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NEW YORK ALL’S FAIR THE ABSOLUTE BEST ART SHOWS AROUND TOWN BROADWAY BOUND? 14 MILLION PEOPLE CAN’T BE WRONG

ADAM

DRIVER BURNS DOWN THE HOUSE

MARCH 2019 INNEWYORK.COM


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MARCH 2019 CONTENT

28 departments 4

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SKYLINE Big happenings around town

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FOOTLIGHTS Theater news

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FLAVOR OF THE MONTH Hot trends in dining

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NIGHT SPOTS The after-dark scene

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OUT & ABOUT Events around the city with our favorite hotel people

features 10

50 Shades of Pale

Adam Driver takes on Pale, one of Broadway’s most defiant characters, in “Burn This.”

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March Madness

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On the Cover Want to know why Adam Driver intimidated fellow students at Juilliard? See p. 10.

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If you are looking for the finest art shows in town, don’t bother going anywhere else but here.

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Census & Sensibility

Broadway audiences: a close look.

COVER PHOTO: MARY ELLEN MATTHEWS/CPI SYNDICATION

listings 20

ENTERTAINMENT

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DINING+DRINKING

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SHOPS+SERVICES

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MUSEUMS+ATTRACTIONS

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GALLERIES+ANTIQUES

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TRANSPORTATION+TOURS

information 36 40

NYC STREET MAP SNEAK PEEK: Special dates of note in April

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T H E H I T B R O A D W AY M U S I C A L


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HOT HAPPENINGS AROUND TOWN by Francis Lewis

The Brant Foundation opens its East Village space with a retrospective of masterworks by Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960–1988). “Basquiat has been a cornerstone of the East Village art scene for decades,” says Brant Foundation founder Peter M. Brant, “and to bring his work back to the neighborhood that inspired it is a great privilege.” | brantfoundation.org, thru May 15

IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

PHOTOS: JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT, “IN ITALIAN,” 1983, COURTESY THE BRANT FOUNDATION, GREENWICH, CT, ©ESTATE OF JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT, LICENSED BY ARTESTAR, NEW YORK; SNARKITECTURE PARTNERS ALEX MUSTONEN, DANIEL ARSHAM AND BEN PORTO, NOAH KALINA, COURTESY SNARK PARK; BYRON TITTLE OF DORRANCE DANCE, MATTHEW MURPHY; ELTON JOHN, KEVIN MAZUR / GETTY IMAGES FOR ROCKET ENTERTAINMENT; MACY’S FLOWER SHOW, BARRY FIDNICK FOR MACY’S INC.

March skyline


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(THRU MARCH 30) Movement becomes music when the tap-dancing feet of New York-based Dorrance Dance make a big, bold and beautiful noise at New York City Center. nycitycenter.org

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Men in Black (and White)

(THRU AUGUST 2019) Alex Mustonen, Daniel Arsham and Ben Porto (above, left to right) are the creators of Snark Park, the new exhibition space at Hudson Yards, and its inaugural installation, “Lost and Found,” an immersive labyrinthine environment. snarkpark.com

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(THRU APRIL 7) Spring has sprung, and the 2019 flower show at Macy’s Herald Square blasts off on a floral-inspired journey to outer space. macys.com/flowershow

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(ALSO MARCH 6, 8 & 9) Elton John is on his worldwide farewell tour, and New York gets to say its goodbyes at Madison Square Garden in Manhattan and Barclays Center in Brooklyn. msg.com; barclayscenter.com

INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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footlights

Made in Detroit

Cut to the Chase ”Everything for me starts with the text,” says Will Chase, speaking of “Kiss Me, Kate,” the Broadway revival of the Cole Porter musical comedy from 1949 in which he plays not one but two roles. As Fred Graham, he’s the star, director and producer of a musical

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version of Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew.” As Petruchio in the show within the show, he’s the misogynist who’s “come to wive it wealthily in Padua.” How does Chase differentiate between the bravado and machismo of Petruchio and the actor portraying him? For that, he went outside the text and the world of the theater to the movies. “Oddly, I looked to Errol Flynn. In my thinking, Fred would want to look like Flynn. I know most Fred/Petruchios in the past have had a mustache and goatee. But I’m going with a little skinny mustache. Flynn had an ease when he walked into a room. I want to do that with Fred. Petruchio takes over the stage, but Fred is looser, a little more—and I hate this word—likable.” | Studio 54, 254 W. 54th St., 212,719.1300

IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

Writing the book for the new Broadway musical “Ain’t Too Proud—The LIfe and Times of The Temptations” was a labor of love for Dominique Morisseau. “I feel connected to The Temptations because [like them] I grew up in Detroit,” she says. “They were my mother and father’s favorite group, and my family has all these beautiful memories that I get to resurrect.” As to the story of the legendary Motown R&B group, Morisseau believes that there is no better time to tell it than now. “They came up in the ’60s with all the political activism and civil unrest going around, and we’re so there now. We are in the next ’60s. I think that watching a story of how these young men found their identity, achieved their desires, followed their dreams and were true to themselves with all that social change happening is going to really resonate with people. It’s the perfect human story.” Morisseau also wants audiences to appreciate The Temptations as artists, not just entertainers. “I hope [the show] gives a deeper insight into what it took to make their music. It costs so much to make art.” | Imperial Theatre, 249 W. 45th St., 212.239.6200

PHOTOS: “AIN’T TOO PROUD—THE LIFE AND TIMES OF THE TEMPTATIONS,” JOEL DOCKENDORF; SIMON RUSSELL BEALE, BEN MILES AND ADAM GODLEY IN “THE LEHMAN TRILOGY,” MARK DOUET

THEATER NEWS by Francis Lewis


Rise and Fall of a Dynasty The American Dream became a nightmare for the real-life family at the center of “The Lehman Trilogy,” written by Stefano Massini and adapted into English by Ben Power. Emigrating from Bavaria in the 1840s, the Lehman brothers achieved wealth beyond imagination, but in 2008 the firm they founded filed for bankruptcy, sparking a global financial crisis. How could it have happened? Find out at the Park Avenue Armory, where Simon Russell Beale, Ben Miles and Adam Godley (above, left to right) star as the brothers, their sons and grandsons. | Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Ave., 212.616.3930, March 22–April 30

INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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flavor of the month

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WHAT’S TRENDING ON THE FOODIE SCENE by Lois Levine

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4 THE FOUR SEASONS RESTAURANT (42 E. 49th St., 212.754.9494), an early example of rarefied city dining when it first opened in 1959, has reestablished itself in a new location, just as haute and elegant as the original. A sunken glass and gold leaf bar, and hand-painted beaded window treatments play to an ambience both serene and lush, appropriate for a menu that includes dishes such as chateaubriand, farmhouse duck and classic dessert soufflé. Chef/restaurateur Daniel Boulud also knows a thing or two about haute (his restaurants have won numerous awards, both in NYC and around the world), and there may be no better example of his talent for turning something simple into sumptuous as his Grapefruit

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

Givré dessert at Boulud Sud (20 W. 64th St., 212.595.1313), a wondrous mix of grapefruit, shredded halva and sweet jam . If you prefer something a bit more relaxed but still heavily soughtafter, try “Iron Chef” Masaharu Morimoto’s casual Momosan Ramen & Sake (342 Lexington Ave., 646.201.5529), a tightly spaced, perennially packed slice of gastronomic heaven for devout ramen seekers. And, keeping to the topic of all things Asian, Hachibei (238 E. 53rd St., 212.888.8003) has reformatted its menu with a focus on eel, a Japanese delicacy that you can enjoy by choosing an Unaju Set (whole grilled eel atop rice with clear soup and garnishes). But don’t even try to get the recipe for the secret sauce.

PHOTOS: THE FOUR SEASONS BAR, FERNANDO GUERRA; HACHIBEI INTERIOR, LILY BROWN; BOULUD SUD, P. WAGTOUICZ

1. The bar area of The Four Seasons 2. Grapefruit Givré at Boulud Sud 3. Dumplings at Momosan 4. The interior of Hachibei


PHOTOS: PLAYBOY CLUB HONEY RIDER COCKTAIL, STEVEN GOMILLION; VALERIE DINING ROOM, LIZ CLAYMAN; HARLEM HOPS INTERIOR, SABRINA THOMPSON FOR KUU PHOTOGRAPHY

night spots

THE AFTER-DARK SCENE by Daniel Fridman

Valerie

Midtown’s newest swanky venue is dynamic. It’s a cocktail lounge that specializes in gin and stays open nightly until 2 am; it’s a bi-level restaurant serving bistro-fare that caters to brunch-loving visitors staying at nearby hotels; it’s the elevated Midtown lunch-and-happyhour spot that the surrounding blocks’ nine-to-fivers in search of a go-to haunt have been yearning for. And best of all for travelers and commuting locals alike: It’s about equidistant from Grand Central Terminal, Penn Station and Port Authority Bus Terminal. 45 W. 45th St., 212.302.4545

Playboy Club New York

Annual memberships for the newest Playboy venue in the U.S.—a resurrection of the iconic Playboy Club New York which closed in 1987—range between $5,000 and $100,000, but guests are welcome nightly to experience the club’s fine dining and specialty cocktail program, presented, of course, by the club’s “Bunnies.” Themed nights at this new Hell’s Kitchen commodity include the Playboy Masquerade Ball and Hef’s Haunted Mansion. 512 W. 42nd St., 212.644.8227

Harlem Hops

Craft beer has found a home in Harlem, thanks to three Harlemites who decided summer 2018 was the right time to open the first allAfrican-American-owned craft beer emporium in the burgeoning neighborhood. Kevin Bradford, Stacey Lee and Kim Harris curate a regularly rotating menu of specialty craft brews that include 16 draft kegs, 18 cans and three bottles, alongside a food menu featuring four varietals each of spicy guma pies (hearty, tortilla wrapped pies filled with meats or veggies and spices) and housemade bratwursts. 2268 Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd., 646.998.3444. INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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50

shades of pale

BY ANY OTHER NAME, Adam Driver’s character Pale in Lanford Wilson’s “Burn This” would be Stanley Kowalski, which was played with the brute force of an unbridled Marlon Brando, both on Broadway and on film. Slightly upgraded from Kowalski’s blue-collar status, Pale manages a restaurant in Montclair, New Jersey, but without any hint of manners or

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

Adam Driver Heats up Broadway as a man named Pale in Lanford Wilson’s play “Burn This.” By Harry Haun

professional decorum. He snorts cocaine, spews profanities, launches into brandy-fueled diatribes about parking spots or expensive shoes that pinch the feet—in general, threatening to incinerate all who cross his path. But that’s how Pale grieves. He just lost a brother in a bizarre boating accident and winds up finding more than solace in Anna (played by Keri Russell), his dead brother’s friend and roommate. Voilá! Suddenly, “Burn This” (playing at Broadway’s Hudson Theatre March 15 thru July 14) is a love story. To negotiate the extremes of this character isn’t easy. But actor Adam Driver, who first captured the public’s attention as Lena Dunham’s boyfriend Adam Sackler on the hit HBO show “Girls, plays the sexy, semi-sinister Pale well. Born Nov. 19, 1983, in San Diego, a genetic mix of Arkansas (dad) and Indiana (mom), he was a Baptist choirboy who, inspired by the film of the same name, co-founded Mishawaka, Indiana’s own (and only) “Fight Club.” The tragedy of 9/11 turned him into a Marine, and he put in two years assigned to the First Battalion Weapons Company before being medically discharged for a mountain-biking mishap. Driver took jobs as a vacuum-cleaner salesman and telemarketer, but was always interested in acting, landing at The Juilliard School in 2005. At first, classmates were standoffish, finding him more intimidating and severe than he really was. That was the Marine training. “I was used to talking in a different way. We were in the military. Stakes were high, and we needed the information fast. I wasn’t used to civilian ways,” he observes. But that worked for his big role there: Enter Pale, round one. “‘Burn This’” is always the play that I learned about at Juilliard,” he says. “I’d always known of Lanford [Wilson]’s work, and I loved this play in particular. Pale is pretty singular. He’s not reflective. He’s very much at the front of your feet at all times. He’s somebody you can constantly mine stuff out of—just this idea of an unexpected loss and not having the ability to articulate it or find comfort in someone who’s a complete stranger to you and couldn’t be more oppo-


