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NEW YORK


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YOU VE NEVER SEEN FROZEN ” LIKE THIS! ’

GOOD MORNING AMERICA

GET TICKETS NOW! VISIT THE BOX OFFICE St. James Theatre OR FrozenTheMusical.com © Disney


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

CITY SPECTACULAR Welcome, visitors, to New York City! I have to admit, as both an editor and passionate New Yorker, I like nothing more than showing off this town, which I unabashedly believe is the most exciting city in the world. This year, Where’s annual GuestBook is chockablock with stories designed to whet your appetite, stir your cultural curiosity and entice you to shop in our diverse retail emporiums. Our fashion feature, “Natural Selection,” is a very timely look at fashion through the lens of a designers concerned with both the current environment and future generations—comfortable, stylish pieces for men and women that are also ethically sourced, sustainable and organic. Similarly, jewelry houses and jewelery makers are also getting involved with conservation and sustainability—in fact, some have been doing so for years (“Jeweled Hearts”), proving that even the most elite and high-end clothing and accessory communities can think like a global village. Speaking of global villages, if you are both adventurous, ethnically curious and a foodie, then you will love “Melting Pots,” our piece on some of the most creative fusion restaurants and chefs in town. Elsewhere on the dining scene: by now, we all know the term farm to table. In this issue, food writer Meryl Pearlstein goes one step further, holding restaurants accountable to the phrase by reporting on those that quite literally, have their own farms from which they source their menus (“From Barn to Table”). What? You say you’re a night owl and a hipster seeker? Seek no further. In “Learning the Ropes,” Karen Tina Harrison gives a brief history on exclusive clubs in Gotham, and reports on today’s most prestigious dance and nightclubs, along with a terrific tip sheet on how to get in (even if you last name is not Kardashian or you are not a regular!) And, if you are not a Kardashian, but would love to know what spots Kim or Kourtney, or Cardi B. rave about for a facial or massage, get the lowdown in “Beauty Buzz.” If you are here for any decent period of time, you are, of course, going to take in a Broadway show. And while many musicals and plays on the Great White Way have come and gone faster

Above: An autumnal moment in Central Park (“First Looks”).


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

than you can say Andrew Lloyd Webber, we take a look at five that beat all odds and are not only still fixtures on Broadway years after first opening, but still as fresh and exciting to watch as the night of their first performance (“Hit Parade”). No matter how long a museum has been in New York City, it is always a thrilling moment when the institution acquires new works of art. Our favorite gallery and museums writer, Terry Trucco, takes a look at what has recently been acquired, from small museums like the Morgan Library & Museum, to cavernous venues like the 125,000-square-foot Museum of Modern Art— and why you need to check them out (“New Blood”). So, get familiar with this town by thumbing through the pages of this Guestbook, and then get going—you have got a lot of territory to cover!

Lois Levine Editor-in-Chief Where GuestBook® New York

Top, from left to right: Ceviche at Zengo (“Melting Pots”); a gilded mummiform coffin lid from the late-Ptolomaic Period at the Met (“New Blood”); the Washington Square Arch in Washington Square Park (“First Looks”).


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CONTENTS 16

FIRST LOOK Iconic sights around this great city.

34

NATURAL SELECTION Fashion designers raise the bar with new looks that are ethically and environmentally responsible.

38

HEARTS OF GOLD Precious gemstones, created with an eye toward conservation.

40

FROM BARN TO TABLE Urban dining spots that source directly from their own farms. BY MERYL PEARLSTEIN

44

MELTING POTS Eat local but go global. BY MERYL PEARLSTEIN

48

LEARNING THE ROPES The inside scoop on the city’s most exclusive bars and nightclubs. BY KAREN TINA HARRISON

54

BEAUTY BUZZ What the hottest celebrities are saying about these city spas on social media. BY JONI SWEET

58

HIT PARADE These Broadway musicals just won’t quit. BY DAVID COTE

64

NEW BLOOD Exciting acqusitions make these museums worth talking about. BY TERRY TRUCCO

68

LOOK BOOK/INDEX High-quality items offered by some of the city’s top retailers and an index of our advertisers.

72

PARTING SHOT

ON THE COVER: THE OCULUS AT WESTFIELD WORLD TRADE CENTER. PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK


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NEW YORK EDITORIAL & DESIGN EDITOR Lois Levine DESIGN DIRECTOR Anna Ratman EXECUTIVE EDITOR Francis Lewis ASSISTANT EDITOR Daniel Fridman

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Where GuestBook® is produced by Morris Visitor Publications (MVP), a division of Morris Communications, Co., LLC. 725 Broad St., Augusta, GA 30901, morrismedianetwork.com. Where® magazine and the where® logo are registered trademarks of Morris Visitor Publications. MVP publishes Where magazine, Where® QuickGuide, IN New York and IN London magazines, and a host of other maps, guides and directories for business and leisure travelers, and is the publisher for the Hospitality Industry Association. In New York City, Where Guestbook is pleased to be a member of: MVP IS A PROUD SPONSOR OF LES CLEFS D’OR USA


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... Here you will find contemporary dishes of surprising delicacy and precision, with a pleasing bias towards wonderful seafood and shellfish, such as scallops with ricotta gnudi, or delicious bluefin tuna with uni and asparagus. You get buzzed in at street level, which adds a bit of mystery to proceedings. Up the stairs and you’ll find yourself in a lavish little jewel box, with colorful murals on the wall, Murano chandeliers hanging from an ornate ceiling, and semi-circular booths. The only thing missing is James Bond’s nemesis drumming his fingers on the table in the corner. Excerpt from 2016 review.


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CONTRIBUTORS David Cote

Karen Tina Harrison

David Cote

Joni Sweet

Meryl Pearlstein

Terry Trucco

Hit Parade, page 58 David Cote has been writing about theater since he moved to New York in 1992. His works appear in publications including American Theatre, What Should We Do?!, Observer and others. He was the longest-serving theater editor and chief drama critic of Time Out New York, and is the author of popular companion books to the hit Broadway musicals, “Wicked,” “Jersey Boys” and “Spring Awakening.” Cote is also a playwright and opera librettist.

Karen Tina Harrison Learning the Ropes, page 48

Four days after her 17th birthday, Harrison moved into her first Manhattan residence, a Barnard College dorm room. “Love at first night,” she recalls it. She has been a columnist, mainly on style and food beats, for three of the city’s newspapers. “Things here change in a New York minute, which visitors discover equals 30 seconds.” Her contribution here traces the evolution of nightclub admission. “Disdainful doormen once presided over those pearly gates,” she notes. “Clubs are more welcoming today. Dress nice, pay up, waltz in.”

Joni Sweet

Beauty Buzz, page 54 Joni Sweet’s journalistic pursuits have taken her around the globe—hiking in the rain forest of Borneo and swimming with sharks in 12

W H E R E G U E ST B OO K

Mexico. She has been published by National Geographic, Lonely Planet and Forbes, among other outlets. When she’s not traveling, Sweet can be found happily getting pampered at NYC’s top spas.

Meryl Pearlstein

From Barn to Table, page 40 Melting Pots, page 44 Originally from Boston, Meryl Pearlstein is a Manhattan-based writer who focuses on luxury, theater and food. She is a restaurant reviewer for Gayot and writes for AllNY.com, Where New York, and Travel and Food Notes, among other publications. A sponge for everything New York City, Meryl can be found exploring the city’s five boroughs in search of what’s new and tempting, from under-theradar street food to fine dining. Additionally, Pearlstein is the founder of MDP Publicity, a boutique travel public relations firm.

Terry Trucco New Blood, page 64

Terry Trucco was raised in Northern California and came to New York as a college student with a summer job for Time magazine. She has worked as a journalist in Tokyo and London, writing for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and The International Herald Tribune, among others. Since moving back to New York, she has written mainly on culture, design and travel for Travel & Leisure, House Beautiful and The New York Times. She is the founder of Overnight New York, an award-winning website featuring news and reviews of New York City hotels. Trucco was thrilled to take a close look at the diversity of new works entering museum collections this past year. It reminded her that everyone wins when new pieces enter a museum, from the institution to museumgoers and even the city itself.


