ARCHIVES DIVISION; PETER HUJAR, GAY LIBERATION FRONT POSTER IMAGE, 1970, GIFT OF THE PETER HUJAR ARCHIVE, LLC. COLLECTION OF LESLIE-LOHMAN MUSEUM

on exhibit


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Good Old Reliable

NATHAN NATHAN LANE, as we all know, is an actor with many moving and amusing parts, but it wasn’t until Howard Kissel, the Daily News’ late theater critic, pointed it out 30 years ago that I realized these parts also included a derriere that did double takes. “Early in Terrence McNally’s ‘The Lisbon Traviata,’” wrote Kissel, “occurs what may be a breakthrough in the history of acting: a double take executed by an actor’s rear end. The rear is draped in an elegant red dressing gown and it is positioned at a fairly sharp angle while the head that belongs to it searches for something on the other side of a sofa … When the buried head hears of the existence of a new record by Maria Callas, the whole body freezes. The ample, grandly draped rear achieves a rigidity, an intensity that speaks volumes. Here is a body in the grip of obsession.” Obsession is the essential motor driving most of Lane’s characters toward comedy or drama and sometimes, simultaneously, to both. He brings all of himself to his roles—even the personal contradictions, which are not only compatible but useful in shaping the human dimensions of the person he is playing. When he was 21, he told his mother he was gay. Her response: “I would rather you were dead.” His response to her response: “I knew you’d understand.” The hurt and the humor in that are something he carries around with him from part to part. Those two components are profoundly in play in Lane’s current Broadway endeavor, Taylor Mac’s “Gary: A

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Sequel to Titus Andronicus,” in which he plays a street clown whose streets are cluttered with cadavers—the bloody and unfortunate consequences of some Shakespearean power-playing. Ordinarily, Lane doesn’t like being lumped in that clown car. He thinks that people don’t see the real actor in there trying to climb out, that a real actor was the reason they got the laugh. Comedy, when one is super-successful at it as he is, can be a curse. This is why Lane has been known to take to the Letters-to-the-Editor portion of publications to wave furiously his “Actor First! Comedian Second!” banner—like the time he took umbrage at a road-company Bialystock and Bloom for saying of his and Matthew Broderick’s acclaimed turns in the 2001 Broadway musical “The Producers”: “When you go to see Nathan Lane or Matthew Broderick, you go to see those guys, their personas, and you sort of miss the show.” Lane promptly came down from On High and corrected their vision: “As the man who created [Max Bialystock] on Broadway, as an actor and uncredited co-writer, let me just say that is pure crap. I was not applying a so-called persona to the character. I wasn’t making a personal appearance. I was acting a role and telling the story to the best of my ability.” He then ran through his award bric-a-brac inventory and deduced, “I must have some credibility as an actor.” In the beginning, he was Joe Lane, the youngest son of three in an Irish Catholic family in Jersey City, New Jersey. But, after a brush with “Guys and Dolls,” he anointed himself Nathan Lane (after Nathan Detroit, a character in that musical) and has been such ever since, earning his first Tony nomination in that role on Broadway. With an alcoholic father and a bipolar mother, his was a childhood that invited diversion. Privately, he did a 360-degree turn to comedy, majoring in the works (and the working parts) of Jackie Gleason and Lou Costello, one has come to suspect. Even more privately, he seeped deeper into theater arts the old-fashioned way—by joining the Fireside Theatre book club that distributed a play a month to its members. His first from Fireside was Neil Simon’s “The Odd Couple,” and, when he did it on Broadway decades later with his “Producers” co-star, Matthew Broderick, they opened with a $20 million advance. Comic chemistry came easy for them, and they often tried to break each other up onstage. On learning “Oklahoma!” bowed in 1943 at the St. James Theatre, where “The Producers” was playing, they started throwing lines with a bucolic spin at each other like laughing lightning bolts. Through the Fireside series, he also struck up an infinity for Theodore Hick-

PHOTO : NATHAN LANE, HOLDING HIS TONY AWARD FOR BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A FEATURED ROLE IN A PLAY FOR “ANGELS IN AMERICA,” JUNE 10, 2018, ©LEV RADIN/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

BY HARRY HAUN


man—“Hickey,” the hardware peddler who brings false hope to fellow barflies of Harry Hope’s saloon in Eugene O’Neill’s “The Iceman Cometh”—and acted it out pretty much to perfection in Chicago and Brooklyn. His darkness was drowned in the brightest light. Lane made his Broadway debut in 1982 in Noël Coward’s “Present Laughter,” playing the talent-free, lavishly ardent playwright who was all over leading man George C. Scott like an ant farm, and he ran right into a stop sign from New Yorker critic Brendan Gill. He can still quote that negative notice verbatim—and did on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” in April: “[Gill] said, ‘Although he garners much laughter and applause, Nathan Lane is a rank amateur who should never be allowed on the stage.’ And then, I met [Gill] at an American Theatre Wing seminar, and he told me he was a big fan.” Happily—for us as well as for Lane—he didn’t heed the Gill ban and has bounded back to Broadway 23 times, in between appearances OffBroadway and on screens large and small, amassing three Tony Awards. In addition, he has won six Drama Desk Awards, six Outer Critics Circle Awards, two Obies, one Lortel, an Olivier and the Drama League’s Distinguished Performance Award, which can be won only once in a performer’s lifetime. Yes, he seems to have acquired “some credibility as an actor.”

Obsession is the essential motor driving most of Lane’s characters toward comedy or drama or both. IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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TABLE FOR TWO, WITH A SIDE OF

Restaurants Designed by Tony Award Winner David Rockwell Have the Recipe for Delicious Entertainment

TAO Downtown

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IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

PHOTO : TKKTK

BY MERYL PEARLSTEIN


PHOTO : TKKTK

Nobu Downtown IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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N HONOR OF the 73rd annual Tony Awards, which take center stage on June 9, I propose a new award category: Best Theater-influenced Dining. The revival of “She Loves Me” won David Rockwell the 2016 Tony Award for Best Scenic Design of a Musical for the “jewel-box” parfumerie that gracefully transitioned into a restaurant, an apartment and a hospital room. His three currently playing musicals, “Kiss Me, Kate,” “Tootsie” and “Pretty Woman: The Musical,” are every bit as stunning, featuring sets that track in and around, creating scenes as varied as a theater stage and dressing room, a hotel suite, a streetscape and a skyline. Thanks to Rockwell’s “emphasis on arrival, procession, lighting and the all-encompassing power of a live theatrical experience,” dining in one of the New York restaurants designed by him can have the same immersive, transformative quality as watching one of his Broadway shows. In stage and restaurant productions, design plays a leading role with storytelling at the heart of each. States Rockwell, “To some extent, both theater and hospitality are centered on scenography and storytelling. They also share the intention to communicate ideas through an experience.” In Rockwell’s vision, theatergoers are transported to a world of fantasy from curtain to curtain, and from scene to scene. Similarly, diners enjoy “acts,” with the plot “choreographed as a promenade through spaces” and cuisine paced into a rhythm of courses. Like some plays, some restaurants can be construed as revivals. The feeling when you dine at the redo of Danny Meyer’s Union Square Cafe is “familiar but fresh,” according to General Manager Chris Nelson. Designed by Rockwell, the “new” USC is akin to “Kiss Me, Kate,” each returning for an encore after a multiyear hiatus. Both incorporate elements of

AVRA MADISON 14 E. 60th St. 212.937.0100 LEGASEA 485 Seventh Ave. 212.268.1888 THE LIBRARY 425 Lafayette St. publictheater.org NOBU DOWNTOWN 195 Broadway 212.219.0500 TAO DOWNTOWN 92 Ninth Ave. 212.888.2724 UNION SQUARE CAFE 101 E. 19th St. 212.243.4020

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the past but add new spins. USC’s balcony, with its choice “opera box” seating, recalls the original café as does a portion of the upstairs bar. Wainscoting from the previous “production” has been refreshed in a richer tone, and familiar artwork graces the walls. Like a theatrical revival paying homage to the original piece, the restaurant feels comfortable and current at the same time. Then there are shows and restaurant designs that stop you cold with their breakthrough quality, charting new territory that wows from the start whether they are “revivals” or totally new productions. Manhattan’s TAO “part two” is such a restaurant. Taking advantage of its multilevel space in the Maritime Hotel, TAO Downtown plays to its audience with even more drama than the Midtown original. Enter through massive doors studded with lion door knockers, and you’ll encounter a long, vaulted corridor leading to a giant reclining Buddha overlooking a staircase that conjures up “Sunset Boulevard” or “Hello, Dolly!” You can feel the “Follies” vibe as you descend the shallow steps toward your table. “We looked at how stairs add drama to the audience’s arrival at a performance venue,” notes Rockwell, “and we wanted to mark and celebrate the entry here.” At TAO, Rockwell gives the stairs two additional roles: They’re the location of the restaurant’s premier seating and a theatrically lit line to the 24-arm Quan Yin statue awaiting diva-like adoration at the back of the room. Successful design also takes into account the culinary orientation of the restaurant. At TAO, food presentations are often as dramatic as the setting. Take, for example, the larger-thanlife fortune cookie filled with chocolate and white mousse and adorned with exotic, diced dragon fruit and rambutan. The

PHOTOS PRECEDING SPREAD: TAO DOWNTOWN AND NOBU DOWNTOWN, ERIC LAIGNEL. THIS PAGE: UNION SQUARE CAFE, EMILY ANDREWS

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PHOTOS: LEGASEA AND AVRA MADISON, WARREN JAGGER

This page, from left: Seafood brasserie Legasea boasts a staircase designed for grand entrances and even grander exits; Avra Madison looks to an open-air villa in Greece for inspiration. Facing page: Union Square Cafe’s new location, designed by David Rockwell, earns rave reviews and draws SRO crowds.

dessert’s provocative double entendre fortunes are the culinary equivalents of characters with dual parts—Think: Michael Dorsey dolled up as Dorothy Michaels in “Tootsie,” or actress Lilli Vanessi as Kate, her shrewish Skakespearean doppelgänger in “Kiss Me, Kate.” Also utilizing the device of a Broadway-like staircase but this time heading skyward, Legasea is a buzzy brasserie on the second floor of the Moxy Times Square hotel. Here Rockwell’s nautical world of tiles, lighting and furnishings creates a fun, maritime feel and an immersive “set” for seafood-focused dining. Scattered theatrical cues enhance the experience with lighting shaped like buoys, rope designs on the ceiling and backdrops decorated with fish. A sidewalk-level sign invites you upstairs with the bright lights and neon of a Broadway marquee. Chef Jason Hall describes the Legasea experience this way: “It’s important that the food, menu and restaurant design all flow together. We have a lot of cool moments depending on where you sit; the bar in the front is like the first act, a comfortable booth in back is the main show. The menu is like that, too, with the appetizer, entrée and dessert sequence leading to the final curtain.” Nobu Downtown is a remake of sorts of Nobu’s nowclosed TriBeCa eatery. Rockwell’s goal was to reprise Nobu’s original “exploration of materiality” and cultures within its new, larger neoclassical home in the Financial District. Hovering over the bar and lounge, a Sumi-e ink swirl sculpture points downstairs to the main dining room, where design elements honor the past but give birth to a new and exciting

space. Signature ash trees inspire the supports for an undulating wood canopy fashioned kirigami style. Two walls of ceramic sake carafes create an intimate tasting room, a set-within-a-set set like those in “The Taming of the Shrew” in “Kiss Me, Kate,” “Juliet’s Nurse” in “Tootsie” and “La Traviata” in “Pretty Woman.” Creating other scenes within the restaurant “story,” banquette areas accented with Peruvian colors call to mind the Rodeo Drive shop in “Pretty Woman,” while the open sushi bar with its “kimono”-draped seats feels like the busy, interactive lobby of the Beverly Wilshire hotel. If not as overtly dramatic as TAO or Nobu, Avra Madison gives you a first-class dining ticket to the Mediterranean. Using props like real lemon trees, a seafood and vegetable market mini-set, and an open staircase linking the airy upstairs with a sexy downstairs space, the sequel to the popular Midtown estiatorio is theater on a lighter scale. While the “melodies” may seem familiar, the fresh whitewashed palette informs Avra Madison’s updated “script” for food and service. Looking for something more intimate but still with a touch of drama? Theatrical dining design doesn’t have to be bold or showy like that of Nobu or TAO, nor does it need to be derivative à la Union Square Cafe or Avra Madison. The Library at the Public Theater, helmed by chefs Andrew Carmellini and John Ramirez and also designed by Rockwell, is a cozy boîte that gives a textured Off-Broadway feel to an unexpected space and a culinary destination for those “in the know.” And, now, Mr. Rockwell, we’re ready for our dinner. IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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BY BRIAN SCOTT LIPTON

The Brazen Tavern

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IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