PHOTOS: ADAM DRIVER, SHUTTERSTOCK; KERI RUSSELL AND ADAM DRIVER IN “BURN THIS,” DANIELLE LEVITT

site. You two have a loss in common and can’t articulate it. I love that aspect of the play.” Driver graduated in 2009, but got more than a degree out of Juilliard. He got a wife, Joanne Tucker (they married in June 2013). They’ve co-starred a few times as well, including a couple of movies: 2012’s “Gayby” and “The Report,” which is scheduled for release later this year. In 2016, director Jim Jarmusch capitalized on Driver’s contradictions by casting him in the movie “Paterson,” a film about a bus driver who writes poetry. Driver also nabbed Golden Globe and Oscar nominations this year for his role in Spike Lee’s “BlacKkKlansman.” Four other Driver films will also be vying for your movie dollars in 2019: “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” from Monty Python’s Terry Gilliam; a yet-to-be-titled Noah Baumbach project; “The Dead Don’t Die” by Jarmusch; and Driver’s third foray into “Star Wars.” Critics of “Star Wars” installments VII (“The Force Awakens”) and VIII (“The Last Jedi”) have called Driver “gorgeously cruel, spiteful and capricious” in the role and ranked his menacing creation “among cinema’s most fascinating human monsters.” Running alongside these high-profile, big-buck projects for Driver is the nonprofit he founded, Arts in the Armed Forces (AITAF), which brings theater to all branches of the military. “It’s nuts that we just had our 10th anniversary. When it first went up, we had enough to do basically one performance a year. This past year, we did 12, and we already have 15 on the books for next year,” he notes. “My wife and I kinda take a repertoire of great contemporary American plays that have

nothing necessarily to do with the military—things like ‘Fences’ or ‘Lobby Hero’—and we travel to different military bases around the country and around the world. We just did a ‘True West’ [reading] on Broadway in honor of Veterans Day. That’s the one New York performance we do.” Driver also created the AITAF Bridge Award, a $10,000 grant passed out annually to an amateur playwright who has served in the U.S. military. Winning entries are chosen by Pulitzer Prize winners Suzan-Lori Parks and Tony Kushner. When they’re not circling the globe doing theater or film, the Drivers live in Brooklyn Heights with their dog, Moose (a Rottweiler-Pitbull mix, naturally enough). “I really love this neighborhood,” Driver confesses. “There’s a place in Brooklyn called the Brooklyn Women’s Exchange that I always enjoy going to. You can get a bunch of wrapping paper—not that I’m a wrapping-paper aficionado, but they have a lot of things there that I really like. Then, there’s this coffee shop called Two for the Pot, run by this guy named John, and it has the best coffee that I’ve ever had in New York. Restaurant-wise, Noodle Pudding in our neighborhood is really good.” Driver seems to have at last accepted himself as a New Yorker. “When I first got here, the natives were, like, ‘Oh, you can’t be a New Yorker till you’ve been here 10 years.’ Then, when I got to the ten-year mark, they were saying, ‘Oh, you’re not a New Yorker till you’ve been here 15 years.’ Well, I’m here, and I very much consider this home.” And where does he most like to hang out? Like a true, new New Yorker: “My home.”

Keri Russell and Adam Driver in “Burn This”

IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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March madness Major art fairs descend on Manhattan. Here are the highlights. By Terry Trucco 12

IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM


PHOTO: KÖNIG GALERIE BOOTH, FEATURING WORKS BY GALLERY ARTISTS ELMGREEN & DRAGSET, AT THE ARMORY SHOW 2018, TEDDY WOLFF

The Armory Show welcomes galleries and art lovers from around the world.

THE MONTH that signals the arrival of the NCAA men’s basketball championships, the St. Patrick’s Day Parade—and spring—also ushers in a heady lineup of major fairs devoted to art, rare books and design. So, clear the calendar, grab a sturdy pair of walking shoes (and a credit card) and make a beeline for an art fair. The festivities start with The Art Show (643 Park Ave., artdealers.org), Feb. 28–March 3. For its 31st year, 72 members of the prestigious Art Dealers Association of America set up shop at the Park Avenue Armory, presenting topflight solo, dual and group exhibitions curated especially for the show. It’s the ultimate gallery crawl under one breathtaking Gothic Revival roof. Nearly half the exhibitions are solo shows, many featuring seldom-seen showpieces like the realist paintings of Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859–1937), the first African-American painter to gain international acclaim, at Michael Rosenfeld Gallery. Look for a bracing dialogue between gimlet-eyed 20th-century portrait artists Diane Arbus and Alice Neel orchestrated by Fraenkel Gallery and David Zwirner. Newly minted art abounds, including moody abstract paintings by Sam Moyer at Sean Kelly and witty work by New Yorker illustrator Maira Kalman inspired by Gertrude Stein’s “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas” at Julie Saul Gallery. And yes, women artists are having a moment at this year’s show. In addition to showcasing 20th- and 21st-century art from an impressive lineup of international galleries, this year’s Armory Show celebrates its 25th anniversary March 7–10 at Piers 92 and 94 (711 12th Ave., thearmo ryshow.com). A bona fide behemoth, the Armory Show encompasses a mind-blowing 194 galleries from 33 countries. Expect attention-grabbing offerings like a restaging of Robert Morris’ cerebral “Finch College Project” from 1969 at Castelli Gallery, rarely seen work by 20th-century Surrealist artist and poet Dorothea Tanning at Alison Jacques Gallery and numerous group shows showcasing work by women artists of multiple generations. Art on Paper at Pier 36 (299 South St., thepaperfair .com), March 7–10, is proof positive that paper is much more than a backdrop for pencil drawings. Consider Jaq Belcher’s “Transit,” a meticulously choreographed blizzard of 8,355 precision cuts on white paper at Heather Gaudio Fine Art. Or Jose Toirac’s disquieting sepia drawing “Larga Vida Breve,” its near life-size subject shrouded with delicate flecks of gold leaf at Pan American Art Projects. As the show’s 85 exhibitors demonstrate, works on paper embrace nearly anything that’s paper-based—collage, painting and photography as well as lithographs by masters like Roy Lichtenstein and Jasper Johns, 19thcentury Japanese woodcuts and classic studies for paintings and sculptures. And, of course, pencil drawings. Alexandra Roozen’s intricate trompe l’oeil renderings at NL=US give pencil and paper a contemporary spin. For bibliophiles and history buffs, the grandest works on paper are rare books. With its proven ability to attract IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

their visit. Expect to see museum-quality work of all periods from India, the Himalayas, Southeast Asia, China, Korea and Japan. Among the eye-catching examples are a rare Tang Dynasty glazed stoneware pillow of a lion devouring its prey from Littleton & Hennessy Asian Art and an oddly cuddly-looking volcanic stone rendering of Kubera, Hindu mythology’s Lord of Wealth, from Buddhist Art. And don’t miss the stylish 18th-century suit of samurai armor from Giuseppe Piva Japanese Art. What kind of house do you want to come home to after a long day? The vast Architectural Digest Design Show at Piers 92 and 94 (711 12th Ave., addesignshow .com) brims with enticing ideas March 21–24. Observing its 18th year, the show addresses every aspect of renovation and home decor. Browse displays of the latest traditional and contemporary furniture, lighting, rugs and textiles. Check out handcrafted woodwork, ceramics, glassware and textiles, including one of a kinds. And bask in the attention lavished on kitchens and baths. You’ll see new products wherever you look, like vanities pairing oak and handcrafted concrete from Native Trails, a maker of eco-friendly products. Also innovative: a line of selfadhesive wall murals inspired by American artists like Julian Schnabel and Jean-Michel Basquiat from Tempaper, a maker of removable wallpaper. So give a cheer that it’s March—and head for a fair.

PHOTOS: ROBERT BECHTLE, “THREE HOUSES ON PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE,” 2011, COLOR SOFT GROUND ETCHING WITH AQUATINT, EDITION 40, PUBLISHED BY CROWN POINT PRESS AND PRINTED BY IANNE KHORLIE, COURTESY CROWN POINT PRESS; A RARE AND DISTINGUISHED IMAGE OF AVALOKITESHVARA, CHINA, 18TH CENTURY, QING DYNASTY, KANGXI STYLE, COURTESY KAPOOR GALLERIES; ZOE BIOS SMOKEY ABSTRACT FOR TEMPAPER, COURTESY ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST DESIGN SHOW; PIERRE MAC ORLAN, “LA DANSE MACABRE,” 1927, WITH 20 ART DECO WATERCOLORS BY YAN B. DYL REPRODUCED IN POUCHOIR, FIRST EDITION, FIRST PRINTING, LIMITED TO 325 COPIES, COURTESY ARTHUR FOURNIER

top-notch dealers, the New York Antiquarian Book Fair at the Park Avenue Armory (643 Park Ave., nyantiquari anbookfair.com), March 7 through 10, has showered book lovers with first editions, maps, manuscripts and ephemera for 59 years. A candidate for this year’s most gorgeous rarity is a 17th-century Japanese illustrated manuscript, whose exquisite colored paintings depict the adventures of a 12th-century samurai, from Jonathan A. Hill Bookseller. A rare catalog featuring 56 examples of tapa cloth collected during the three Pacific voyages of Captain James Cook from Hordern House should get history lovers’ blood pumping. And offering a tech-free respite from video games is the “Mansion of Happiness,” a first edition children’s board game from 1843 designed to teach Christian morality in an entertaining way from Steffen Völkel Rare Books. As the world’s largest continent, it’s fitting that Asia gets its own festival of art and culture. Celebrating its 10th year, Asia Week (asiaweekny.com), March 13–23, unfurls under numerous roofs and encompasses six auction houses, galleries showcasing work from 48 top-tier international dealers and shows at 16 New York and surrounding area cultural institutions. Given the festival’s complex nature, Asia Week Chairman Christina PrescottWalker suggests visitors consult the Asia Week website or pick up a copy of the printed guide at participants to plan


Facing page: A Robert Bechtle etching with aquatint at The Art Show. This page, clockwise from above: A rare image of Avalokiteshvara from China shown during Asia Week; artist-inspired Tempaper wallpaper at the Architectural Digest Design Show; a first edition, first printing of “La Danse Macabre� from 1927 at the New York Antiquarian Book Fair.

IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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13.8

MILLION ADMISSIONS TO BROADWAY SHOWS

Experiencing “Aladdin” on Broadway will turn a kid into a theatergoer for life.

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM


BROADWAY

census & sensibility

PHOTO: MICHAEL JAMES SCOTT AS GENIE, AINSLEY MELHAM AS ALADDIN AND COMPANY IN “ALADDIN,” DEEN VAN MEER

c is L e w is n a r F y B . h erse bunc iv d a e r a P la y g o e r s AVERAGE AGE OF THEATERGOER:

Oscar Hammerstein II had a way with words. In 1953, the lyricist collaborated with composer Richard Rodgers on “Me and Juliet,” a big Broadway musical about (what else but?) a big Broadway musical. In it, he described a theater audience as a “big black giant who looks and listens with thousands of eyes and ears … and ev’ry night the mixture’s diff’rent, altho’ it may look the same.” Ponder Hammerstein’s words the next time you take your seat in one of Broadway’s 41 theaters. Just who is the person sitting next to, in front of and behind you? Come to think of it, who are you? The Broadway League’s most recent demographics report, “The Demographics of the Broadway Audience 2017– 2018,” can clue you in. First off, more than half of all playgoers in the survey—63 percent of the 13.8 million attendees at a Broadway show, to be precise—were people just like you:

visitors to the city. Fortyeight percent came from the United States (excluding NYC and its suburbs) and 15 percent of them from abroad. What might an out-oftowner choose to see? Something grand and emotionally engaging. Something that epitomizes the glitz and glamour of the Broadway experience. Something like “The Phantom of the Opera,” now in its mind-boggling 32nd year on the Great White Way. The razzle-dazzle of “Chicago” has no language barrier, while “Wicked,” another long-running crowd-pleaser, offers spectacle to spare and showstopping songs that rattle the rafters. With an average age of 40.6, audiences skewed 65 percent female that season. Since seven musicals currently on the boards put strong female protagonists squarely in the spotlight, it’s not hard to see why these shows strike a chord with this group in the #MeToo, Time’s Up era.

40.6

IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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OF THEATERGOERS 25 AND OLDER

81% COMPLETED COLLEGE

41% Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird” is now a bona fide Broadway hit.

EARNED GRADUATE DEGREES

“Wicked” continues to cast its spell and defy gravity on Broadway.