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16

WHERE GUESTBOOK


FIRST LOOK

PHOTO: ROCKEFELLER CENTER CHRISTMAS TREE, ISTOCK

Seasonal looks at distinct New York City landmarks that not only present a study in contrasts but also define the very heart and soul of the metropolis.

WINTER Rockefeller Center Every year at the end of November, thousands of bundled-up spectators, locals and visitors alike, gather at Rockefeller Plaza to witness the annual lighting of New York City’s largest and most dazzling Christmas tree. The ice-skating rink—perched right below the tree and amid this landmark complex’s skyscrapers, upscale eateries and gilded statue of Prometheus—celebrates its 83rd birthday in 2019. 45 Rockefeller Plz. WHERE GUESTBOOK

17


FIRST LOOK

Times Square In the City That Never Sleeps’ most bustling ’hood, everything stays illuminated around the clock, from restaurants and bars to digital billboards and live news tickers. Two century-old spectating traditions live here. The first: Storied Broadway playhouses host the finest live theater in the world every day. The second happens on Dec. 31: More than a million spectators put on their warmest gear and pile in to watch the New Year’s Eve ball drop (above). Broadway & Seventh Ave., btw W. 42nd & W. 47th sts.

New York Botanical Garden More than a million living plants reside inside this 127-yearold, 250-acre institution, one of the largest on the planet and easily the largest in a U.S. city, home to 29 gardens and collections. The Holiday Train Show (top, right), on view from late-November to late-January, features model trains zipping through more than 175 New York landmarks in the breathtaking Enid A. Haupt Conservatory glass-enclosed greenhouse. 2900 Southern Blvd., the Bronx, 718.817.8700 18

WHERE GUESTBOOK

Lincoln Center NYC’s aesthetically brilliant epicenter for the performing arts spans three city blocks and is home to the New York Philharmonic, New York City Ballet, Metropolitan Opera, Lincoln Center Theater and School of American Ballet Theatre. The renowned cultural complex features crystal chandeliers (above) and Marc Chagall murals in the Metropolitan Opera House, and LED-lit “Grand Stairs” that “welcome” guests in dozens of languages. 10 Lincoln Center Plz., 212.875.5000

PHOTOS: TIMES SQUARE, AMY HART; NYBG HOLIDAY TRAIN SHOW, ROBERT BENSON; METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE, COURTESY LINCOLN CENTER

WINTER


THE PRIDE OF BROADWAY

©Disney

LET IT MOVE YOU

Minskoff Theatre, Broadway & 45th Street lionking.com


FIRST LOOK

SPRING

Brooklyn Botanic Garden Since 1910, the 52-acre oasis has fostered curiosity in the world of plants while inspiring an appreciation and sense of stewardship of the environment. The Garden includes a number of specialty “gardens within the Garden,� plant collections and the Steinhardt Conservatory, which houses the C. V. Starr Bonsai Museum, three climate-themed plant pavilions, a white cast-iron and glass aquatic plant house, and an art gallery. There are several itineraries and programs to enjoy, including the new immersive Discovery Garden, a landscape created to encourage children to explore nature through hands-on experiences as they investigate plants and animals in a variety of landscapes. Visitors can enjoy the lush landscape year-round on their own and discover over 18,600 species of plants, or take a guided tour. 990 Washington Ave., the Bronx, 718.623.7200 20

WHERE GUESTBOOK


O MAJESTIC

THEATRE | 247 West 44 th St. | Telecharge.com | 212.239.6200 | phantombroadway.com

Photo: Matt Crockett

L E T Y O U R F A N TA S I E S U N W I ND


FIRST LOOK

Jane’s Carousel The historic attraction with 48 carved wooden horses and two chariots was created in 1922, the heyday of the American carousel, by the Philadelphia Toboggan Company; it was then lovingly restored to its original elegance and donated to Brooklyn Bridge Park in 1984. Take the kids for a ride on this beautiful, antique carousel housed in a gorgeous glass pavilion, designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect, Jean Nouvel (above). Brooklyn Bridge Park, Brooklyn, 718.222.2502

Citi Field Home field of the New York Mets, the open-air Citi Field baseball park (top, right) was completed in 2009 as a replacement for Shea Stadium. During baseball season, get to the park between the time the gates open up and an hour before game time and head to the field-level railings for a chance to get player autographs. Times and prices of tickets for home games vary. 123-01 Roosevelt Ave., Queens, 718.507.8499 22

WHERE GUESTBOOK

Washington Square Park Beneath the giant Washington Arch (above) lies the Fifth Avenue entrance to one of the city’s most recognizable public spaces. The 9.75acre park is notable for its celebration of nonconformity: New York University students congregate around the majestic bronze statue of Garibaldi, musicians sit on benches and strum guitars, and serious chess players compete beneath vintage-style streetlights that lend to the park’s 19th-century feel. W 4th St. to Waverly Pl.

PHOTOS: JANE’S CAROUSEL, ©JULIENNE SCHAER; CITI FIELD, DOMINICK TOTINO; WASHINGTON SQUARE ARCH, ©MICHELLE BENNETT

SPRING


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FINE DINING & COCKTAILS Agern, The Campbell Bar, Cipriani Dolci, Grand Central Oyster Bar & Restaurant, Michael Jordan’s The Steak House N.Y.C. FAST CASUAL DINING including Art Bird & Whiskey Bar, Café Spice, Central Market New York, Chirping Chicken, Eata Pita, Frankies Dogs On The Go, Golden Krust Patties, Great Northern Deli/Danish Dogs, Great Northern Food Hall, Hale and Hearty Soups, Jacques Torres Ice Cream, La Chula, Mendy’s Kosher Delicatessen/Dairy , Prova Pizzabar, Shake Shack, Shiro of Japan, Sushi by Pescatore, Tartinery, Tri Tip Grill, Wok Chi Stir Fry Kitchen, Zaro’s Family Bakery

COFFEE & BAKERIES including Bien Cuit, Café Grumpy, Doughnut Plant, Eli Zabar’s Bread & Pastry, Financier Patisserie, Irving Farm Coffee Roasters, Joe Coffee, Magnolia Bakery, Starbucks, Zaro’s Family Bakery

FOOD & BEVERAGE SHOPS including Beer Table To Go, Beverage Bar, Central Cellars, Ceriello Fine Foods, Dishes at Home, E.A.T. Gifts, Eli Zabar’s Farm to Table, Jacques Torres Chocolate, Juice Press, Li-Lac Chocolates, Murray’s Cheese, Neuhaus Belgian Chocolate, Oren’s Daily Roast, O&CO, Pescatore Seafood Co., Spices and Tease, Taste NY

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4 5 6 S 7


FIRST LOOK

Staten Island Ferry It all began more than 200 years ago, when, in 1817, the Richmond Turnpike Company started a steamboat service to Manhattan from Staten Island. Cornelius Vanderbilt stepped in to purchase the company in 1838, merging it with its competitors. By 1905, the City of New York had assumed control of the ferry service. Today, with 70,000 weekday passengers, the Staten Island Ferry is the single busiest ferry route in the United States and the world’s busiest passenger-only ferry system. This last remaining vestige of an entire ferry system is not only a pleasant ride for commuting professionals from Staten Island, along with others coming in from the borough to enjoy a day in the city, it is also free. Now, ain’t that grand? Whitehall St., at South Ferry, 311 24

WHERE GUESTBOOK

PHOTO: STATEN ISLAND FERRY, CHRISTOPHER ONG

SUMMER


“A magical Broadway musical with

BRAINS, HEART and COURAGE.” Time Magazine

GERSHWIN THEATRE x WickedtheMusical.com Audio translations available in 7 languages.


