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LETTER FROM THE EdiTOR

CiTY SPECTACULAR Welcome, visitors, to New York City! I have to admit, as both an editor and passionate New Yorker, I like nothing more than showing off this town, which I unabashedly believe is the most exciting city in the world. This year, Where’s annual GuestBook is chock-a-block with stories designed to whet your appetite, stir your cultural curiosity and entice you to shop in our diverse retail emporiums. Our fashion feature, “Breaking the Rules,” plays off the old-hat ideas of do’s and don’ts in fashion that no longer exist. No white after Labor Day? Glitter only after 6 pm? Sandals and socks a no-no? Oh, how yesterday. We show you how to pull off such styles, the New York way. Speaking of style, watches have truly come into their own in the past couple of years. No longer simply handy timepieces (after all, our smartphones can take care of that), in “Precious Time,” we dazzle you with spectacularly gorgeous braceletlike pieces, for both men and women, as technologically precise as they are aesthetically stunning. We know that shopping for clothing and accessories can build up a hearty appetite. In that case, we send you to restaurants that serve real, down-home goodness: With “Elevated Comfort,” you can find dishes like mac ’n’ cheese, juicy hamburgers and more, but with a decidedly upscale spin and only, of course, in our chicest restaurants. And, in “Brunch With a Twist,” we direct you to spots for that leisurely weekend meal, a staple for New Yorkers and visitors alike. Sure, you can get a classic plate of waffles or eggs Benedict in practically any one of the restaurants mentioned, but these chefs also know how to wow with a new spin on such tried-and-true standards. Ever wonder where the great New York City writers (Dylan Thomas, O. Henry, F. Scott Fitzgerald), would go for their particular Happy Hours? Well, even happier still, most of the bars that writers such as these frequented are still around and thriving in this town. In “Bar Scrawl,” we point you to the perfect cocktail, at the perfect bar, with some great literary history thrown in for garnish. New York City, of course, is also home to the Great White Way, and frankly, one of the main

Above: Shooting the fashion feature “Breaking the Rules,” p. 44 on the streets of SoHo.

reasons why visitors make it their business to come here. How fortunate for you, then, that our

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LETTER FROM THE EdiTOR resident theater writer Francis Lewis, who has also been Where New York’s executive editor for over 25 years, picks out the city’s longest-running shows for you to see. In “Winner’s Circle,” he explains why these theatrical gems are still running, and more importantly—why, while you are here, you need to see them! Eating, drinking, shopping and theatergoing—all great ventures while in town. But we are nuthin’ if not also a town filled to the brim with great art. So, we share with you two features on art. One is on the exploding art scene in Brooklyn (“My Space”), where we profile several hot young artists who have brought their studios to this happenin’ borough. And, for the visitor who also loves admiring the masterpieces of such visionaries as Picasso and van Gogh, we give you a tour of our top museums (“Museum Superstars”), honing in on several iconic works from the city’s great art repositories, pieces that will simply take your breath away. Also, just for fun: In “The Gold Standard,” a survey of some of the city’s world-class spas that offer gemstone treatments (diamond facials? massages infused with sapphire crystals?), and in “Home Field Advantage,” a look at the city’s great sports venues, both today and yesteryear, complete with memorable historic photos, such as the one of Lou Gehrig’s heartbreaking farewell speech at Yankee Stadium.

Top left: A succulent cheeseburger from “Elevated Comfort,” p. 78. Bottom left: Citi Field from “Home Field Advantage,” p. 112. Below: Castle Williams on Governors Island, which can be seen in “First Look,” p. 24.

So, please—come into our wonderful world, known elsewhere as the Big Apple. We simply like to call it the greatest place on earth.

Lois Levine Editor-in-Chief Where GuestBook® New York

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contentS 24

first look Iconic sights around this great city.

44

breaking the rules Rules were made to be broken, especially when it comes to fashion.

50

precious time Watches destined to dazzle New York City. BY LOIS LEVINE

54

brunch with a twist NYC chefs recreate a weekend classic. BY WALECIA KONRAD

58

winner’s circle Four Tony Award-honored Broadway musicals play to packed houses—decades after opening. Why? BY FRANCIS LEWIS

66

faces of nyc Meet the city’s top influencers.

78

elevated comfort Upscale eateries that offer a whole new spin on down-home cooking. BY JILL FERGUS

86

bar scrawl

108

Historic estates in the lower Hudson River Valley. BY NANCY J. BRANDWEIN

Tour New York watering holes from a writer’s perspective. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON

92

112

BY RICH FISHER

BY KAREN TINA HARRISON

my space

118

102

6

122

look book High-quality items offered by some of the city’s top retailers and art galleries.

museum superstars Within our cultural institutions are works that signify a turning point in major art movements. BY TERRY TRUCCO

Jerry’s on Jerry Seinfeld on the good, the bad and the ugly of NYC.

For these Brooklyn artists, their studios are a lot more than just places to work. BY ASHLEY SCHNEIDER

home-field advantage The venues where New York athletes play are so much more than mere stadiums.

the gold standard Jewel-enhanced facials and massages.

96

up in the valley

128

parting shot

on the cover: the chrysler building at night. photo: berthold trenkel

W H eRe G Ue StB o o k

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BOSSA NOVA

WHEN STYLE BECOMES A STATEMENT.

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where GUESTBOOK

®

new york EDITORIAL & ART

ADVERTISING & CIRCULATION & mARkETING Publisher Adeline Tafuri Jurecka

editor Lois Levine

vice President, sales develoPment Lauren Alperin Meirowitz

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executive editor Francis Lewis

circulation & sPecial events manager Gabrielle Santo

associate editor Joni Sweet

client services manager Dyxa Cubi

marketing & advertising coordinator Sarabeth Brusati marketing editor Katie Labovitz

Morris Visitor Publications

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office manager Sandra

chief creative officer Haines Wilkerson senior regional editorial director Margaret Martin

Azor

Morris Visitor Publications

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director of PhotograPhy Isaac Arjonilla

chief strategy officer Reab Berry

associate Photo editor Stephen Archer

chief financial officer Dennis Kelly

creative coordinator Beverly Mandelblatt

vice President of oPerations Angela E. Allen

vice President, internal business develoPment Karen Rodriguez

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vice President, national marketing Adeline Tafuri Jurecka

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EmAIL fOR ALL Of ThE AbOVE:

national sales coordinator David Gately

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EmAIL fOR ALL Of ThE AbOVE : fIRSTNAmE.LASTNAmE@mORRIS.COm

Where GuestBook® publishes editions for the following U.S. cities and regions: Arizona, Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Colorado, Dallas, Florida Gold Coast (Fort Lauderdale & Palm Beach), Fort Worth, Hawai‘i Island (the Big Island), Houston, Jacksonville/St. Augustine/Amelia Island, Kansas City, Kaua‘i, Los Angeles, Maui, Miami, Nashville, New Orleans, New York, Northern Arizona, O‘ahu, Orange County (CA), Orlando, Philadelphia, Reno/Lake Tahoe, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle/The Eastside/Tacoma, Southwest Florida (Naples), Tampa Bay, Tucson, Virginia, Washington D.C.

MVP new york city, eDitorial & sales offices 79 madison Ave., 8th fl., New York, NY 10016 Phone: 212.636.2700; fax: 212.716.2786 www.wheretraveler.com

©2016 by Morris Visitor Publications. All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, in whole or in part, without the express prior written permission of the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility to any party for the content of any advertisement in this publication, including any errors and omissions therein. By placing an order for an advertisement, the advertiser agrees to indemnify the publisher against any claims relating to the advertisement.

Morris coMMunications chairman William S. Morris III President & ceo William S. Morris IV

Printed in the United States of America.

Where GuestBook is produced by Morris Visitor Publications (MVP), a division of Morris Communications, Co., LLC. 725 Broad St., Augusta, GA 30901, morrismedianetwork.com. Where magazine and the where logo are registered trademarks of Morris Visitor Publications. MVP publishes Where magazine, Where® QuickGuide, IN New York, and IN London magazines, and a host of other maps, guides, and directories for business and leisure travelers, and is the publisher for the Hospitality Industry Association. ®

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In New York City, Where Guestbook is pleased to be a member of: MVP IS A PROUD SPONSOR OF LES CLEFS D’OR USA

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cOnTRiBUTORS Nancy J. Brandwein

Paul Gelsobello

As a writer, Nancy J. Brandwein is an avowed generalist, but one with a particular interest in everything New York City. Her column “Snack Attack” ran for four years in Manhattan Media’s community newspapers. With each article, and especially this piece on Hudson Valley estates, she has enjoyed introducing visitors to exciting facets beyond city life.

Paul Gelsobello has been taking photos professionally for 35 years. An experienced location photographer as well, he has traveled nationally and internationally. Clients include Starwood Hotels, French’s Foods and Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants. He has photographed hundreds of restaurants and world-class chefs.

Up in the Valley, page 108

Jill Fergus

Elevated Comfort, page 78 Jill Fergus is a New York-based travel and lifestyle journalist. Her writing has appeared in numerous print and digital publications, including The New York Times, National Geographic Traveler, The Huffington Post and Fodors .com. A few of her notable travel adventures include walking the Great Wall of China, swimming in Iceland’s Blue Lagoon and zip-lining in Utah’s Wasatch Mountains.

Rich Fisher

Home-Field Advantage, page 112 Rich Fisher has been covering sports on the high school, college and professional levels for nearly four decades, and has been a regular contributor throughout the years to newspapers such as The Philadelphia Inquirer and The Boston Globe. As a lifelong Philadelphia sports fan, Rich was conditioned to root against all New York teams. But in researching this article he got caught up in the many magical moments that put New York sports on a pedestal of its own. 14

Faces of NYC, page 66

Karen Tina Harrison The Gold Standard, page 92

Sophy Holland

A New Yorker and former columnist for three city newspapers, Harrison edits global travel website luxurytravel.about.com. “On your next jaunt to the Big Apple,” she advises, “fly into LaGuardia in a left-side window seat not over the wing. The usual landing approach overlooking Manhattan is the greatest show on Earth.”