63%

O OF BR

ET Y TICK A W D A

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WERE SOLD TO TOURISTS


O A REC

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2.1

MILLION CHILDREN AND TEENS SAW A BROADWAY SHOW

66% OF AUDIENCES WERE FEMALE “Anastasia” plays its final Broadway performance on March 31.

PHOTOS: JEFF DANIELS AND GBENGA AKINNAGBE IN “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD,” JULIETA CERVANTES; WILL ROLAND AND COMPANY IN “BE MORE CHILL,” MARIA BARANOVA; CHRISTY ALTOMARE AND CODY SIMPSON IN “ANASTASIA,” EVAN ZIMMERMAN / MURPHY MADE; JESSICA VOSK IN “WICKED,” JOAN MARCUS 2018

Calling all teenage geeks and nerds: “Be More Chill” is a show to see.

In the revival of “My Fair Lady,” an independent-minded Eliza Doolittle gets the best of chauvinistic Henry Higgins. Likewise the heroine of “King Kong” is no shrinking violet: When her captor roars, she roars back. In bio musicals, “Beautiful—The Carole King Musical” and “The Cher Show,” real-life female entertainers overcome obstacles to reach the top of their male-dominated profession. Sure, women still fall in and out of love onstage, but in “Anastasia,” “Pretty Woman: The Musical” and “Waitress,” they do so on their terms. No woman is the same person at the end of these shows as she is at curtain-up. And that kind of journey resonates with female audiences. Not surprisingly, audiences surveyed were educated, with 81 percent having completed college. To fuel their brain cells, there’s no dearth of dramatic food for thought on the boards. Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird,” voted the bestloved novel in the United States and a staple of syllabi from sea to shining sea, is one of the biggest hits, critically and commercially, this season. History and political science majors can debate “What the Constitution Means to Me,” while literature majors analyze “King Lear.” As to the latter, all majors should run not walk to see 82-year-old Glenda Jackson wear the pants and stride the stage as Shakespeare’s greatest tragic figure. Twenty-two years ago, the first “Harry Potter” book turned a generation of kids on to reading. “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child,” the play, is having a similar effect: It’s turning the young on to live theater. A record 2.1 million children and teens under 18 saw a Broadway show in 2017–2018. These are the audiences of the future, and Broadway knows how to nurture them. For a child’s first show, look no further than Disney’s “The Lion King,” “Aladdin” and “Frozen.” For high schoolers, a Golden Age has arrived. All the pertinent issues confronting them in life—social media, teenage angst, bullying, sexual identity—are explored entertainingly and compassionately in “Dear Evan Hansen,” “Be More Chill,” “Mean Girls” and “The Prom.” With a Broadway show for every demographic, it’s time to add your eyes and ears to Hammerstein’s “big black giant.” IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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entertainment

2

3

1 The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 36-38).

1 New York’s celebration of Irish heritage and pride, held this year on March 16, marches up Fifth Avenue, between 44th and 79th streets, from 11 am to 5 pm. | St. Patrick’s Day Parade, nycstpatricksparade .org 2 The vocal, instrumental and dance ensemble, dedicated to French Baroque music, performs two of Jean-Philippe Rameau’s rarely seen opera-ballets. | Les Arts Florissants, p. 25 3 “Live From Here” with mandolinist Chris Thile, a concert exploring the Scottish and Irish roots of American bluegrass, opens “Migrations: The Making of America,” a five-week citywide festival. | Carnegie Hall, p. 25

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

BROADWAY OPENINGS Ain’t Too Proud—The Life and Times of The Temptations Imperial Theatre, 249 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. ainttooproudmusical.com. (Previews began Feb. 28, opens March 21) (2 hrs 30 mins) The new musical captures the R&B group’s harmonies, dance moves and personal stories. H14 Be More Chill Lyceum Theatre, 149 W. 45th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.239.6200.

bemorechillmusical.com. (Previews began Feb. 13, opens March 10) (2 hrs 20 mins) The coming-of-age-in-the-digital-age musical is the story of a high-school kid who longs to be popular, while remaining true to himself. H14

Burn This Hudson Theatre, 139-141 W. 44th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 855.801.5876. burnthisplay.com. (Previews begin March 15, opens April 16) A sexual attraction leads to a deeper love connection in the revival of Lanford Wilson’s 1987 play. H14

PHOTOS: ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE, COURTESY NYC ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE; LES ARTS FLORISSANTS, PHILIPPE DELVAL; CHRIS THILE, BRANTLEY GUTIERREZ, COURTESY THE ARTIST

FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC


Gary: A Sequel to Titus Andronicus Booth Theatre, 222 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. garyonbroadway.com. (Previews begin March 5, opens April 11) Taylor Mac’s comedy picks up where Shakespeare’s tragedy “Titus Andronicus” leaves off. Nathan Lane and Andrea Martin star. H14 Hadestown Walter Kerr Theatre, 219 W. 48th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. hadestown.com. (Previews begin March 22, opens April 17) (2 hrs 30 mins) Anaïs Mitchell’s musical is an epic interpretation of two classic love stories: that of Orpheus and Eurydice, and that of Hades and his wife, Persephone. H13 Hillary and Clinton John Golden Theatre, 252 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. hillaryandclintonbroadway.com. (Previews begin March 16, opens April 18) Any similarity between a former first lady and her husband is intentional in Lucas Hnath’s timely comedy about politics and marriage. H14

WINNER!

BEST

MUSICAL

ALL ACROSS NORTH AMERICA

King Lear Cort Theatre, 138 W. 48th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.239.6200. kinglearon broadway.com. (Previews began Feb. 28, opens April 4, closes July 7) Tony Award winner Glenda Jackson stars in the title role of a new production of Shakespeare’s tragedy. H13 Kiss Me, Kate Studio 54, 254 W. 54th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.719.1300. round abouttheatre.org. (Previews began Feb. 14, opens March 14, closes June 2) The revival of Cole Porter’s musical-comedy valentine to the theater stars Kelli O’Hara and Will Chase. H13 Oklahoma! Circle in the Square Theatre, 235 W. 50th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. oklahomabroadway.com. (Previews begin March 19, opens April 7) (2 hrs 45 mins) Rodgers and Hammerstein’s 1943 musical is reinvented for the 21st century in an intimate and immersive production. I13 What the Constitution Means to Me The Hayes Theater, 240 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. constitutionbroadway .com. (Previews begin March 14, opens March 31) (1 hr 30 mins, no intermission) Author and performer Heidi Schreck tells the story of how she paid for her college education by winning Constitutional debate competitions. H14

COME FROM AWAY Book, Music and Lyrics by Irene Sankoff and David Hein Directed by Christopher Ashley

BROADWAY Aladdin C0L46N 7 ew Amsterdam Theatre, 214 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 866.870.2717. aladdinthemusical.com. (2 hrs 20 mins) The musical comedy is an exotic magic carpet ride, filled with romance, special effects and songs from Disney’s 1992 animated feature. H14 Anastasia Broadhurst Theatre, 235 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. anastasiabroadway.com. (2 hrs 25 mins) A young woman with amnesia takes a musical journey from Russia to 1920s Paris in search of her identity. Is she the sole surviving daughter of the slain czar? Or an imposter? H14

THE REMARKABLE TRUE STORY OF THE SMALL TOWN THAT WELCOMED THE WORLD

NOW ON BROADWAY

TELECHARGE.COM (212) 239-6200

O Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, 236 W. 45 TH STREET COMEFROMAWAY.COM

OFFICIAL AIRLINE

INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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entertainment The Band’s Visit Ethel Barrymore Theatre, 243 W. 47th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. thebandsvisitmusical.com. (Closes April 7) (1 hr 30 mins, no intermission) In the Tony-winning Best Musical of 2018, an Egyptian police band is in Israel to give a concert, when, through a mix-up at the bus station, it is sent to an isolated village deep in the desert. H14 Beautiful–The Carole King Musical C0L421Stephen Sondheim Theatre, 124 W. 43rd St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.239.6200. beautifulonbroad way.com. (2 hrs 20 mins) The long-running musical traces the rise of the singer/songwriter. H14

TM©RUG1986

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The Book of Mormon C0L97231Eugene O’Neill Theatre, 230 W. 49th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. bookofmormonthemusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Two Mormon boys are on a mission to save souls in Africa in the irreverent, politically incorrect musical comedy. H13 The Cher Show Neil Simon Theatre, 250 W. 52nd St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. thechershowbroadway.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Using 35 of Cher’s greatest hits, the new musical follows the ups and downs of the superstar’s career and personal life. H13 Chicago Ambassador Theatre, 219 W. 49th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. chicagothemusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) In the 1997 Tony Award-winning revival of the vaudeville musical, two alluring jailbirds named Roxie Hart and Velma Kelly attain stardom while singing about sex and corruption. H13

Choir Boy Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, 261 W. 47th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. manhattantheatreclub.com. (Closes March 10) (1 hr 45 mins, no intermisPage # 1 at an all-male Africansion) A gay student American prep school is the conflicted leader of the gospel Inkschoir. H14 Approvals Cyan CD None Come FromMagenta Away Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, CW Tom Yellow AD Peter 236 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., Black Studio Miles 212.239.6200. (1 hr 40 mins, Used comefromaway.com. Swatches Acct Kyle/marci Black Proofrd Joe F no intermission) On Sept. 11, 2001, 38 GRAY @ 60% Prod None PMS 178 C 4

T:4.75”

commercial airplanes were diverted to Gander, C=100 M=0 Y=0 K=0 Newfoundland; when PHAN Light Blue the 6,579 passengers landed, they found themselves stranded in a small town with a population half their size. How they adjusted to a changed world on Sept. 12 is the basis of the upbeat musical. H14

“A magical Broadway musical with BRAINS, HEART and COURAGE.” Time Magazine

Dear Evan Hansen Music Box Theatre, 239 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. dearevanhansen.com. (2 hrs 30 Print Ad Slug mins) A socially awkward high-school senior goes from outsider to cool guy when he comforts the parents of a troubled teenager who has committed suicide in the Tony Award-winning musical. H14 The Ferryman Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, 242 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. theferrymanbroadway.com. (3 hrs 15 mins) Jez Butterworth’s acclaimed comedy drama is set in 1981 at harvest time during the Northern Ireland conflict. H14

GERSHWIN THEATRE, 222 West 51st St. WickedtheMusical.com

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

Frozen St. James Theatre, 246 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 866.870.2717. frozenthe musical.com. (2 hrs 15 mins) Disney’s 2013


Academy Award-winning animated film is now a full-length stage work, featuring the original songs, plus new songs and story material. H14

Hamilton Richard Rodgers Theatre, 226 W. 46th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. hamiltonbroadway.com. (2 hrs 45 mins) Expect the unexpected when America’s past is told through the hip-hop sounds of today in the Pulitzer Prize-winning musical about political mastermind Alexander Hamilton. H14

ONE OF THE MOST REMARKABLE SHOWS IN MUSICAL THEATER HISTORY. –Peter Marks,

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Lyric Theatre, 214 W. 44th St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 877.250.2929. harrypottertheplay.com. (Part One, 2 hrs 40 mins; Part Two, 2 hrs 35 mins) Harry Potter is a grown-up with children of his own in this eighth story in the Harry Potter series. “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” is one play presented in two parts. H14 King Kong Broadway Theatre, 1681 Broadway, btw W. 52nd & W. 53rd sts., 212.239.6200. kingkongbroadway.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Beauty tames the beast in the new musical, set on an uncharted island and in 1930s NYC. H13 Kinky Boots C0L4751Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 302 W. 45th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 877.250.2929. kinkybootsthemusical.com. (Closes April 7) (2 hrs 20 mins) A down-on-its-heels shoe factory is given a transfusion of style, thanks to a drag queen, in the long-running musical. I14

Music Box Theatre 239 W. 45th St. • DearEvanHansen.com •

@DearEvanHansen

The Lion King C0L41896Minskoff Theatre, 200 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 866.870.2717. lionking.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Theatergoers sing along at the hit stage version of Disney’s beloved animated movie, enjoying songs by Elton John, as well as spectacular masks and dazzling puppets. H14