FIRST LOOK

Coney Island

Flushing Meadows Corona Park Many suburban New Yorkers still have memories of sitting in the backseat of the family car in 1964 and pulling into the World’s Fair parking lot, astounded by their first glimpse of the Unisphere (top)—the spectacular stainless steel representation of Earth, built as the thematic symbol for the Fair (and the Space Age). And while, today, this park is filled with several worthwhile destinations, from Citi Field (home of the New York Mets) to the New York Hall of Science, the still-standing Unisphere can’t help but dwarf all in its path. Grand Central Pkwy., btw 111th St. & College Point Blvd., Park Drive E., Queens, 718.760.6665 26

WHERE GUESTBOOK

First discovered by Henry Hudson in 1609, Coney Island eventually became one of the country’s most famous amusement parks and beach resort areas, known as “heaven at the end of a subway ride.” Come summer, many still feel that way. After all, where else can you find an aquarium, the Cyclone Roller Coaster, the original Nathan’s Famous hot dogs, a local brewery, a mermaid parade and (bottom, left) a series of outdoor murals created by local graffiti artists? Entrance to Coney Island Luna Park, 1000 Surf Ave., Brooklyn, 718.258.2460

Empire State Building Whether lit up in red, white and blue during 4th of July celebrations (above), or decked out in green for St. Patrick’s Day, the world’s most famous skyscraper never disappoints. Contracts inked just weeks before the 1929 stock market crash, the sleek, Art Deco landmark was still built 45 days ahead of schedule and $5 million under budget. 350 Fifth Ave., 212.736.3100

PHOTOS: CONEY ISLAND GRAFFITI WALL BY TATS CRU, MARTHA COOPER; FLUSHING MEADOWS CORONA PARK UNISPHERE, ISTOCK; MACY’S 4TH OF JULY FIREWORKS, KENT MILLER

SUMMER


THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

N ew A m s te rda m Th e atre , B ro a dway & 42n d Stre et Ala d dinTh e M u sic al.co m

©Disney

T H E HI T B R OA DWAY M U SIC A L


SUMMER

Snug Harbor Cultural Center & Botanical Garden Among the many charms of this center, originally a 19thcentury charitable rest home for sailors, is the New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden (above), with rockery resembling mountains that inspired the poems of Buddhist and Taoist monks. Elsewhere in Snug Harbor are 28 historic buildings dating from 1833, including six of the first New York City Landmarks. 1000 Richmond Terr., Staten Island, 718.448.2500

The High Line This elevated park started out in 1934 as an industrial train line for the New York Central Railroad. In 2009, the first section of the new public space opened up to the public, with two more sections opening in subsequent years. Here, one can stroll the 1.45-mile-long park and admire its wild landscape and planted trees, art exhibits, special events and views of the Hudson River and NYC street life. Gansevoort to W. 34th sts., btw 10th & 12th aves., 212.500.6035 28

WHERE GUESTBOOK

Domino Park

One of the latest additions to Gotham, this new park in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, opened in June 2018, and was once home to the Domino Sugar Refinery. The five-acre park on the waterfront (above) includes Artifact Walk, with remnants of the old refinery (like the tanks and cranes that were used during the sugar refining process, now painted turquoise blue); a playground, built like a miniature sugar refinery; a bocce court; a dog run; and Tacocina, the taco stand from famed NYC restaurateur (and founder of Shake Shack), Danny Meyer. 300 Kent Ave., Brooklyn, 212.484.2700

PHOTOS: SNUG HARBOR CULTURAL CENTER & BOTANICAL GARDEN, CHRISTOPHER ONG; THE HIGH LINE, IWAN BAAN; DOMINO PARK WATERFRONT WALKWAY AND FLEXIBLE TURF GROUND, DANIEL LEVIN

FIRST LOOK


ONE OF THE MOST REMARKABLE SHOWS IN MUSICAL THEATER HISTORY. –Peter Marks,

Music Box Theatre 239 W. 45th St. • DearEvanHansen.com •

@DearEvanHansen


FIRST LOOK

FALL

Central Park The shortest distance between two points is a straight line, and the only straight line in New York’s 643-acre “backyard” of meandering trails and recreational green spaces is The Mall (above). At the southern end of the quarter-mile promenade is Literary Walk, where statues of Shakespeare, Walter Scott, Robert Burns and a now-obscure American poet, Fitz-Greene Halleck, preside; at the northern end is Bethesda Terrace and Fountain. Lining the path and forming a leafy canopy is a stand of majestic American elm trees. The Mall: mid-park, btw 66th & 72nd sts., 212.794.6564 30

WHERE GUESTBOOK


FIRST LOOK

Wave Hill A mid-19th-century private estate, where Theodore Roosevelt summered as a boy and Mark Twain set down roots for a few years, is now a 28-acre public garden and cultural center in the affluent Riverdale section of the Bronx. Visitors wander through flower, herb, wild and aquatic gardens, pausing under a pergola (above) to take in views of the Palisades, a range of sheer cliffs just across the Hudson River in New Jersey. W. 249th St. & Independence Ave., the Bronx, 718.549.3200

Madison Square Garden In the fall, this legendary sports and entertainment venue (top, right) is home to the New York Knicks basketball team and the New York Rangers hockey team, pop concerts and other events. The current complex is the fourth that bears the name; the first two were located on Madison Square, the third on W. 50th St. 4 Pennsylvania Plz., 866.858.0008 32

WHERE GUESTBOOK

Carnegie Hall “How do you get to Carnegie Hall?” the old joke asks. “Practice, practice, practice,” the punch line answers. The words held true in 1891 when Tchaikovsky traveled from Russia to conduct the first concert in the plush venue (above), prized for its incomparable acoustics. A who’s who of artists, classical and popular, have practiced, practiced, practiced to perform here: Jay-Z among them. Seventh Ave. & W. 57th St., 212.247.7800

PHOTOS: PERGOLA, COURTESY WAVE HILL; MADISON SQUARE GARDEN, COURTESY MADISON SQUARE GARDEN; CARNEGIE HALL, JEFF GOLDBERG

FALL


WINNER! BEST MUSICAL

ALL ACROSS NORTH AMERICA

COME FROM AWAY Book, Music and Lyrics by Irene Sankoff and David Hein Directed by Christopher Ashley

THE REMARKABLE TRUE STORY NOW ON BROADWAY

O Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, 236 W. 45 TH STREET OFFICIAL AIRLINE

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NATURAL SELECTION Eco-conscious, sustainable and ethically sourced are the stylish must-haves. PHOTOGRAPHY BY EMON TOUFANIAN

Merchandising and Styling, Anna Katsanis Hair, Evanie Frausto; Makeup, Allie Smith Models: Madison Moehling/Fusion Models, Luca Bertea/DNA Models Shot on location in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. 34

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This page, on her: KORDAL cropped top, kordalstudio.com • ACEANDJIG trousers, aceandjig.com • ANGELA ROI vegan leather bag, angelaroi.com • K/LLER COLLECTION rings, kllercollection.com On him: O.N.S. jacket, onsclothing.com • DROPEL waterproof cashmere T-shirt, dropelfabrics.com • KRAMMER & STOUDT drawstring shorts, krammer-stoudt.com Facing page: VOZ hand-loomed short duster, madebyvoz.com • ACEANDJIG romper, aceandjig.com


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This page, left: NUDE turtleneck sweater with fringe, lulubrandt.com • ACEANDJIG skirt, aceandjig.com Right: MARA HOFFMAN coat and skirt, marahoffman.com • HAN dress shirt, han-newyork.com • BROTHER VELLIES boots, brothervellies.com Facing page: JOHN VARVATOS striped T-shirt and cardigan, john varvatos.com • KRAMMER & STOUDT pants, krammer-stoudt.com

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HEARTS OF GOLD Artistic vision meets ethical standards.

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As part of Tiffany’s commitment to sustainability and conservation, 100 percent of the profits from the Tiffany Save the Wild Collection supports the protection of African elephants, rhinos and lions, three species on the endangered list. Tiffany & Co. is particularly dedicated to the well-being of the African continent, where the company sources many of its diamonds. Ana-Katarina Petrovic-Dervisevic has been practicing sustainability since 1999, using recycled gold, fair-trade gems and diamonds sourced from companies which can provide the origins of their stones.