Robert Haynes-Peterson Bar Scrawl, page 86

Robert Haynes-Peterson covers wine, cocktails and lifestyle and is certified by the American Sommelier Association and Pernod-Ricard’s BarSmarts advanced program. His preferred tipple at home is a Shiraz or scotch, but his advice when going out is to be kind to bartenders: Buy them a shot for the road.

Evan Sung

Terry Trucco

Sophy Holland

Breaking the Rules, page 44 Sophy Holland is a British-born photographer and creative director. She started her career as a painter before transitioning to art direction for both editorial and advertising clients in NYC and London.

Nancy J. Brandwein

Rich Fisher

W H E R E G U E STBO O K nE W yO RK

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cOnTRiBUTORS George Itzhak My Space, page 96

George Itzhak is a producer of fiction and nonfiction video stories. His work with NBC News has taken him from San Bernardino to Cuba and beyond. When he visited the studio of these artists, he was struck by how much their art and working spaces reflected their personalities. “At times, I experimented with their physical appearance and the shapes and colors around them. All of these elements revealed their stories.”

Anna Katsanis

Breaking the Rules, page 44 Anna’s interest in fashion, which stemmed from her love of film and fashion design, came at a young age. A film buff, Anna’s work has cinematic elements ranging from the 1950s-1970s. Anna’s styling work can be seen in several international publications, including Vogue, Elle and Glamour.

Walecia Konrad

Brunch With a Twist, page 54 Konrad is a personal-finance writer and editor, former New York Times reporter and a New York resident for 34 years. Living across the East River in Brooklyn, Konrad has watched Downtown transform itself from a financial hub into a vibrant neighborhood.

Francis Lewis

Winner’s Circle, page 58 When revisiting “The Phantom of the Opera” for this article, Where New York’s executive editor reacquainted himself with the Majestic Theatre. “You always remember your first Broadway 20

show,” Lewis says, “and mine was Rodgers & Hammerstein’s ‘Me and Juliet’ at the Majestic. My lifetime of theatergoing began that Saturday sfternoon.”

Ashley Schneider My Space, page 96

Ashley, a fiction and travel writer, has been published in IN New York, Where New York, Vogue .com, Paste Magazine and Bustle. In writing this piece, the moment of entering the artist’s studio stole all of her attention. “There’s something magical in that first moment when the viewer encounters an artist’s work for the first time.”

George Itzhak

Evan Sung

Brunch With a Twist, page 54, Comfort Foods, page 78, Bar Scrawl, page 86 Evan Sung is a prominent food, lifestyle and travel photographer based in Brooklyn. A native Manhattanite, his work has taken him from Seventh Avenue to Senegal. In addition to his long freelance tenure with The New York Times, Evan has photographed for Vogue, The Wall Street Journal, GQ, Gourmet, Delta SKY and many others.

Karen Tina Harrison

Paul Gelsobello

Terry Trucco

Museum Superstars, page 102 Picture New York without a flourishing art world jam-packed with museums, galleries and artists. “That’s like imagining the city without the Empire State Building,” says Trucco, a culture writer and founder of overnightnewyork.com, an award-winning website featuring news of NYC hotels. “Art nourishes without the calories,” she says.

Robert Haynes-Peterson

Anna Katsanis

W H E R E G U E STBO O K

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24

WHERE GUESTBOOK

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FIRST LOOK Distinct New York City landmarks that not only present a study in contrasts but also define the very heart and soul of the metropolis.

“Its magnificence was indescribable and its magnitude was inconceivable.” MONA RODRIGUEZ, novelist, “Forty

PHOTO: CAMERON DAVIDSON

Years in a Day”

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Statue of Liberty

Lady Liberty actually came about in 1865, when Frenchman Édouard de Laboulaye proposed the idea of a monument to bequeath to the United States. A decade later, Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi was commissioned for the job, with the task of completing it by 1876, in time for the United States centennial. Structural and funding issues, however, delayed the completion until July 1884: The following June, the statue arrived in New York Harbor. 201.604.2800

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first look

“The most unusual and surrealistic place in New York City is Central Park.” CHRISTO, artist

Central Park

Even if you’ve never been to NYC, chances are you have seen Central Park in one of the many films that have been shot there, including “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979), “Stuart Little” (1999), “What Happens in Vegas” (2007) and “The Avengers” (2011), to name just a smattering. But if you make it to the real place, you will rejoice in this verdant, 843-acre expanse in Manhattan that includes a Shakespeare garden, the Sheep Meadow, the Loeb Boathouse and Strawberry Fields. From W. 59th St. to W. 110th St., btw Central Park W. & Fifth Ave., 212.310.6600 26

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“It could be seen as a testament to the castle’s intimidating nature that it was never tested by the British, who avoided New York altogether in the War of 1812.” HELENE STAPINSKI, The New York Times

Designed by Jonathan Williams, a greatnephew of Benjamin Franklin, Castle Williams, a “circular defensive work of red sandstone,” according to the National Park Service, sits on Governors Island in New York Harbor overlooking One World Trade Center. The fort was erected between 1807 and 1811 as the prototype for new forms of coastal fortification. It was off-limits to the public until 2011, when, after undergoing an extensive renovation, it finally opened for sightseeing. Governors Island, New York, 212.825.3045 28

Photo: christoPher ong

Castle Williams

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“The presence of Gandhi in Union Square Park serves as a public marker of New York City’s liberal humanist tradition of tolerance and internationalism.” MAY JOSEPH,

Union Square Park

Opened in 1839 and redesigned in 1872 by landscape architects Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux (who designed Central Park), the park served as the venue for the city’s first Labor Day parade (1882), a place for workers’ rallies in the 1930s and various political demonstrations throughout the 20th century. In 1986, Kantilal B. Patel enriched the space by creating this statue of Mohandas Gandhi, in part because of the park’s tradition of civil protest. E. 14th St. to E. 17th St., Broadway to Fourth Ave. 30

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first look

“You can catch the New York City bus to The Cloisters. After a very long time, you turn into the enormous open gates of a park which sits high above the Hudson River ... You look up at the great tower, and you are no longer anywhere but here, perhaps the year 1200, some place in France. You have arrived at the Cloisters Museum.” STEPHANIE COWELL, wondersandmarvels.com

The Cloisters Museum & Gardens

There really is a hushed beauty to this branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art: Many people comment, after visiting, that it was hard for them to believe they were still in Manhattan. Located on four acres overlooking the Hudson River in Fort Tryon Park, it is home to the art, architecture and gardens of Medieval Europe. Here is a little secret that few know about the museum: Each of its seven famous Unicorn Tapestries features the letters AE, a possible clue to the textiles’ origins, as no one is really sure who designed them. 99 Margaret Corbin Dr., 212.923.3700 32

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“While my 10-year-old usually gripes that merry-go-rounds are for babies, she had no such complaints about SeaGlass (she went on five times until I dragged her off!). That might be [its] greatest attribute. Even, I, the jaded Goth mom, grinned from ear to ear.” RAVEN SNOOK, mommypoppins.com

SeaGlass at the Battery

The New York Aquarium first opened in 1896 (in what is now Castle Garden in Battery Park), welcoming over 2 million visitors before closing in 1941. When the city decided to commission a carousel as part of the park’s renovation, the designers behind it decided to create something that would reflect The Battery’s history as the first home of The New York Aquarium, and so they did, with these 30 massive fiberglass fish, color-changing LED light fixtures and “water effect” light projectors hung from the ceiling. The Battery, 212.344.3491 34

Photo: the battery conservancy

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“First-time visitors may well gasp at the vastness of New York’s second-largest museum and one of the largest in America.” fodors.com

Brooklyn Museum

Its extensive permanent collection includes ancient Egyptian masterpieces, African art, decorative arts, period rooms and contemporary art. Along with rotating exhibits, you can also have fun examining, up close, a real pre-Revolutionary dwelling, the two-room Jan Martense Schenck House, built in 1676 in the former town of Flatlands (before Brooklyn became a borough), and which represents one of the city’s oldest architectural designs. 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, 718.638.5000 36

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Fulton Center

This new transportation hub in Lower Manhattan serves MTA subway lines, the PATH trains and the Ferry Terminal, creating easy access for more than 300,000 visitors, commuters and locals. All enjoy its sleek, modern aesthetic while traveling to and from work, shopping or dining (options include Freedom Wine Cellar, Moleskine, Shake Shack, Zaro’s Family Bakery). The centerpiece of the hub is architect Santiago Calatrava’s Oculus, a structure designed to resemble a bird in flight. 200 Broadway, 212.590.5020 38

Photo: ©DaviD SunDberg/eSto

“Centrally located in Lower Manhattan, this welcoming metro hub resembles the modern mass transit systems around the world. Large, modern, clean and clear signage make this station a star in MTA’s station portfolio.” LEEAN O., yelp.com

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Photo: Matt Crockett

THEATRE | 247 West 44 th St. | Telecharge.com | 212.239.6200 | phantombroadway.com

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O MAJESTIC


first look

“Everything looks great. The battement, the turns, the counts—all that stuff. But when you land, I want to see what it felt like to see Times Square at night for the first time in your life.”

Times Square

What can be said about the Crossroads of the World that hasn’t already been said in a song or a book? Besides being the neighborhood that plays landlord to the greatest live theatrical dramas and musicals on the planet, in Times Square you can also read the world’s latest news and stock quotes on scrolling electronic tickers; see huge, illuminated ads on Jumbotrons; eyeball characters like Spider-Man and the Naked Cowboy; and walk by swarms of visitors, as equally in awe of it all as you are. W. 41st to W. 53rd sts., btw Sixth & Eight aves. 40

Photo: ©Rudy Sulgan/CoRbiS

ANDY BLANKENBUEHLER, Broadway choreographer, instructing a dancer

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Pablo Picasso, Tête de femme (Dora Maar), 1er mai 1944. Oil on canvas, 46 x 33 cm - 18.1 x 13 in.