“MAGICAL DOESN’T EVEN BEGIN TO DESCRIBE IT.” 141200_DEH_INNY_Feb_FIN.indd

Document Path: studio:DEAR EVAN HANSEN:ADS:2018:141200_DEH_INNY_Feb:141200_DEH_INNY_Feb_FIN.indd Mean Girls August Wilson Theatre, 245 W. 52nd ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. Pg Specs Job # 141200 Sprd Specs Print / User Info Fonts meangirlsonbroadway.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Berthold Akzidenz Grotesk (Bold, Stacey Mindich Printed at None Bleed None Bleed Sprd 4.625” x 4.75” Newbie Cady Heron is Client taken up by her high Condensed, Regular), Shubert Description Magazine Trim 4.625” x 4.75” Trim Sprd 4.625” x 4.75” Print/Export Time 12-20-2018 12:43 PM (Regular), Minion Pro (Regular) school’s most elite clique, The Plastics, but is Safety None Safety Sprd 4.625” x 4.75” Pub Where this the pink pack she Run really Datewants None to hang with Visual Artist Saroop Srichawla Gutter None in the musical with a book byDate TinaNone Fey? H13 Release Previous Artist Saroop Srichawla

Approvals CD None CW None AD Gerri Studio Miles Acct None Proofrd Joe F. Prod None

Images My Fair Lady Vivian Beaumont Theater at THE(studio:DEAR MOST AWARDED NEW PLAY DEH_TITLE_3-LINE_W-MB-B_TONY-STRAP-2017_4C.ai EVAN HANSEN:ART:BROADWAY:_Title_Treatment:_4C:_3-LINE:_TONY_STRAPLINE_2017:DEH_TITLE_3-LINE_W-MB-B_TONY-STRAP-2 Lincoln Center, 150 W. 65th St., btw Broadway & DEH_TITLE_3-LINE_W-MB-B_TONY-STRAP_4C.ai (studio:DEAR EVAN HANSEN:ART:BROADWAY:_Title_Treatment:_4C:_3-LINE:_TONY_STRAPLINE:DEH_TITLE_3-LINE_W-MB-B_TONY-STRAP_4C.ai) Amsterdam Ave., 212.239.6200. lct.org. (2 hrs 55 IN THEATRE HISTORY DEH_Social_Icons.eps (studio:DEAR EVAN HANSEN:ART:BROADWAY:4C:Logos:Social:DEH_Social_Icons.eps) mins) The tuneful 1956 Lerner & Loewe musical is back on Broadway. I12

Network Belasco Theatre, 111 W. 44th St., btw Sixth Ave. & Broadway, 212.239.6200. network broadway.com. (2 hrs, no intermission) Bryan Cranston stars as a TV news anchor whose on-air rants draw big ratings and off-air controversies. H14 The Phantom of the Opera C0L64M 187 ajestic Theatre, 247 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. phantombroadway.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Broadway’s longest-running show tells the tragic story of a disfigured composer who falls in love with a young soprano. H14 Pretty Woman: The Musical Nederlander Theatre, 208 W. 41st St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 877.250.2929. prettywomanthemusical .com. (2 hrs 30 mins) The musical comedy tells the contemporary Cinderella story of a

ON BROADWAY

HarryPotterThePlay.com • LYRIC THEATRE, 214 W. 43RD ST. TM & © HPTP. Harry Potter ™ WBEI

INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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entertainment diamond in the rough, who finds a better life in the arms of a handsome corporate raider. H14

The Prom Longacre Theatre, 220 W. 48th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. theprommusical.com. (2 hrs 15 mins) An Indiana high schooler wants to take her girlfriend to the prom in the new musical comedy. H13 To Kill a Mockingbird Shubert Theatre, 225 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. tokillamockingbirdbroadway.com. (2 hrs 35 mins) Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prizewinning novel has been adapted for the stage. Jeff Daniels stars as Atticus Finch. H14 True West American Airlines Theatre, 227 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.719.1300. roundabouttheatre.org. (Closes March 17) (2 hrs) Two brothers—a thief (Ethan Hawke) and a screenwriter (Paul Dano) —reverse roles in Sam Shepard’s play. H14 Waitress Brooks Atkinson Theatre, 256 W. 47th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. waitressthemusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) A waitress, with a talent for baking, dreams of opening her own pie shop. Sara Bareilles has written the songs for the musical. H14 Wicked C0L418Gershwin Theatre, 222 W. 51st St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. wickedthe musical.com. (2 hrs 45 mins) This hit musical— now in its 16th year—imagines Oz as a land of strife, where a young, green-hued girl is branded the Wicked Witch of the West. I13

OFF-BROADWAY+BEYOND Stomp C0L94O 1 rpheum Theatre, 126 Second Ave., at E. 8th St., 800.982.2787. stomponline.com. (1 hr 45 mins, no intermission) In a dazzling percussive performance, the cast conjures rhythm out of brooms, dustbins, hubcaps and more. E18 White Noise The Public Theater, 425 Lafayette St., at Astor Place, 212.967.7555. publictheater .org. (Previews begin March 5, opens March 20, closes April 14) Pulitzer Prize winner Suzan-Lori Parks’ world-premiere play examines race, friendship and today’s social contract. F18

CABARETS+COMEDY CLUBS Carolines on Broadway C0L9431 1 626 Broadway, btw W. 49th & W. 50th sts., 212.757.4100. carolines .com. Headliners and up-and-coming comics. Highlights: March 7-9: Alyssa Edwards. March 14-16: Joel Kim Booster. H13 Feinstein’s/54 Below C0L52138254 W. 54th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 646.476.3551. 54below .com. The subterranean nightclub, restaurant and cocktail lounge is underneath the former Studio 54 disco. Highlights: March 12-16, 20-21: Luann de Lesseps: #countessandfriends. March 27-29: Lainie Kazan. H13

CELEBRATING 25 YEARS IN NYC

or 800-982-2787 · ORPHEUM THEATRE, 2nd Ave. at 8th St. #StompNYC

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/StompOnline

@StompNYC

IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

@StompNYC

StompOnline.com

Gotham Comedy Club 208 W. 23rd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.367.9000. gothamcomedyclub.com. Headliners and new talents are on the calendar. Highlights: March 1-2: Ian Bagg. March 8-9: Lynne Koplitz. March 15-16: Robert Kelly. March 21-23: Carlos Mencia. March 29-30: Nathan Macintosh. I16


S:4.625”

FIVE GUYS. ONE DREAM. AND A SOUND THAT WOULD LAST A LIFETIME.

DANCE+MUSIC Carnegie Hall C0L9541Seventh Ave., at W. 57th St., 212.247.7800. carnegiehall.org. Carnegie Hall’s 2018–2019 season is its 128th. Highlights: March 2-3, 5-6: Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra. March 8: The Philadelphia Orchestra. March 9: “Live From Here” with Chris Thile. March 15: The New York Pops. March 19-20: Boston Symphony Orchestra. March 27: Emanuel Ax, piano. H13

S:4.75”

Joyce Theater C0L1 9541 75 Eighth Ave., at W. 19th St., 212.242.0800. joyce.org. The venue welcomes modern-dance companies from the U.S. and abroad. Highlights: March 6-17: Hubbard Street Dance Chicago. March 20-24: Aspen Santa Fe Ballet. March 26-31: Ballet Hispánico. H17 Les Arts Florissants C0L9541BAM Howard Gilman Opera House, 30 Lafayette Ave., btw St. Felix St. & Ashland Pl., 718.636.4100. bam.org. (March 1-3) The noted ensemble from France performs two one-act opera-ballets created by Jean-Philippe Rameau for the court of Louis XV. AA23 Madison Square Garden C0L95461Seventh Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 866.858.0008. msg.com/ madison-square-garden. The entertainment/ sporting venue hosts concerts. Highlights in the Arena: March 2: Travis Scott. March 5-6: Elton John: Farewell Yellow Brick Road Tour. March 8: Robyn. March 11 & 18: Fleetwood Mac. March 12: Weezer / Pixies. March 21: Billy Joel. March 27: Kiss: End of the Road World Tour. G13

ON BROADWAY AT THE

IMPERIAL THEATRE

AintTooProudMusical.com

Metropolitan Opera C0L3572Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., btw W. 63rd & W. 64th sts., 212.362.6000. metopera.org. This month, the company performs “Rigoletto,” “La Fille du Régiment,” “Falstaff,” “Aida,” “Das Rheingold,” “Samson et Dalila,” “Tosca,” “Die Walküre” and “La Clemenza di Tito.” I12

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New York Philharmonic C0LD 1964 avid Geffen Hall at Job # 140662 Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., at W. 64th St., Client Ira Pittleman Productions 212.875.5656. nyphil.org. The city’s preeminent Description Magazine classical-music orchestra. Concerts: Feb. Pub IN NY Mag 28-March 2, 6-9, 13, 15-16, 19, 21, 23, 26, 27. I12 Run Date None Release Date None

JAZZ CLUBS

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Images Blue Note Jazz ClubATP_TITLE_4C_NEW-TAG.ai 131 W. 3rd St., btw (Studio:AINT TOO PROUD:ART:TITLE:_4C:ATP_TITLE_4C_NEW-TAG.ai) MacDougal St. & Sixth Ave., 212.475.8592. bluenote.net. The best and brightest jazz luminaries perform here. Highlights: March 5-10: Spyro Gyra. March 14-17: Charles Tolliver. March 21-24: Sadao Watanabe Quartet. March 28-31: Bobby McFerrin & Gimme5. G18

Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola C0L96418Jazz at Lincoln Center, 10 Columbus Cir., Broadway & W. 60th St., 212.258.9595. jazz.org/dizzys. The club boasts a stunning stage backdrop: the Manhattan skyline. Highlights: March 7-10: Renee Rosnes Quartet. March 15-17: Johnny O’Neal Quartet. March 21-24: DIVA Jazz Orchestra. I12

IAN BAGG

SHAWN WAYANS

Thu. February 28 – Sat. March 2

Fri. March 8 – Sun. March 10

ROBERT KELLY

CARLOS MENCIA

Fri. March 15 – Sat. March 16

Thu. March 21 – Sat. March 23

Print/Export Time 1-23-2019 12:06 PM Visual Artist Saroop Srichawla Previous Artist Allison Minsk

Purchase tickets online at www.GothamComedyClub.com

Village Vanguard C0L1 9471 78 Seventh Ave. So., btw Perry & W. 11th sts., 212.255.4037. villagevan guard.com. The quintessential subterranean jazz club. Highlights: March 5-10: Ambrose Akinmusire. March 12-17: Miguel Zenón. March 19-24: The Bad Plus. March 26-31: Broken Shadows. H18

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dining+drinking

2

3

1 The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 36-38).

1 This celeb hot spot has been buzzing in its original locale since 1979, serving creative Chinese specialties such as fresh scallops, topped with light soy sauce, minced peppers, green onion and fresh cilantro and served on a shell. | Mr Chow, 212.751.9030 2 The newest locale of this franchise of sophisticated sports bars is parked just north of Port Authority Bus Terminal. Signature cocktails include Le Kriek, So Chic, a cherry-topped flute of Grey Goose vodka, Pama liqueur, prosecco, raspberry and lemon. | Treadwell Park West, 212.388.6751 3 Butcher John Ratliff serves his 21-day dry-aged top sirloin and short ribs burger at his Industry City meat emporium and restaurant. | Ends Meat, 718.801.8895

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

New York City Restaurant Prices Prices in the five boroughs vary wildly, from inexpensive pizza and burger joints to temples of haute cuisine that can cost a month‘s salary. To get a sense of price points for a particular eatery, we suggest you visit the restaurant’s website.

DOWNTOWN Blue Ribbon Fried Chicken—American 28 E. 1st St., at First Ave., 212.228.0404. blueribbon friedchicken.com. The Bromberg brothers’ counter-service fried chicken joint is one of the most revered (and affordable) spots for deep-fried

poultry in New York City, and stays open until 2 am nightly. L & D (daily). D19

Gardenia—Latin-American 64 Downing St., at Varick St., 212.604.0500. gardenianyc.com. A bright and airy dining room with a colorfully and florally decorated bar sets the scene for Latin-accented dishes, such as Catalan paella and pork loin ribs. L & D (daily). G19 Hop Shing—Chinese 9 Chatham Sq., btw Doyers & Mott sts., 212.267.0220. hopshingnyc .com. Roasted, barbecued pork fills soft buns, the hallmark of this dim sum joint that also

PHOTOS: SCALLOPS ON A SHELL, COURTESY MR CHOW; TREADWELL PARK WEST LE KRIEK, SO CHIC COCKTAIL, COURTESY MERCHANTS HOSPITALITY; ENDS MEAT BURGER, COURTESY INDUSTRY CITY

FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC


offers fried pork and vegetable dumplings and fried shrimp balls. B, L & D (daily).