This page: JOHN HARDY Wave Hammered Bypass Ring with diamonds, johnhardy.com • TIFFANY & CO. Save the Wild Collection pendants in 18-karat rose gold, tiffany.com • ANA-KATARINA “Ain’t She Sweet” earrings, anakatarina.com Facing page: CHOPARD earrings from the Green Carpet Collection, chopard.com

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

For a while now, certain fine jewelers have designed with an eye toward social responsibility, whether they have been focused on preserving ethnic heritages; helping to foster sustainability and conservation; and/or using fair-trade gems and recycled precious metals for their rings, necklaces and pendants. Chopard’s Green Carpet Collection combines both ethics and aesthetics: The white gold used in the jeweler’s earrings has been awarded the Fairmined certificate, meaning the gold was mined in accordance with social and environmental standards. All diamonds in the collection are sourced from suppliers certified by the Responsible Jewellery Council, which monitors for ethical criteria. John Hardy established an artisan collective back in 1975 dedicated to creating one-of-a-kind jewelry and preserving the rich heritage of Bali. Artisans make jewelry using vetted suppliers to ensure diamonds and gemstones conform to ethical standards, as well as reclaimed silver and gold. Jewelry is created one piece at a time, starting with a hand-sketched and watercolor design, and ending with the hand-setting of each gemstone.

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FROM BARN TO TABLE These city restaurants take the farm-to-table movement very literally. Lucky for us. BY MERYL PEARLSTEIN


PHOTOS: ROSEMARY’S ROOFTOP GARDEN, DANIEL KRIEGER; BOBO CUISINE GARDEN, DANIELLE ADAMS

This page: Rosemary’s Rooftop Garden. Facing page: The patio at Bobo.

At this point, seeing “farm-to-table” on a menu feels old hat. But how many restaurants can really bring the goodness from their own farms to your table? These are some of the best around town. Manhattan’s Riverpark (450 E. 29th St., 212.729.9790) has one of the largest farms in New York City. At 10,000 square feet, Riverpark Farm is a year-round producer of ingredients that feature on the restaurant’s menu in dishes like branzino and carrots topped with herbs, or lamb chops with parsnip. Throughout the year, you’ll see specials that show off some of the 100 or so varieties of veg-

etables, herbs and flowers grown above Manhattan’s FDR Drive. As part of Riverpark’s commitment to the community, school tours and community planting workshops are held on a regular basis. Like other restaurants with urban farms, Riverpark is continually learning about what works in a city environment, where challenges like unstable wind, heat and sun can greatly influence a crop. Because of this, Riverpark’s entire farm is portable, planted in milk crates that can be moved to optimize crop output. During colder months, Riverpark uses low tunnels to keep the plants as warm as possible for growth or hibernation. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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In Brooklyn, cozy Olmsted (659 Vanderbilt Ave., Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, 718.552.2610) utilizes its outdoor space for both gardening and guest entertainment. Chef Greg Baxtrom had the idea of turning the small space into a self-sustaining, organic micro-garden with animals as well as plants. An aquaponics system in a clawfoot tub is home to crayfish, which create fertilizerfilled water for the garden and for water-loving plants like watercress that, in turn, purify the water in the tub. Two quail provide eggs. Herbs like Genovese basil, Thai basil mint, lemon balm and chives comprise the green garden, along with radishes, ají dulce peppers, cucumbers, beets, sour gherkins and more. Edible flowers, such as marigolds and calendulas, add colorful (and tasty) accents. Olmsted takes it a step further with an indoor “living wall” of microgreens that feed into dishes like carrot crepes topped with sunflower sprouts. Olmsted recently added a greenhouse in the backyard and created a second growing space nearby to continue the growing experimentation.

This page: Exterior of Blue Hill at Stone Barns. Facing page: Octopus and alliums at Riverpark.

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PHOTO: BLUE HILL, IRA LIPPKE; OCTOPUS AND ALLIUMS, COURTESY RIVERPARK

A restaurant that invites diners to literally smell the flowers and herbs is Rosemary’s (18 Greenwich Ave., 212.647.818) in Greenwich Village. Led by Chef Wade Moises, Rosemary’s delights in the surprises that urban gardening brings. “We love making new discoveries as the garden matures. For example, we find that micro vegetables grow better than full-size ones on our roof,” says Moises. Seasonal highlights can be found in Rosemary’s daily specials featuring a fresh mix of cooked and raw veggies and herbs, such as basil, ground cherries and celery. Cocktails at Rosemary’s also benefit from the garden, with fresh mint and lemon balm finding their way into seasonal libations. If you’re in the restaurant at the right moment, you’ll see the “roof-to-table” sourcing in action, with ingredients lowered by basket from above. Rosemary’s also operates a farm in the Hudson Valley, which delivers produce and eggs to Rosemary’s and sister restaurants Claudette and Bobo. Bobo (181 W. 10th St., 212.488.2626) sits in a 100-year-old town house with a garden.


Like Riverpark, Olmsted views the garden as a vital part of the community and welcomes school groups and guests. Williamburg, Brooklyn’s rustic, industrial Egg (109 N. 3rd St., Williamsburg, Brooklyn, 718.302.5151) sources vegetables, herbs and other produce from Goatfell Farm in Oak Hill, New York, which restaurant founder George Weld purchased a decade ago. Weld sees the farm as a way to build community for Egg’s employees, who all spend time at the farm. Egg’s summer bounty includes asparagus, snap peas, radishes and spring beets. At other times, you’ll find kale, beet greens, tomatoes, beans and more. Just north of Manhattan, Stone Barns Center in

Pocantico Hills is a living and learning agricultural center that feeds Blue Hill New York (75 Washington Pl., 212.539.1776) as well as Blue Hill at Stone Barns (in Pocantico Hills). Diners at Blue Hill New York benefit from the experience of the farmers at Stone Barns and those at Chef Dan Barber’s family farm, Blue Hill Farm in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. A four-course tasting menu and a larger “Farmer’s Feast” are offered, with courses changing frequently based on the bounty of the day. Blue Hill New York also sources from a wide range of nearby Hudson Valley farms to ensure that all dishes are representative farm-to-table. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

Tricolor quinoa at Sen Sakana.


MELTING POTS Where else but New York City would you find the finest in fusion cuisines?

PHOTO: TRICOLOR QUINOA, EVAN SUNG

BY MERYL PEARLSTEIN

Benefiting from the many nationalities in this city and the wealth of culinary talent here, foodies have always had an opportunity to explore a global selection of cuisines. Chefs who have trained in a variety of kitchens now create fusions reflecting their own personal heritage as well. Ready for culinary adventure? Read on! Japanese cuisine shows up in many permutations, wedding its own flavors to other cuisines. Japanese and Korean culinary marriages make perfect sense, as the countries’ proximity allows for easy migration of talent and recipes. Newcomer The Bari (417 Lafayette St., 646.869.0383) focuses on small Japanese and Korean plates from restaurateur Danny Hahn and Chef Mason Rhee. The restaurant prides itself on spicy and umami fusions, like sashimi with gochujang (red chili paste), or uni bibimbap. For something unexpected, The Bari’s bulgogi truffle udon is likely to become a new obsession. Korean melds with French at Soogil (108 E. 4th St., 646.838.5524), a cozy bistro from Chef Soogil Lim, a native of South Korea with a culinary pedigree from French restaurant Daniel. Try French beignets filled with Korean sweet potatoes and a side of chilled white kimchi soup, or short ribs braised with soy sauce. A menu standout, the nurungji gras is a plate of sautéed foie gras served over spinach and oyster mushrooms atop a rice cake. Experience Japanese with an Italian twist at Natsumi Tapas (323 Third Ave., 212.889.2182). You won’t have to choose one favorite here, because the small plates menu

encourages diners to create a mash-up medley. How do tofu ravioli, hamachi carpaccio with balsamic vinegar, or meatballs with basil pesto teriyaki sauce sound? Chefs Andrea Tiberi and Hiroyuki Nagao conjoin the two countries’ tastes with dishes that are subtle (shrimp fettuccine with yuzu tobiko) or dramatic (salmon pepperoncini roll). Japanese influences also merge with Jewish cuisine at tiny Shalom Japan (310 S. 4th St., Williamsburg, Brooklyn, 718.388.4012), where co-chefs and spouses Aaron Israel and Sawako Okochi literally marry their culinary backgrounds. Brooklyn Jewish traditionalists might go into shock seeing kasha from the Old Country used as a crust for fluke, enhanced here with a sake beurre blanc; or the radical but wonderfully flavorful matzo ball ramen with a foie gras dumpling. Okonomiyaki, a messy Japanese omelet-pancake, goes even further down the fusion fairway when served with pastrami, sauerkraut and bonito flakes. Desserts and cocktails include Japanese sweet potato and ricotta cheesecake with a black sesame crust or the potent Oy Vey Iz Kir cocktail with Manischewitz wine. Japanese-Peruvian has become another hot combination. Japanese migrant workers settled in Peru in the late 19th century, adapting culinary traditions with ingredients found in South America. The resulting cuisine, called Nikkei, is a fascinating fusion of tastes and preparations. Sen Sakana (28 W. 44th St., 212.221.9560), from Chefs Mina Newman and Taku Nagai, illustrates this cuisine with a menu of cold and hot small plates, sushi, grills and WHERE GUEST B OOK