The Rum House

IF YOU’RE A NATIVE New Yorker—or even if you just look like one—you can be guaranteed that someone, somewhere, sometime will ask you this question: “Where is your favorite place to eat or drink?” And to be honest, this query always poses a bit of a conundrum: Do you share the name of that very special spot or keep it to yourself, afraid it will get even more crowded, making it even harder than it already is to get a table or bar stool? Fortunately, we found some very generous people who didn’t hesitate to tell us where they hang out. In honor of the 2019 Tony Awards (June 9 at Radio City Music Hall), we asked some former Tony winners and nominees—all currently appearing on Broadway—to let us in on their favorite dining and drinking spots, whether in the Theater District or near their residences. Take our advice and take their advice! “I love La Masseria. Beautiful, delicious and wonderful service!”—Beth Leavel (“The Prom”), 2006 Tony winner for “The Drowsy Chaperone” “Recently I find myself eating at Brasserie Athénée or getting a drink at The Rum House. I love a moody atmosphere, and both places play amazing music. Brasserie Athénée has an amazing menu full of goodies. I’m glad the [Walter Kerr Theatre] is so close to both places, so I have an excuse to go to them more often!”—Eva Noblezada (“Hadestown”), 2017 Tony nominee for “Miss Saigon”

PHOTOS THIS PAGE, FROM TOP: EVA NOBLEZADA IN “HADESTOWN, ©HELEN MAYBNAKS; THE RUM HOUSE, COURTESY THE RUM HOUSE; BRIAN D’ARCY JAMES IN “THE FERRYMAN,” JOAN MARCUS; THE BRAZEN TAVERN, COURTESY THE BRAZEN TAVERN

EAT, DRINK AND BE STARRY


B Squared

ADDRESS BOOK B SQUARED 679 Ninth Ave., 646.362.3171 BRASSERIE ATHÉNÉE 300 W. 46th St., 212.399.1100 THE BRAZEN TAVERN 356 W. 44th St., 646.678.5989

PHOTOS THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: CHRISTOPHER SIEBER IN “THE PROM,” DEEN VAN MEER, 2018; B SQUARED’S KILLER B AND OSCAR THE GROUCH PIZZAS, COURTESY B SQUARED; JARROD SPECTOR IN “THE CHER SHOW,” JOAN MARCUS; TOLOACHE’S TACOS DE LECHON, COURTESY TOLOACHE; HARRY HADDEN-PATON IN “MY FAIR LADY,” JOAN MARCUS; CAFE FIORELLO, COURTESY CAFE FIORELLO

Cafe Fiorello

“My favorite Midtown haunt is the cozy and rustic Casellula. Not only does it boast an impeccably curated wine and cheese list, its menu also features delicious tapas plates to appeal to all palates. Sublime yumminess.”—Emily Skinner (“The Cher Show”), 1998 Tony nominee for “Side Show” “‘The Cher Show’ is my second run on West 52nd Street and, just as I did during my four-year stretch in ‘Jersey Boys,’ I’ve made Toloache my goto neighborhood spot. Whether it’s for brunch (order the chilaquiles and a café de olla), dinner (camarones Toloache is a particular favorite) or something off the extensive tequila/margarita menu, they never disappoint me. It’s always a great time.”—Jarrod Spector (“The Cher Show”), 2014 Tony nominee for “Beautiful: The Carole King Musical” “My family and I have been blown away by the incredible quality and range of restaurants in New York, but the one place we keep going back to, and taking our visiting family to, is Cafe Fiorello. It’s our home away from home. And their focaccia got me through previews!”—Harry Hadden-Paton (“My Fair Lady”), 2018 Tony nominee for “My Fair Lady” “I love The Brazen Tavern. It’s a fantastic pub with great atmosphere. Chances are you’ll find ‘The Ferryman’ cast there after the show, as it’s become our go-to place for after-show drink and food.”—Brian d’Arcy James (“The Ferryman”), 2002, 2009 and 2015 Tony nominee for “Sweet Smell of Success,” “Shrek The

Toloache

Musical” and “Something Rotten!” “Usually between shows I will head over to Island Burger & Shakes; they have amazing chicken sandwiches, burgers and wine!! I also love B Squared, an unconventional pizza place with the best thin-crust pizzas! Try the meatballs!! And, then, after a show, I will head to Glass House Tavern for their wonderful bar food and cocktails!”—Christopher Sieber (“The Prom”), 2005 and 2009 Tony nominee for “Spamalot” and “Shrek The Musical” “I love walking up to Jacob’s Pickles for lunch with my daughter, Skyler. Comfort food at its best!”—Shuler Hensley (“The Ferryman”), 2002 Tony winner for “Oklahoma!” “I’m a recent resident of Cobble Hill, Brooklyn, and there is a serious Thai restaurant called KROK that will knock your socks off. The ambience is quaint, nothing fancy, but the food is simply remarkable. It’s Thai street food, and it is completely sensational. The fish sauce wings will change you on a cellular level.”—Alexander Gemignani (“My Fair Lady”), 2018 Tony nominee for “Carousel” “My wife, Carrie, and I have a 4-year-old child, so we don’t get out very often these days. So, honestly, my favorite NYC hangout is just anywhere I can meet up with and see my friends. It could be a park bench! Although, admittedly, proximity to bourbon is always a plus.”—David Furr (“Burn This”), 2016 Tony nominee for “Noises Off”

CAFE FIORELLO 1900 Broadway, 212.595.5330 CASELLULA 401 W. 52nd St., 212.247.8137 GLASS HOUSE TAVERN 252 W. 47th St., 212.730.4800 ISLAND BURGERS & SHAKES 766 Ninth Ave., 212.307.7934 JACOB’S PICKLES 509 Amsterdam Ave., 212.470.5566 KROK 117 Columbia St., Brooklyn, 718.858.8898 LA MASSERIA 235 W. 48th St., 212.582.2111 THE RUM HOUSE 228 W. 47th St., 646.490.6924 TOLOACHE 251 W. 50th St., 212.581.1818

IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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entertainment

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3

1

4 The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 36-38).

1 The farce, a success on Broadway, has moved to an Off-Broadway theater for an extended run. | “The Play That Goes Wrong,” p. 22 2 Jonny Lee Miller (left) and Bertie Carvel play newspapermen Larry Lamb and Rupert Murdoch respectively in the hit play from London’s West End. | “Ink,” p. 20 3 Two-time Tony Award winner Patti LuPone celebrates her 70th birthday with the city’s leading orchestra on May 16. | New York Philharmonic, p. 22 4 The variety arts ensemble takes audiences on a journey through Brooklyn. | Bindlestiff Family Cirkus: “Brooklyn Abridged,” p. 22

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IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

BROADWAY OPENINGS Frankie & Johnny in the Clair de Lune Broadhurst Theatre, 235 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. frankieand johnnybroadway.com. (Previews begin May 4, opens May 30, closes Aug. 25) (2 hrs 15 mins) A waitress (Audra McDonald) and a short-order cook (Michael Shannon) fall in love. H14 In Residence on Broadway Lunt-Fontanne Theatre, 205 W. 46th St., btw Broadway & Eighth

Ave., 877.250.2929. inresidenceonbroadway.com. Iconic performers in concert on Broadway. May 28-June 2: Yanni. June 17 & 18: Mel Brooks. H14

BROADWAY Ain’t Too Proud—The Life and Times of The Temptations Imperial Theatre, 249 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. ainttooproudmusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) The new musical captures the R&B group’s dance moves, harmonies and personal stories. H14

PHOTOS: BRENT BATEMAN, CHRIS LANCELEY, BIANCA HORN, RYAN VINCENT ANDERSON AND ASHLEY REYES (UPSIDE DOWN) IN “THE PLAY THAT GOES WRONG,” ©JEREMY DANIEL, 2019; JONNY LEE MILLER AND BERTIE CARVEL IN “INK,” ©JOAN MARCUS, 2019; PATTI LUPONE, AXEL DUPEUX; BINDLESTIIFF FAMILY CIRKUS IN “BROOKLYN ABRIDGED,” COURTESY BINDLESTIFF FAMILY CIRKUS

FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC


T:4.625”

Aladdin C0L46N 7 ew Amsterdam Theatre, 214 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 866.870.2717. aladdinthemusical.com. (2 hrs 20 mins) The musical comedy is an exotic magic carpet ride, filled with romance, special effects and songs from Disney’s 1992 animated feature. H14

Be More Chill Lyceum Theatre, 149 W. 45th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.239.6200. bemorechillmusical.com. (2 hrs 20 mins) The coming-of-age-in-the-digital-age musical is the story of a high-school kid who longs to be popular, while remaining true to himself. H14

T:4.75”

All My Sons American Airlines Theatre, 227 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.719.1300. roundabouttheatre.org. (Closes June 23) (2 hrs 15 mins) The revival of Arthur Miller’s fi rst major play stars Annette Bening and Tracy Letts. H14

“A magical Broadway musical with

BRAINS, HEART and COURAGE.” Time Magazine

Beautiful–The Carole King Musical C0L421Stephen Sondheim Theatre, 124 W. 43rd St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.239.6200. beautifulonbroad way.com. (2 hrs 20 mins) The long-running musical traces the rise of the singer/songwriter. H14 Beetlejuice Winter Garden Theatre, 1634 Broadway, btw W. 50th & W. 51st sts., 212.239.6200. beetlejuicebroadway.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) The new musical is based on the 1988 film about a demented, rambunctious ghost named Beetlejuice. H13

GERSHWIN THEATRE ♦ WickedtheMusical.com T:4.625”

The Book of Mormon C0L97231Eugene O’Neill Theatre, 230 W. 49th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. bookofmormonthemusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Two Mormon boys are on a Document Path: studio:WICKED:WICKED-NEW YORK:ADS:Color Ads:142415_WIC_InNYMag_ThrdPg_Mar2019:142415_WIC_InNYMag_ThrdPg_Mar2019_FIN.indd mission to save souls in Africa in the irreverent, politically incorrect musical comedy. H13 Pg Specs Job # 142415 Sprd Specs Print / User Info Fonts

142415_WIC_InNYMag_ThrdPg_Mar2019_FIN.indd ONE OF THE MOST

REMARKABLE SHOWS IN MUSICAL THEATER HISTORY.

Client David Stone Bleed None Bleed Sprd 4.625” x 4.75” Burn This Hudson Theatre, 139-141 MagazineW. 44th St., Trim 4.625” x 4.75” Description Trim Sprd 4.625” x 4.75” –Peter Marks, btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 855.801.5876. Safety None Safety Sprd 4.625” x 4.75” Pub In Mag Run Date burnthisplay.com. (Closes July5/114) (2 hrs 30 Gutter None Release Date 4/2 mins) A sexual attraction leads to a deeper love

Printed at None

Print/Export Time 4-1-2019 1:44 PM

Caxton Std (Bold, Book), Zapf Dingbats (Regular)

Visual Artist Saroop Srichawla Previous Artist Bo Krucik

connection in the revival of Lanford Wilson’s Images 1987 play. H14

Approvals

CD Jay CW None AD Peter Studio Bo Acct Kelly / Kevin / Marci Proofrd Joe F. Prod Heather

GreenSky.psd (CMYK; 2936 ppi; Studio:WICKED:ART:4C art:GreenSky.psd) Elphaba-4C-Square.psd (CMYK; 1088 ppi; Studio:WICKED:ART:4C art:Elphaba-4C-Square.psd)

T:4.75”

The Cher Show NeilGlinda-4C.psd Simon Theatre, 250ppi; W.Studio:WICKED:ART:4C art:Glinda-4C.psd) (CMYK; 1089 Monkey-4C_hi-res.psd 52nd St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., (CMYK; 13264 ppi, 20084 ppi, -20085 ppi; Studio:WICKED:ART:4C art:Monkey-4C_hi-res.psd) WICKED.LOGO.4C.psd (CMYK;(2 3472 ppi; Studio:WICKED:ART:4C art:Titles:WICKED.LOGO.4C.psd) 877.250.2929. thechershowbroadway.com. hrs 30 mins) Using 35 of Cher’s greatest hits, the new musical follows the ups and downs of the superstar’s career and personal life. H13 Chicago Ambassador Theatre, 219 W. 49th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. chicagothemusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) In the 1997 Tony Award-winning revival of the vaudeville musical, two alluring jailbirds named Roxie Hart and Velma Kelly attain stardom while singing about sex and corruption. H13 Come From Away Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, 236 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. comefromaway.com. (1 hr 40 mins, no intermission) On Sept. 11, 2001, 38 commercial airplanes were diverted to Gander, Newfoundland; when the 6,579 passengers landed, they found themselves stranded in a small town with a population half their size.