Katz’s Delicatessen—Jewish-American 205 E. Houston St., at Ludlow St., 212.254.2246. katzsdelicatessen.com. This iconic spot has been serving pastrami, corned beef, knishes, housemade pickles and other classics since 1888, and stays open around the clock F-Su. Tickets are given for purchase and seating; don’t lose them! B, L & D (daily). D19 Kubeh—Middle Eastern 464 Sixth Ave., at W. 11th St., 646.448.6688. eatkubeh.com. Chef Melanie Shurka names her restaurant after her favorite dish: kubeh (Levantine dumplings made with semolina and bulgur wheat and served in broth). Specialties include Syrian codfish kubeh in tomato, fennel and arak soup, and beef kubeh in beet broth. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). G17 Lombardi’s—Italian 32 Spring St., at Mott St., 212.941.7994. firstpizza.com. America’s first pizzeria has been serving its New York-style, coal-oven-fired pizza pies for more than 100 years. Cash only. L & D (daily). Lupe’s East L.A. Kitchen—Mexican C0L4181 5 10 Sixth Ave., at Watts St., 212.966.1326. lupeskitch en.com. A lengthy menu of California-style Mexican fare, with dishes such as chicken enchiladas mole poblano and chiles rellenos. A housemade traditional dark mole sauce is made with 20 ingredients. B, L & D (daily). G20 Raoul’s—French 180 Prince St., btw Thompson & Sullivan sts., 212.966.3518. raouls.com. The nationally ranked burger is offered during brunch or off the menu as soon as the kitchen opens at 5:30 pm, but only 30 of the famed sandwiches are served up nightly, at the bar only. D (nightly). Brunch (Sa & Su). G19 The Tang—Contemporary Chinese 120 First Ave., at E. 7th St., 646.678.3092. thetangnyc .com. House-pulled noodles are served cold or in housemade broth in this cove for creative and spicy Sichuan offerings. L & D (daily). C18 Tetsu—Contemporary Japanese 78 Leonard St., btw Broadway & Church St., 212.207.2370. tetsunyc.com. Guests at Michelinthree-star chef and restaurateur Masa Takayama’s modern robatayaki can order Chef Masa’s first-ever burger (off the menu—lamb or beef—from 5 to 6 pm nightly). D (M-Sa). F21

MIDTOWN BarBacon—Contemporary American 836 Ninth Ave., btw W. 54th & W. 55th sts., 646.362.0622, I14; 127 Fourth Ave., btw E. 12th & E. 13th sts., 212.477.0104, D18. barbacon.com. Chef/owner Peter Sherman slings an elaborate, extensive menu of creative pig-based fare, such as a house-cured lamb bacon Reuben. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). Becco—Italian 355 W. 46th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.397.7597. becco-nyc.com. A daily rotating trio of housemade specialty pastas (with vegetarian options) is served in unlimited quantities and can be had as a meal with an appetizer and salad, or as a complement to an

entree, like braised veal shank with faro and butternut squash. The Bastianich family’s second house novelty is a wide-ranging list of reputable wines on offer for the restaurant’s standard $32 per bottle. L & D (daily). I14

of creative fare includes Bellini’s brick-oven pizza, with caramelized peach slices, bacon, ricotta cheese and onion confit. Weekend brunch features bottomless Bellinis and mimomas. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). G3

Cote—Korean Steak House 16 W. 22nd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.401.7986. cotenyc .com. A daily rotating “butcher’s feast” of prime and specialty cuts, seasonal ban-chan and housemade stews earned this team a second consecutive Michelin star. D (M-Sa). F16

Cafe Frida—Mexican 368 Columbus Ave., btw W. 77th & W. 78th sts., 212.712.2929. cafefrida .com. Authentic Mexican cuisine includes quesadillas monarcas, flautas and enchiladas de mole. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). I10

Eleven Madison Park— American 1 Madison Ave., btw E. 23rd & E. 24th sts., 212.889.0905. elevenmadisonpark.com. Seasonal, refined dishes on a customizable tasting menu are enhanced by a lengthy international wine list at this Gramercy Park gem, which was named the greatest resto in the world by The World’s 50 Best Restaurants Organization in 2017. L (F-Su), D (nightly). F16 Il Gattopardo—Italian 13-15 W. 54th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.246.0412. ilgattopardonyc .com. Southern Italian fare—pan-seared veal loin scented with wild fennel pollen from Felitto, with porcini mushrooms and fingerling potatoes—on a menu offering housemade pastas and a lengthy rotating wine list. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). G13 Le Bernardin—French 155 W. 51st St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.554.1515. le-bernardin .com. Simply prepared fish dishes are offered in an elegant space by world-renowned culinary legend Eric Ripert. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). Jackets required, ties optional. G13 Morrell Wine Bar & Café—American 1 Rockefeller Plz., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.262.7700. morellwinebar.com. A 1,000-plus bottle list and more than 150 by-the-glass wines complement charcuterie in the heart of Rockefeller Center. L (daily), D (M-Sa). G13 Nur—Israeli 34 E. 20th St., btw Park Ave. So. & Broadway, 212.505.3420. nurnyc.com. Specialties include Damascus qatayef (crispy Syrian pancake filled with spiced lamb and herb yogurt chaser) and octopus, served with spice glaze, cardamom yogurt and harissa. D (nightly). E17 Sardi’s—American 234 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.221.8440. sardis .com. This legendary restaurant is known for its humorous celebrity caricatures and has been a Theater District staple since 1921. Specialties include jumbo lump crab cakes and grilled sirloin steak. L & D (Tu-Su), Brunch (Su). H14 Zero Otto Nove—Italian 15 W. 21st St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.242.0899, F17; 2357 Arthur Ave., at E. 186th St., Belmont, Bronx, 718.220.1027. zeroottonove.com. Named for the area code of Italian seaside town Salerno, home of Chef Roberto Paciullo, this pizzeria— originally on Staten Island and also in Flatiron— serves pizzas, pastas, calzoni and fish dishes. L (M-F). D (nightly).

UPTOWN

Clay—Contemporary American 553 Manhattan Ave., at W. 123rd St., 212.729.1850. claynyc.com. Ingredients from more than seven New York State and two Pennyslvania farms are used to formulate seasonal, creative fare that offers options for carnivores, pescatarians and herbivores alike. D (nightly), Brunch (Su). I4 Demarchelier—French 50 E. 86th St., at Madison Ave., 212.249.6300. demarchelier restaurant.com. Restaurateur-and-painter Eric Demarchelier has been serving traditional French specialties in his art-centric space since 1978. L & D (daily). F9 Dinosaur Bar-B-Que—Barbecue C0L7 694 00 W. 125th St., at 12th Ave., 212.694.1777, K4; 604 Union St., at 4th Ave., Gowanus, Brooklyn, 347.429.7030. dinosaurbarbque.com. Barbecue thrives north of the Mason-Dixon Line at this Southern-style eatery, serving pulled pork, ribs, burnt ends and other ‘cue fixtures in a variety of regional preparations alongside frosty pints of craft beer, with jazz and blues music on Friday and Saturday nights. L & D (daily). Lexington Candy Shop—American 1226 Lexington Ave., at E. 83rd St., 212.288.0057. lexingtoncandyshop.net. This classic, old-school luncheonette—family-owned on the Upper East Side since 1925—is best known for its traditional all-day diner menu and fresh egg creams. B, L & D (daily). F9 Red Rooster Harlem—Soul Food 310 Lenox Ave., btw W. 125th & W. 126th sts., 212.792.9001. redroosterharlem.com. Ethiopian-born Chef/ owner Marcus Samuelsson names his spot after the famed speakeasy and serves local comfort foods, such as coconut rice with lentils and papaya, and blackened catfish with pickles. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). G4 2nd Floor Bar & Essen—Jewish-American 1442 First Ave., 2nd fl., at E. 75th St., 212.737.1700. 2ndavedeli.com/2nd-floor. This wood-finished, speakeasy-style cocktail lounge and restaurant above the original 2nd Ave Deli offers pastrami and other house-prepared meats and their offshoots (veal bone broth, beef bone marrow), as well as European specialties, such as potato pierogi and herring. D (nightly). D10 Sushi Inoue—Japanese 381 Lenox Ave., at W. 129th St., 646.706.0555. sushiinoue.com. Fresh, simple plates of sushi, sashimi and other varieties of fish are presented by esteemed sushi chef Shinichi Inoue and served as part of an omakase, in an elegant space with traditional Japanese decor, at Harlem’s only Michelin-star restaurant. D (Tu-Su). G3

Bellini—Italian 483 Columbus Ave., at W. 83rd St., 212.724.4615. bellininewyork.com. The menu INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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shops+services FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC

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4

1 The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 36-38).

1 Get revved up for spring with this Habitual Anja poplin shirt and Ria mid-rise trouser. | Habitual habitual.com 2 Aquarium long earrings in rhodium-plated sterling silver and marine turquoise enamel porcelain. | lladro lladro.com/en_us 3 Creed Floralie fragrance, 75ml. | Creed creedboutique.com 4 The overear speaker Space One Wireless includes noise cancellation and Bluetooth. | Porsch Design porsche-design.com

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

ACCESSORIES+FOOTWEAR Artbag C0L951 62 130 Madison Ave., at E. 84th St., 212.744.2720. artbag.com. The store is known for expertly repairing and cleaning high-end handbags, briefcases, luggage and leather garments. Artbag also sells a wide range of fine leather bags. F9 Mulberry 134 Spring St., btw Greene & Wooster sts., 646.669.8380. mulberry.com. Founded in 1971, the British luxury brand, worn by celebrities including Kate Moss and Julianne Moore, offers fine leather bags, along with hats, scarves, shoes, belts and more. F19

Reebok FitHub C0L42420 Fifth Ave., btw 37th & 38th sts., 212.395.9614, G15; 1 Union Sq. West, at E. 14th St., 212.206.7641, F17. reebok.com. The sportswear brand’s concept stores include signature athletic apparel, footwear and accessories for men, women and kids. Vans DQM General 93 Grand St., btw Mercer & Greene sts, 212.226.7776, E20; 102 N. 6th St., btw Berry St. & Wythe Ave., Williamsburg, Brooklyn, 718.388.2508. vansdqm.com. New York City contemporary streetwear fashion brand DQM teams up with the Californian skatewear professionals at Vans to open this surfing, skateboarding and casualwear boutique.


carrying designer clothing, jewelry, accessories and more. E12

items, from pens to furniture to clothing to suitcases. G17

Brookfield Place 230 Vesey St., btw West & Liberty sts., 212.978.1698. brookfieldplaceny.com. The shopping center brings high-end apparel and accessories brands for men, women and kids, along with dining options. G22

JEWELRY

Century 21 C0L962 87 2 Cortlandt St., btw Broadway & Church St., 212.227.9092; and several other NYC locations. c21stores.com. Deep discounts on everything, from famous designer apparel for men, women and children to cosmetics, shoes, electronics and housewares. F22 Macy’s Herald Square C0L961 3 51 W. 34th St., btw Broadway & Seventh Ave., 212.695.4400. macys .com. The department store spans a full city block with clothing, accessories and home decor, plus cosmetics and fragrances. G15

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APPAREL Alexander McQueen C0L65747 Madison Ave. btw E. 64th & E. 65th sts., 212.645.1797. alexander mcqueen.com. Alexander McQueen’s flagship store sells edgy clothes and accessories. F12 Gentlemen’s Resale C0L4623322 E. 81st St., btw First & Second aves., 212.734.2739. designerresale consignment.com. This consignment store sells luxury apparel from labels such as Armani and Zegna in an Upper East Side town house. D10 Joe’s Jeans C0L529617 3 7 Mercer St., btw Broome & Spring sts., 212.925.5727. joesjeans.com. The denim line’s SoHo shop offers its signature jeans in a variety of fits, colors, styles and washes, as well as a small selection of clothing and accessories for men, women and children. F20 Scotch & Soda C0L2 7961 73 Lafayette St., at Prince St., 212.966.3300; and several other NYC locations. scotch-soda.com. Upscale Dutch fashions for men, women and youths include velvet blazers with brocade collars, leather bomber jackets, plaid button-ups and belted coats. F19