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The product of Chef-owner Richard Sandoval, winner of Mexico’s prestigious Toque d’Oro, Zengo (622 Third Ave., 212.808.8110) has commanded recognition for its forward-thinking Latin-Asian fusion menu. Dishes like hamachi tiradito with shiso, Sriracha and ponzu (Japanese-Peruvian); achiote hoisin pork arepas (Mexican-Colombian-Asian); or the restaurant’s signature Thai chicken empanada filled with chile poblano and Oaxaca cheese (Thai-Mexican) show off bold fusions of traditional preparations with regional ingredients. Korean-born Phillip Lee’s dream was to introduce Korean tastes to New York diners in a variety of accessible ways. His creative Kimchi Taco Truck, perennially mobbed at food truck rallies, has expanded to a brick-and-

PHOTOS: DISHES FROM LOLO’S SEAFOOD SHACK, THEO SAMUELS; CEVICHE, MARGARET LEFTON; VARIETY OF PLATES AT SHALOM JAPAN, JOHN KEON

main dishes. Here you’ll find Peruvian accents like yuzu, aji amarillo and raw fish, or Peruvian dishes like cold ceviche, also served hot and with Japanese mushrooms. A personal favorite: Japanese cucumbers with fried Peruvian quinoa and a drizzle of sesame and soy. Chinese-Cuban has been an inexpensive NYC dining option for years, starting with diner-like La Caridad 78 (2199 Broadway, 212.874.2780), opened nearly 50 years ago. Slightly newer Flor de Mayo (484 Amsterdam Ave., 212.787.3388) offers Chino-Latino combination plates. Both restaurants popularized the idea of serving dishes from two cultures, to be eaten side by side. Taking this a step further is the blended diaspora cuisine known as Chino-Indo. Named after a club offering dining for Chinese expats living in Darjeeling and later in New York City, The Chinese Club (208 Grand St., Williamsburg, Brooklyn, 718.487.4576) draws inspiration from the centuries-old fusion of Chinese and Indian cuisines. Chefs Stacey Lo and Salil Mehta have upped the spiciness intrinsic to much of this cooking, using Hakkanese and Kolkata-Chinese regional recipes as a base and creating dishes like tandoori kung pao chicken marinated in spices instead of yogurt, and Calcutta chicken dressed with sambal, scallions and celery.


This page: A variety of plates at Shalom Japan. Facing page, left to right: LoLo’s Seafood Shack; ceviche at Zengo.

mortar establishment. Kimchi Grill (766 Washington Ave., Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, 718.360.1839) serves up a menu of Mexican-inflected Korean standbys. A variety of dishes include homemade kimchi (spicy pickled cabbage), a staple throughout Lee’s early years in Seoul, and the popular vegetarian tofu edamame falafel taco. Duck confit enchiladas and smoky poblano peppers stuffed with goat cheese make waves on the MexicanFrench menu at Jolie Cantina (241 Smith St., Cobble Hill, Brooklyn, 718.488.0777), which offers French dishes like bouillabaisse with spicy tomato-achiote broth and habanero aioli. Bring a group and create a mini-ravioli or steak tartare World Cup competition, choosing Mexican and French versions of each to share, washed down with

a Michelada or Frenchilada, made from Modelo Negra or Kronenbourg beer. Each drink has MX hot sauce and lemon, and is rimmed with salt and chile a la Mexicana. Lolo’s Seafood Shack (303 W. 116th St., 646.649.3356) may be more pan-Caribbean than true fusion, but it’s all a matter of delicious definition. With the Caribbean itself being influenced by its British, French and American cultures, island cuisine is already a mash-up by default. Here you’ll find smoked Mayan-influenced chicken wings, perfectly salted conch fritters and New England seafood steam pots. Finally, a simple but fusion sensation: the ramen burger, now in its own storefront restaurant Ramen Shack (1313 40th Ave., Long Island City, Queens, 929.522.0285).


The ins and outs of New York’s nightclub culture. BY KAREN TINA HARRISON

If you can make it into a New York nightclub, you can make it anywhere. A paradox of this welcoming city is its exclusionary club culture. Here, the velvet-rope mystique goes back to the city’s Colonialera, English-style gentlemen’s clubs. As the city became America’s prosperous financial hub, it got more status-conscious. In the late 1800s, the social secretary of Mrs. Astor, the Gilded Age’s reigning socialite, composed a list of 400 New York desirables—the number who would fit in milady’s ballroom. Prohibition came and went, and high society flocked to midcentury nightspots and supper clubs. Noncelebs seeking entry to The Stork Club or the Copacabana needed to dress the part and throw tips around. It helped to know the maître d’, an all-powerful character celebrated by tabloids and movies. As discos supplanted nightclubs in the 48

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1960s, velvet-rope stanchions and an omnipotent doorman ruled the entrance. To fun-loving New Yorkers of the late 1970s, the name Marc meant one thing: Studio 54’s doorman. Velvet-rope clubs have waned in the city. Only the hottest clubs, featured daily in gossip media, can withstand the barrage of biting Yelp and TripAdvisor reviews posted by rejected guests. Most nightclubs have converted to ticketed entry: Buy online and cut the line. Some rules still apply, though. The bigger the club, the likelier you can buy into VIP treatment or “bottle service.” You still have to look like a swanky New Yorker: so, dress to impress. Here, the ins and outs of eight New York nightclubs whose door policies (all mentioned here, except Ginny’s Supper Club, have someone at the door) range from forbidding to friendly.

PHOTOS: RED ROPES IMAGE, GETTY IMAGES, SAFIA FATIMI; TABLE WITH CHAMPAGNE, ISTOCK, ONEINCHPUNCH

LEARNING THE ROPES


MAGIC HOUR ROOFTOP BAR & LOUNGE

305 Spring St., 212.620.5220 THE SCENE: A gritty side street near the Holland Tunnel opens into a Moroccan fantasy, with seductive harem lamps, flirtatious nooks and glittering bars. Guest DJs helm the turntable. THE IN: Look famous. A European accent may help. Paul is Paul Sevigny, a banker turned restaurateur turned impresario. Do you know him or his sister Chloë? THE OUT: Couldn’t get in? Move on to a more welcoming SoHo spot like Raoul’s and get your Chloë fix from her recording on the Paul’s Casablanca’s club phone.

485 Seventh Ave., 212.268.0188 THE SCENE: An 18th-floor rooftop lounge with a postcollegiate local crowd, carnival theme (with carousel!), and mesmerizing views of the Empire State Building and Times Square. Gawk, drink, dance, play miniature golf. THE IN: Make reservations, optimally for carousel seats. THE OUT: Go earlier (opens at 4 pm) or for brunch. No love at the door? There are plenty of other rooftop bars.

THE BLOND 11 Howard St., 212.235.1111 THE SCENE: A plush, modern lounge in a trendy Downtown hotel, The Blond brims with models, stars, and real-estate billionaires. Patrons come for dinner or to sip artisanal cocktails in velvet-cushioned booths. THE IN: Rich and/or beautiful? If you got it, flaunt it. THE OUT: Head south for Chinatown’s sublime eats or east for the Lower East Side’s night-owl cafés.

TOP OF THE STANDARD 848 Washington St., 212.645.7600 THE SCENE: Atop The Standard Hotel, this sumptuous penthouse bar delivers 360-degree views, refined cocktails and a well-heeled crowd heavy on Wall Streeters. THE IN: A reservation and cocktail garb are key. The doorman is notoriously picky; your odds improve for sunset drinks or Sunday brunch. Tthe club becomes members-and-guestsonly after 9 or 10 pm. THE OUT: The hotel anchors the High Line: walk it!