Music Box Theatre 239 W. 45th St. • DearEvanHansen.com •

@DearEvanHansen

INNEWYORK.COM | MAY-JUNE 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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WINNER! BEST MUSICAL ALL ACROSS NORTH AMERICA

entertainment How they adjusted to a changed world on Sept. 12 is the basis of the upbeat musical. H14

Dear Evan Hansen Music Box Theatre, 239 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. dearevanhansen.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) A socially awkward high-school senior goes from outsider to cool guy when he comforts the parents of a troubled teenager who has committed suicide in the Tony Award-winning musical. H14 The Ferryman Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, 242 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. theferrymanbroadway.com. (3 hrs 15 mins) Jez Butterworth’s acclaimed comedy drama is set in 1981 at harvest time during the Northern Ireland conflict. H14 Frozen St. James Theatre, 246 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 866.870.2717. frozenthe musical.com. (2 hrs 15 mins) Disney’s 2013 Academy Award-winning animated film is now a full-length stage work, featuring the original songs, plus new songs and story material. H14

COME FROM AWAY Book, Music and Lyrics by Irene Sankoff and David Hein Directed by Christopher Ashley

THE REMARKABLE TRUE STORY NOW ON BROADWAY

TELECHARGE.COM (212) 239-6200 O Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, 236 W. 45 TH STREET I COMEFROMAWAY.COM

OFFICIAL AIRLINE

Gary: A Sequel to Titus Andronicus Booth Theatre, 222 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. garyonbroadway.com. (1 hr 35 mins, no intermission) Taylor Mac’s comedy picks up where Shakespeare’s tragedy “Titus Andronicus” leaves off. Nathan Lane stars. H14 Hadestown Walter Kerr Theatre, 219 W. 48th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. hadestown.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Anaïs Mitchell’s musical is an epic interpretation of two classic love stories: that of Orpheus and Eurydice, and that of Hades and his wife, Persephone. H13 Hamilton Richard Rodgers Theatre, 226 W. 46th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. hamiltonbroadway.com. (2 hrs 45 mins) Expect the unexpected when America’s past is told through the hip-hop sounds of today in the Pulitzer Prize-winning musical about political mastermind Alexander Hamilton. H14 Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Lyric Theatre, 214 W. 44th St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 877.250.2929. harrypottertheplay.com. (Part One, 2 hrs 40 mins; Part Two, 2 hrs 35 mins) Harry Potter is a grown-up with children of his own in this eighth story in the Harry Potter series. “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” is one play presented in two parts. H14 Hillary and Clinton John Golden Theatre, 252 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. hillaryandclintonbroadway.com. (Closes July 21) (1 hr 30 mins, no intermission) Any similarity between a former first lady and her husband is intentional in Lucas Hnath’s timely comedy about politics and marriage. H14 Ink Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, 261 W. 47th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. manhattantheatreclub.com. (Closes June 16) (2 hrs 40 mins) A struggling London newspaper becomes a must-read sensation in James Graham’s play, based on real events. H14

CELEBRATING 25 YEARS IN NYC

or 800-982-2787 · ORPHEUM THEATRE, 2nd Ave. at 8th St. #StompNYC

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/StompOnline

@StompNYC

IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

@StompNYC

StompOnline.com

King Kong Broadway Theatre, 1681 Broadway, btw W. 52nd & W. 53rd sts., 212.239.6200. kingkongbroadway.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Beauty


tames the beast in the new special-effectsladen musical, set on an uncharted island and in 1930s NYC. H13

King Lear Cort Theatre, 138 W. 48th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.239.6200. kinglearon broadway.com. (Closes July 7) (3 hrs 30 mins) Glenda Jackson takes on one of the most challenging roles in the canon: the aging monarch in Shakespeare’s tragedy. H13 Kiss Me, Kate Studio 54, 254 W. 54th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.719.1300. round abouttheatre.org. (Closes June 30) (2 hrs 30 mins) The sparkling revival of Cole Porter’s musical-comedy valentine to the theater stars Kelli O’Hara and Will Chase as squabbling thespians. H13

Mean Girls August Wilson Theatre, 245 W. 52nd St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. meangirlsonbroadway.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Newbie Cady Heron is taken up by her high school’s most elite clique, The Plastics, but is this the pink pack she really wants to hang with in the musical with a book by Tina Fey? H13

PHOTOS: ANDREW ECCLES

The Lion King C0L41896Minskoff Theatre, 200 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 866.870.2717. lionking.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Theatergoers sing along at the hit stage version of Disney’s beloved animated movie, enjoying songs by Elton John, as well as spectacular masks and dazzling puppets. H14

Telecharge.com • 212-239-6200 • ThePromMusical.com O Longacre Theatre, T:4.625” 220 W. 48th St.

My Fair Lady Vivian Beaumont Theater at Lincoln Center, 150 W. 65th St., btw Broadway & Amsterdam Ave., 212.239.6200. lct.org. (2 hrs 55 mins) The tuneful 1956 Lerner & Loewe musical is back on Broadway, starring winner Laura Benanti as Eliza Doolittle and Harry HaddenPaton as Professor Higgins. I12 Network Belasco Theatre, 111 W. 44th St., btw Sixth Ave. & Broadway, 212.239.6200. network broadway.com. (Closes June 8) (2 hrs, no intermission) Bryan Cranston stars as a TV news anchor whose on-air rants draw big ratings and off-air controversies in the play based on the movie of the same name. H14

T:4.75”

Oklahoma! Circle in the Square Theatre, 235 W. 50th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. oklahomabroadway.com. (2 hrs 45 mins) Rodgers and Hammerstein’s 1943 musical is reinvented for the 21st century in an intimate and immersive production. I13

Pretty Woman: The Musical Nederlander Theatre, 208 W. 41st St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 877.250.2929. prettywomanthemusical .com. (2 hrs 30 mins) The musical comedy tells the contemporary Cinderella story of a diamond in the rough, who fi nds a better life in the arms of a handsome corporate raider. H14 The Prom Longacre Theatre, 220 W. 48th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200.

TM©RUG1986

The Phantom of the Opera C0L64M 187 ajestic Theatre, 247 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. phantombroadway.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Broadway’s longest-running show tells the tragic story of a disfi gured composer who falls in love with a young soprano. H14

O MAJESTIC THEATRE | 247 West 44 th St. Telecharge.com | 212.239.6200 | phantombroadway.com INNEWYORK.COM | MAY-JUNE 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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entertainment theprommusical.com. (2 hrs 15 mins) An Indiana high schooler wants to take her girlfriend to the prom in the new musical comedy. H13

To Kill a Mockingbird Shubert Theatre, 225 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. tokillamockingbirdbroadway.com. (2 hrs 35 mins) Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prizewinning novel has been adapted for the stage. Jeff Daniels stars as Atticus Finch. H14 Tootsie Marquis Theatre, 210 W. 46th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. tootsiemu sical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) The new musical comedy, based on the 1982 movie of the same name, features songs by David Yazbek. H14 Waitress Brooks Atkinson Theatre, 256 W. 47th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. waitressthemusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) A waitress, with a talent for baking, dreams of opening her own pie shop. Sara Bareilles has written the songs for the musical. H14 What the Constitution Means to Me The Hayes Theater, 240 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. constitutionbroadway .com. (1 hr 30 mins, no intermission) Author/ performer Heidi Schreck tells the story of how she paid for her college education by winning Constitutional debate competitions. H14 Wicked C0L418Gershwin Theatre, 222 W. 51st St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. wickedthe musical.com. (2 hrs 45 mins) This hit musical— now in its 16th year—imagines Oz as a land of strife, where a young, green-hued girl is branded the Wicked Witch of the West. I13

OFF-BROADWAY+BEYOND Bindlestiff Family Cirkus: Brooklyn Abridged The Connolly Theater, 220 E. 4th St., btw Ave. B & Ave. A, 646.343.1584. bindlestiff .org. (May 30-June 9) (2 hrs) The history of Brooklyn is brought to life via circus acts, live music, analog projections and personal stories in the entertainment hybrid (vaudeville, circus, comedy, burlesque and sideshow). C18

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Company XIV: Queen of Hearts Théâtre XIV, 383 Troutman St., btw Wyckoff & Irving aves., Bushwick, Brooklyn, 866.811.4111. companyxiv .com. (2 hrs 15 mins) The world-premiere production is inspired by Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,” but with an avant-garde twist. Cocktails have been specially created to accompany the show. The Play That Goes Wrong New World Stages, Stage 4, 340 W. 50th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.239.6200. broadwaygoeswrong .com. (2 hrs) Everything that could comically go wrong does when a college drama society puts on a 1920s murder mystery. H14 The Secret Life of Bees Atlantic Theater Company’s Linda Gross Theater, 336 W. 20th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 866.811.4111. atlantictheater.org. (Performances begin May 12, opens June 13, closes July 14) Based on the best-selling novel by Sue Monk Kidd, the new musical features a book by Pulitzer Prize winner Lynn Nottage and music by Tony and Grammy winner Duncan Sheik. I17

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IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

Stomp C0L94O 1 rpheum Theatre, 126 Second Ave., at E. 8th St., 800.982.2787. stomponline.com. (1 hr 45 mins, no intermission) In a dazzling percussive performance, the cast conjures rhythm out of brooms, dustbins, hubcaps and more. E18

CABARETS+COMEDY CLUBS Café Carlyle C0L9431The Carlyle, A Rosewood Hotel New York, 35 E. 76th St., at Madison Ave., 212.744.1600. cafecarlylenewyork.com. A swanky supper club. Highlights: April 30-May 4, 7-11: John Pizzarelli. May 14-18, 21-25: “Nancy and Beth,” starring Megan Mullally and Stephanie Hunt. May 28-June 1, 4-8: Mary Wilson of The Supremes. June 11-15, 18-22, 25-29: Sutton Foster. F10 Feinstein’s/54 Below C0L52138254 W. 54th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 646.476.3551. 54below .com. The subterranean nightclub, restaurant and cocktail lounge is underneath the former Studio 54 disco. Highlights: May 3-4, 7: Paul Alexander Nolan. May 9-11: Paulo Szot. May 13: Matt Doyle. May 17-18, 22-25: John Lloyd Young. May 27-28, 30-June 1, 4: Chita Rivera. June 7 & 8: Maurice Hines. June 12-15: Liz Callaway. June 20-22: Andrea McArdle. June 25-29: Ann Hampton Callaway. H13 Gotham Comedy Club 208 W. 23rd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.367.9000. gothamcomedyclub.com. Headliners and new talents are on the calendar. Highlights: May 2-4: Samuel J. Comroe. May 10-11: Finesse Mitchell. May 17-18: Vladimir Caamaño. May 30-June 1: Godfrey. June 7-8: Derek Gaines. June 21-22: Josh Wolf. June 28-29: Jessica Kirson. Food and drink menus available. I16

DANCE+MUSIC American Ballet Theatre C0L3572Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., btw W. 63rd & W. 64th sts., 212.362.6000. abt.org. (May 13-July 6) The revered company pirouettes into Lincoln Center for its spring season. I12 Carnegie Hall C0L9541Seventh Ave., at W. 57th St., 212.247.7800. carnegiehall.org. Carnegie Hall’s 2018–2019 season is its 128th. Highlights: May 16: Evgeny Kissin, piano. May 18: The Met Orchestra. May 19: National Symphony Orchestra. June 3 & 14: The Met Orchestra. June 7: The Philadelphia Orchestra. H13 Joyce Theater C0L1 9541 75 Eighth Ave., at W. 19th St., 212.242.0800. joyce.org. The venue welcomes modern-dance companies from the U.S. and abroad. Highlights: April 29-May 12: Australia Festival. May 14-26: Parsons Dance. May 29-June 2: Limón Dance Company. June 6-9: Ballet Tech Kids Dance. June 11-29: Pilobolus. H17 New York Philharmonic C0LD 1964 avid Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., at W. 64th St., 212.875.5656. nyphil.org. The city’s preeminent classical-music orchestra. Concerts: May 2-4, 11, 16-18, 22-23, 25, 28, 30, June 1, 6-8, 11-14. I12

JAZZ CLUBS Blue Note Jazz Club 131 W. 3rd St., btw MacDougal St. & Sixth Ave., 212.475.8592. bluenote.net. The best and brightest jazz


luminaries perform here. Highlights: May 2-5: Bill Frisell Trio. May 7-12: Maceo Parker. May 16-19: Eric Krasno & Friends. May 23-26: Chris Dave & The Drumhedz. May 30-June 2: Kenny Garrett. June 6-9: Joey Alexander. June 13-16: The Martin Family. June 20-23: Ms. Lisa Fischer & Grand Baton. June 24-26: Savion Glover. June 26-30: Kenny G. G18

Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola C0L96418Jazz at Lincoln Center, 10 Columbus Cir., Broadway & W. 60th St., 212.258.9595. jazz.org/dizzys. The club boasts a stunning stage backdrop: the Manhattan skyline. Highlights: May 2-3: Houston Person Quartet. May 9-12: Juilliard Jazz Orchestra. May 15-19, 21-26: Bill Charlap Trio. May 29-30: Nicole Henry. May 30-June 2: Georgia Horns. June 6-9: Dion Person & 21st Century Band. June 11-16: Christian McBride Big Band. June 20-23: Christian McBride’s Tip City. June 27-29: Sean Jones: Dizzy Spellz. Dinner served nightly. I12 Village Vanguard C0L1 9471 78 Seventh Ave. So., btw Perry & W. 11th sts., 212.255.4037. villagevan guard.com. The quintessential subterranean jazz club. Highlights: April 30-May 5: Gilad Hekselman. May 7-12: Antonio Sanchez. May 14-19: Ben Wendel. May 21-26: Joe Lovano. May 28-June 2: Mark Guiliana Jazz Quartet. June 4-9: Renee Rosnes Quartet. June 11-16: Peter Bernstein Quartet. June 18-23: Brad Mehldau Quintet. June 25-29: Ethan Iverson. H18

POP/ROCK CLUBS + VENUES Barclays Center C0L46 7 20 Atlantic Ave., at Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn, 800.745.3000. barclayscenter .com. Brooklyn’s state-of-the-art entertainment and sports arena. Highlights: May 2: Cher. May 11: Erykah Badu and H.E.R. June 4: Twenty One Pilots. June 14-15: Ariana Grande. AA24 Beacon Theatre C0L2 941 124 Broadway, at W. 74th St., 866.858.0008. msg.com/beacon-theatre. Pop-music concerts and other acts. Highlights: May 1: Joan Baez. May 3-4: Jerry Seinfeld. May 14: Ben Platt. May 16: Jessie James Decker. May 18: Rodrigo Y Gabriela Mettavolution Tour. May 21-25: Eddie Izzard: “Wunderbar.” May 28: Yann Tiersen. June 1: Glen Hansard. June 4: David Gray. June 6-7: Jerry Seinfeld. June 9: India.Arie. June 10: Jon Meacham and Tim McGraw. June 13: Derek Hough. June 15: The Ultimate Doo-Wop Show. June 23, 24, 26, 28: Jackson Browne. J11

THE BIG BROADWAY HIT.