DEPT. STORES+CENTERS Barneys New York C0L32496660 Madison Ave., btw E. 60th & E. 61st sts., 212.826.8900; and three other NYC locations. barneys.com. Luxe couture for men and women from top designers, such as Marc Jacobs, Givenchy and Fendi. F12 Bergdorf Goodman C0L7 32749 54 Fifth Ave., btw 57th & 58th sts., 212.753.7300. bergdorfgoodman.com. Women can find designer labels, accessories and cosmetics in this iconic New York department store. The men’s store is directly across the street. G12 Bloomingdale’s C0L421 5 000 Third Ave., at E. 59th St., 212.705.2000; and two other NYC locations. bloomingdales.com. A storied fashion hub

Saks Fifth Avenue C0L48156611 Fifth Ave., btw 49th & 50th sts., 212.753.4000, F14; 250 Vesey St., Brookfield Place, at West St., 212.301.2440, G22. saksfifthavenue.com. A luxury department store carrying designer apparel, accessories, home decor, luxury brand cosmetics and fragrances. The Shops at Columbus Circle C0L36Time Warner Center, 10 Columbus Cir., btw W. 58th & W. 60th sts., 212.823.6300. theshopsatcolumbuscircle .com. This high-end retail and dining complex features more than 40 stores, the world-class Restaurant and Bar Collection, a park-view atrium and art installations. I12 Westfield World Trade Center 185 Greenwich St., btw Vesey & Barclay sts., 212.284.9982. westfield.com/westfieldworld tradecenter. This shopping center features a stellar lineup of stores, including John Varvatos, L.K. Bennett and Roberto Coin. G22

GIFTS+HOME ABC Carpet & Home C0L796888 Broadway, at E. 19th St., 212.473.3000. abchome.com. This multilevel store carries a curated selection of home goods, gifts, clothing and jewelry from a variety of artisans. Pieces are sourced from around the world. F17 The Metropolitan Museum of Art Store C0L1 7842 000 Fifth Ave., at 82nd St., 800.662.3397. metmuseum.org. With an array of merchandise that is nearly as large as the museum’s actual collection, this shop earns its place inside one of the world’s most fabled institutions. G9 MoMA Design Store C0L72644 W. 53rd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.767.1050, G13; 81 Spring St., at Crosby St., 646.613.1367, F19. momastore.org. Cutting-edge designs for the home, office and body, along with fun gadgets, toys and jewelry, are selected by the discerning eyes of the Museum of Modern Art’s curatorial staff. Muji16 W. 19th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.414.9024; and several other NYC locations. muji.com/us. The Japanese company produces environmentally friendly, moderately priced and innovative personal, travel and home

Cartier C0L31653 Fifth Ave., at 52nd St., 212.446.3400; and one other NYC location. cartier.us. The palatial New York location of the French luxury design house offers jewelry, tableware, objets d’art, antiques and diamonds. G13 Tiffany & Co. C0L727 6 27 Fifth Ave., at 57th St., 212.755.800; and two other NYC locations. tiffany .com. The world-famous jewelry store carries diamonds, pearls, gold, silver, sterling flatware, fine timepieces, crystal and more—all of which come wrapped in signature robin’s-egg blue boxes. G13 Wempe Jewelers C0L347 15 00 Fifth Ave., at 55th St., 212.397.9000. wempe.com. Fifth Avenue’s only official Rolex dealer also carries prestigious brands such as Jaeger-LeCoultre, Patek Philippe, Chopard and Baume & Mercier. G13

SPORTING GOODS NBA Store C0L3575 1 45 Fifth Ave., at 45th St., 212.457.3120. nba.com/nycstore. Team jerseys, basketballs, gifts and footwear fill this arena-style sports emporium of National Basketball Association merchandise and memorabilia. G14 The NHL Store C0L1 4287 185 Sixth Ave., at W. 47th St., 917.261.6770. nhl.com/info/nhl-store. The National Hockey League flagship store offers apparel, jerseys, footwear and merchandise for all 31 pro hockey teams, visits from players and an NHL-themed Starbucks. G14 Paragon Sporting Goods C0L48 317 67 Broadway, at E. 18th St., 212.255.8889. paragonsports.com. This only-in-New-York-City sports mecca carries all kinds of sports equipment and clothing, as well as exercise gear from major brands, including Timberland and Patagonia. F17

TOYS+GAMES American Girl Place New York C0L3817 6 5 Rockefeller Plz., at W. 51st St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 877.247.5223. americangirl.com. In addition to the popular historical and contemporary doll collection, the store sells doll accessories and matching doll-and-girl clothing. F13 Dinosaur Hill C0L5498306 E. 9th St., at Second Ave., 212.473.5850. dinosaurhill.com. The East Village shop carries a variety of toys and knickknacks—from marionettes to small musical instruments, stuffed animals, elaborate puzzles and more. E18 Nintendo® World C0L5110 Rockefeller Plz., at W. 48th St., 646.459.0800. nintendoworldstore.com. This 10,000-square-foot interactive gaming paradise features Nintendo Wii kiosks, branded merchandise and the latest video games—plus, live in-store demos, competitions, and game and console release parties. F13

INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC

2

3

1 The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 36-38).

1 Electrical engineer, scientist, inventor and photographer Harold Eugene Edgerton used a high-speed flash system to capture “Golf Drive by Densmore” (shown), one of 68 works in the exhibition, “The Extended Moment: Photographs From the National Gallery of Canada.” | The Morgan Library & Museum, p. 31 2 An artist’s self-portrait is a mirror into his or her soul. “The Self-Portrait: From Schiele to Beckmann” presents 70 self-reflections by more than 30 artists mainly from Austria and Germany, including George Scholz (shown). | Neue Galerie New York, p. 32 3 Giovanni Battista Moroni broke with convention when he painted what is arguably the Italian Renaissance’s first fulllength portrait of a standing woman alone (shown). Important Moroni portraits are on view thru June 2. | The Frick Collection, p. 31

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

MUSEUMS AKC Museum of the Dog 101 Park Ave., at E. 40th St., 212.696.8360. museumofthedog.org. The city’s newest museum, under the auspices of the American Kennel Club (AKC), pays homage to man’s best friend and features artwork and half a dozen interactive digital displays. Tu-Su 10 am-5 pm. F14 American Folk Art Museum C0L5482 Lincoln Sq., Columbus Ave., at W. 66th St., 212.595.9533. folkartmuseum.org. The collection focuses on works created by self-taught American artists in a variety of mediums and dating from the 18th century to today. Tu-Th, Sa 11:30 am-7 pm, F noon-7:30 pm, Su noon-6 pm. Free. I11

American Museum of Natural History C0L365Central Park West, at W. 79th St., 212.769.5100. amnh.org. Guests explore halls filled with dinosaur skeletons, fossils, dioramas, artifacts, gems and minerals, meteorites and more. Daily 10 am-5:45 pm. I10 Brooklyn Museum C0L5948200 Eastern Pkwy., at Washington Ave., Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, 718.638.5000. brooklynmuseum.org. Ancient Egyptian artifacts, photography and European, Asian and American art are housed in a grand 560,000-square-foot Beaux Arts building. W, F-Su 11 am-6 pm, Th 11 am-10 pm. Cooper Hewitt 2 E. 91st St., at Fifth Ave., 212.849.8400. cooperhewitt.org. This Smithson-

PHOTOS: HAROLD EUGENE EDGERTON, “GOLF DRIVE BY DENSMORE,” 1938, PRINTED 1977, NATIONAL GALLERY OF CANADA, ©HAROLD EDGERTON / MIT, COURTESY PALM PRESS, INC.; GEORG SCHOLZ, ”SELF-PORTRAIT IN FRONT OF AN ADVERTISING COLUMN,” 1926, BPK BILDAGENTUR / STAATLICHE KUNSTHALLE KARLSRUHE / ART RESOURCE, NY, ©2018 ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK; GIOVANNI BATTISTA MORONI, “PACE RIVOLA SPINI,” CA. 1573–75, FONDAZIONE ACCADEMIA CARRARA, BERGAMO

museums+attractions


ian museum uses groundbreaking technology to create interactive exhibits on historic and contemporary design. Su-F 10 am-6 pm, Sa 10 am-9 pm. F9

Fraunces Tavern Museum 0316 54 Pearl St., at Broad St., 212.425.1778. frauncestavern museum.org. Built in 1719, the building showcases Revolutionary War-era manuscripts, art, memorabilia and meticulously recreated period rooms. M-F noon-5 pm, Sa-Su 11 am-5 pm. F23 The Frick Collection 1 E. 70th St., btw Madison & Fifth aves., 212.288.0700. frick.org. Paintings by old masters are on display in the palatial former home of industrialist Henry Clay Frick. Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. G11 Guggenheim MuseumC0L136 1071 Fifth Ave., at 89th St., 212.423.3500. guggenheim.org. A major architectural icon, Frank Lloyd Wright’s spiraling landmark building houses significant modern and contemporary art. M, W-F & Su 10 am-5:30 pm, Tu & Sa 10 am-8 pm. G8 The Jewish Museum 1109 Fifth Ave., at 92nd St., 212.423.3200. thejewishmuseum.org. A showcase for Jewish art and culture. Su-Tu, Sa 11 am-5:45 pm, Th 11 am-8 pm, F 11 am-4 pm. G8 The Metropolitan Museum of Art 1000 Fifth Ave., at 82nd St., 212.535.7710. metmuseum.org. Renowned for its encyclopedic collections of American, European and Far Eastern fine and decorative art. Su-Th 10 am-5:30 pm, F-Sa 10 am-9 pm. G9

ANDY WARHOL—FROM A TO B AND BACK AGAIN

The Morgan Library & Museum 225 Madison Ave., at E. 36th St., 212.685.0008. themorgan.org. Rare books, manuscripts, drawings, prints and other treasures. Tu-Th 10:30 am-5 pm, F 10:30 am-9 pm, Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. F15 Museum of Arts and Design C0L6312 Columbus Cir., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.299.7777. madmuseum.org. The center celebrates innovative arts and crafts. Tu-W, F-Su 10 am-6 pm, Th 10 am-9 pm. F13

Museum of the City of New YorkC0L5914 1220 Fifth Ave., at 103rd St., 212.534.1672. mcny.org. The permanent exhibition, “New York at Its Core,” is a three-gallery, high-tech look at NYC’s 400-year history. Daily 10 am-6 pm. F7 National Museum of the American Indian C0L561 2 Bowling Green, at Broadway, 212.514.3700. nmai.si.edu. This Smithsonian Institution museum promotes Native American history, culture and arts. Su-W, F-Sa 10 am-5 pm, Th 10 am-8 pm. Free. F23

WHITNEY

The Museum of Modern Art 11 W. 53rd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.708.9400. moma.org. Modern and contemporary masterpieces in sculpture, drawing, painting, photography and film are in the permanent collection. Daily 10:30 am-5:30 pm, F until 8 pm. G13

THROUGH MAR 31

Andy Warhol (1928–1987), Flowers, 1964. Acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, 24 x 24 in. (61 x 61 cm). Private collection. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Whitney Museum of American Art 99 Gansevoort Street whitney.org @whitneymuseum #WarholxWhitney

National September 11 Memorial & MuseumC0L415879 Museum entrance at 180 Greenwich INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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LaPlacaCohen Publication: Insertion date: Size:

museums+attractions

Visit The Met. See the world.

212-675-4106 IN NY MARCH 1, 2019 4.625" x 4.75" 4C MAG

St., btw Liberty & Fulton sts., 212.312.8800. 911memorial.org. The memorial features waterfalls set within the footprints of the Twin Towers. Memorial: Daily 7:30 am-9 pm. Free. Museum: Su-Th 9 am-8 pm (last entry 6 pm), F-Sa 9 am-9 pm (last entry 7 pm). G22

Neue Galerie New York C0L1 457 048 Fifth Ave., at 86th St., 212.628.6200. neuegalerie.org. Dedicated to 20th-century German and Austrian art and design. Th-M 11 am-6 pm. G9 New Museum C0L57235 Bowery, btw Rivington & Stanton sts., 212.219.1222. newmuseum.org. American and international cutting-edge art. Tu-W, F-Su 11 am-6 pm, Th 11 am-9 pm. D20 New-York Historical Society Museum & Library C0L51 8 70 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (W. 77th St.), 212.873.3400. nyhistory.org. Objects and works of art focusing on the rich history of NYC and New York State. Tu-Th, Sa 10 am-6 pm, F 10 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. I10

TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence Hall of Fame 2018

Whitney Museum of American Art 99 Gansevoort St., btw Greenwich & West sts., 212.570.3600. whitney.org. More than 50,000 square feet of indoor galleries and 13,000 square feet of outdoor spaces are devoted to American art and artists. M, W-Th, Su 10:30 am-6 pm, F-Sa 10:30 am-10 pm. I18

Start at metmuseum.org CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC

Visit The Met Fifth Avenue, The Met Breuer, and The Met Cloisters for three days with general admission

ATTRACTIONS

Empire State Building ExperienceC0L3487 Entrance: 20 W. 34th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.736.3100. esbnyc.com. Views of NYC and 2/7/19 11:31 AM beyond can be seen from the 86th- and 102nd-floor indoor/outdoor observatories. Daily 8 am-2 am (last elevator ascends at 1:15 am). G15

TOUR-07-Fragment_InNY_4.625x4.75_v7.indd 1

The High Line C0L568G 1 ansevoort to W. 34th sts., btw 10th and 11th aves., 212.500.6035. thehighline .org. The 1.45-mile-long elevated park and public promenade offers views of the Manhattan skyline and public art displays. Daily 7 am-7 pm. Free. J15-J18 New York Botanical Garden C0L48572900 Southern Blvd., Bronx, 718.817.8700. nybg.org. Miles of seasonal gardens and walking trails offer an escape from the city. Tu-Su 10 am-6 pm.