MARQUEE NEW YORK 289 10 Ave., 646.473.0202 THE SCENE: Loud, lively dance club with top-name electronic dance music DJs and light shows. The crowd is youthful. Open Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday. THE IN: Buy a ticket in advance, and come around opening time (11 pm) to minimize your wait. THE OUT: Stroll east, turn south on Broadway, and you’re in the NoMad bar district. 50

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CLUB CUMMING 505 E. 5th St. (no phone) THE SCENE: A diverse clientele frolicking on a capacious dance floor. Nightly shows feature cabaret cronies and Broadway buds of owner Alan Cumming. He might be bartending (try his tequila-and-pineapple “Up & Cumming”). No cover or minimum except on Saturdays and special events. THE IN: “I want everyone to feel welcome,” says Cumming. “Inclusiveness is what NYC is all about.” THE OUT: Around midnight, you might be asked to wait until the crowd thins out.

Magic Hour Rooftop Bar & Lounge

PHOTO: MAGIC HOUR ROOFTOP BAR & LOUNGE, EMILIE BALTZ

PAUL’S CASABLANCA


PHOTO: LAIDBACK LUKE AT SCHIMANSKI, COURTESY SCHIMANSKI; MARQUEE NEW YORK, NOAH FECKS

GINNY’S SUPPER CLUB 310 Lenox Ave., 212.421.3821 THE SCENE: This Uptown speakeasy is downstairs from Marcus Samuelsson’s Red Rooster Harlem restaurant, serving up drinks, dinner, a gospel brunch and live local jazz Thursday through Saturday nights. THE IN: There’s no door policy or cover charge; reservations are advised. (Try for table 91, fronting the dance floor, with bottle service.) THE OUT: You won’t need a Plan B.

SCHIMANSKI

Left to right: Marquee New York, Schimanski

54 N. 11th St., Brooklyn, 718.486.2299 THE SCENE: Brooklyn casual cool at Williamsburg, Brooklyn’s something-for-everyone DJ showcase, spinning techno, trance, EDM, house and hip-hop. The main space rocks and raves with dance parties Thursday through Saturday. THE IN: The in: Preticketing is the express lane, though indecisive types can pay at the door. THE OUT: You can be certain that you are pretty much in unless you showed up in gym gear or flip-flops.

YOU, TOO, SHALL PASS Knowledge is power, says Anthony Vennitti, an ace doorman and manager at GoldBar, the opulent, celeb-driven NoLita lounge. Here’s his velvet-rope advice. LOOK THE PART: “A doorman is creating a mix, like a DJ. Be your best self and express your individuality. It’s better to overdress than underdress, but try to avoid either.” STAY CALM: “Approach the rope with confidence and a smile. Say hello to the doorman. Don’t be cocky. Name-drop only if you can back it up.” INSIDER INFO: “Thursday is when locals go out and Sunday/Monday is industry night, with lots of other club personnel. You get points for venturing out on these nights.” GAME OVER: “Don’t shout, don’t make the door your photo shoot, and never, ever offer a cash bribe. Tip on your way out if you loved the club.” WHAT IF: “Not getting in is just part of nightlife’s mystery. Don’t throw a hissy fit and ruin your night. Go laugh about it somewhere else.”

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SPECIAL PROMOTION

DINE IN STYLE There is a reason why New York City has a reputation for being the foodie capital of the world. Our restaurants range from the most casual of delis to the most formidable of steak houses, with lots of variety in between. Here is just a small sampling of what you can find in this town when hunger—and the dinner hour—strike.

STRIP HOUSE Experience charred cuts perfectly paired with decadent sides and served in siren-red interiors, where old-world glamour meets modern style and sophistication. Named one of “New York’s Best Steak Restaurants” by Zagat and awarded four stars by Forbes, the namesake cut isn’t the only thing to marvel at. Whether you are coming for the perfect after-work cocktail or to experience our late-night tableside service, you are guaranteed not to be disappointed.

13 E. 12th St., 212.328.0000; 15 W. 44th St., 212.336.5454, striphouse.com

DOS CAMINOS Join the fiesta at one of New York City’s original Mexican restaurants! Dos Caminos features an expanded menu of authentic Mexican dishes with a modern twist, including fresh guac and ceviche, as well as an extensive selection of premium tequilas, killer margs and innovative cocktails. With five locations in New York City, experience the multi-regional modern cuisine for lunch, dinner and weekend brunch, or enjoy happy hour weekdays 3-6 pm and 9 pm to close.

Times Square, Meatpacking, Park Ave South, Soho, Third Ave., doscaminos.com 52

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SPECIAL PROMOTION

BILL’S BAR & BURGER Bill’s Bar & Burger is your one-stop shop for classic American fare. Every burger, shake and fry, in dozens of varieties, is made fresh daily. With three locations in New York City, Bill’s provides a welcoming space for guests to enjoy sports games, great food and an extensive list of local and craft beers.

16 W. 51st St., at Fifth Ave., 212.705.8510, 85 West St., 212.894.3800, billsbarandburger.com

MASTRO’S STEAKHOUSE Mastro’s Steakhouse is recognized for its combination of highly acclaimed cuisine and live entertainment in an elegant yet energetic atmosphere. Featuring 15 different steaks, chops and an array of fresh seafood selections, Mastro’s is committed to delivering an unforgettable dining experience every time.

1285 Sixth Ave., at W. 52nd St., 212.459.1222, mastosrestaurants.com

MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE At Morton’s every guest is treated like a VIP. Enjoy USDA prime aged beef and fresh seafood. With two locations near New York City’s most exciting attractions, our private boardrooms are ideal for any event, while the bar is a perfect gathering spot during Power Hour for specially priced drinks and bar bites.

551 Fifth Ave., 212.972.3315 136 Washington St., 212.608.0171, mortons.com

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BEAUTY BUZZ Celebrities share their love for NYC spas on social media.

There’s no better testimony to a business, whether it’s a restaurant, store or even a hotel, than when an influencer is caught eating, shopping or sleeping there. And if they are so enthused that they start sharing their experiences on social media, the endorsement becomes priceless. We spa lovers feel the same way, especially when it comes to where celebrities go for beauty and pampering. With their packed schedules and the need to look their best 24/7, celebrities don’t have time to waste on spas that are anything less than extraordinary. The fact that they found a few spare minutes to share their experience on Twitter or Instagram further proves that it’s worth a visit. Curious about where the celebs are relaxing and beautifying around the city? We pulled together some key social-media posts celebrities have shared about their favorite spas and salons—no scrolling necessary. Emily Ratajkowski Thank you @JoannaVargas

DAPHNE

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Got a case of the Monday blues? European skincare and sugaring studio Daphne will take care of your mood and your face, says actress Sofia Black-D’Elia, who played Sage Spence in “Gossip Girl.” “Monday gloom defeated thanks to … the heavenly @daphne.nolita,” Black-D’Elia wrote on an Instagram selfie taken in one of Daphne’s crisp white treatment rooms, loaded with shelves of Biologique Recherche skincare products. The spa has also earned praise from runway model Erin Wasson, who called it “a little slice of paradise in the city” on Instagram.

tresses. “I always feel great after a little hair care session,” she wrote next to an Instagram photo at the salon. Soap opera star Kelly Rutherford (“Melrose Place,” “Gossip Girl”) also goes to the salon, which she Instagrammed was the “Best in NYC!” Hair treatments aren’t the only thing on the menu, though. In an Instagram story showing a facial at the spa, Russian fashion model Natasha Poly wrote, “What an amazing start to the day.”

JULIEN FAREL RESTORE SALON & SPA

HAVEN SPA

Does fashionista and entrepreneur Olivia Palermo ever have a bad hair day? By the looks of all her photos, it doesn’t seem like it—and it’s probably because she trusts the team at Julien Farel Restore Salon & Spa with her

“Orange Is the New Black” actress Alysia Reiner loves living in her Harlem neighborhood, but when her skin needs a little love, she heads downtown to Haven Spa. “Yass!!! Always remember to #treatyoself,” she tweeted, along

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This page: Emily Ratajkowski Facing page, clockwise, from top left: Georgia Louise Atelier; Olivia Palermo; Miles McMillan

PHOTOS: EMILY RATAJKOWSKI, OLIVIA PALERMO AND MILES MCMILLAN, GETTY IMAGES; GEORGIA LOUISE ATELIER, COURTESY GEORGIA LOUISE ATELIER

BY JONI SWEET


Olivia Palermo I always feel great after a little hair care session @Julien Farel Restore Salon & Spa

Karolina Kurkova Having a bit of brightening and rejuvenation from the skincare maven @GeorgiaLouiseSk

with a clip from Life & Style magazine that talked about her day of pampering.