BIG. HUGE!

Madison Square Garden C0L95461Seventh Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 866.858.0008. msg.com/ madison-square-garden. A prime entertainment and sporting venue. Highlights: May 9: Billy Joel. May 13: The Who: Moving On! May 21-22: Pink: Beautiful Trauma World Tour. June 2: Billy Joel. June 6: Pentatonix. June 18-19: Ariana Grande. June 28-29: Hugh Jackman: The Man. The Music. The Show. G13 Radio City Music Hall C0L1 657 260 Sixth Ave., at W. 50th St., 866.858.0008. radiocity.com. The theater is an Art Deco landmark. Highlights: May 5: Al Green. May 14-15: “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend Live” Starring Rachel Bloom. May 16-19: Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Farewell Play Tour. June 14: Aziz Ansari. June 18: Eros Ramazzotti. June 19: Billie Ellish. June 20: Lauren Daigle. June 22: Diana Ross. G13

Tickets at PrettyWomanTheMusical.com 877-250-2929 • Nederlander Theatre, 208 W. 41st St. PHOTO BY ANDREW ECCLES

INNEWYORK.COM | MAY-JUNE 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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dining+drinking

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3

1

4

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 36-38).

1 Richard Lippold’s brass rod sculpture hangs from the ceiling above the square bar, where old-school cocktails are the order of the day. | The Grill, p. 26 2 Ingredients for signature dishes like this hamachi roll are handpicked and sourced from small farms across Japan. | Zuma New York, p. 27 3 Bartender Nico de Soto has created the drinks for this new department-store restaurant, including La Liqueur D’Echalotte, a vodka, shallot-infused St.-Germain, pineapple and cucumber cocktail. | L’Avenue at Saks, p. 27 4 Every month, Chef/owner John Doherty creates a seasonal five-course menu with wine pairings and serves it at the Chef’s Table in the restaurant’s kitchen. | Blackbarn Restaurant, p. 26

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IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

New York City Restaurant Prices Prices in the five boroughs vary wildly, from inexpensive pizza and burger joints to high-ticket temples of haute cuisine. To get a sense of price points for a particular eatery, we suggest you visit the restaurant’s website.

DOWNTOWN Balthazar—French C0L8 6127 0 Spring St., at Crosby St. 212.965.1414. balthazarny.com. Open since 1997, the dashing bistro in SoHo is a mainstay for its authentic bistro fare (steak au poivre, duck confit, pan-roasted salmon), plats du jour,

charming Parisian ambience, weekend brunch, and breads and pastries to die for (and to take home) from the bakery next door. B (daily), L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). F19

Bâtard—Contemporary European C0L4589239 West Broadway, at N. Moore St., 212.219.2777. batardtribeca.com. Voted Best New Restaurant by the James Beard Foundation in 2015, this Michelin-star TriBeCa stalwart serves inventive Modern European cuisine, expertly crafted cocktails and 800 international wines in a relaxed setting with warm lighting and cozy banquettes. D (M-Sa). G21

PHOTOS: THE BAR AT THE GRILL, ANTHONY CAUSI; HAMACHI ROLL AT ZUMA, COURTESY ZUMA NEW YORK; LIQUEUR D’ECHALOTTE AT L’AVENUE AT SAKS, COURTESY MELISSA HOM FOR SAKS FIFTH AVENUE; CHEF JOHN DOHERTY, COURTESY BLACKBARN RESTAURANT

FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC


Carbone—Italian 181 Thompson St., btw Houston & Bleecker sts., 212.254.3000. carbonenewyork.com. The posh but unpretentious Village ristorante with a retro backroom features classic red-sauce Italian fare (linguine vongole, veal Parmesan) and is frequented by celebrities. L (Tu-Su), D (nightly). G19 Chumley’s—Gastropub 86 Bedford St., btw Barrow & Grove sts., 212.675.2081. chumleys newyork.com. Originally opened in 1922 as a Prohibition-era speakeasy, this storied American resto on a charming West Village street serves classic fare (beef pie, chili, burgers) behind a covert green door. D (M-Sa), Brunch (Su). I18 Craft—American C0L4 179 3 E. 19th St., btw Park Ave. So. & Broadway, 212.780.0880. craftrestaurant .com. Celebrated James Beard Award-winning chef and TV personality Tom Colicchio’s flagship restaurant in the Flatiron District uses seasonal ingredients to create family-style dishes. L (M-F), D (nightly). F17 Gotham Bar and Grill—American 0941 37L 2 E. 12th St., btw University Pl. & Fifth Ave., 212.620.4020. gothambarandgrill.com. At his classic Greenwich Village staple (the restaurant opened in 1984), Chef Alfred Portale creates dishes that consistently earn a Michelin star. The three-course prix fixe lunch ($48) is one of the city’s best culinary bargains. Dining on your own? A seat at Gotham’s bar is the place to be. L (M-F), D (nightly). F18 Gramercy Tavern—American 42 E. 20th St., btw Park Ave. So. & Broadway, 212.477.0777. gramercytavern.com. Guests experience the comfort of a late-19th-century American inn at this ever-popular restaurant in the Flatiron District, savoring such cuisine as black bass with Brussels sprouts and bacon, and pork loin and belly over red cabbage. Seasonal and vegetable tasting menus are available. This is a non-tipping restaurant; hospitality is included. L & D (daily). F16 Katz’s Delicatessen—Jewish-American 205 E. Houston St., at Ludlow St., 212.254.2246. katzsdelicatessen.com. This iconic spot on the Lower East Side of Manhattan has been serving pastrami, corned beef, knishes, house-made pickles and other classics since 1888, and stays open around the clock F-Su. Tickets are given for purchase and seating; don’t lose them! B, L & D (daily). D19 Nobu Downtown—Japanese–Peruvian 0L4181 27 95 Broadway, btw Vesey & Fulton sts., 212.219.0500. noburestaurants.com. Celebrated dishes on Chef Nobu Matsuhisa’s menu include yellowtail with jalapeño and black cod with miso. Located in the landmarked former AT&T building in Lower Manhattan, the restaurant has been designed by David Rockwell with theatrical flair. Both cuisine and ambience have to be experienced to be believed. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). G22 Union Square Cafe—American 0L1 41 01 E. 19th St., at Park Ave. So.,, 212.243.4020. unionsquare cafe.com. Restaurateur Danny Meyer’s hot spot is known for such classics as ricotta gnocchi, INNEWYORK.COM | MAY-JUNE 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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dining+drinking

3

1 1 The 30-foot blue tile water wall, inspired by the cliff divers of Acapulco and designed by David Rockwell, is a signature of the Lincoln Center branch of this restaurant, as are the frozen pomegranate margaritas. | Rosa Mexicano, p. 27 2 Chef/ owner Daniel Boulud poses outside his eponymous restaurant. | Daniel, p. 27 3 Menu choices come and go, but the crab cake is forever at this Midtown fave.| 21 Club, p. 27 4 Midcentury Italian-American fare and ambience have earned this Village hot spot a Michelin star. | Carbone, p. 25 4

roasted monkfish and Berkshire pork chop. Since 1985, Union Square has been treasured for its effortless, friendly service. This is a non-tipping restaurant; hospitality is included. L (M-F) D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). F17

Untitled—American 99 Gansevoort St., btw Greenwich & West sts., 212.570.3670. untitledat thewhitney.com. Seasonal American fare is served in a windowed, Renzo Piano-designed space in the Whitney Museum of American Art in the Meatpacking District. This is a non-tipping restaurant; hospitality is included. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). J18

MIDTOWN Aureole—American 1 0586 Bryant Park, 135 W. 42nd St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.319.1660. charliepalmer.com/aureole-new-york. Chef Charlie Palmer’s flagship restaurant is a sleek haunt in Times Square with a dual personality. The dining room is white-tablecloth formal and serene, while the Liberty Room and bar area is more casual and lively. Both serve the cuisine for which Palmer is justly renowned. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). G14

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IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

Benjamin Steakhouse—Steak House Dylan Hotel, 52 E. 41st St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.297.9177. benjaminsteakhouse.com. Cuts of USDA prime steak are dry-aged on the premises at this classic chophouse with a rich clubby ambience. B, L & D (daily). F14 Blackbarn— American 19 E. 26th St., btw Madison & Fifth aves., 212.265.5959. blackbarn restaurant.com. The rustic three-level space suits the farm-to-table menu, which is broken down into categories such as Garden, Ocean, Slow-cooked and Wood-grilled. L (M-F), D (nightly) Brunch (Sa-Su). F16 Eleven Madison Park— American 1 Madison Ave., btw E. 23rd & E. 24th sts., 212.889.0905. elevenmadisonpark.com. Seasonal, refined dishes on a customizable tasting menu are enhanced by a lengthy international wine list at this gem, which was named the greatest resto in the world by The World’s 50 Best Restaurants Organization in 2017. L (F-Su), D (nightly). F16 Four Cuts Steakhouse—Steak House 1076 First Ave., btw E. 58th & E. 59th sts.,

212.204.0008. fourcutsny.com. The four cuts in question are porterhouse, sirloin, rib eye and filet mignon, all USDA prime and dry-aged. Seafood options (grilled branzino, salmon and yellowfin tuna, plus clams and oysters on the half shell) abound at this sleek and modern Sutton Place charmer a few blocks from Bloomingdale’s. D (nightly). D12

Gabriel Kreuther—French 41 W. 42nd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.257.5826. gknyc.com. A warm space featuring weathered wood beams and cream banquettes sets the stage for Alsatian-inspired creations by James Beard Award winner and Michelin-starred chef Gabriel Kreuther. Dishes can include haysmoked lamb and spice-rubbed pork collar and cheek with roasted fennel and pear. Prix fixe menus only, except at the bar. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). G14 The Grill—American The Seagram Building, 99 E. 52nd St., btw Lexington & Park aves., 212.375.9001. thegrillnewyork.com. A powerlunch mainstay of the last century has been refreshed and reinvigorated for the 21st with a firm attention to detail, service and, of course,

PHOTOS: FROZEN POMEGRANATE MARGARITA AT ROSA MEXICANO, COURTESY ROSA MEXICANO; CHEF DANIEL BOULUD, DANIEL KRIEGER; 21 CLUB CRAB CAKE, COURTESY 21 CLUB; CARBONE, EVAN SUNG

2


cuisine. The elevated menu features such classics as Dover sole, whole grilled squab and prime ribs of beef, the latter spit-roasted and served tableside from a trolley. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). F13