FOLLOW US ON

One World Observatory One World Trade Center, 285 Fulton St., entrance to the observatory is on West St., at Vesey St., 844.696.1776. oneworldobservatory.com. The indoor observatory is located in the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. Daily 9 am-9 pm (last tickets sold at 8:15 pm). G22 @INNEWYORKMAGAZINE

Statue of Liberty C0L652 7 12.363.3200. libertyellis foundation.org. The 151-foot neoclassical statue is known worldwide as a symbol of freedom and democracy. Accessible by Statue Cruises ferry service: 201.604.2800. statuecruises.com. Top of the Rock C30 0L57 Rockefeller Plz., W. 50th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.698.2000. topofthe rocknyc.com. Panoramic vistas of the city can be enjoyed from a vantage point some 70 floors above the ground. Daily 8 am-midnight (last elevator ascends at 11 pm). G13

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM


galleries+antiques FOR MORE ART, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC

PHOTOS: LE PHO, “LE DÉBUT DE L’AUTOMNE,” 1982, COURTESY FINDLAY GALLERIES; THE CONNOR BROTHERS, “THE TRUTH IS RARELY PURE AND NEVER SIMPLE,” 2018, COURTESY CHASE CONTEMPORARY AND MADDOX GALLERY; LOUISE NEVELSON, “NIGHTSCAPE I,” 1974–83, COURTESY MICHAEL ROSENFELD GALLERY, LLC, NEW YORK, NY; TUCKER FACTORIES, PHILADELPHIA, “THE ANDREW CRAIG WALKER HANDLED URN,” 1828, ERIC W. BAUMGARTNER

Americas, Europe, Africa and Asia. M-Sa 10:30 am-6 pm, Su noon-6 pm. E13

ART GALLERIES Chase Contemporary 231 10th Ave., btw W. 23rd & W. 24th sts., 212.337.3203; and one other NYC location. chasecontemporary.com. Original art, prints and multiples, and sculpture by established and emerging artists and photographers. Featured artists include Retna, Robert Crumb, Bernie Taupin, Ronnie Wood and John Lennon. Daily 10 am-6 pm. J16

3

Findlay Galleries C0L4687 3 24 Fifth Ave., 7th flr., btw 56th & 57th sts., 212.421.5390. findlaygalleries .com. The 150-year-old family art business specializes in impressionism, European modernism and 20th-century American art. Tu-W, F-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Th 10 am-8 pm. G13 Hirschl & Adler Galleries C0L53T4 he Fuller Building, 41 E. 57th St., 9th fl., at Madison Ave., 212.535.8810. hirschlandadler.com. Nineteenthand 20th-century American and European paintings, sculpture and prints; American decorative arts 1810–1910 (including furniture); and a recent focus on contemporary art. Tu-F 9:30 am-5:15 pm, Sa 9:30 am-4:45 pm. F12 Michael Rosenfeld Gallery C0L31 95 00 11th Ave., at W. 19th St., 212.247.0082. michaelrosenfeldart .com. Specializing in 20th- and 21st-century American art, including African-American and abstract art. Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm, and by appointment. J17

2

AUCTION HOUSES Christie’s C0L5724120 Rockefeller Plz., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.636.2000. christies.com. Auctioneer of fine art and antiques since the 18th century. March 19: Fine Chinese Paintings; Japanese and Korean Art. March 20: South Asian Modern and Contemporary Art; Indian, Himalayan & Southeast Asian Works of Art. March 21: Lacquer, Jade, Bronze, Ink: The Irving Collection Day Sale. March 22: Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art. G13 4

1

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 36-38).

1 To coincide with the opening of Asia Week New York, this revered gallery presents a career retrospective of the work of Le Pho (1907–2001), a master of the colonial period of Vietnamese art, on view March 5–April 2. | Findlay Galleries, this page 2 The first solo exhibition of British artists The Connor Brothers, thru March 16, features new works from 2018 executed in their signature style of witty proverbs superimposed over motifs from historical pop culture. | Chase Contemporary, this page 3 “Art of Defiance: Radical Materials,” thru March 30, features women artists who broke free of conventional mediums, like Louise Nevelson whose wooden construction (shown) helped expand the possibilities of art-making. | Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, this page 4 Exceptional offerings at this dealer include an 1828 porcelain urn. | Hirschl & Adler Galleries, this page

ANTIQUES The Gallery at 200 Lex Powered by Incollect New York Design Center, 200 Lexington Ave., 10th fl., btw E. 32nd & E. 33rd sts., 646.293.6633. nydc.com/antiques. More than 50 leading international and American dealers show and sell antiques, vintage pieces and 21st-century design in a 33,000-square-foot destination for collectors and connoisseurs. M-F 9:30 am-5 pm. E15 The Manhattan Art & Antiques Center C0L51 9 050 Second Ave., at E. 55th St., 212.355.4400. the-maac.com. More than 100 established galleries on three levels offer an encyclopedic selection of antiques, fine art, decorative accessories, silver and jewelry from the

Sotheby’s C0L1 2315 334 York Ave., at E. 72nd St., 212.606.7000. sothebys.com. Fine art and collectibles go on the block. March 1: Contemporary Curated. March 6: American Art. March 9: Finest and Rarest Wines. March 18: Modern and Contemporary South Asian Art. March 19-20: Important Chinese Art. March 21: Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Art. March 22: Fine Classical Chinese Paintings and Calligraphy. March 23: Asian Art. C8 Swann Auction Galleries C0L1 4687 04 E. 25th St., btw Lexington & Park aves., 212.254.4710. swanngal leries.com. A family-owned auction house specializing in rare and antiquarian books and works on paper. March 5: 19th- and 20th-Century Prints and Drawings. March 7: Early Printed, Medical, Scientific and Travel Books. March 21: Autographs. March 28: Printed and Manuscript African Americana. F16

INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2019 | IN NEW YORK

33


transportation+tours FOR MORE ON WHAT TO DO, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC

offers a number of one-hour group tours, free with admission to the museum. Other tours include A Revolutionary Spies Tour and Women of the Revolutionary War Tour. $25. Dates/times vary. E24

Ground Zero Tour 911groundzero.com. Twohour walking tours offer a chance to gain an understanding of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The stroll includes skip-the-line access to the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. Daily tours start at 9:30 am, 10:30 am and 2 pm. $69 adults, $59 children. G22 Lincoln Center Tours C0L68942David Rubenstein Atrium, Broadway, btw W. 62nd & W. 63rd sts., 212.875.5350. lincolncenter.org/tours. Guided excursions offer visitors an inside look at Lincoln Center, exploring the performance center’s theaters and concert halls. Daily; times vary. $25 adults, $20 students under 30. I12

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 36-38).

New York Sports Tours E. 44th St. & Vanderbilt Ave., 212.244.1132. newyorksports. tours. Learn about the history of sports in NYC. Some tours include a meal and sports lecture at Keens Steakhouse (above). Prices

NYC Ferry ferry.nyc. Ferry service offered along the East River to and from Lower Manhattan and Midtown and parts of Brooklyn and Queens. Adult one-way ticket, $2.75.

TRANSPORTATION

Penn Station Eighth Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 212.630.6401. amtrak.com. Subways converge with commuter rail and bus services to New Jersey and Long Island and national rail services. I15

Amtrak C0LPenn Station, Eighth Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 800.872.7245. amtrak.com. Guests travel in comfort on these passenger trains, stopping at stations throughout the country and in Canada. Refreshments are available on most trains. I15

Port Authority Bus Terminal C0L526 13 25 Eighth Ave., btw W. 40th & W. 42nd sts., 800.221.9903. panynj .gov/bus-terminals/port-authority-bus-terminal .html. Bus carriers available at this terminal include New Jersey Transit, Greyhound and ShortLine Bus. H14

Grand Central Terminal C0L45789 E. 42nd St., btw Lexington & Vanderbilt aves., 212.340.2583. grandcentralterminal.com. Trains run on the Metro-North railroad line to and from this majestic landmark. For schedules and prices, visit mta.info/mnr. Terminal open daily 5:30 am-2 am. F14

TOURS

Long Island Rail Road mta.info/lirr. Operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week (including all holidays), taking visitors from Penn Station or Jamaica, Queens, to destinations throughout Long Island. For pricing and schedules, go online or call 511 and say “LIRR” at any time. I15 Metro-North Railroad C0L58 18 9 E. 42nd St., btw Lexington & Vanderbilt aves., 212.532.4900. mta .info/mnr. Commuter trains operate to 120 stations throughout seven counties in New York State. All trains depart from Grand Central Terminal. F14

34

IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

Big Bus Tours 212.685.8687. bigbustours.com. Visitors can see NYC’s most famous attractions, including the Empire State Building and the Statue of Liberty, on this bus service, which offers fixed loops and hop-on, hop-off tours with 30 stops. Times/prices vary. Foods of NY Tours C0L7914855.223.8684. foodsofny .com. These walking, tasting and cultural tours offer a look at NYC’s various neighborhoods, restaurants and markets. Tours include Original Greenwich Village, Chelsea Market, Gourmet Chinatown and The Best of Brooklyn. Times/ prices vary. Fraunces Tavern Museum Group Tours C0L5739City Hall Park Main Gate, Broadway, at Park Row, 212.425.1778. frauncestavernmuseum.org. The Fraunces Tavern Museum in Lower Manhattan

The New York Beer and Brewery Tour 265 Bowery, btw Stanton & E. Houston sts., 646.552.4718. tourguidesofnewyork.com. Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in style. Beer tours include The Signature Tour ($125), a 4.5-hour tour in a luxury van, where you will visit four breweries, drink a wide variety of local craft beer, learn how beer is made, enjoy artisanal food and beer pairings, and more. The Express Tour ($79), including transportation and snacks, is a three-stop, three-hour tour. E19 New York City Food Tours C0L739212.535.8687. cityfoodtours.com. Tours include Lower East Side food tastings; In the Steps of a Top Chef; Beer, Cheese & Chocolate; and others. Dates/ times/prices vary. Scott’s Pizza Tours 212.913.9903. scotts pizzatours.com. Scott Wiener created his tour company from his passion for great pizza. Tours include a Lower East Side/East Village Pizza Walk and Times Square Pizza Walk, along with bus tours. Prices/times/locations vary. A Slice of Brooklyn Bus ToursC0L796 212.913.9917. asliceofbrooklyn.com. Tours depart from Manhattan and take visitors to iconic sites around the borough. Tours include the Chocolate Tour and the Original Pizza Tour. Turnstile Tours 347.903.8687. turnstiletours .com. Enjoy two-hour walking tours of Manhattan’s Financial District or Midtown, and experience some of the city’s finest street food. Each tour includes five to six generous tastings. Prices/schedules/locations vary. Woolworth Building 233 Broadway, btw Park Pl. & Barclay St., 203.966.9663. woolworthtours .com. Designed in 1912 by architect Cass Gilbert as Frank W. Woolworth’s NYC headquarters, the landmarked Woolworth Building was once the tallest building in the world. Tours of the magnificent vintage lobby, long closed to the public, are available. Prices for timed tours $20-$45. E21


out & about CONCIERGES MIXED & MINGLED AT SEVERAL POSH EVENTS AROUND NEW YORK CITY

DISTINGUISHED CONCERTS INTERNATIONAL NEW YORK hosted a concierge appreciation night that included an orchestral performance at Carnegie Hall. Local restaurant, Four Cuts Steakhouse, provided light hors d’oeuvres for the occasion.