JOHN BARRETT SALON When you’ve got an Emmy, a Tony and a Grammy under your belt (all for the Broadway hit “Dear Evan Hansen”), you can expect all eyes on you, all the time. That’s why award-winning actor Ben Platt trusts the high-end John Barrett Salon to keep his hair camera-ready. “Ain’t nobody better than @johnbarrettnyc,” the Los Angeles native captioned an Instagram pic of him with the hairstylist (who he referred to as a “genius” in another ’gram).

HIGHERDOSE

Miles McMillan Bomb infrared session tonight! @HigherDose

“Bomb infrared session tonight!” model Miles McMillan (boyfriend of actor Zachary Quinto) posted under an Instagram photo. He was in one of HigherDOSE’s infrared saunas, which might garner more visits from models (including Bella Hadid) than the runways of New York Fashion Week. Check out the sauna spa’s Instagram account to see for yourself! WHERE GUEST B OOK

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JOANNA VARGAS SALON If there’s one NYC event that requires celebs to pull out all the stops, it’s the Costume Institute Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. And it’s one of the busier days of the year for celebrity facialist Joanna Vargas. “No filter, no nothing. Leaving magician @JoannaVargasnyc for my Met Gala glow up,” actress Mindy Kaling enthused with a smiling image on Instagram after her treatment. “Thank you @JoannaVargas,” was all that model and actress Emily Ratajkowski needed to say on an Instagram video showing off her dewy skin before attending the gala.

JENNY’S SPA

GEORGIA LOUISE ATELIER Serene Upper East Side skincare spa Georgia Louise Atelier is no stranger to the rich and famous, counting Emma Stone, Jennifer Aniston and Gwyneth Paltrow among its celebrity clientele. Why? “I love my @GeorgiaLouiseSK facials. They are epic. #goodskin,” tweeted Kelly Bensimon, former cast member of “The Real Housewives of New York City.” Czech supermodel Karolina Kurkova also tweeted, “Big weekend ahead … Having a bit of brightening and rejuvenation from the skincare maven @GeorgiaLouiseSk.”

JOEY HEALY EYEBROW STUDIO The world seems more obsessed with eyebrows than ever (case in point: model/actress Cara Delevingne’s bold brows)—all the reason why celebs are very particular about which experts they go to for shaping and pruning. Yoga instructor/wellness expert Hilaria Baldwin, wife of Alec Baldwin, relies on Joey Healy to beautify her brows. In an Instagram post featuring Healy working his magic while Baldwin balanced her daughter in her arms, she 56

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Cardi B I loooooveeeeeeeeeeee my nails … Thank you @nailson7th @jennys_spa_bx. I had to come to the X to get my nails done!! wrote, “But seriously, check out @JoeyHealyBrows for some amazing tips on the perfect brow. He is a total beauty guru and has his own line of great products. Making me feel good while being a working, pregnant, crazy mommy on the run is such a treat.”

TRACIE MARTYN SKIN CARE SALON Celeb skincare guru Tracie Martyn’s Instagram feed is flooded with photos of her famous clients, including Rihanna, Gigi and Yolanda Hadid, Kim Kardashian West and Robert Pattinson. But the real accolades come from celebrities’ own feeds. “Beautiful skin doesn’t come from makeup, it comes from a good facialist,” was the quote actress Christine Baranski included under an Instagram pic of her with Martyn. Singer-songwriter Kesha also shared a happy message about Martyn and her products, posting on Instagram, “Thank you so much to the lovelies at @TracieMartyn for making my face happpyyyyy and hydrated this morning.”

PHOTO: CARDI B, GETTY IMAGES

Fame can change everything, but there’s one thing rapper Cardi B has kept the same: her nails. She still gets her stiletto-shaped nails blinged out at Jenny Bui’s Harlem and Bronx nail salons, which specialize in wild, rhinestone-adorned designs. “I loooooveeeeeeeeeeee my nails … Thank you @nailson7th @jennys_spa_bx. I had to come to the X to get my nails done!!” she enthused over an Instagram video of her flashy manicure.


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HIT PARADE These four musicals have rewritten Broadway history. BY DAVID COTE

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PHOTOS: JAMES BARBOUR IN “THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA,” MATTHEW MURPHY; THE DRESS REHEARSAL OF “HANNIBAL” IN “THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA,” JOAN MARCUS

When did Broadway actually begin? Was it during the so-called “Golden Age” of the 1920s through the 1940s, when legendary songwriters such as George Gershwin, Cole Porter and Rodgers & Hammerstein were pioneers of the American musical? Or did it come earlier, somewhere in the late-19th century? Or is the beloved cultural phenomenon—geographically and aesthetically—a more recent innovation? Truth is, the Broadway landscape that we know today, 41 theaters that stretch from West 41st Street up to West 65th (the Vivian Beaumont at Lincoln Center) is in a constant state of selfreinvention. Maybe it would be most illuminating to focus on four hit musicals that shaped Broadway over the past 30 years. All these shows made history. Best of all, you can still see them today. Curtain up!

THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (1988) Andrew Lloyd Webber’s global megahit epitomizes the so-called “British Invasion” that shaped Broadway for much of the 1970s and 1980s. Webber was in the vanguard of that transatlantic dominance, with blockbusters such as “Jesus Christ Superstar,” “Evita” and “Cats.” During the same period, Stephen Sondheim was writing some of his greatest shows (“Sweeney Todd,” “Into the Woods”), but it was Webber and other European artists (such as the French team behind “Les Misérables”) who were the long-running commercial victors. And somehow, more than 30 years after opening night, “Phantom” is still inviting hordes of ticket-buyers to hear “the music of the night.” The gilded, old-world setting and director Harold Prince’s sumptuous staging make sure this classic remains timeless. Majestic Theatre, 247 W. 44th St. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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With the waning of the British Invasion and millennium approaching, it was up to local forces to reinvent Times Square and the Theater District, which had fallen into disrepair for decades. In 1992, an urban-renewal outfit called New 42nd Street signed a 99-year lease with New York City and the state, taking over seven theaters. The next year, the Walt Disney Company inked a deal with the city and state that allowed it to renovate and lease the New Amsterdam Theatre. The first show Disney opened at the New Amsterdam, 60 years after the venue’s heyday? It was a huge risk for the Mickey Mouse corporation: A live stage version of its animated hit, “The Lion King,” directed by avant-garde star Julie Taymor. With its multicultural theatricality and expressive, experimental puppetry, this project could easily have been a disaster. Instead it won critical acclaim and became an instant popular sensation. Suddenly, Broadway seemed like a place where not only families could be entertained, but audiences could be treated to world-class live art. Now playing at the Minskoff Theatre, 200 W. 45th St. 60

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PHOTO: TSHIDI MANYE AS RAFIKI IN “THE LION KING,” JOAN MARCUS

THE LION KING (1997)


PHOTO: CODY JAMISON STRAND AS ELDER CUNNINGHAM IN “THE BOOK OF MORMON,” ©JOAN MARCUS

THE BOOK OF MORMON (2011) In 2001, American musical comedy underwent a renaissance with the huge success of Mel Brooks’ “The Producers,” based on his cult-hit 1967 movie. This backstage satire about a pair of crooked showmen hoping to cash in on an abomination called “Springtime for Hitler” ran for six years. A decade later, the seed planted by “The Producers” would bloom into a mighty tree: “The Book of Mormon.” This irreverent, anything-for-a-laugh show, co-written by “South Park” creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone, is the apex of the “spoofical.” More than just musical comedy, the spoofical is a selfreferential patchwork of satire, parody and original tunes. These types of shows use the vocabulary of showbiz—chorus kick lines, power ballads—to poke fun at the genre. The continued success of “Mormon” says a couple of things about Broadway audiences. First, they are sophisticated enough about the clichés of musicals to appreciate a parody of them. Second, they’re not offended easily! Bad-taste comedy has become mainstream. Eugene O’Neill Theatre, 230 W. 49th St. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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HAMILTON (2015)

PHOTO: JAVIER MUÑOZ AS ALEXANDER HAMILTON AND THE CAST OF “HAMILTON,” JOAN MARCUS

What does the monumental global fame of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s “Hamilton” say about us? People of color are telling their own stories—and taking over our nation’s master narratives. Hip-hop can make thrilling musical theater. And the future of Broadway lies with nonprofit institutions, rather than commercial producers of yesteryear. “Hamilton” began life at downtown’s Public Theater, which also gave the world “A Chorus Line” in the mid-1970s. Like many breakthroughs, it was a tremendous risk that paid off. Dramatizing the life and times of Alexander Hamilton, a Founding Father of the United States, with a mostly nonwhite, rapping cast, set to a hip-hop beat? Sounds crazy. And yet, great songwriting and masterful storytelling won, and continue to win, the day. Broadway and the musical keep reinventing themselves. It will be so exciting to see what the next chapter brings. Richard Rodgers Theatre, 226 W. 46th St.