L’Avenue at Saks—French Entrance: 8 E. 50th St., btw Madison & Fifth aves., 212.940.4099. saks.com/locations/services/l-avenue-at-saks. Designer Philippe Starck has converted the eighth and ninth floors of the New York flagship of the Saks Fifth Avenue department store chain into an elegant aerie worthy of the famed Parisian restaurant, whose first location outside of the City of Lights this is. Specialties on the all-day menu include sea bass tartare, seared tuna niçoise and desserts from pâtissier and chocolatier Pierre Hermé. L & D (daily). F13 Le Bernardin—French 155 W. 51st St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.554.1515. le-bernardin .com. Simply prepared fish dishes are offered in an elegant space by world-renowned culinary legend Eric Ripert. Jackets required, ties optional. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). G13 Orso—Italian 322 W. 46th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.489.7212. orsorestaurant.com. Established restaurateur Joe Allen pays homage to Italy with a simple, cozy decor and classic menu of crispy pizzas, savory pastas, and roasted fowl and steaks. A popular stop before or after a Broadway show. L (W, Sa & Su), D (nightly). I14 The Polo Bar—American 1 E. 55th St., at Fifth Ave., 212.207.8562. ralphlauren.com/global-polobar. The American menu at this exclusive eatery (featuring a chopped vegetable salad. Loch Duart salmon and a corned beef sandwich) is inspired by stylemaker Ralph Lauren and his culinary tastes. The stylish, clubby space is filled with plaid pillows and equestrian art and saddles. Celebs like the Duchess of Sussex (aka Meghan Markle) and Serena Williams have dined here. Reservations required. Jackets are recommended for men. D (nightly). F13 Rock Center Café—American C0L64220 W. 50th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.332.7620. patina group.com/rock-center-cafe. Outdoor seating in warm months and tall-window views of the Rockefeller Center ice-skating rink in winter set the scene for a menu offering house-made pastas and a specialty burger blended in-house with chuck and Black Angus short ribs. Children’s menu available. B, L & D (daily). G13 Sardi’s—American 234 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.221.8440. sardis .com. This legendary restaurant, known for its humorous celebrity caricatures, has been a Theater District hangout since 1921. Specialties include jumbo lump crab cakes and grilled sirloin steak. L & D (Tu-Su), Brunch (Su). H14 The Sea Fire Grill—Seafood 158 E. 48th St., btw Third & Lexington aves., 212.935.3785. theseafiregrill.com. Contemporary dishes emphasize the flavors of fresh, seasonally sourced fish—whole Maine lobsters stuffed with crabmeat, roasted Nova Scotia halibut—in a space with a sleek, modern bar and an elegant dining room. Steaks and chops are also on the menu. L (M-F), D (nightly). E13

21 Club—American 21 W. 52nd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.582.7200. 21club.com. A top-tier menu of filet mignon, Dover sole, chicken hash and steak tartare, a well-stocked wine cellar and a festive atmosphere and clubby lounge make this spot favored by movers and shakers and captains of industry, who have donated the toys and sports memorabilia that dangle memorably from the ceiling of the Bar Room. Jackets for gentlemen. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). The Upstairs at ‘21’ is an intimate and elegant salon with a four-course prix fixe menu, $95. D (F & Sa). G13 Wild ink—Asian/International 20 Hudson Yards, 5th Fl., W. 33rd St. at 10th Ave., 646.974.7305. wildinknyc.com. The new 5,800-square-foot restaurant and bar in Hudson Yards boasts views of the Hudson River, The Vessel interactive sculpture and The Shed, an arts center. The Asian-influenced menu offers dim sum, small plates for sharing (seared diver scallops) and main courses that can include Arctic char and Japanese risotto. L & D (daily), Brunch (Sa-Su). J15 Zuma New York—Japanese 261 Madison Ave., btw E. 38th & E. 39th sts., 212.544.9862. zumarestaurant.com. Sleek, upscale and dimly lit digs set the scene for a menu that features sushi, steaks from the robata grill and izakaya bites. Specialties can include lobster no oven yaki (roasted lobster with shizo-ponzu butter). House-branded sake and house-made specialty cocktails are on offer. L (M-F), D (nightly). F15

UPTOWN Bar Boulud—French 1900 Broadway, at W. 64th St., 212.595.0303. barboulud.com. Chef/ owner Daniel Boulud’s bistro, which is close to Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, serves seasonal fare—including signature terrines, pâtés, charcuterie and cassoulet—in a space with a striking contemporary design and an outdoor terrace. Wines come from the Burgundy and Rhône Valley regions. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). I12 Cafe Sabarsky—Austrian C0L6428Neue Galerie, 1048 Fifth Ave., at E. 86th St., 212.288.0665. neuegal erie.org/cafes/sabarsky. Josef Hoffmann lighting fixtures, Adolf Loos furniture and Otto Wagner fabrics help make this über-comfortable coffeehouse in the Neue Galerie a splendid evocation of turn-of-the-last-century Vienna. Chef Kurt Gutenbrunner’s authentic menu features sausages, Schnitzel, coffee specialties and Sachertorte mit Schlag, of course. B, L & D (Th-Su), B & L (M & W). G9 Daniel—French 46 31 0 E. 65th St., btw Madison & Park aves., 212.288.0033. danielnyc.com. Awarded two stars in the 2019 Michelin Guide, Chef Daniel Boulud’s haute dining experience on the Upper East Side embraces seasonal Gallic cuisine, imbued with tradition but with a contemporary accent. Prix fixe tasting menus; wine pairings available. As befits the luxurious, regal space with neoclassical accents, jackets are required. D (M-Sa). F12 Jean-Georges—French 4C310L92T6 rump International Hotel & Tower, 1 Central Park W., btw W. 60th & W. 61st sts., 212.299.3900. jean-georges.com.

This four-star haven overlooking Central Park offers the seasonal, market-driven cuisine of Chef/owner Jean-Georges Vongerichten in a formal dining room and the more casual Nougatine café. Jackets required in the dining room. L & D (daily), Brunch (Su). I12

Lincoln Ristorante—Italian C0L9L6184 incoln Center, 142 W. 65th St., btw Broadway & Amsterdam Ave., 212.359.6500. lincolnristorante.com. A stunning glass-enclosed pavilion, with a sloping roof covered in lush grass, houses Chef Shea Gallante’s culinary visions, from fresh pastas and meat dishes to focaccia breads and charcuterie. Located on the Lincoln Center campus, the restaurant is a convenient option for dining before a concert, opera, ballet or play. L (W-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). J12 Masa—Japanese 0453Time Warner Center, 10 Columbus Cir., 4th fl., btw W. 58th & W. 60th sts., 212.823.9800. masanyc.com. Chef Masa Takayama pulls out all the stops at this fine dining treasure, which is among the city’s most expensive restaurants. The omakase dinner experience costs $595 per person and can last two hours; the dress code, however, is casual. This is a non-tipping restaurant; hospitality is included. L (Tu-F), D (M-Sa). I12 Porter House Bar and Grill—Steak House 10 Columbus Cir., 4th fl., btw W. 58th & W. 60th sts., 212.823.9500. porterhousenyc.com. Chef Michael Lomonaco’s quintessential New York steak house serves USDA prime 28-day dry-aged beef (porterhouse, chili-rubbed rib eye, cowboy rib steak) in a sleek haunt with views of Columbus Circle and Central Park. Wagyu beef is available on the menu, as well as a full complement of seafood and poultry. L & D (daily). I12 Red Rooster Harlem—Soul Food 310 Lenox Ave., btw W. 125th & W. 126th sts., 212.792.9001. redroosterharlem.com. Ethiopian-born Chef/ owner Marcus Samuelsson names his spot after the famed local speakeasy and serves comfort foods, such as Papa Eddie’s shrimp and grits, seafood jambalaya and jerk chicken. Ginny’s Supper Club downstairs features live music and a gospel Sunday brunch. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). G4 Rosa Mexicano—Mexican C0L193661 Columbus Ave., at W. 62nd St., 212.977.7700. rosamexicano .com. The spirited decor matches the colorful menu of citrus-marinated seafood, skewered and grilled filet mignon, tacos and enchiladas. Rosa is justly renowned for its signature frozen pomegranate margaritas and guacamole prepared tableside. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). I12 The Writing Room—American 1703 Second Ave., btw E. 88th & E. 89th sts., 212.335.0075. thewritingroomnyc.com. Classic American cuisine, such as country fried chicken, spaghetti and meatballs, and seared Atlantic salmon, is served in a library-themed space formerly occupied by celebrity hangout Elaine’s. Bottles of wine priced under $100 are half off on Mondays. L (Tu-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). E9

INNEWYORK.COM | MAY-JUNE 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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shops+services

2 3

4

1

5

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 36-38).

1 John Mahdessian, president and CEO of the familyowned dry-cleaning business, applies his expertise to restoring a couture gown. | Madame Paulette, p. 29 2 The jeweler’s new collection for spring includes these drop earrings in the form of daisies made of sterling silver and 18-karat gold. | Tiffany & Co., p. 29 3 The Longines Heritage Military watch is a reissue of the original 1940s watch designed by Longines for the British Royal Air Force. | Tourneau TimeMachine, p. 29 4 Fifty percent of the purchase price from the sale of each polo, hoodie, hat and tote in Ralph Lauren’s unisex Pride collection is donated to the Stonewall Community Foundation, a global organization touching many LGBTQ community needs. | Polo Ralph Lauren, p. 29 5 STORY, a store within a store, merchandises products by color. | Macy’s Herald Square, p. 29

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IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

ACCESSORIES+FOOTWEAR

found at the New York fl agship of this luxury Italian leather goods brand. H18

Ferragamo C0L64655 Fifth Ave., btw 52nd & 53rd sts., 212.759.3822. ferragamo.com. Although most closely associated with fi ne leather footwear, handbags and small leather goods, this upscale Italian company features clothing and accessories for men and women that sport the same fi ne design and high-quality materials as the company’s famed shoes. G13

John Lobb C0L42578800 Madison Ave., btw E. 67th & E. 68th sts., 212.888.9797. johnlobb.com. Lobb’s exceptional bespoke and ready-to-wear shoes for gentlemen have been crafted in England since 1866 and Paris since 1902, and are made to last. F11

Il Bisonte C0L475381 Bleecker St., at Perry St., 212.633.0334. ilbisonte.com. High-quality, well-designed handbags, briefcases, backpacks, travel bags and accessories can be

APPAREL Brooks Brothers C0L695346 Madison Ave., at E. 44th St., 212.682.8800. brooksbrothers.com. Since 1818, this well-respected American clothier has

PHOTOS: PRESIDENT AND CEO JOHN MAHDESSIAN OF MADAME PAULETTE, COURTESY MADAME PAULETTE; RETURN TO TIFFANY LOVE BUGS EARRINGS, COURTESY TIFFANY & CO.; LONGINES HERITAGE MILITARY 1940S REISSUED WATCH, COURTESY LONGINES; RALPH LAUREN POLO SHIRT, COURTESY RALPH LAUREN; COLOR STORY AT MACY’S HERALD SQUARE, COURTESY MACY’S INC.

FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC


been known for its superior-quality conservative clothing and accessories for boys, men and women. F14

.com. The department store spans a full city block with clothing, accessories and home decor, plus cosmetics and fragrances. G15

J. Press C0LY 5142 ale Club, 51 E. 44th St., at Vanderbilt Ave., 646.973.1329. jpressonline.com. Ivy league-inspired suits, sport coats, blazers, neckwear, shirts, outerwear, shorts, trousers, sweaters and accessories. F14

Neiman Marcus 20 Hudson Yards, at 10th Ave. & W. 33rd St. neimanmarcus.com. The luxury department-store chain’s first-ever brick-andmortar flagship in NYC offers the highest level of service and exclusive designer apparel and accessories for men and women. J15

Madame Paulette C0L1 5142 255 Second Ave., btw E. 65th & E. 66th sts., 212.750.4927. madamepau lette.com. Custom couture dry cleaners since 1959. Travel without luggage using Madame Paulette’s Destination Valet service, which cleans, presses, packs and ships clothing to any destination in the world. E11 Paul Stuart C0L6587350 Madison Ave., at E. 45th St., 212.682.0320. paulstuart.com. The updated classics at this specialist can seamlessly take both men and women from the boardroom to a night on the town. F14 Polo Ralph Lauren C0L41 32 09 Prince St., at Greene St., 212.625.1660. ralphlauren.com. The iconic brand’s Downtown location in SoHo. F19

DEPT. STORES+CENTERS Barneys New York C0L32496660 Madison Ave., btw E. 60th & E. 61st sts., 212.826.8900; and several other NYC locations. barneys.com. The pick of runway styles for men and women from top designers, such as Marc Jacobs, Givenchy and Fendi. F12 Bergdorf Goodman C0L7 32749 54 Fifth Ave., btw 57th & 58th sts., 212.753.7300. bergdorfgoodman.com. Women can find designer labels, accessories and cosmetics in this iconic New York department store. The separate men’s store is directly across the street. G12 Bloomingdale’s C0L421 5 000 Third Ave., at E. 59th St., 212.705.2000; and several other NYC locations. bloomingdales.com. The storied fashion hub has recently renovated its shoe, cosmetics and ready-to-wear floors. E12 Brookfield Place 230 Vesey St., btw West & Liberty sts., 212.978.1698. brookfieldplaceny.com. The shopping center brings high-end apparel and accessories brands for men, women and kids, along with dining options. G22 Century 21 C0L962 87 2 Cortlandt St., btw Broadway & Church St., 212.227.9092; and several other NYC locations. c21stores.com. Deep discounts on everything, from famous designer apparel for men, women and children to cosmetics, shoes, electronics and housewares. F22 Empire Outlets 1 Richmond Terr., Staten Island. empireoutlets.nyc. The only outlet shopping center in New York City houses more than 100 designer outlet retailers. With easy access to and from Manhattan via the Staten Island Ferry, the center is less than a five-minute walk from the St. George Terminal. Macy’s Herald Square C0L961 3 51 W. 34th St., btw Broadway & Seventh Ave., 212.695.4400. macys