T-MOBILE welcomed concierges to light bites and cocktails as they explored the Times Square location. Concierges were given information about the debut of T-Mobile’s exclusive concierge plan and referral program.

From left to right: Mark Widerman, NYC JC Suites; guest of Mark Widerman; Nadia Richards, The Central Park North.

Above: Paul White, Walker Tower; Jacob Cerda, Archer Hotel. Right: Gabrielle Sarmiento, News Inflight. Below, from left to right: Guest of Kal Naim; Kal Naim, Lotte New York Palace; guest of Kal Naim.

From left to right: Guest of Fernando Bardina; Fernando Bardina, Superior Ink; guest of Fernando Bardina.

From left to right: Denise Bethune-Mignot, The Phillips Club; Deniz Altan, NH Jolly Madison Towers Hotel; Paul White, Walker Tower; guest of Paul White.

INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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PARK

137 St

1

125 St

Claremont Ave

Riverside Dr

Henry Hudson Pkwy

Riverside Dr

RIVERSIDE PARK

1

New-York Historical Society

Delacorte Theater

Loeb

CENTRAL PARK The Great Lawn

85th St Transverse

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Jewish Museum Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Guggenheim Museum

6

110 St

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103 St

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r

Gracie Mansion

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JEFFERSON PARK

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Triborough Tri Tr iborou ough gh B Br Bridge rid idg ge

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E 116 St (Luis Muñoz Marin Blvd)

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86 St Q

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American Museum of Natural History / Rose Center for Earth & Space

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El Museo del Barrio Museum of the City of NY Madison Ave

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Studio Museum in Harlem

Malcolm X. Blvd (Lenox Ave)

(110 St)

Broadway

116 St

Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd

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125 St

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Manhattan Ave

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Apollo Theater

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nv

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Lincoln Tunnel

New York Water

W 44 St

Pier 63

Hell’s Kitchen

W 23 St

Chelsea

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N 5 St N 4 St N 3 St

Lor ime r St Gu D ob e r n s e bin y St Ban St ke Gem St St r St ay N 15 St Qu N 14 St McCARREN N 13 St PARK N 12 St N 11 St N 10 St N 9 St Bedford Av N 8 St L N 7 St N 6 St

Eck Leo ford S nar t dS t

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Greenpoint

Gu ine ss Bl y vd Cla nt St o St t p Du gle n S Ea ema St Fre reen n St t G ur o a S H Indi St t va Ja nt S Ave Ke oint t np on S e Gre Milt le St b t No kS Oa

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P.S. 1

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A Point 47 R e nters 48 Av Hu

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F• J • M• Z

Delancey StEssex St

St Attorney St Clinton Delancey St

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FDR Dr

Little Italy

Nolita

St Orchard t Allen S St Eldridge

Suffolk Stanton St

Columbi

HAMILTON FISH PARK

Alphabet City

Ave D

Noho

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TOMPKINS SQUARE

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East Village

Queensboro Bridge

Queens-Midtown Tunnel

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GREENWICH VILLAGE

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Roosevelt Island

Long Island City

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Soho

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West Village

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Whitney Museum

Sutton Place

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Lenox Hill

Grand Central Terminal

UNION SQUARE

MADISON SQUARE 23 St PARK W•R Flatiron Building

Midtown South

W•R

28 St

Empire State Bldg

6

51 St

Midtown East

New York Public Library The Morgan Library & Museum

Midtown West

NY Waterway Tours Bus Stop

B• D • F • M W• N•Q•R

34 St

47-50 Sts

Diamond Rockefeller Ctr District B• D • F • M

7 B• D • F • M BRYANT PARK

42 St Bryant Pk

Theater District

St. Patrick’s Cathedral

E•M

Lex Av/53 St

4 •5 •6

59 St

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68 St

72 St Q

Second Ave

Pier

A•C•E

8 Av L

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18 St

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23 St

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28 St

Madison Square Garden

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34 St-Penn Station

Garment District

W •N•Q•R S•1•2 3•7

Times Sq 42 St

49 St

Radio City Music Hall

Rockefeller NY Waterway Center Tours Bus Stop

B• D • E

7 Av

F

57 St

Museum of 5 Av/ Modern Art 53 St (MoMA) E•M

Central Park South

N • W• R

5 Av/59 St

Park Zoo

Frick Collection

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10 St

77 St

First Ave

Little W 12 St E 12 St Gre W 12 St Wa enwi rt St ver ch A evoo ly P ve Gans ratio St t E 10 St W 10 St t S o H ane S l 52 Ble J W Astor Pl yvesant St ec 4S W 12 St 6 ke Stu t e t W 8 St n St. Mark’s Pl 8 StNYU u W 4 St S r k Beth St Washington Mews W • R Astor Pl Cooper Wash Sq Ban 11 St W t Christopher St Washington Pl A • B• C • D WASHINGTON Waverly Pl Union E 6 St S ry Sheridan Sq E•F•M Per les St St St SQUARE r W 4 St t1 rce es Cha 10 St t E 4 St New Broadway St W 3 St e S me Jon lia S W r v e Great Jones St e Minetta La ro ComB ph o York Lafayette St n t G r Pier 46 is edf o t C • • • Chr ord Bond St E 2 St S University B D F M St Barrow ine St Pier 45 Bleecker St Bleecker rm g n St Ca wninSt Morto St t S o y D 2 Av Lero 6 W Houston St Houston St Jersey St ICP F n St Prince St 1 Clarkso Prince St Museum uston g St o H St W Kin t Bowery Spring W•R ton S Pier 40 Charl Spring J•Z t Spring St St am S St Vand C•E Kenmare St 6 t S ick Broome St Hornblower Cruises & Events Domin Grand St Grand St B• D t Canal St Watts S l nne u t T d S Canal St St Canal St k s How r e Hollan ard o ss St Pier 32 • • • • • • Y bro

Meatpacking District

Tenth Ave

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Joyce Theater

C•E

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34 St

Penn Station A•C•E

Port Authority Bus Terminal A•C•E

42 St

1

50 St

N•Q W •R

57 St 7 Av

The Pond

Carousel Wollman Skating Rink

Sheep Meadow

Strawberry Fields

Conservatory Water

The Met Breuer

St

Map is not to scale.

Pier 61

Chelsea Piers

34th St Hudson Yards 7

Jacob K. Javits Convention Center

Pier 78

50 St

C•E Gray Line New York Sightseeing

Clinton

Circle Line Sightseeing 42nd St W 42 St World Yacht Dining Cruises W 40 St NY Waterway Commuter Ferry CitySightseeing Cruises

Pier 84 Taxi West 44th St

W 46 St

W 48 St

Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum

W 53 St

W 50 St

DEWITT CLINTON PARK

W 55 St

W 57 St

1

66 St

B• C

72 St

American Folk Art Museum

Lincoln Center

1•2•3

72 St

DAMROSCH PARK 59 St Columbus Circle A • B• C • D • 1 Museum of Arts & Design

Pier 90

Pier 96

W 60 St

W 62 St

W 65 St

W 70 St

W 72 St

Bethesda Fountain

Loeb Boathouse

FDR Dr

MacDougal St

13 St

Blvd Vernon

9 St 10 St

21 St 22 St

23 St

W 74 St

Eighth Ave Sullivan St

Dyer Ave Sixth Ave La Guardia Pl

24 St

The Lake

Ave C

Kent A

Wooster St

e Av an

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Fifth Ave

Thompson St

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Wythe

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nA

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esce nt St 27 St 28 St 29 St 30 St illm

12 St l St rcia me Com

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Fifth Ave Park Ave

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Park Ave Lexington Ave

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Lexington Ave Third Ave

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Drigg

Third Ave M

h an

Bedford

Second Ave First Ave

t

me rS t Tay lo

First Ave Sutton Pl 5 St

tS

Cly

York Ave n Blvd

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Roosevelt Island Verno

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12 St t 21 S

Pr

No r

11 St Pl 30 St 30 St 29

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S UD South End Ave

ON Battery Park City

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Columbia

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Church St

Trinity Pl

West BRdway

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Montague

Ter

PROME

NADE

Sidney Pl

Clinton St

Garden

Pl

Dean St Bergen St

BROOKLYN

DownTown

Fort Greene

Center Atlantic Ave

B•D•N•Q•R•2•3•4•5

Schermerhorn A•C

Bergen St F

2•3•4•5

Boro Hall

Cobble Hill

Ave

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Museum

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Brooklyn Heights

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Museum City Sightseeing Cruises South Statue Cruises Statue of Liberty National Monument Ferry & Hu Staten Island Ferry gh & Ellis Island Immigration Museum Whitehall L. St (closed) Ca rey W• R T

National

Tribeca

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PROMOTION

IN Places to Go THIS MONTH’S TOP PICKS FOR SHOPPING, ATTRACTIONS AND MORE

T-Mobile T-Mobile is redefining the way consumers and businesses buy wireless services through leading product and service innovation. The Company’s advanced nationwide 4G LTE network delivers outstanding wireless experiences to millions of customers who are unwilling to compromise on quality and value. Visit T-Mobile’s Times Square signature store on the corner of W. 46th and Broadway for an amazing experience! 1535 Broadway, Ste. 161A, 646.350.4645, www.t-mobile.com

Paname French Restaurant Paname, a French nickname for Paris, offers French cuisine and weekend brunch in a sophisticated but charming neighborhood bistro. Located in Midtown East, Paname serves artfully presented classic and contemporary menu items, including baby octopus, escargot, boudin noir and bouillabaisse. Come in for a prix fixe lunch with three courses for $26, or dinner with three courses for $43. 1068 Second Ave., 212.207.3737, www.panamenyc.com

The Band’s Visit

Last chance to see the best—the 10time Tony Award®-winning Best Musical featuring a score that seduces your soul, star-making performances and worldclass onstage musicians. This joyously offbeat show is about a lost Egyptian band, the wrong Israeli town and the glorious music that brings them together. Rolling Stone magazine cheers, “It’s one of my favorite musicals of all time.” FINAL BROADWAY PERFORMANCE APRIL 7. The Ethel Barrymore Theatre, 243 W. 47th St., 212.239.6200, www.TheBandsVisitMusical.com

Hooters Stop by and visit Hooters at its new Midtown location all month long to catch the tournaments! With two floors and over 65 TVs, Hooters is the perfect place to catch the big game. Wings, seafood, burgers and craft beer are all served by the World Famous Hooters Girls. Just when you thought it couldn’t get any better, Hooters now offers brunch on the weekend! Conveniently located right across the street from Madison Square Garden and Penn Station. 155 W. 33rd St., 212.695.9580, www.hooters.com

Patsy’s Italian Restaurant Patsy’s, a celebrity favorite since 1944, was Frank Sinatra’s choice when in New York. Just steps from Carnegie Hall, this fourth-generation, family-owned and operated restaurant provides generous portions and a family-friendly atmosphere that feels like home. Patsy’s signature award-winning sauces, as well as artisanal pastas, are available at Patsy’s only location and better grocers nationwide. 236 W. 56th St., 212.247.3491, www.patsys.com


APRIL’19 HIGHLIGHTS

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Sakura Matsuri Cherry Blossom Festival Brooklyn Botanic Garden (also April 28), bbg.org/visit/event/sakura_matsuri_2019

TriBeCa Film Festival (thru May 5), Various NYC theaters, tribecafilm.com

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New York International Auto Show (thru April 28), Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, autoshowny.com

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The Photography Show (thru April 7), Pier 94, aipadshow.com

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The Pancakes & Booze Art Show MI-5 Lounge, pancakes andbooze.com/nyc

IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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NYC Hot Sauce Expo (also April 14), Brooklyn Expo Center, nychotsauceexpo.com

International Pillow Fight Day Washington Square Park, pillowfightday.com

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9/11 Memorial & Museum 5K Run/Walk & Community Day Pier 26, 911memorial.org

PHOTOS: NEW YORK INTERNATIONAL AUTO SHOW, COURTESY NEW YORK INTERNATIONAL AUTO SHOW; TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL VIRTUAL-REALITY SESSION, COURTESY TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL; SAKURA MATSURI CHERRY BLOSSOM FESTIVAL, COURTESY LIZ LIGON PHOTOGRAPHY; NYC PILLOW FIGHT DAY, BRITTANY WAGES

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Profile for IN New York

IN New York - March 2019  

IN New York - March 2019  

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