791 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10065 T. + 1 (646) 707 3299 · nyc@operagallery.com · operagallery.com NEW YORK · MIAMI · ASPEN · LONDON · PARIS · MONACO · GENEVA · DUBAI · BEIRUT · HONG KONG · SINGAPORE · SEOUL

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first look

“The people loved the Unisphere from the start. Much as the Eiffel Tower was scorned only to become a universal symbol of Paris, [Gilmore D.] Clarke’s steel globe has become an icon of Queens.” THOMAS J. CAMPANELLA, The Wall Street Journal

Flushing Meadows Corona Park

Landscape architect Clarke’s 350-ton, 125-foot-diameter globe became the centerpiece and eventually the permanent symbol of the New York World’s Fair of 1964-65. The sphere was designed to represent both the dawn of the space age and the continents of the world. It is encircled by three giant orbital rings that depict the tracks of early satellites. During the fair, the capital cities of the world were illuminated by flashing lights. Today, the Unisphere still stands in Flushing Meadows Corona Park, which houses the annual US Open, the New York Hall of Science and the Queens Museum. Flushing Meadows Corona Park 42

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models: francesca/wilhelmina, cole/ford. shot on location in soho, new york.

hair: keiko hamaguchi/art department. manicure: aki hirayama.

merchandised and styled by anna katsanis/atelier. makeup: fumi/wall group.


Breaking the rules Rules were made to be broken, especially when it comes to fashion. PhoToGRaPhY BY soPhY holland

pairing daywear with evening attire and socks with high heels On him: BURBERRY biker jacket, $2,295, white shirt, $385, and denim jeans, $215, us.burberry.com • TiffanY & Co. CT60 chronograph rose gold watch, $15,000, tiffany.com On her: PasCal MillET sequin coat, $5,655, and silk dress, $1,555, pascalmillet.com • R.J. GRaziano Peyton necklace, $40, rjgraziano.com • REiss suede pumps, $285, reiss.com • falKE socks, $28, falke.com

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mixing bold prints This page: ETRO shearling coat, $4,780, etro.com • TORY BURcH dress, $295, toryburch.com • FalKE green graphic tights, $49, falke.com • cHRisTian lOUBOUTin boots, $1,995, us.christianlouboutin.com • maRK cROss Grace mini-box bag, $2,195, markcross.com

glitter before 6 pm Facing page, on him: ETRO burgundy striped silk shirt, $1,112, etro.com • BURBERRY stretch denim jeans, $215, us.burberry .com • ValEnTinO GaRaVani loafers with rockstud details, $1,445, valentino.com On her: VladimiRO GiOia fur jacket, $5,625, vladimirogioia .com • maRia lUcia HOHan metallic lame dress, $3,325, mlh-shop.com • R.J. GRazianO necklace, $35, rjgraziano.com • KaTE HEwKO earrings, $139, katehewko.com • cHRisTian lOUBOUTin patent black shoes, $995, us.christianlouboutin.com

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pastels for fall and whites after labor day Facing page, on him: rEiss belted jacket, $465, and print shirt, $170, reiss.com • Gap light wash denim, $68, gap.com On her: rEiss blazer, $445, trousers, $240, and blouse, $240, reiss.com • Christian LoUBoUtin boots, price upon request, us.christianlouboutin.com • LotUs JEwELry stUdio ring, $40, lotusjewelrystudio.com

pairing black with navy blue This page: John VarVatos jacket, $1,198, striped trousers, $398, and sweater, $298, johnvarvatos.com • ariat boots, $209.95, ariat.com • Etro belt, etro.com

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This page: Chanel’s 18-karat gold watch with diamonds, onyx, mother-ofpearl and alligator strap; Bulgari’s 18-karat white gold watch with diamonds and satin strap. Opposite page: Hublot’s sapphire crystal watch; Charriol’s amethyst, quartz, motherof-pearl, sapphire, diamond and stainless steel watch; and Hermès’ steel watch with diamonds and alligator strap.

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precious time Watches destined to dazzle New York City. by LOIS ANZELOWITZ LEVINE

phOTOgrAphy by grANT cOrNETT

If you are in the mood for some extravagant timepiece shopping, you’re in the right city. A slew of ultraluxe watches are being showcased this year by some of the most prestigious brands. From Chanel to Omega, there are watches embedded with an eye-popping number of diamonds; strong, sturdy pieces that marry practical (stainless steel) with luxurious (sapphire crystal); straps made of silicone, rubber, leather and gold. Wristwatches are no longer just a way to give you an accurate reading of the time: They are a showstopping accessory statement. Bulgari is expanding its operations across the United States, feeling a strong sense of global competition as watches become, more and more, an integral part of fashion. The famed Roman brand recently debuted its Octo Finissimo Minute Repeater, touted as the world’s thinnest repeater watch. Chanel, too, is cutting a wide swath this year when it comes to watch designs. In addition to the simplicity and masculine concept behind its Boy.Friend collection, Chanel is showing intricate watches with faces made of gold flowers, birds, diamonds, onyx and mother-ofpearl. Hublot is creating fantastic pieces with sapphire crystal and skeleton dials, made from transparent resin. Elsewhere, beauty is meshing with technical prowess: Citizen’s gorgeous Eco-Drive One is being billed as the world’s thinnest light-powered watch. Apparently, it’s time to get serious about telling time. WHERE G UEST B OOK

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Facing page: Kyboe’s watch with rose gold finish and silicone strap; Breitling’s steel watch with sapphire crystal and onyx and rubber strap. This page, from above: Stainless-steel watches from Girard-Perregaux, Citizen and Omega.

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This page: At Il Gattopardo, try ricotta pancakes with a Mimosa. Facing page: Chalk Point Kitchen’s eggs Benedict with asparagus and a bacon-garnished Bloody Mary.

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10/27/16 3:52:34 PM


brunch with a twist Leave it to NYC chefs to recreate the most leisurely of meals. by walecia konrad

PhotograPhy by evan sung

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These days, brunch in New York is a culinary bright spot, including everything from reinvented Benedicts and hashes to unique cocktails foamy with egg whites and seasonal garnishes. Thanks to creative chefs committed to fresh, local and multicultural ingredients, this midday, often-on-a-weekend meal runs the gamut of farm-to-table, seasonal, small plates, Italian and more. Whatever your tastes, these restaurants have tweaked the meal that for many is a favorite. And all these spots take reservations, so you can keep your trip on schedule.

Buttermilk channel’s short ribs hash and hearty Bloody Mary (this page), and its legendary pecan-pie French toast (opposite page, lower left).

Scrapple and More Chef Adriana Maldonado has infused her Austin, Texas, roots into the brunch menu at Playa Betty’s (320 Amsterdam Ave, 212.712.0777). The popular Upper West Side spot offers breakfast Dharma bowls with a mix of grains, eggs, protein, beans and vegetables of your choosing. Another bright spot: brandade (a salt-cod dish) baked in a crispy bacon-lined cup topped with baked egg and buttermilk sauce. Cocktails are decidedly Tex-Mex. Micheladas and mescal Bloody Marys flow freely or, for a twist on juice, try the frozen Paloma, a grapefruit tequila slushy with sea salt and pink peppercorn on the glass rim.

ItalIan pancakeS and Great BellInIS Step into the special atrium dining room in the historic Rockefeller town houses, home to Il Gattopardo (13-15 W. 54th St., 212.246.0412), and you’ll find yourself in one of Gotham’s most elegant yet inviting spots. Salerno, Italy-born Executive Chef Vito Gnazzo offers an Italian take on classic brunch items, including the frittatina del giorno and ricotta pancakes. Or try the spaghetti alla carbonara, with egg yolk, pecorino cheese guanciale and black pepper, and a wine from Il Gattopardo’s extensive list, perhaps the sparkling Billecart-Salmon Brut Réserve NV, served by the glass or bottle. Bloody Marys, Mimosas and Bellinis are also on hand.

a claSSIc Hotel experIence Downmarket hotel brunches, with their all-you-can-eat steam tables, are most assuredly a thing of the past. Case in point: The Carlyle Restaurant (35 E. 76th St., 212.744.1600) in the famed Carlyle Hotel. The sophis56

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ticated country house dining room has a prix fix menu, including appetizer, entrée and dessert. Don’t miss the Carlyle lobster bisque to start, or perhaps the chef-selected oyster platter. Entrées include braised short ribs hash with poached eggs, steak frites and wild striped bass. All goes nicely with the included glass of prosecco.

Mediterranean Feast Housed in the former Knitting Factory music venue, Estella (47 E. Houston St., 212.219.7693) takes small plates of Mediterranean-inspired fare into the brunch realm with creations such as lamb ribs with charmoula and honey, or eggs with beans, harissa and mojama. On a recent Sunday visit, the Serrano ham and ricotta dumplings with mushrooms and pecorino sardo were dominating the tables. The hip downtown crowd also loves the cocktails. One example: the Pompelmo Sour made with gin, Amaro Montenegro, grapefruit syrup, lemon and egg whites. the Carlyle restaurant’s trout with deviled eggs and brunch menu steak frites (lower right).

Country KitChen in soho Chalk Point Kitchen (527 Broome St., 212.390.0327) is a SoHo favorite with a constantly changing menu, but some recent options include avocado hash, gluten-free quinoa waffles and spicy kimchi eggs Benedict. Bloody Marys adorned with bacon are a house favorite. An even longer list of special cocktails are available downstairs at The Handy Liquor Bar (same owners as Chalk Point Kitchen). This can be a plus, as you may have to wait a bit for your table, even with a reservation.

BrooKlyn’s Best This popular Brooklyn spot takes brunch to a new level with items such as pecan-pie French toast and fried pork chop and cheddar waffle. Living up to its name, the menu at Buttermilk Channel (524 Court St., Carroll Gardens, 718.852.8490), of course, includes buttermilk pancakes and biscuits. But the restaurant is actually named after the nearby mile-long tidal strait between Brooklyn and Governors Island. Less brunchy but also comforting are the ABC grilled cheese (apples, bacon and cheddar) and the Rancho Gordo bean stew. Try one of the eye-opening cocktails like the celery-and-peppercorn-infused vodka garnished with a freshly shucked oyster. WHERE G UEST B OOK

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The PhanTom of The oPera. opening night Jan. 26, 1988.

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winner’s circle Four Tony Award-honored musicals play to packed houses and standing ovations—decades after opening. Why?

photo: james barbour as the phantom in “the phantom of the opera,” matthew murphy

By francis lewis

Shows open and close with regularity on and off Broadway, but some stick around for a long time. I recently revisited four of New York’s longest-running musicals. Each won the Tony Award, Broadway’s highest accolade, for best of its year, and each has become a cultural icon. I was excited: I had not seen “The Phantom of the Opera,” “Chicago,” “The Lion King” and “Avenue Q” since their premieres—28, 20, 19 and 13 years ago. What did I think of them then, and what do I think now?