Saks Fifth Avenue C0L48156611 Fifth Ave., btw 49th & 50th sts., 212.753.4000, F14; 250 Vesey St., Brookfield Place, at West St., 212.301.2440, G22. saksfifthavenue.com. A luxury department store carrying designer apparel, accessories, home decor, luxury brand cosmetics and fragrances. The Shops at Columbus Circle C0L36Time Warner Center, 10 Columbus Cir., btw W. 58th & W. 60th sts., 212.823.6300. theshopsatcolumbuscircle .com. This high-end retail and dining complex features more than 40 stores, the world-class Restaurant and Bar Collection, a park-view atrium and art installations. I12 The Shops at Hudson Yards 20 Hudson Yards, at 10th Ave. & W. 33rd St. hudsonyards newyork.com/shopping. Scores of luxury and specialty stores fill the seven floors of this new retail mecca. Among the establishments under one roof are Aritzia, Cartier, Coach, H&M, Jo Malone, Kiehl’s, Muji, Piaget, Rolex, Van Cleef & Arpels and the city’s first Neiman Marcus. J15 Westfield World Trade Center 185 Greenwich St., btw Vesey & Barclay sts., 212.284.9982. westfield.com/westfieldworld tradecenter. This shopping center features a stellar lineup of stores, including John Varvatos, L.K. Bennett and Roberto Coin. G22

GIFTS+HOME MoMA Design Store C0L72644 W. 53rd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.767.1050, G13; 81 Spring St., at Crosby St., 646.613.1367, F19. momastore.org. Cutting-edge designs for the home, office and body, along with fun gadgets, toys and jewelry, are selected by the discerning eyes of the Museum of Modern Art’s curatorial staff. Pearl River Mart C0L5328395 Broadway, at Walker St., 212.431.4770. pearlriver.com. An enormous selection of authentic Asian goods, including silk mandarin-collared shirts, flower-embroidered dresses, toys, teas, trinkets, candy, paper lanterns and sake sets, are sold at this Chinese emporium. F20 Zarin Fabrics C0L236 67 9 Orchard St., btw Grand & Broome sts., 212.925.6112. zarinfabrics.com. Family-owned and operated since 1936, Zarin showcases thousands of bolts of designer upholstery and drapery fabrics by leading manufacturers at discounted prices. Full decorating services available, as well as furniture, lighting and accessories. D20

JEWELRY

French luxury design house, founded in 1847, offers exquisite jewelry, watches and clocks, leather goods, fragrances, tableware and objets d’art. G13

Martinique Jewelers C0L727 6 50 Seventh Ave., btw W. 49th & W. 50th sts., 212.262.7600. martinique jewelers.com. In Times Square since 1963, this fine jeweler has a vast selection of jewelry, including Alex and Ani bangles; a full Pandora boutique with exclusive NYC charms; the Thomas Sabo collection; and timeless diamond and 18-karat gold pieces. H13 Tiffany & Co. C0L727 6 27 Fifth Ave., at 57th St., 212.755.8000. tiffany.com. The world-famous jewelry store carries diamonds, pearls, gold, silver, sterling flatware, fine timepieces, crystal and more—all of which come wrapped in signature robin’s-egg blue boxes. G13 Tourneau TimeMachine 12 E. 57th St., btw Madison & Fifth aves, 212.758.7300. tourneau .com. Established in 1900, Tourneau is the leading retailer of luxury watches in the United States, offering more than 80 world-famous brands, in more than 8,000 unique styles. F12

SPORTING GOODS NBA Store C0L3575 1 45 Fifth Ave., at 45th St., 212.457.3120. nba.com/nycstore. Team jerseys, basketballs, gifts and footwear fill this arena-style sports emporium of National Basketball Association merchandise and memorabilia. G14 The NHL Store C0L1 4287 185 Sixth Ave., at W. 47th St., 917.261.6770. nhl.com/info/nhl-store. The National Hockey League flagship store offers apparel, jerseys, footwear and merchandise for all 31 pro hockey teams, visits from players and an NHL-themed Starbucks. G14 Paragon Sporting Goods C0L48 317 67 Broadway, at E. 18th St., 212.255.8889. paragonsports.com. This only-in-New-York-City sports mecca carries all kinds of sports equipment and clothing, as well as exercise gear from major brands, including Timberland and Patagonia. F17

TOYS+GAMES Forbidden Planet C0L6930 Rockefeller Plz., btw W. 49th & W. 50th sts.,212.473.1576. A massive stock of graphic novels and DC, Marvel and Darkhouse comics, plus games, posters, action figures, DVDs and anime. F18 The Lego Store 200 Fifth Ave., btw 23rd & 24th sts., 212.255.3217. lego.com. An 8-foot tall Statue of Liberty and NYC street scenes built from mini Legos inspire kids to create designs of their own. F17 Nintendo New York C0L5110 Rockefeller Plz., at W. 48th St., 646.459.0800. nintendonyc.com. A 10,000-square-foot interactive gaming paradise that features Nintendo Wii kiosks, branded merchandise, exclusive items and all the latest video games. F13

Cartier C0L31653 Fifth Ave., at 52nd St., 212.446.3400. cartier.us. The palatial New York location of the INNEWYORK.COM | MAY-JUNE 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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museums+attractions

2

1

3 The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 36-38).

1 Visitors to this world-famous collection only have through June 15 to see Pablo Picasso’s masterpiece, “Les Demoiselles d’Avignon,” before it goes into storage while the museum is closed for a major reinstallation and expansion, reopening Oct. 21. | The Museum of Modern Art, p. 32 2 When the Palazzo Archinto in Milan was bombed during World War II, its ceiling frescoes by Gimabattista Tiepolo were destroyed. The exhibition, “Tiepolo in Milan: The Lost Frescoes of Palazzo Archinto,” on view thru July 14, tells the story of these important works and includes the oil sketch, “Triumph of the Arts and Sciences.” | The Frick Collection, p. 31 3 Satirical drawings and prints by William Hogarth, whose self-portrait is shown here, depict the ills and injustices of Georgian London. “Hogarth: Cruelty and Humor,” on view from May 24, features more than 20 of these works. | The Morgan Library & Museum, p. 31

MUSEUMS AKC Museum of the Dog 101 Park Ave., at E. 40th St., 212.696.8360. museumofthedog.org. One of the city’s newest museums, under the auspices of the American Kennel Club (AKC), pays homage to man’s best friend and features artwork and half a dozen interactive digital displays. Tu-Su 10 am-5 pm. F14 American Folk Art Museum C0L5482 Lincoln Sq., Columbus Ave., at W. 66th St., 212.595.9533. folkartmuseum.org. The permanent collection focuses on works created by self-taught artists in a variety of mediums and dating from the 18th century to today. Thru July 28: “Made in New York: The Business of Folk Art.” Tu-Th, Sa 11:30 am-7 pm, F noon-7:30 pm, Su noon-6 pm. Free. I11 American Museum of Natural History C0L365Central Park West, at W. 79th St., 212.769.5100. amnh.org. Guests explore halls filled with dinosaur skeletons, fossils, dioramas, artifacts,

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IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

gems and minerals, meteorites and more. Thru Aug. 9, 2020: “T. rex: The Ultimate Predator.” Daily 10 am-5:45 pm. I10

Brooklyn Museum C0L5948200 Eastern Pkwy., at Washington Ave., Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, 718.638.5000. brooklynmuseum.org. Ancient Egyptian artifacts, photography and European, Asian and American art are housed in a grand 560,000-square-foot Beaux Arts building. May 3-Dec. 8: “Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall.” W, F-Su 11 am-6 pm, Th 11 am-10 pm. Cooper Hewitt 2 E. 91st St., at Fifth Ave., 212.849.8400. cooperhewitt.org. This Smithsonian museum uses groundbreaking technology to create interactive exhibits on historic and contemporary design. May 10-Jan. 20, 2020: “Nature: Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial.” Su-F 10 am-6 pm, Sa 10 am-9 pm. F9 Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration C0L6E 15 llis Island: 212.363.3200. libertyellisfounda

PHOTOS: PABLO PICASSO, “LES DEMOISELLES D’AVIGNON,” 1907, ACQUIRED THROUGH THE LILLIE P. BLISS BEQUEST, ©2011 ESTATE OF PABLO PICASSO/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK; GIAMBATTISTA TIEPOLO, “TRIUMPH OF THE ARTS AND SCIENCES,” CA. 1730–31, MUSEU NACIONAL DE ARTE ANTIGA, LISBON. PHOTO: ©DIREÇÃO-GERAL DE PATRIMÓNIO CULTURAL / ARQUIVO DE DOCUMENTAÇÃO FOTOGRÁFICA (DGPC/ADF) / PHOTO LUISA OLIVEIRA; WILLIAM HOGARTH, “SELF-PORTRAIT,” CA. 1735, YALE CENTER FOR BRITISH ART, PAUL MELLON COLLECTION, B198125.360

FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC


THE DEFINING MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART FROM THE 20TH CENTURY TO TODAY

Fraunces Tavern Museum 0316 54 Pearl St., at Broad St., 212.425.1778. frauncestavern museum.org. Built in 1719, the building showcases Revolutionary War-era manuscripts, art, memorabilia and recreated period rooms. Thru September 2019: “Confidential: The American Revolution’s Agents of Espionage.” M-F noon-5 pm, Sa-Su 11 am-5 pm. F23 The Frick Collection 1 E. 70th St., btw Madison & Fifth aves., 212.288.0700. frick.org. Paintings by Old Masters are on display in the palatial former home of industrialist Henry Clay Frick. Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. G11

Whitney Museum of American Art 99 Gansevoort Street

whitney.org @whitneymuseum

Whitney Museum of American Art. Photograph © Ben Gancsos

Insertion date: MAY 1, 2019 Size: 4.625” x 4.75” 4C MAG

Guggenheim MuseumC0L136 1071 Fifth Ave., at 89th St., 212.423.3500. guggenheim.org. A major architectural icon, Frank Lloyd Wright’s spiraling landmark building houses significant modern and contemporary art. May 24-Jan. 12, 2020: “Artistic License: Six Takes on the Guggenheim Collection.” M, W-F & Su 10 am-5:30 pm, Tu & Sa 10 am-8 pm. G8

WHITNEY

tion.org. Millions of immigrants entered the U.S. on this historic island between 1892 and 1954. In addition to viewing artifacts displayed in the museum, visitors seeking their heritage are welcome to consult the archives of the American Family Immigration History Center. The Peopling of America galleries tell the story of immigration to America before the processing center opened in 1892 and after it closed in 1954. Daily. Free.

Play It Loud

Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum C0L3276Pier 86, 12th Ave., at W. 46th St., 212.245.0072. intrepid museum.org. The USS Intrepid aircraft carrier offers access to several of its decks featuring historic aircraft, interactive exhibits and flight simulators, plus the space shuttle Enterprise. M-F 10 am-5 pm, Sa-Su 10 am-6 pm. K14

INSTRUMENTS OF ROCK & ROLL

The Jewish Museum 1109 Fifth Ave., at 92nd St., 212.423.3200. thejewishmuseum.org. A showcase for Jewish art and culture. Thru Sept. 8: “Leonard Cohen: A Crack in Everything.” M, Tu & F 11 am-5:45 pm, Th 11 am-8 pm, Sa-Su 10 am-5:45 pm. G8 The Metropolitan Museum of Art 1000 Fifth Ave., at 82nd St., 212.535.7710. metmu seum.org. Renowned for its encyclopedic collections of American, European and Far Eastern fine and decorative art. May 9-Sept. 8: “Camp: Notes on Fashion.” Su-Th 10 am-5:30 pm, F-Sa 10 am-9 pm. G9

Rock’s seismic influence and how the music was made

The Morgan Library & Museum 225 Madison Ave., at E. 36th St., 212.685.0008. themorgan.org. Rare books, manuscripts, drawings, prints and other treasures. Tu-Th 10:30 am-5 pm, F 10:30 am-9 pm, Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. F15 The Museum at FIT C0L531S 6 eventh Ave., at W. 27th St., 212.217.4558. fitnyc.edu/museum. Fashion is celebrated as an art form through public programs and exhibitions of contemporary and historic clothing, avant-garde accessories, textiles and other visual materials. May

Through October 1

metmuseum.org

#MetRockandRoll

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The exhibition is made possible by the John Pritzker Family Fund, the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, Diane Carol Brandt, the Paul L. Wattis Foundation, Kenneth and Anna Zankel, and the National Endowment for the Arts. It is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

Les Paul Custom electric guitar. Gibson Guitar Corp., 1957; painted by Keith Richards, 1968. Collection of Keith Richards. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Photo by Joseph Coscia.