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Recent acquisitions invigorate NYC museum collections. BY TERRY TRUCCO

FROM THE COLECCIÓN PATRICIA PHELPS DE CISNEROS

PHOTOS: ROY LICHTENSTEIN, “LAMP (MODEL),” 1977, ©ESTATE OF ROY LICHTENSTEIN; JUAN MELÉ (ARGENTINE, 1923–2012), “IRREGULAR FRAME NO. 2,” 1946, COURTESY MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK, GIFT

NEW BLOOD


WONG PING, “DEAR, CAN I GIVE YOU A HAND?,” 2018 (DETAIL), SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM NEW YORK, THE ROBERT H.N. HO FAMILY FOUNDATION COLLECTION 2018.18, ©WONG PING

PHOTOS: NIKOLAI SEDELNIKOV (RUSSIAN, 1905–1994), “ADVERTISING TECHNIQUE (TEKHNIKA REKLAMY, NO. 2),” 1930, COURTESY MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK, THE MERRILL C. BERMAN COLLECTION;

This page, from left: A photomontage by Nikolai Sedelnikov from the Berman Collection at MoMA; Wong Ping’s video, commissioned by the Guggenheim Museum. Facing page, from left: Roy Lichtenstein’s “Lamp (Model),” donated to the Whitney; Juan Melé’s “Irregular Frame,” at MoMA.

Every picture tells a story, as the saying goes. But how and why the picture—or artifact or towering ceramic sculpture—you’re looking at came to land in a museum is often a compelling story in itself, one that can add to your enjoyment and understanding of the work, especially if it’s a recent acquisition. Once upon a time, museums were tight-lipped when new additions arrived, particularly if they were purchased. (Of course, once upon a time, museums were airless places, where visitors spoke in hushed tones and the pictures on the walls never changed.) But today, New York City museums herald the arrival of noteworthy newcomers—gifts, commissions and purchases alike—with social media shout-outs, laudatory press releases and, sometimes, limited-run exhibitions built around their

latest treasure, whether it’s “MAD Collects: The Future of Craft,” the Museum of Arts and Design’s celebration of new arrivals, or the ancient gilded coffin of a high-ranking Egyptian priest that commands a gallery of its own at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The Met even publishes Met Collects, a website feature that unpacks what’s new and noteworthy in the collection. New acquisitions are important to the city’s museums. To stay vibrant and relevant, museum collections must grow and evolve. The culture doesn’t stand still. Neither does scholarship. And woe to the museum that thinks its holdings are complete because they are vast. If the art that entered New York’s top museums in and around 2018 was a wine, we’d call it a very good year. Just drink in the beauties on these pages. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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OF ART; CLÉRISSY MANUFACTORY, “EWER,” MOUSTIERS, CA. 1700–25, SIDNEY R. KNAFEL COLLECTION, PHOTO: CHRISTOPHE PERLÈS

Clockwise, from top left: Coille Hooven’s porcelain “No Names” at the Museum of Arts and Design; a gilded mummiform coffin lid from the latePtolomaic Period at the Met; an early18th-century French faience ewer, promised to The Frick Collection.

PHOTOS: COILLE HOOVEN, “NO NAMES,” 1992, PHOTO: FARROL MERTES, COURTESY THE ARTIST AND PHOTOGRAPHER; GILDED COFFIN LID FOR THE PRIEST NEDJEMANKH, 150–50 B.C., THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM

While purchases account for a small percentage of New York museum holdings, the generosity of trustees and supporters of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) facilitated a masterful buy of more than 300 works from the Merrill C. Berman Collection of early-20th-century works on paper from the era’s major avant-garde movements, including Dada and Russian Constructivism. Glenn D. Lowry, MoMA’s director, calls it “a transformative addition” to the museum. Gifts account for the lion’s share of New York museums’ holdings and, like purchases, are acquired strategically. They can fill gaps in a collection, provide insights into existing pieces, spur scholarship or amplify a chosen area of the collection. That last point explains why “Dear, can I give you a hand?,” Hong Kong artist Wong Ping’s mischievous animated video addressing intergenerational tensions, is a pleasing addition to the Guggenheim Museum, an institution that actively collects and exhibits contemporary Asian art. It also explains why the promised gift of French faience from Sidney R. Knafel to The Frick Collection greatly enhances that museum’s important


COURTESY PAULA COOPER GALLERY, NEW YORK

PHOTO: SOL LEWITT (1928–2007), “WALL DRAWING 552D,” GIFT OF THE LEWITT FAMILY IN HONOR OF RICHARD AND RONAY MENSCHEL, ©2018 THE LEWITT ESTATE / ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK,

“Wall Drawing 552D” by Sol LeWitt, installed in The Morgan Library & Museum’s Gilbert Court.

holdings in ceramics that go back to founder Henry Clay Frick’s interest in Chinese and Sèvres porcelain. If museums are choosy about what they take, donors are just as picky about where they give. Consider the Museum of Modern Art’s recent windfall from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros: 90 contemporary works by 48 Latin American artists, including “Irregular Frame” by Argentinean artist Juan Melé. Why MoMA? Cisneros has donated Latin American art to the museum for decades, in part because MoMA was the first museum outside Latin America to acquire and exhibit works by Latin American artists, beginning with a show by Diego Rivera in 1931. Collectors weren’t the only donors to the city’s museums in 2018. With his posthumous gift of more than 400 works, including “Lamp (Model),” the great Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein left the world’s largest study collection of his art to the Whitney Museum of American Art, the grateful

institution that acquired its first work by him in 1966. Gifts of contemporary works have also expanded the holdings of The Morgan Library & Museum, from filmmaker James Ivory’s annotated scripts, notebooks and correspondence to the collection of works by Irish author James Joyce assembled by New York gallery owner Sean Kelly and his wife, Mary Kelly, to Sol LeWitt’s “Wall Drawing 552D,” donated to the Morgan by the artist’s estate. One of 1,200-plus drawings LeWitt made directly on walls complete with instructions for authorized installations, it’s a permanent addition to the museum and a colorful acknowledgement that today’s Morgan is more than a repository for historic books, papers and Gutenberg Bibles (of which it has three). It’s also a reminder of why museums collect. After all, if a work of art can change the way a single visitor sees the world, the institution has done its job. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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Triumphal Arch at Grand Army Plaza: Then and Now Known as the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Arch, this impressive structure, also the main entrance to Prospect Park in Brooklyn, was built as an American Civil War memorial, selected in 1889 by the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument Commission and designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux (who had designed both Central and Prospect parks), in collaboration with architect Stanford White. The unveiling ceremony in 1892, led by President Grover Cleveland, revealed a simple, stately monument (above) that did not yet include the three bronze sculptural groupings you see on the facing page: the Quadriga, which sits on top and depicts the Lady Columbia; the Spirit of the Army (left sculptural grouping) and the Spirit of the Navy (right sculptural grouping), which were added three years later. 72

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PHOTO OF TRIUMPHAL ARCH IN COLOR: SHUTTERSTOCK

PARTING SHOT


Profile for IN New York

Where Guestbook New York - 2019 Edition  

Where Guestbook New York - 2019 Edition  

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