The PhanTom of The oPera Trailing clouds of glory from its London premiere two years previously and with the West End originalcast album selling like hotcakes in New York record stores, it was next to impossible to approach “The Phantom of the Opera” at the Majestic Theatre (247 W. 44th St., 212.239.6200) in 1988 without heightened expectations. Here was Andrew Lloyd Webber’s lushest, most melodic score to date. Here was spectacle hitherto unknown on a New York stage: a crashing crystal chandelier, a boat ride across the labyrinthine lake beneath the Paris Opera House.

Here, too, was an unabashedly and irresistibly romantic beauty-and-the-beast love story between a horrifically disfigured, reclusive and vengeful composer (The Phantom) and his muse: a young, beautiful and talented soprano (Christine Daaé), who, though attracted to The Phantom, loves another. The stage was set, and magnificently so by the late production designer Maria Björnson, for tragedy. On every level—musically, visually, dramatically—“Phantom” lived up to its hype. If I went the second time anticipating threadbare costumes, dilapidated sets and actors performing on autopilot, I was in for a surprise. Broadway’s longest-running show ever is as pristine now as it was on opening night and as evergreen as the 1910 Gaston Leroux novel on which it is based. The clincher for me was the final confrontation between The Phantom and Christine, “The Point of No Return,” passionately sung and acted by James Barbour and Ali Ewoldt at the performance I attended. Heart-stopping, goose-bump scenes like this underscore why “The Phantom of the Opera” may very well run for at least another 28 years, if not more, on Broadway. WHERE G UEST B OOK

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ChiCago I saw the original Broadway production of “Chicago” in 1975 and hated it, in spite of first-class songs by John Kander (music) and Fred Ebb (lyrics) and legendary actresses Gwen Verdon and Chita Rivera in the lead roles of Roxie Hart and Velma Kelly respectively, two murderous broads out to take the Windy City by storm and get their names in the tabloids (preferably on the front page). Overblown and overseen by director/choreographer Bob Fosse, that production was sexy as hell, but cold as ice. 60

The second time I saw “Chicago” was the 1996 revival, which has become Broadway’s longest-running American musical. I loved the revival 20 years ago, and I love it even more now. How can that be? Same score, same sardonic book about celebrity culture, political corruption and the pursuit of fame. But what director Walter Bobbie has masterfully done is to strip the musical of its Roaring ’20s trappings and find the universal in the specific. There is no set, the orchestra is onstage, all the costumes are black—timeless, in other words. There’s another reason

Photo: ryan worsing, bianca marroquin and michael cusumano in “chicago,” jeremy daniel

ChiCago. opening night Nov. 14, 1996.

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NBC-TV

New Amsterdam Theatre, Broadway & 42nd Street • 866-870-2717 AladdinTheMusical.com

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©Disney

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why “Chicago” endures at the Ambassador Theatre (219 W. 49th St., 212.239.6200): As long as reality show “celebs” and their ilk dominate the media, social and otherwise, the show proves just how relevant it is.

No show on Broadway opens as majestically or as memorably as Disney’s “The Lion King” at the Minskoff Theatre (200 W. 45th St., 866.870.2717). It doesn’t matter how many times you see it, the parade of animals in the “Circle of Life” number takes the breath away: first time, second time, every time. Thanks to designer/director Julie Taymor’s ingenious masks, costumes and puppets worn and manipulated by the 51-member cast, wildebeests, gazelles, zebras, antelopes, giraffes, a rhinoceros and a cheetah glide, stomp, spring, run and steal across the sun-kissed stage, paying homage to King Mufasa and his newborn heir, Simba. Taymor’s coup de théâtre is a 13-foot-long, 9-foot-wide elephant and her baby who solemnly galumph down the orchestra aisle within touching distance of eager youngsters and their equally gobsmacked parents. “The Lion King” is the ultimate family experience: a great coming-of-age story about the triumph of good over evil. And even though it has marked its 19th birthday on Broadway, it keeps up to date. Disney has cleverly inserted a musical allusion to another of its mega-hit 62

The Lion King. opening night nov. 13, 1997.

Photo: jelani remy as simba in “the lion king,” joan marcus

The Lion King

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PHOTOS © JOSH LEHRER, DARREN COX AND JOAN MARCUS

BOOK BY

MUSIC & LYRICS BY

DIRECTED & CHOREOGRAPHED BY

HARVEY CYNDI JERRY FIERSTEIN LAUPER MITCHELL

BASED ON THE MIRAMAX MOTION PICTURE KINKY BOOTS WRITTEN BY GEOFF DEANE & TIM FIRTH

WINNER

OF EVERY MAJOR

BEST MUSICAL AWARD

2013

TONY AWARD®

GRAMMY AWARD®

KINKYBOOTSTHEMUSICAL.COM

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2014

2016

OLIVIER AWARD

BROADWAY’S HUGE-HEARTED HIT

Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 302 W. 45th St.

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avenue q “Avenue Q” is the little show that could. Beginning its success story Off-Broadway in 2003, where it was a critical and popular success, the show quickly transferred to Broadway, won three 2004 Tony Awards for Best Musical, Book and Score, played on the Great White Way for 2,500 performances and then did the unthinkable: It returned to its Off-Broadway roots, where it’s been running at New World Stages (340 W. 50th St., 212.239.6200) since 2009. I may have underestimated “Avenue Q” when I first saw it back in 2003. Sure, I relished its subversive humor and

avenue q. Opening night July 31, 2003.

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political incorrectness in songs like “Everyone’s a Little Bit Racist” and “The Internet Is for Porn.” (Obviously, and in spite of its cuddly Muppets-like hand-puppet characters, this is no “Lion King.”) But I may have fallen into the generation gap. A story about twentysomethings finding their way in life seemed a little too sweetly sophomoric to me at the time. Well, I’m older and wiser now: The issues that “Avenue Q” dealt with head-on when it first opened—race, religion, sexual orientation, unemployment and underemployment—are still with us. Even more so. And that’s what “Avenue Q” has in common with its long-running musical mates. Each holds the mirror up to nature and reflects life’s tragedies, triumphs and absurdities. Great theater is entertaining, but it is also full of cautionary tales that should be seen again and again.

Photo: lexy fridell and jason jacoby as trekkie monster in “avenue q,” carol rosegg

animated movies—and soon-to-be Broadway musical— “Frozen.” A few notes of “Let It Go” at the top of “Lion King’s” second act has the audience going wild.

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Photo: Zachary ww Maxwell Stertz

Stephen Sondheim Theatre 124 West 43rd Street www.BeautifulOnBroadway.com

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Behind the music that made other people famous was a woman who needed to let her own voice be heard.


p r o m ot i o n

Faces oF NYc Meet the city’s top influencers—the front-runners of their industries—whose expertise creates unique and memorable experiences for travelers and locals alike. Those profiled here are the reason our city is a top visitor destination. photography by paul gelsobello 66

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11/1/16 2:27:06 PM


FACE OF LUXURY TRANSPORTATION

EMPIRECLS WORLDWIDE CHAUFFEURED SERVICES Chairman and CEO David Seelinger is the driving force behind EmpireCLS—the largest privately held chauffeured transportation company in the world. Under his direction, the company has grown from a small NJ-based limousine outfit to an impressively large-scale operation that extends throughout the United States and abroad, with fleets of luxury vehicles in over 700 cities worldwide and a variety of specialty services. While EmpireCLS has grown in size over the past 35 years, David’s dedication to unparalleled, professional service remains at the core of the company’s culture. 800.451.5466, empirecls.com

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11/1/16 2:27:12 PM


FACES OF

NYC 2017

FACES OF FINE FOOTWEAR

CITISHOES

Ben Khoudari (left) left his position as an electronics design engineer in 1993 and opened his own business—Citishoes. With a love for fashion and a knack for finding the best style to match each customer, Khoudari and his staff of professionals, including Manager Voltaire Blain (right), are dedicated to ensuring Citishoes is New York City’s premier shoe store. With its sterling reputation and extensive collection of the finest, classic brands such as Alden Shell Cordovan shoes—including special colors and custom models—Church’s, Edward Green, Gaziano & Girling, Paraboot and Mephisto, you’re sure to find your next perfect pair here. 445 Park Ave., btw E. 56th & E. 57th sts., 212.751.3200, citishoes.com

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11/1/16 2:28:00 PM


FACE OF CHIC HAIRSTYLES

SALON ZIBA Salon Ziba owner Alonso Salguero has always believed in building a renowned, international platform for the salon’s discerning clientele. Now in its 27th year in business, Salon Ziba has assembled a talented staff from South America, Europe and the Far East—each excelling in the art of providing patrons with the perfect hairstyle. With three great locations, VIP rooms and the use of luxury brand products, Salon Ziba has been defining beauty with an ever-growing list of clients who include models, journalists and performers. Salon Ziba locations are open seven days a week, with in-hotel and bridal services also available. 50 W. 57th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves.; 200 W. 57th St., at Seventh Ave.; 485 Sixth Ave., at W. 12th St., 212.767.0577, salonziba.com WHERE G UEST B OOK

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FACES OF

NYC 2017

FACES OF FABULOUS BLOOMS

STARBRIGHT FLORAL DESIGN Starbright Floral Design has a two-decade history in New York City, making its mark by offering the freshest and highest quality blooms. With this father/son team—Nic (right) and Stephen Faitos—that drives innovation in both design and style, Starbright is expected to set the gold standard of modern floral design in NYC for many years to come. This organization is built on a culture of enthusiasm and a passion for flowers that spills over to its customers. Over 200 of the city’s best-known concierges recommend Starbright, which has earned the moniker, “The Official Florist of the City That Never Sleeps.” 140 W. 26th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.229.1610, starbrightnyc.com

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11/2/16 12:12:32 PM


FACE OF GRAND CENTRAL PARTNERSHIP

GRAND CENTRAL PARTNERSHIP

As President/CEO of the Grand Central Partnership, Fred Cerullo continues his commitment to public service in New York City. Grand Central Partnership is a nonprofit organization dedicated to ensure the neighborhood surrounding Grand Central Terminal is safe, clean and thriving. This dynamic area of Manhattan has some of the best dining, tourism, shopping and nightlife hot spots in the city and the Grand Central Partnership helps maintain its ever-evolving accomplishments. 122 E. 42nd St. #601, at Lexington Ave., 212.883.2420, grandcentralpartnership.nyc WHERE G UEST B OOK