INNEWYORK.COM | MAY-JUNE 2019 | IN NEW YORK Met-409-Play it Loud_InNY_May1_4.625x4.75_v1.indd 1

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museums+attractions 28-Nov. 16: “Minimalism/Maximalism.” Tu-F noon-8 pm, Sa 10 am-5 pm. Free. H16

Museum of Arts and Design C0L6312 Columbus Cir., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.299.7777. madmuseum.org. The center celebrates innovative arts and crafts. May 2-Sept. 15: “Roger Brown: Virtual Still Lifes.” Tu-W, F-Su 10 am-6 pm, Th 10 am-9 pm. F13 Museum of Chinese in America C0L562215 Centre St., btw Howard & Grand sts., 855.955.6622. mocanyc.org. Artifacts, exhibits, events and archives chronicle the traditions and history of Chinese Americans. May 2-Sept. 15: “The Moon Represents My Heart: Music, Memory and Belonging.” Tu-W, F-Su 11 am-6 pm, Th 11 am-9 pm. E20 Museum of Illusions 77 Eighth Ave., at W. 14th St., 212.645.3230. museumofillusions.us. More than 70 exhibits, based on mathematics, psychology, biology and other sciences, invite visitors to test their vision and learn about the human brain and how it perceives. The totally interactive and Instagram-worthy two-story space includes the Infinity Room, the Tilted Room, the Rotated Room and the Anti-Gravity Room. M-Th 9 am-10 pm, F-Su 8 am-11 pm. I17 Museum of Jewish Heritage: A Living Memorial to the Holocaust C0L56Edmond J. Safra Plaza, 36 Battery Pl., btw West St. & First Pl., 646.437.4202. mjhnyc.org. Exhibitions and cultural events at this museum, which was created in 1997, celebrate the lives of those who perished in the Holocaust. May 8-Jan. 3, 2020: “Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away.” Su-Th 10 am-9 pm (last entry 7 pm), F 10 am-5 pm (last entry 3 pm). G23 The Museum of Modern Art 11 W. 53rd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.708.9400. moma.org. Modern and contemporary masterpieces of sculpture, drawing, painting, photography and film are in the collection. Daily 10:30 am-5:30 pm, F until 8 pm. The last day of public admission is June 15; the museum reopens Oct. 21. G13 Museum of Sex C0L52 76 33 Fifth Ave., at 27th St., 212.689.6337. museumofsex.com. This museum is dedicated to the history, evolution and cultural significance of human sexuality. Thru Sept. 8: “James Bidgood: Reveries.” Su-Th 10:30 am-11 pm, F-Sa 10:30 am-midnight (last ticket sold one hour before closing). G16 Museum of the City of New YorkC0L5914 1220 Fifth Ave., at 103rd St., 212.534.1672. mcny.org. The permanent exhibition, “New York at Its Core,” is a three-gallery, high-tech look at NYC’s 400-year history. Thru Sept. 15: “In the Dugout With Jackie Robinson.” Daily 10 am-6 pm. F7 National Museum of the American Indian C0L561 2 Bowling Green, at Broadway, 212.514.3700. nmai.si.edu. This Smithsonian Institution museum promotes Native American history, culture and arts. Thru Sept. 16: “T.C. Cannon: At the Edge of America.” Su-W, F-Sa 10 am-5 pm, Th 10 am-8 pm. Free. F23 National September 11 Memorial & MuseumC0L415879 Museum entrance at 180 Greenwich St., btw Liberty & Fulton sts., 212.312.8800.

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911memorial.org. The memorial features waterfalls set within the footprints of the Twin Towers. Memorial: Daily 7:30 am-9 pm. Free. Museum: Su-Th 9 am-8 pm (last entry 6 pm), F-Sa 9 am-9 pm (last entry 7 pm). G22

.org. The 1.45-mile-long elevated park and public promenade offers views of the Manhattan skyline and public art displays. Thru May 31: Daily 7 am-10 pm. June 1-Sept. 30: 7 am-11 pm. Free. J15-J18

Neue Galerie New York C0L1 457 048 Fifth Ave., at 86th St., 212.628.6200. neuegalerie.org. Dedicated to 20th-century German and Austrian art and design. Thru June 24: “The Self-Portrait, From Schiele to Beckmann.” Th-M 11 am-6 pm. G9

New York Botanical Garden C0L48572900 Southern Blvd., Bronx, 718.817.8700. nybg.org. Miles of seasonal gardens and walking trails offer an escape from the city. June 8-Sept. 29: “The Living Art of Roberto Burle Marx.” Tu-Su 10 am-6 pm.

New Museum C0L57235 Bowery, btw Rivington & Stanton sts., 212.219.1222. newmuseum.org. Contemporary cutting-edge art in a variety of mediums by American and international artists. Thru May 26: “Nari Ward: We the People.” Tu-W, F-Su 11 am-6 pm, Th 11 am-9 pm. D20

New York Hall of Science C0L94 457 7-01 111th St., Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, 718.699.0005. nysci.org. Although designed primarily for children, this hands-on learning center appeals to everyone. Visitors explore biology, physics, chemistry and technology through more than 450 permanent exhibitions. M-F 9:30 am-5 pm, Sa-Su 10 am-6 pm.

New-York Historical Society Museum & Library C0L51 8 70 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (W. 77th St.), 212.873.3400. nyhistory.org. Objects and works of art focusing on the rich history of NYC and New York State. May 24-Sept. 22: “Stonewall 50 at New-York Historical Society.” Tu-Th, Sa 10 am-6 pm, F 10 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. I10 Rubin Museum of Art C0L1 4957 50 W. 17th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.620.5000. rmanyc.org. Paintings, books, artifacts, textiles and more from the Himalayas and the surrounding regions, including Nepal, Bhutan, India, China and Mongolia. Thru Oct. 14: “The Power of Intention: Reinventing the (Prayer) Wheel.” M & Th 11 am-5 pm, W 11 am-9 pm, F 11 am-10 pm, Sa-Su 11 am-6 pm. H17 Tenement Museum C0LV 516 isitor center: 103 Orchard St., btw Broome & Delancey sts., 212.982.8420. tenement.org. Turn-of-the-20thcentury immigrant life on Manhattan’s Lower East Side is illustrated on guided tours of authentically preserved tenement apartments. Daily 10 am-6 pm (last tour 5 pm). C20 Whitney Museum of American Art 99 Gansevoort St., btw Greenwich & West sts., 212.570.3600. whitney.org. More than 50,000 square feet of indoor galleries and 13,000 square feet of outdoor spaces are devoted to American art and artists. May 17-Sept. 22: “Whitney Biennial 2019.” M, W-Th, Su 10:30 am-6 pm, F-Sa 10:30 am-10 pm. I18

ATTRACTIONS Bronx Zoo C0L5312300 Southern Blvd., Bronx, 718.220.1500. bronxzoo.com. The largest urban zoo in the United States provides natural habitats and environments for its 4,000 species, including snow leopards, lemurs and Western lowland gorillas. M-F 10 am-5 pm, Sa-Su 10 am-5:30 pm. Empire State Building ExperienceC0L3487 Entrance: 20 W. 34th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.736.3100. esbnyc.com. Views of NYC and beyond can be seen from the 86th- and 102nd-floor observatories. Daily 8 am-2 am (last elevator ascends at 1:15 am). G15 The High Line C0L568G 1 ansevoort to W. 34th sts., btw 10th and 11th aves., 212.500.6035. thehighline

One World Observatory One World Trade Center, 285 Fulton St., entrance to the observatory is on West St., at Vesey St., 844.696.1776. oneworldobservatory.com. The indoor observatory is located at the top of the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. Daily 8 am-9 pm (last tickets sold at 8:45 pm). G22 SeaGlass Carousel The Battery, enter at State St. & Peter Minuit Plz., 212.344.3491. seaglasscar ousel.nyc. Within a monumental glass and steel pavilion, shaped like a nautilus shell, 30 fiberglass fish, lit by LED lights and as large as 9.5 feet wide and 13.5 feet tall, spin and swim. Each ride lasts approximately 3.5 minutes. M-Th 10 am-7 pm, F-Su 10 am-8 pm. F24 Snug Harbor Cultural Center and Botanical Garden C0L7261 8 000 Richmond Terrace, btw Broadway & N. Burgher Ave., Staten Island, 718.448.2500. snug-harbor.org. Eighty-three acres house several gardens and Greek Revival buildings containing art galleries, theaters and a library. General grounds & botanical garden: Daily dawn until dusk. Spyscape 928 Eighth Ave., at W. 55th St., 212.549.1941. spyscape.com. The interactive experience includes a museum of spy artifacts, such as an original Enigma machine from World War II, and immersive spy challenges, such as encryption, deception, surveillance, hacking and special ops. Recommended for adults and teens. M-F 10 am-9 pm, Sa-Su 9 am-9 pm. Last entry 7:30 pm. I13 Statue of Liberty C0L652 7 12.363.3200. libertyellis foundation.org. The 151-foot neoclassical statue, designed by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi, is known worldwide as a symbol of freedom and democracy. The new Statue of Liberty Museum opens to the public on May 16. Statue Cruises operates a daily ferry service to Liberty Island: 201.604.2800. statuecruises.com. Top of the Rock C30 0L57 Rockefeller Plz., W. 50th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.698.2000. topoftherocknyc.com. Panoramic vistas of the city can be enjoyed from a vantage point some 70 floors above the ground. Daily 8 am-12:30 am (last elevator ascends at 11:55 pm). G13


galleries+antiques

PHOTOS: INSTALLATION VIEW OF “MAYBE MAYBE NOT: CHRISTOPHER WOOL AND THE HILL COLLECTION,” ©CHRISTOPHER WOOL, PHOTOGRAPH BY MATTHEW HERRMANN, ©HILL ART FOUNDATION; ANDY WARHOL, “BLONDIE,” 1981, ©THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC. / LICENSED BY ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK

FOR MORE ART, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC

1

2 The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 36-38).

1 The inaugural exhibition of this nonprofit art institution’s space in Chelsea is “Maybe Maybe Not: Christopher Wool and the Hill Collection,” on view thru June 28. | The Hill Art Foundation, this page 2 “Blondie,” aka Debbie Harry, is included in the oneman show, “Warhol Women,” an exhibition devoted exclusively to Andy Warhol’s portraits of women from the early 1960s through the 1980s, on view thru June 15. | Lévy Gorvy, this page

Showplace Antique + Design CenterC0L195 40 W. 25th St., btw Broadway & Sixth Ave., 212.633.6063. nyshowplace.com. More than 200 antiques dealers on four floors exhibit European and American furniture, art glass, textiles, silver, fine and costume jewelry, pottery, vintage clothing and more. M-F 10 am-6 pm, Sa & Su 8:30 am-5:30 pm. G16

ART GALLERIES ANTIQUES 1stdibs Gallery C0L416T5 erminal Stores, 269 11th Ave., Lobby 4, 7th fl., btw W. 27th & W. 28th sts., 646.779.0768. 1stdibs.com/gallery. The popular shopping website, 1stdibs.com, now has a physical presence in an 1890s landmark building within walking distance of Hudson Yards, featuring 50-plus antiques and 20th-century design dealers from the United States and abroad. M-F 10 am-6 pm. J16 The Gallery at 200 Lex Powered by Incollect New York Design Center, 200 Lexington Ave., 10th fl., btw E. 32nd & E. 33rd sts., 646.293.6633. nydc.com/antiques. More than 50 leading international and American dealers show and sell antiques, vintage pieces and 21st-century design in a 33,000-square-foot destination for collectors and connoisseurs. M-F 9:30 am-5 pm. E15 The Manhattan Art & Antiques Center C0L51 9 050 Second Ave., at E. 55th St., 212.355.4400. the-maac.com. More than 100 established galleries on three levels offer an encyclopedic selection of antiques, fine art, decorative accessories, silver and jewelry from the Americas, Europe, Africa and Asia. M-Sa 10:30 am-6 pm, Su noon-6 pm. E13

Acquavella Galleries C0L1 8165 8 E. 79th St., btw Madison & Fifth aves., 212.734.6300. acquavella galleries.com. Nineteenth-, 20th- and 21st-century paintings and sculpture from such artists as Paul Cézanne, Edgar Degas, Mark Rothko and Damien Loeb. Thru May 24: “Lucian Freud: Monumental.” M-Sa 10 am-5 pm. F10 David Zwirner C0L35728537 W. 20th St., btw 10th Ave. & West St., 212.517.8677. davidzwirner.com. Paintings, sculpture and conceptual photography from international contemporary artists, including R. Crumb and Diana Thater. May 3-June 22: “Joan Mitchell: I carry my landscapes around with me.” Call for opening hours. J17 The Hill Art Foundation C0L453239 10th Ave., 3rd & 4th fls., btw W. 24th & W. 25th sts., 212.337.4455. hillartfoundation.org. A showcase for works from the collection in four main categories: Renaissance and Baroque bronzes, Old Master paintings, Modern Masters and contemporary artists. Tu-Sa noon-6 pm. J16 Hirschl & Adler Modern C0L534Fuller Building, 41 E. 57th St., 9th fl., at Madison Ave., 212.535.8810. hirschlandadler.com. Established and emerging realist artists and American and European art from the Postwar period. Thru June 7: “Honoré Sharrer: Claws Clothed in Velvet.” Tu-F 9:30 am-5:15 pm, Sa 9:30 am-4:45 pm. G12

Lévy Gorvy C0L453909 Madison Ave., at E. 73rd St., 212.772.2004. levygorvy.com. Artists represented include Gunther Uecker, Pierre Soulages and Pat Steir, as well as the estates of Yves Klein and Germaine Richier. Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm. F10 Luxembourg & Dayan C0L43964 E. 77th St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.452.4646. luxembourgday an.com. Works by artists such as Enrico Baj and César. May 3-July 3: “Irma Blank: Painting Between the Lines.” Tu-Sa 10 am-5 pm. F10 Richard Gray Gallery New York C0L1 8154 018 Madison Ave., 4th fl., btw E. 78th & E. 79th sts., 212.472.8787. richardgraygallery.com. Paintings, sculpture and drawings by modern and contemporary European and American masters. Thru June 29: “Ewan Gibbs: New York / Chicago.” M-F 10 am-5 pm, Sa by appointment. F10 Ryan Lee 515 W. 26th St., 3rd fl., btw 10th & 11th aves., 212.397.0742. ryanleegallery.com. International contemporary artists. May 16– June 15: “George Miyasaki: Abstract Expressionist California: Paintings and Lithographs, 1955–61.” Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm. J16 Ulterior Gallery C0L251 346 72 Attorney St., btw Houston & Stanton sts., 917.472.7784. ulteriorgallery.com. An intergenerational array of artists of diverse cultures and backgrounds. Thru May 26: “Margaret Meehan: Bare teeth. Grow wings.” Th-Su noon-6 pm. C19 Yossi Milo Gallery C0L25346245 10th Ave., btw W. 24th & W. 25th sts., 212.414.0370. yossimilo.com. Contemporary art in all disciplines, with a specialty in photo-based art, video and works on paper. May 2–June 22: “Meghann Riepenhoff: Ecotone.” Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm. J16

INNEWYORK.COM | MAY-JUNE 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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transportation+tours FOR MORE ON WHAT TO DO, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 36-38).