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FACES OF

NYC 2017

FACES OF LUXURY SKINCARE

OSSWALD PARFUMERIE + LUXURY SKINCARE BOUTIQUE Tanja Dreiding Wallace (center)—whose grandfather Boris Dreiding established the world-famous Parfumerie Osswald in Zurich, Switzerland, in 1921—opened Osswald New York in 2012. Building on Parfumerie Osswald’s reputation for offering groundbreaking and hard-to-find brands, Osswald New York is home to over 30 luxury fragrance, skincare and cosmetic lines—many of which can only be found there. As Tanja Wallace likes to say, the Osswald New York team—including Josie Plumey (left) and Daniel Ramirez (right)—offers a “little bit of Swiss hospitality in the Big Apple.” 311 W. Broadway, btw Canal & Grand sts., 212.615.3111, osswaldnyc.com 72

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11/1/16 2:29:50 PM


FACE OF EFFECTIVE NONSURGICAL PAIN RELIEF

ROSENBERG WELLNESS CENTER

Dr. Jeff Rosenberg has over 20 years of experience practicing chiropractic wellness and is certified in three chiropractic techniques—Cox, Active Release and Graston—that are proven most effective for lasting pain relief. This dedication to nonsurgical pain treatment offers patients a safe and fast road to recovery from disc injuries, carpal tunnel, sciatica, plantar fasciitis, shoulder pain and more. Dr. Rosenberg’s expert comprehensive care will alleviate both the patient’s concerns and discomfort, allowing them to enjoy the full benefits of his cutting-edge, holistic treatments. 635 Madison Ave., 4th Floor, at E. 59th St., 212.858.0015, Rosenbergwellnesscenter.com

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FACES OF

NYC 2017

FACES OF CHOCOLATE

VOILÀ CHOCOLAT Entrepreneur Peter Moustakerski’s (right) innovative concept of offering unique chocolatemaking experiences and artisanal chocolate treats in one shop came to life with Voilà Chocolat. At this Upper West Side store, visitors of all ages apply traditional chocolatiering techniques using top-quality chocolate by participating in à-lacarte activities—like crafting their own gourmet chocolate bars. Educational classes, team-building for corporate events and chocolate pairings all take place in Voilà Chocolat’s chocolate lounge. Award-winning chocolate creations by Master Chocolatier Christophe Toury (left) are available, as are customizable gifts with personalized graphics or text printed right on the chocolate. 221 W. 79th St., btw Amsterdam Ave. & Broadway, 212.920.8799, voila-chocolat.com

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FACE OF GREEK CUISINE

KELLARI TAVERNA Stavros Aktipis, owner of Kellari restaurants in NYC and Washington, D.C., has been in the Greek food business for over 30 years. His journey to create an authentic, modern Greek restaurant began in Athens, Greece, and brought him to the United States. Celebrating its 10th anniversary in 2016, Kellari Taverna, his flagship restaurant, continues to specialize in Mediterranean cuisine with an exceptional array of imported seafood—as part of a top-notch sustainable fish program—and prides itself in using only the freshest ingredients. Don’t take our word for it; go to Kellari Taverna and get a taste of true Greek hospitality! 19 W. 44th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.221.0144, kellariny.com

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FACES OF

NYC 2017

FACE OF OUTDOOR ANTIQUES AND FLEA MARKETS

ANNEX MARKETS

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For 40 years, Alan Boss has been known to both New Yorkers and frequent city visitors as the Big Apple’s Flea and Antiques Market Impresario. Boss’ markets, located in Hell’s Kitchen and Chelsea, are packed every weekend of the year with vendors of eclectic collectibles and customers from around the city and the world. For discerning shoppers (like Andy Warhol, who was a regular at Chelsea Flea), these antiques and flea markets offer both contemporary and historic treasures that will be hard to find anywhere else. Chelsea: W. 25th St., btw Broadway and Sixth Ave., 212.243.5343; Hell’s Kitchen: W. 39th St., at Ninth Ave., 212.220.0239, annexmarkets.com

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FACES OF LGBT SPORTS BARS

BOXERS NYC

Avid sports fans Rob Hynds (left) and Bob Fluet (right) are the proud owners of Boxers Bars—also known as “America’s Gay Sports Bars.” Now in their sixth year of operation with two locations in the heart of New York City (Chelsea and Hell’s Kitchen) and one in Philadelphia, they have become leaders in the gay sports bar industry. Boxers Bars bring the LGBT community, gay sports leagues, other New Yorkers and visitors together to enjoy outdoor terraces, brick-oven pizza and popular 2-for-1 happy hour deals served by athletic Boxers bartenders who don nothing else but signature boxer shorts. Stop by and be debriefed on what Boxers NYC is all about. Chelsea: 37 W. 20th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.255.5082; Hell’s Kitchen: 742 Ninth Ave., at W. 50th St., 212.951.1518, boxersnyc.com

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This page: Rotisserie Georgette’s roasted whole chicken with baked potato and (facing page) its Tarte Tatin with crème fraîche.

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ElEvatEd comfort Upscale eateries that offer a whole new spin on down-home cooking. by Jill Fergus

PhotograPhy by evan sung

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Sometimes all it takes to send you right back to childhood is one taste, and, more often than not, that taste comes from what’s known as “comfort food.” There is no technical description for this oft-used culinary term, but it doesn’t really need one because you know them well: mac ’n’ cheese, burgers, potpies … foods that are rich, warm, filling and offer a taste of home. The good news is you don’t have to sacrifice ambience and service for this kind of hearty and simple fare. More and more, top NYC chefs are creating modern, sophisticated takes on traditional preparations. There may be no place like home, but these stick-to-your-ribs offerings will make you feel the love, same as if mama had cooked them.

roTisserie GeorGeTTe Georgette Farkas trained at Monaco’s Le Louis XV, then worked for years as the communications director for famed Chef Daniel Boulud and his stable of award-winning restaurants. But she always dreamed of having her own restaurant and so, in late 2013, she opened Rotisserie Georgette (14 E. 60th St., 212.390.8060). The signature dishes are Zimmerman Farm rotisserie chickens: classic roasted half chicken cooked with herbes de Provence and served with a choice of sauce, and the truly decadent “Poule de Luxe”—a whole roasted chicken (for two) stuffed with wild mushrooms, quinoa and herbs, and topped with seared foie gras. The stuffed potato, a hollowed-out Idaho baked potato refilled with Gruyère-infused mashed potatoes, is a must.

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The smiTh midTown

Gramercy Tavern

It’s hard to go wrong at The Smith Midtown (956 Second Ave., 212.644.2700), the always-jammed Midtown branch of the popular chain of American-style brasseries (The Smith Lincoln Center and The Smith East Village round out the trio). The cavernous, ceramic-tiled space is filled with a trendy crowd, and walk-ins don’t mind waiting for a table (people-watching at the zinc-topped bar certainly make the time go faster). The menu has plenty of options —there are braised short ribs, ricotta gnocchi and the perennially popular chicken potpie, a delicious mix of free-range chicken, carrots, celery, peas and caramelized red pearl onions with a cheddar-chive biscuit crust.

One of the longest-standing restaurants in Danny Meyer’s culinary empire, Gramercy Tavern (42 E. 20th St., 212.477.0777) has always had its own niche. The homey vibe—wood-beamed ceilings, colorful murals, blue-shirted servers in vests—and upscale yet rustic American cuisine focused on seasonal ingredients are hallmarks of this Flatiron District mainstay. While the dining room, with its tasting menus, is certainly worth a visit, the more casual tavern section offers an à la carte menu with comfort dishes like duck meat loaf. Made like a very firm pâté, the meat is seasoned with onion, black pepper and fennel seed (among other items) and served with a mushroom

at The smith midtown, you can savor a chicken potpie with a side of jalapeño cheddar grits.

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and chestnut ragout—this definitely isn’t your mother’s meat loaf. Save room for desserts like the Dutch apple pie for two with sour cream and walnut streusel. the burger, the most democratic of foods: Here, the Bowery Meat Company offers a cheeseburger with griddled onions, raclette, tomato aioli and french fries.

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Bowery Meat CoMpany With a name like Bowery Meat Company (9 E. 1st St., 212.460.5255), you know you’ve come to the right place to indulge in a beef-, veal- and lamb-centric menu (to be fair, there are nonmeat items as well). This sleek and modern Lower East Side steak house has everything from filet mignon and lamb chops to feel-good items like wagyu meatballs with creamy polenta, short ribs ravioli and duck lasagna. Burger lovers will be happy to know that this clas-

sic comfort food doesn’t get short shrift—here, it’s gussied up to gourmet status. The 40-day, dry-aged beef patty is topped with a red onion jam, melted raclette cheese and roasted tomato garlic aioli on a toasted brioche bun and served with hand-cut crispy fries.

IrvIngton The stylish restaurant on the ground floor of the W New York-Union Square hotel is all about elevated comfort food. Irvington (201 Park Ave. So., 212.677.0425) offers rotisserie-roasted meats, house-made pastas and the super popular flatbread pizzas. These soft, oblong-shaped, brick-oven-cooked pizzas (served on small wooden pizza

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CoCktAIlS

CAVIAR CRuDo

FINE DININg

CAVIAR to go

CAVIAR RuSSE MIChElIN

REStAuRANt - CAVIAR BoutIquE 538 Madison Avenue at East 54th street New York, NY 10022 - Also visit us in Miami at the Four Seasons Tower. Monday through Saturday, serving all day noon - 10 pm, Sunday noon - 4 pm. Inquire for Private Dining. 212 980 5908 - 1 800 NYCAVIAR - www.CaviarRusse.com

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paddles) might come topped with spicy merguez sausage, red onions and dollops of ricotta cheese, or perhaps with wild mushrooms, roasted garlic and Parmesan (many of the ingredients are fresh from the Union Square Greenmarket right across the street). Drinkwise, there are plenty of craft beers, as well as bottled cocktails (Negronis, Moscow Mules and other classics) that are carbonated and bottled in-house.

The CloCkTower Jason Atherton, chef of The Clocktower (5 Madison Ave., 212.413.4300), is English, so he knows a thing or two about comfort food (all those rainy days lend themselves to hearty tavern dinners). The Michelin-starred chef has put his stamp on a quintessentially American comfortfood dish—mac ’n’ cheese. His haute version—served as a main course—is prepared using rigatoni tossed with a cheddar cheese sauce and topped with bits of slowcooked ox cheek, panfried wild mushrooms and Parmesan cheese shavings. The restaurant, on the second floor of the Edition Hotel, has three intimate, clublike dining rooms. Try to snag a table in the one with the marble fireplace.

Birds & BuBBles A story about comfort food must include fried chicken. And while you can get this soul-food staple at many places in this town, it won’t be as meticulously prepared as it is at Birds & Bubbles (100B Forsyth St., 646.368.9240). You will be charmed by the tiny two-room restaurant, tucked into a side street on the Lower East Side and accessed via a precariously short flight of steel steps. North Carolinaborn owner Sarah Simmons dry-brines her Pennsylvania Dutch Country birds for up to 48 hours in a cayenne-based spice mix; they are then dipped in buttermilk, coated with flour and panfried in cast-iron skillets. Don’t miss the biscuits and jalapeño corn bread. “Bubbles” refers to champagne—order a split or a bottle and toast to your delightful, decadent chow.

Telepan The Upper West Side is home to Telepan (72 W. 69th St., 212.580.4300), the elegant restaurant from Chef-owner Bill Telepan, who garnered rave reviews (three stars from 84

The New York Times) when he helmed the kitchen at the now-defunct JUdson Grill. Telepan’s leafy, residentialblock location and farm-to-table philosophy make it an ideal neighborhood spot, but its proximity to both Lincoln Center (a 10-minute walk) and Central Park (down the block) ensures plenty of visitors, too. On the menu, expect items like lobster Bolognese, roasted chicken with herb dumplings and, a dish that’s pure comfort food, meatballs. Telepan’s version uses duck meat (from the leg of the bird), rolled with a mixture that includes bread crumbs, pork fat, garlic, cream and eggs, and then oven roasted before being served over house-made canestri pasta (a macaroni-rigatoni hybrid) and topped with fresh Parmesan.

innovative spin on mac ’n’ cheese, with wild mushrooms and ox cheeks at The Clocktower.

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Handmade pasta, perfectly cooked steaks and fresh seafood expertly prepared using the finest ingredients.

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This page: Authors and intellectuals of the Round Table perfected the art of conversation at the Algonquin Hotel. Facing page: The “O. Henry booth” at Pete’s Tavern, where, it is said, the writer wrote “The Gift of the Magi.”

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Bar scrawl Tour New York watering holes from a writer’s perspective. by RobeRt Haynes-PeteRson

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A bookish ambience in the Library at the NoMad Hotel.

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It’s almost a given that writers—novelists, journalists, bloggers—do their best “work” in bars. Whether you’re a struggling author with the Great American Novel trapped inside, curious to see where Jack Kerouac bent his elbow or simply like bars with a bookish vibe, New York has got you covered.

Writerly Hangs

New York City’s literary drinking scene isn’t a past-tense experience. Many bars and lounges are like a second home to today’s literati.

The pressed tin ceilings and ornate backbar at Pete’s Tavern (129 E. 18th St., 212.473.7676) aren’t ironic or “throwback,” they’re the real deal: Pete’s has been a Gramercy Park fixture since 1864. And in that time, many creatives have thrown back a drink or three here. Ludwig Bemelmans wrote his first Madeline book at Pete’s, supposedly on the back of a menu; O. Henry, who lived just down the street, mentions the bar (changing the name to Kenealy’s) in his short story “The Lost Blend,” and legend holds that he wrote “The Gift of the Magi” on the premises (sans laptop). Literature fans can and do request to be seated in O. Henry’s booth. Straightforward bar fare and classic Italian dishes (such as linguine with clam sauce and veal parmigiana) at the welcoming, casual spot are accompanied by well-made classic cocktails, Pete’s famous house-made eggnog at Christmastime and signature drinks like the Pineapple Jerry, a blend of Sailor Jerry rum, Licor 43, pineapple juice, sour mix and cinnamon. The White Horse Tavern (567 Hudson St., 212.989.3956), which opened in 1880, attracted the Beat poets and the folk music scene in the 1950s and 1960s. Here, the likes of Bob Dylan, Norman Mailer and Hunter S. Thompson all spent time. But the most newsworthy carouser was poet Dylan Thomas, who did not go gentle into that good night. Thomas famously went on a massive bender at the White Horse in November 1953 and died a few days later. While we recommend you do not emulate the poet, the cash-only spot is ideal for a Brooklyn Brewery beer, along with shots and mixed drinks like a Negroni. Many establishments attracting writers fall into the neighborhood-tavern or inexpensive-dive category. But for Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley and the rest of the 1920s writing/theatrical group, the Vicious Circle (as they called themselves), such surroundings simply wouldn’t do. Instead, they took their martini-

fueled “business meetings” at Midtown’s Algonquin Hotel (59 W. 44th St., 212.840.6800), where they became known as the Round Table. Today, you can eat in the main dining room and admire Natalie Ascencios’ large and colorful portrait of the group or sip martinis in the hotel’s iconic Blue Bar, where the tribe originally convened. A street with a literary history is MacDougal, south of Washington Square. In the 1930s and 1940s, Minetta Tavern (113 MacDougal St., 212.475.3850) attracted authors (Ernest Hemingway, Joseph Mitchell) and bohemians (Joe Gould, who claimed to be writing a comprehensive history of the modern world). Restaurateur Keith McNally has kept the historic trappings, but has reinvented the space as a celebrity-studded destination. Jack Kerouac used to live above the Gaslight Cafe, a coffeehouse (with notoriously terrible coffee), which opened in 1958 and helped turn Greenwich Village into a folk music mecca. Today, it’s the Up & Up (116 MacDougal St., 212.260.3000), a casually immaculate, semisubterranean bar featuring craft cocktails served with no attitude.

Bars and Books Perhaps it’s not an author’s ghost you seek, but simply a spot with a literary feel. Done. Hudson Bar and Books (636 Hudson St., 212.229.2642) was an innovator in the concept of drinking cocktails while surrounded by shelves of hardcover books. It’s also a cigar bar. Order James Bond’s favorite, the Vesper (gin, vodka, Lillet Blanc), and light up a fine maduro. An events calendar often includes Bond films and specialized whiskey tastings. The several bars at the NoMad Hotel (1170 Broadway, 212.796.1500) regularly win national and international awards for their exquisite drinks, like the rich Gentleman’s Exchange (rye, Suze, amaro, vermouth, cold-brew coffee, absinthe and bitters). The hotel’s Library bar, an intimate den of sofas and club chairs, surrounded by shelves stacked with historic cookbooks and adventure texts, is generally reserved for hotel guests (if you’re there at the right moment and are extra nice, you might get lucky). Bookmarks (299 Madison Ave., 212.204.5498), the inside-outside rooftop bar at the Library Hotel, is similarly adorned, but accessible to the general public daily WHERE G UEST B OOK

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from 4 pm. Themed drinks, like The Pulitzer (Plymouth gin, elderflower liqueur, Fernet-Branca, lemon juice and agave nectar), add some fun to the experience.

I Read ThaT Book Because writers so happily hang around taverns, many works employ real bars as settings. Joseph Mitchell set much of his book “Joe Gould’s Secret” at Minetta Tavern, while F. Scott Fitzgerald’s fictional Jay Gatsby spent time at the real Plaza Hotel because it made sense for the era’s wealthy social set to do so. Today, the Plaza honors its Jazz Age literary heritage in the plush Rose Club (768 Fifth Ave., 212.546.5311), where live music, distressed velvet seating and pre-Prohibition cocktails (like the Whiskey Mac, a blend of Dewar’s and ginger wine) reign supreme. In Tom Robbins’ infectiously abstract 1976 novel “Even Cowgirls Get the Blues,” Sissy Hankshaw and her friend discuss “dancing Friday night at Kenny’s Castaways.” 90

The lowbrow venue closed recently to reopen as Carroll Place (157 Bleecker St., 212.260.1700), a higher-brow gastropub and wine bar. There’s still live music, but beer pong has been replaced by an impressive wine selection and cocktails like the Bleecker Street Sour (rye, amaretto, lemon juice, egg white, with a Montepulciano wine float). While researching (read: drinking) for this article at Dante (79-81 MacDougal St., 212.982.5275), where expertly made, seasonally inflected cocktails augment an elevated Italian menu, I found myself seated alongside a Wall Street Journal writer and a novelist of some note—proof that New York’s literary drinking scene isn’t a past-tense experience. In fact, many of the aforementioned watering holes attract the literati. “The Algonquin wasn’t just a 1919–1929 author hangout,” insists Kevin Fitzpatrick, man of letters and Dorothy Parker authority. “I’m always running into writers,” he says. “Authors still go there to meet publishers and have a drink.”

Carroll Place, formerly kenny’s Castaways, in the heart of Greenwich Village.

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Hornblower Hornblower’s New York City Lights Dinner Cruise is the city’s quintessential dining cruise. No other dining experience can provide such breathtaking views and changing scenery. Pass by the Statue of Liberty and beneath the Brooklyn Bridge. Awe-inspiring views of the Manhattan skyline that are always evolving. Add to this exceptional service, a seasonal à la carte menu and after-dinner dancing, and you have all the ingredients for an unforgettable evening. See New York. Be New York.

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551 Fifth Ave., at e. 45th St., 212.972.3315, 136 washington St., at Albany St., 212.608.0171, mortons.com

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the gold standard Jewel-enhanced facials and massages make your spa experience even more luxe. By Karen Tina Harrison

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This page: The ice fountain at The Peninsula Spa offers a cooling treatment after a steam. Facing page: Facials at The Spa at The Mandarin Oriental New York can include jade stones and pearls.