Long Island Rail Road mta.info/lirr. Operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week (including all public and religious holidays), taking visitors from Penn Station or Jamaica, Queens, to destinations throughout Long Island. For pricing and schedules, go online or call 511 and say “LIRR” at any time. I15

TRANSPORTATION

Metro-North Railroad C0L58 18 9 E. 42nd St., btw Lexington & Vanderbilt aves., 212.532.4900. mta .info/mnr. Commuter trains operate from Grand Central Terminal to 120 stations throughout seven counties in New York State. F14

Amtrak C0LPenn Station, Eighth Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 800.872.7245. amtrak.com. Guests travel in comfort on these passenger trains, stopping at stations throughout the United States and Canada. I15 Empire Limousine 2 21. 12.537.9304. empirelim ousine.net. Professional chauffeurs take passengers to and from airports in the tristate region, as well as to parties, proms, casinos, weddings and family celebrations. Nights on the town are a specialty. Grand Central Terminal C0L45789 E. 42nd St., btw Lexington & Vanderbilt aves., 212.340.2583. grandcentralterminal.com. The majestic transportation hub, now more than 100 years old and beautifully restored, houses more than 65 shops and 35 restaurants. Tours of the landmark are offered daily. F14

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IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

NJ TRANSIT 973.275.5555. njtransit.com. NJ Transportation to Newark Liberty International Airport, MetLife Stadium, Prudential Center, the Jersey Shore and more. Buy tickets in advance with NJ Transit’s Mobile App. NYC Ferry ferry.nyc. Ferry service offered along the East River to and from Lower Manhattan and Midtown and parts of Brooklyn and Queens. Adult one-way ticket, $2.75. Penn Station Eighth Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 212.630.6401. amtrak.com. Subways converge with commuter rail and bus services to New Jersey and Long Island and national rail services. I15

TOURS Big Bus Tours 212.685.8687. bigbustours.com. Visitors can see NYC’s most famous attractions, including the Empire State Building and the Statue of Liberty, on this bus service, which offers fixed loops and hop-on, hop-off tours with 30 stops. Times/prices vary. Broadway Up Close Walking Tours C0L46589 7 17.841.0187. broadwayupclose.com. Visitors go behind the scenes on one-hour-and-45-minute excursions into the Great White Way’s colorful past (ghostly and otherwise) and present. Dates/times/ meeting locations/prices vary. Circle Line Sightseeing Cruises C0L48P 27 ier 83, W. 42nd St., at the Hudson River, 212.563.3200. circleline42.com. Day and night tours around the island of Manhattan, including the Best of NYC Tour, a two-and-a-half-hour guided tour that circumnavigates Manhattan Island. Times/ prices vary. K14 Ghosts of New York Walking Tour C0L4652 87 02.780.7169. ghostsofny.com. Guides take visitors in search of the city’s ghostly spirits on tours such as “Edgar Allan Poe Spook” and “Phantom Pub Crawl Starring Harry Houdini.” Dates/times/prices vary.

PHOTO: HAPPY HOUR CRUISE DEPARTING FROM NORTH COVE ON YACHT FULL MOON, COURTESY CLASSIC HARBOR LINE

Classic Harbor Line 212.627.1825. sail-nyc .com. Luxury yachts and schooners offer views of New York Harbor and the skyline. Wine tastings, happy hour and brunch sails, architecture tours, and sunset and music cruises offered. Times/prices vary.


Green-Wood Cemetery Guided Tour C0L45725th St. & Fifth Ave., Greenwood Heights, Brooklyn, 718.768.7300. green-wood.com/toursevents. Visitors can learn about the landmark’s history and landscaped 478 acres on a two-hour guided trolley tour every W and Su at 1 pm. $20. Harlem Spirituals Gospel and Jazz Tours C0L5839690 Eighth Ave., 1st fl., btw W. 43rd & W. 44th sts., 212.391.0900. harlemspirituals.com. Visitors experience informative sightseeing tours that showcase Harlem’s rich cultural diversity and world-famous sites and attractions centered around gospel and jazz music. Some tours include brunch or lunch. Dates/times vary. I14 Liberty Helicopters C0L58426 East River Bikeway, 800.542.9933. libertyhelicopter.com. Passengers enjoy sweeping views of NYC. Flights last 12 to 20 minutes, soaring past the city’s most popular sights. Times/prices vary. E23 Madison Square Garden All-Access Tour C0L64589Seventh Ave., btw W., 31st & W. 33rd sts., 866.858.0007. msg.com/tours. This tour of the famous sports and entertainment arena takes visitors on an exploration of the totally revamped and modernized venue. Daily 9:30 am-3 pm, departing about every 30 minutes, with tours lasting approximately 75 minutes. $33 adults, $28 seniors/students/children 12 and under. H15 Merrily Kerr New York Art Tours C0L3751 877.839.4926. newyorkarttours.com. The city’s vibrant art and architecture scene is revealed on scheduled group tours—and customized private tours—led by a professional art critic through Chelsea, the Lower East Side, local museums and more. Dates/prices vary. Municipal Art Society of New York Tours C0L584212.935.3960. mas.org. These walking tours are architectural forays through NYC’s neighborhoods, historic districts, landmark buildings and street life. Dates/times vary. A daily 75-minute tour of Grand Central Terminal is offered at 12:30 pm. $30 adults, $20 seniors/ students, children under 10 and military.

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NYC Discovery 17 212.465.3331. Dozens of guided walks, including food and drink-oriented tavern tours, and art history and movie site tours. Private tours also available. Dates/times/ prices/meeting points vary. Radio City Stage Door Tour C0L512For tickets, visit the Radio City Sweets & Gifts Shop, 1260 Sixth Ave., at W. 50th St., 866.858.0007. radiocity.com/ tours. Radio City Music Hall’s secrets are revealed on a guided walking tour that explores the venue’s Art Deco interiors and introduces visitors to one of the iconic Rockettes. Daily 9:30 am-5 pm. $30 adults, $26 students/seniors (65+). G13 Watson Adventures Scavenger Hunts C0L5872877.946.4868. watsonadventures.com. These scavenger hunts—private or public, adults-only or family-friendly—are staged in some of the city’s top neighborhoods and attractions, such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Grand Central Terminal, the American Museum of Natural History and Central Park. Dates/times/ prices/meeting points vary.

EMPIRECLS.COM | 800-451-5466 | @EMPIRECLS

INNEWYORK.COM | MAY-JUNE 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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PARK

137 St

1

125 St

Claremont Ave

Riverside Dr

Henry Hudson Pkwy

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1

New-York Historical Society The

Delacorte Theater

Loeb Boathouse

CENTRAL PARK The Great Lawn

85th St Transverse

4•5•6

125 St

E 127 St

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The Met Breuer

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Jewish Museum Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Guggenheim Museum

110 St

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86 St

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C•E Gray Line New York Sightseeing

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Circle Line Sightseeing 42nd St W 42 St World Yacht Dining Cruises W 40 St NY Waterway Commuter Ferry CitySightseeing Cruises

Pier 84 Taxi West 44th St

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Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum

W 53 St

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DEWITT CLINTON PARK

W 55 St

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American Folk Art Museum

Lincoln Center

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W 60 St

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New-York Historical Society

First Ave

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PROMOTION

IN Places to Go THIS MONTH’S TOP PICKS FOR SHOPPING, ATTRACTIONS AND MORE

Pretty Woman: The Musical

Paname French Restaurant

One of the biggest rom-coms of the ‘90s is now a “BIG, HUGE” Broadway hit! “Pretty Woman: The Musical” is a theatrical take on a love story for the ages. In this modern update on Cinderella, a prostitute and a wealthy businessman fall in love, forming an unlikely pair. Experience iconic moments from the movie—and get to know these characters in a whole new way. Nederlander Theatre, 208 W. 41st St., 877.250.2929, www.PrettyWomanTheMusical.com

Paname, a French nickname for Paris, offers French cuisine and weekend brunch in a sophisticated but charming neighborhood bistro. Located in Midtown East, Paname serves artfully presented classic and contemporary menu items, including baby octopus, escargot, boudin noir and bouillabaisse. Come in for a prix fixe lunch with three courses for $26, or dinner with three courses for $43. 1068 Second Ave., 212.207.3737, www.panamenyc.com

Lexington Candy Shop Established in 1925 in the heart of Manhattan’s Upper East Side, Lexington Candy Shop, the authentic NYC luncheonette, is just three blocks from the Metropolitan Museum. The family-owned diner has been serving all-day breakfast, milkshakes, sandwiches and burgers for three generations. Newsday calls this joint a “New York City landmark.” Open MonFri 7 am to 7 pm, Sat 8 am to 7 pm, Sun 8 am to 6 pm. 1226 Lexington Ave. (@83rd St.), 212.288.0057, www.lexingtoncandyshop.net

Patsy’s Italian Restaurant

Patsy’s, a celebrity favorite since 1944, was Frank Sinatra’s choice when in New York. Just steps from Carnegie Hall, this fourth-generation, family-owned and operated restaurant provides generous portions and a family-friendly atmosphere that feels like home. Patsy’s signature award-winning sauces, as well as artisanal pastas, are available at Patsy’s only location and better grocers nationwide. 236 W. 56th St., 212.247.3491, www.patsys.com

The Frick Collection Since 1935, the Frick has been one of NYC’s cultural treasures. Located on the Upper East Side, the Frick is known for its distinguished old master paintings and outstanding examples of European sculpture and decorative arts. Along with special exhibitions and concert series, the Frick offers a wide range of educational programs. Come enjoy paintings by Bellini, Goya, Rembrandt, Renoir, Turner and many others. Children under 10 not admitted. 1 E. 70th St., 212.288.0700, www.frick.org


JUNE-JULY ’19 HIGHLIGHTS

30

JULY

NYC Pride March Kick off: Fifth Ave. & 26th St., 2019-worldpride-stonewall50 .nycpride.org

4

Macy’s 4th of July Fireworks East River, btw E. 24th & E. 41st sts., macys.com/social/fireworks

JULY

JUNE

2

Criss Angel on Broadway (thru July 7) Lunt-Fontanne Theatre, inresidenceon broadway.com

15

Jazz Age Lawn Party (also June 16) Governors Island, jazzagelawnparty.com

JUNE

JUNE

20 40

Soho International Film Festival (thru June 27), Village East Cinemas, sohofilmfest.com

22

JULY

Mermaid Parade Kick off: Surf Ave. & W. 21st St., Coney Island, Brooklyn, coneyisland.com

IN NEW YORK | MAY-JUNE 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

8

JULY

French Restaurant Week (thru July 21), various establishments, frenchrestaurantweek.com

16

“Coriolanus” (thru Aug. 11), Delacorte Theater, Central Park, publictheater.org

PHOTOS: JAZZ AGE LAWN PARTY, FILIP WOLAK; 2018 NYC PRIDE MARCH, ALEXANDRE ROTENBERG/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; MACY’S 4TH OF JULY FIREWORKS, KENT MILLER STUDIOS–MACY’S, INC.; CRISS ANGEL, JERRY METELLUS

JUNE

sneak peek


St. James Theatre, 44th Street & 8th Avenue

Minskoff Theatre, Broadway & 45th Street

New Amsterdam Theatre, Broadway & 42nd Street

Great Seats Available at DisneyOnBroadway.com

©Disney

T H E H I T B R O A D W AY M U S I C A L


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IN New York - May-June 2019  

IN New York - May-June 2019  

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