New York is a treasure chest of extravagant experiences, if you have the means: the haute-est hotels, shopping, dining and theatergoing imaginable. Manhattan’s elite spas, suitably set in five-star hotels (but available to anyone), put a new spin on opulence, with services that incorporate gems and rare metals to rejuvenate skin. Here is the latest on these treatments. Nestled in The Greenwich Hotel in TriBeCa, Shibui Spa (377 Greenwich St., 646.203.0045) embodies Japanese Zen serenity (with a cutting-edge fitness room and lap pool). Shibui’s most glamorous treatment, the Barcelona-developed Natura Bissé Diamond Multisensorial Lifting Facial, is a favorite of The Greenwich’s celebrity visitors and TriBeCa gentry. Throughout 90 lulling minutes in a heated spa bed, you are pampered by a series of collagen-boosting Natura Bissé Diamond Collection balms. These elixirs harness marine substances produced by microorganisms with regenerative powers. The facial’s cryo mask (a cold sheet

mask that includes grape seed) revitalizes and hydrates dry skin. A head and shoulder massage while the mask is on completes the experience. Spas don’t get ritzier than La Prairie spa in The RitzCarlton New York, Central Park (50 Central Park So., 212.521.6135). La Prairie Cellular Mineral Body Exfoliator, a key ingredient in the full-body, 90-minute Diamond Perfection Treatment, glitters with powdered diamonds, peridots, amethysts—and meteorite dust. Swirled on by hand, this mixture polishes your skin, and afterward, you enjoy an allover rub with Skin Caviar Luxe Soufflé Body Cream. The spa’s Ultimate Platinum Rare Facial delivers detoxifying nano-infusions of platinum plus copper-rich malachite (a copper-based mineral). And La Prairie’s Ultimate Pure Gold Radiance Facial lavishes complexions with 24-karat infused pure gold serum, transmitting gold’s prized suppleness and sheen. The Spa at Mandarin Oriental, New York (80 Columbus Circle, 212.805.8800) couples ancient Asian healing arts with Manhattan panoramas from its 35th-floor aerie, designed using luxe Asian-style decor. One jewel of the spa menu: the Jade Stone Facial, devised by Dr. Ping Zhang, a New York-based doctor of Oriental medicine and a certified herbologist. This 80-minute indulgence begins with a gentle exfoliation courtesy of hand-crushed pearls. Next, your aesthetician brandishes smooth pebbles of Chinese jade, the qi energy-releasing “divine stone,” sculpting the “youth line” along your jaw and cheekbone, attacking toxins, bloat and gravity. The deal is sealed with an herbal mask of calming ginseng, immunity enhancing persimmon leaf and circulation-optimizing Chinese angelica. Afterward, clients can use the spa’s oxygenated Vitality Pool and signature amethyst steam room with a dazzling, foot-high amethyst crystal, ensconced in a wall niche. Revered for millennia by the Chinese, amethyst’s magnetic aura and positive radiation are known to fortify cell regeneration and enhance sleep. Multisensory pleasures abound at the exclusive Peninsula Spa at The Peninsula New York (700 Fifth Ave., 212.903.3910), with its award-winning services and relaxation room’s cocoonlike beds. Spa clients who book two hours of treatments are granted access to the hotel’s sleek gym, indoor pool and sun terrace. WHERE G UEST B OOK

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The two-hour, Peninsula Beijing-originated Jade Hot Stone Massage is designed to include a facial cleanse, full-body exfoliation and massage, and relaxing foot ritual. The main event is a scalp-to-sole massage performed with deeply fragrant ESPA oil and strategically set warm jade cabochons that balance and ease tension. In the spa’s Lemongrass and Jade Stone Vitality Manicure and Pedicure, jade stones are used to massage hands and feet, while you inhale the exotic fragrance of the Thai lemongrass scent. Julien Farel Restore Salon & Spa perches in Loews Regency New York (540 Park Ave., 212.888.8988). Nowadays, this sunny loft beckons busy Manhattanites and travelers with its “Power Hour” beauty services, a trio of signature offerings, finessed to just 60 minutes. One must-include is Farel’s Magnifique Scalp Treatment, with bioactive metals and minerals, such as anti-inflammatory zinc and conductive silicon. Comprising a relaxing head massage and rehabilitative hair tonic, this follicle miracle retexturizes stressed strands and decelerates graying. To round out your power hour: a blowout by an aesthetician and a Power Manicure with elastin-enhancing diamond-dust microdermabrasion that reportedly turns back time on your hands. Then again, Julien Farel’s power hour is optional. You’re welcome to linger longer and sip complimentary champagne. The Surrey is New York’s sole Relais & Châteaux hotel, and Cornelia Spa at The Surrey (20 E. 76th St., 646.358.3600) boasts flower-laden dressing rooms that offer sybaritic steam showers, and lounge pods with cupcakes and champagne. Cornelia Spa focuses on gemstone treatments, showcased in the hour-long Lumina Gemstone Radiance facial. Its posh potions, also available for purchase in white jewel boxes, flaunt micronized rubies, emeralds, sapphires, citrines, gold and pearls. These gems unleash electrical charges that promote subdermal circulation, hydration and collagen renewal. (An add-on, Hematite Eye Therapy, boosts circulation via ironrich moonstones.) Cornelia Spa’s head-to-toe Champagne & Pearl Sugar Glow uses mother-of-pearl powder on your body and gold-and-pearl serum on the face. The Iridescent Pearl Manicure includes hand-silkening milled pearls and pearl oil. Now that’s what we call a royal treatment. 94

Top: A lounge area at The Cornelia Spa at the Surrey. Bottom: Diamond Perfection Body Exfoliation at La Prairie Spa.

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Dr. Jan Linhart has been practicing the art and science of dentistry for over 30 years in midtown Manhattan. With International patients coming into New York from around the world, many of whom are accompanied by an entourage of family or friends, Dr. Linhart was inspired to create the Continental Suite, a 750-square foot treatment suite outfitted with State-of-the-Art equipment, a luxurious seating area and other amenities within his spacious office. The office provides a wide range of dental services as well as 24-hour emergency service!

EXPERTISE IN: • Veneers (2 days) • PearlinbriteTM Laser Whitening • Implants • Crowns • Root Canals • Periodontics • Oral Medicine • 24-Hour Emergency Care Russian, Arabic, German, Spanish, French, Czech, Hungarian spoken A VISIT TO DR. LINHART CAN CHANGE YOUR LIFE. “IT’S ONE-STOP DENTAL PERFECTION” -New York Magazine

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Brie Ruais in her studio in Sunset Park.

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my space For these innovative Brooklyn artists, their studios are a lot more than just places to work. by ashley schneider photography by george itzhak

The last 70 years have witnessed a transformation in the New York art world. As the cityscape shifts, the art world adapts. Starting in the 1950s, artists would seek out neighborhoods like SoHo (simply called “Downtown” then), where they could rent huge, empty lofts and warehouses for their studios at affordable prices. Today, due to rising rents in Manhattan, sculptors, painters and the like have been forced to find other areas in which to live, work and create new communities. We tracked down four artists working in Brooklyn. Having made their homes in the borough now known for its hipster/bohemian vibe, these artists create in unusual spaces—an apartment-turned-studio, a revamped army terminal—works that the art world is noticing. Their studios serve as incubators for the development of medium into provocative new visual statements. Here, they tell us how their studios shape their work, share their challenges, tell us why they prefer Brooklyn to Manhattan and let us in on what’s up next. WHERE G UEST B OOK

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Brie ruais To fully understand the ceramic sculptures of Brie Ruais requires a visit to her studio in Sunset Park. Working with a mass of clay equal in weight to her own body, Ruais records a set of preliminary “instructions” for handling the medium (“spread the clay outwards in all directions”), designed to bring focus to the piece and free up her movements. As she listens to the instructions—which are sometimes literal, sometimes mantras or abstract thoughts—she allows her body to move freely and interact with the clay. The results are often richly colored and glazed abstracts, landscapes and contours of the human 98

body. “The work is about what happens when one’s body is overcome by a physically demanding process. We are forced to remember that making something requires the laborious use of the body.” In Brooklyn for 15 years, Ruais now has a studio in Industry City, a huge complex of buildings where many artists rent space. She and several other artists whom she met at Columbia University moved here in 2012, splitting up a large space into individual studios. “We developed this space together,” Ruais says, having partly chosen it for its capacity to supply industrial-strength power for her two kilns. Look for her work at the Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery in Chelsea.

Jaqueline Cedar works in a studio converted from part of her apartment.

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Jaqueline Cedar

Caleb nussear at studio is in the brooklyn army Terminal.

It’s going on three years that Jaqueline Cedar has worked in a studio converted from part of her Ditmas Park, Brooklyn, apartment. “I’d been living in a suburban neighborhood for a while and keeping a separate studio in a more industrial area. I was ready for a change of scenery,” she says. Cedar works in figuration and abstraction: Figures in her paintings are on abstract backgrounds, creating a subtle discord. Her most recent solo exhibition, “Be real,” at the Steven Zevitas Gallery in Boston, showed drawn figures cut from canvas and placed in abstract fields of sourced fabric. Subtle manipulations—one figure’s feet cut and slightly removed from the rest of the body or a line trailing downward off the frame—can be fascinating, but unsettling to the viewer. Cedar’s studio allows her a convenient work schedule. No need to block hours for traveling to a studio elsewhere and studio access at any time give her the ability to walk away from her work and return to it as needed. “The ‘thought’ space I enter when I’m in the studio feels completely separate from the living space. When I’m in the studio, I close the door and immerse myself in that world.” When she’s not in the studio, she draws inspiration from her environment in a way different from many New York artists: “I’m based in a fairly suburban area with many large homes and trees, so I walk around a lot and get ideas about space, architecture, light and movement daily.”

Caleb nussear Caleb Nussear draws heavily on the natural world for inspiration. Mathematics and theories of dimensionality also inform his art as he works primarily in sculpture and drawing using a variety of materials. In November 2015, he collaborated with choreographer Peter Kyle to create an evening-long dance performance with his Miura-fold paper sculptures, fluid geometrical shapes based on an origami form called “Miura Ori.” In addition to now casting these works in glass and porcelain, Nussear finished a series of large-scale cut-mirror sculptures for the Katonah Museum of Art in Westchester, New York, which were placed, along with the works of other artists, outdoors on the museum grounds this past summer and fall. WHERE G UEST B OOK

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Nussear found his studio in the Brooklyn Army Terminal in Sunset Park through the nonprofit organization Chashama, which procures work space for artists at a subsidized rate. The space sits in two buildings right on the New York Harbor. The maritime influence on the artists’s work exerts itself in the abstract at this stage in his career. “Seeing the harbor each time I exit and enter the working space of the studio is very important,” says Nussear. His studio’s open floor plan offers the creative opportunity of working beside 20 other artists; it also presents certain limitations. “My investigation into the Miura fold has in some part been necessitated by my not being able to weld or resin cast immediately in the studio.” He is represented by GP Presents, a division of the Gerald Peters Gallery on the Upper East Side.

Derrick ADAms Irrevocably affected by a Bruce Nauman exhibit in the 1990s, Adams began as a painter and then plunged into mixed media, integrating performance, sculpture, collage, assemblage and sound. Now, to start his working days, he spends the morning collecting objects at mom-and-pop shops and dollar stores in Downtown Brooklyn before bringing them back to his studio in Crown Heights. “My studio is more like a laboratory or a production space; all I need are tables, chairs and music.” There, he might take apart a bizarre T-shirt and use the material for assemblage or reflect on the space at Pioneer Works, an interdisciplinary space in Red Hook, Brooklyn, for research and experimentation founded by artist Dustin Yellin in 2012. Pioneer Works featured Adams’ exhibition “ON” in summer 2015, which was an exploration of consumerism and the depiction of black figures in pop culture. “Context is everything,” continues Adams. “As an artist, you have the ability to insert yourself into a context and reroute it.” Adams dismantles pop culture, consumption and perpetuated stereotypes in entertainment through commonly recognized objects. In his ON” show, Adams, who is represented by the Tilton Gallery on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, featured wall hangings, sculpture and improvisational performance pieces: Adams manipulated and mixed audio that included soundtracks from 1980s and 1990s television shows and infomercials, leaving the viewer to reflect on the artist’s cultural observations. 100

Derrick Adams at his crown Heights studio.

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Within the walls of the city’s most celebrated cultural institutions are works that signify a turning point in major art movements and human history itself. by Terry Trucco

This page: The spectacular titanosaur at the American Museum of Natural History. Facing page: Vincent van Gogh‘s timeless “The Starry Night” at the Museum of Modern Art.

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Photos: titanosaur, amnh/d. finnin; vincent van gogh, “the starry night,” 1889, acquired through the lillie P. bliss bequest

museum superstars

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Visiting a museum for the first time can make your head spin. Where do you begin? And what if you have just 30 minutes to navigate a century of American art or more than 2,000 years of civilization? One strategy is to aim for the stars: The superstar pieces that changed the course of art and are so familiar they cry out to be seen in person and make the heart beat a little faster. Only the Louvre has the “Mona Lisa,” but every world-class museum has its own must-see masterpieces guaranteed to thrill and nourish newcomers and repeat visitors alike. We asked authorities from five of New York City’s top museums to choose their must-see masterworks from the permanent collection that are often on view and to tell us why they’re too good to miss. We start at the 148-year-old American Museum of Natural History, because the oldest museum of the group boasts the newest must-see attraction in town—the titanosaur, a 122-foot-long cast of a 20-ton WHERE G UEST B OOK

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Whitney Studio Club in 1920), Miller calls Hopper one of the quintessential American artists. “Buildings don’t look like that in Paris,” she says of “Early Sunday Morning,” his moody streetscape from 1930. “It happens to be Seventh Avenue [in Manhattan], but because he’s removed any identifying details, it looks like any American main street before there are any signs of life. It’s interesting to think of the painting as a precursor of midcentury abstraction,” she adds, noting the geometric bands of color delineating the sky, bricks and storefronts. A concise history of modern art can be gleaned from the three showstoppers at the Museum of Modern Art selected by Meagan Johnson, Director of Membership and Visitor Services. Calling Vincent van Gogh’s “The Starry Night” from 1889 “a beautiful picture that people need to see,” Johnson points to the painting’s pronounced psychological underpinnings which befuddled the artist’s

This page: Edward Hopper’s “Early Sunday Morning,” from the Whitney Museum of American Art. Facing page: The Temple of Dendur at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Photo: edward hoPPer, “early sunday morning,” 1930, ©edward hoPPer/whitney museum, new york

herbivore that went on view in January 2016. “It’s so big they had to have the head of the dinosaur swoop out the doorway and come into the next hall,” says Brad Harris, Senior Director of Visitor Services. Based on 84 fossil bones excavated in Patagonia in 2014, the life-size fiberglass cast took over six months to construct. Far bigger than the T. rex, the museum’s other marquee dino, the massive plant eater would have weighed as much as 10 African elephants. Not quite as huge as a dinosaur, but equally compelling, is a standout by Edward Hopper from the collection at the Whitney Museum of American Art, which Dana Miller, Richard DeMartini Family Curator and Director of the Collection at the Whitney, calls “iconic in terms of what’s on view from the permanent collection.” As befits an artist closely associated with the Whitney (Hopper’s first-ever solo exhibition was held at the W H E R E G UESTBO O K

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Photo: temPle of dendur, given to the united states by egyPt in 1965, awarded to the metroPolitan museum of art in 1967, and installed in the sackler wing in 1978

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contemporaries. “He painted it while he was at Saint-Paul asylum. The inspiration came from his observation of the world but also his imagination.” Elsewhere, the origins of Cubism are impossible to miss in “Les Demoiselles d’Avignon,” Pablo Picasso’s grandscale 1907 painting of five naked women with menacing, masklike faces. In this radical break from the traditional depiction of figures, “Picasso wasn’t trying to make this realistic. He wanted to show you everything about the women at the same time,” Johnson explains. Another unprecedented masterstroke is “Bicycle Wheel,” a 1951 version of Marcel Duchamp’s iconic 1913

ready-made wheel planted atop a painted stool. Duchamp had used the term “ready-made” to explain the commercial objects in his work. “By using mass-produced objects, Duchamp subverted the idea of the artist as a creator of original art and made the idea of what constitutes art as important as the object itself,” Johnson says. Though 20th-century paintings form the core of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the collection begins with Camille Pissarro’s “The Hermitage at Pontoise,” ca. 1867, a precursor of modern art that eschewed the conventions of traditional academic painting. “Pissarro depicted a class of people that critics would have deemed vulgar,”

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Pablo Picasso‘s “Woman Ironing” at the Guggenheim.

Photo: Pablo Picasso, “woman ironing,” 1904, ©2012 estate of Pablo Picasso/artists rights society (ars), new york. kristoPher mckay, ©the solomon r. guggenheim foundation, new york

says Megan Fontanella, Associate Curator, Collections and Provenance. Also of note is the painting’s peripatetic past: The famous art dealer Justin K. Thannhauser spirited it out of Nazi Germany for an art show touring South America before fleeing the country himself. He later donated 75 important works to the Guggenheim, including the Pissarro. Also not to be missed at the Guggenheim: “Woman Ironing,” a melancholic 1904 Blue Period painting by Picasso. And one with a secret. Due to limited finances, the young Picasso often reused his canvases. “In the late 1980s, a conservation study identified a portrait of a standing man beneath the laundress one sees today,” says Fontanella. Note the telltale drips of paint from the underlying canvas near the woman’s head. Not long after Thomas P. Campbell became Director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, he handpicked 35 highlights for an audio tour, a lifeline for those confounded by the encyclopedic collection on view. Three dependable dazzlers are the 2,000-year-old Temple of Dendur, the 15th-century Studiolo from the Ducal Palace in Gubbio and Johannes Vermeer’s “Young Woman With a Water Pitcher” from 1662-63. Of Dendur, a gift to the American people for helping save Egyptian monuments from flooding in the 1960s, Campbell calls the “small but impressive” temple that once stood on the bank of the Nile a way for visitors “to experience an Egyptian temple in New York.” To sample the trompe l’oeil splendors of a Renaissance Italian’s private retreat, the director dispatches us to Federico da Montefeltro’s studio, an exquisite room that looks like a fully furnished interior but is made entirely of intarsia, an elaborate form of wood inlay. “The illusionism is taken to a virtuoso level, with thousands of pieces of various kinds of wood fitted together to form an extraordinary result,” he says. As for Vermeer, the 17th-century Dutch artist created just 36 paintings, but five are housed at the Met, including the luminous young woman holding a pitcher. Drawing attention to the masterfully structured composition and the ingenious way light enters the room, Campbell declares the little painting “a simple scene invested with poetic truth.” And poetry, all these works are. W H E R E G UESTBO O K

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The facade of Kykuit, the grand Rockefeller estate, home to four generations of the Rockefeller family.

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UP IN THE VALLEY Take a short, scenic train trip to the historic estates in the lower Hudson River Valley, New York by NaNcy J. braNdweiN

Just an hour or so north of New York City is the picturesque Hudson River Valley, known for its food and music; festivals; rich, verdant landscapes; and historical estates. Here is a peek at some of the area’s finest mansions deserving of a day trip.

which sweeping lawns are accented with specimen trees, such as a massive copper beech, and the curved entrance drive reveals “surprise” views, such as the United States’ first steel-framed conservatory.

KyKuit, sLeepy hoLLow

Photo: KyKuit, Bryan haeffele

LyNdhurst, tarrytowN Sprawled on a rugged knoll overlooking the Hudson River, Lyndhurst (635 S. Broadway, 914.631.4481) is one of the nation’s finest examples of Gothic Revival architecture, with its high, vaulted roofs and steep gables. Not only do rooms contain original furnishings and objets d’art, but rooms or groups of rooms also reveal the tastes and lives of three different owners: former New York City Mayor William Paulding, who first commissioned architect A.J. Davis in 1838; New York businessman George Merritt, who died in 1873, seven years after doubling the building’s size to trumpet his wealth and showcase his linden trees; and the very private railroad magnate Jay Gould, whose family occupied the estate from 1880 until 1961. Decorative-arts buffs thrill to details of faux painting throughout the home or A.J. Davis’ singular wheel-back chairs. The upstairs vaulted art gallery is the most swoonworthy space, with original works by Jean-BaptisteCamille Corot and Jean-Léon Gérôme. Oh, to wake to the stunning view of the Hudson River and grounds from the gallery’s huge, arched window! You can marvel at Ferdinand Mangold’s pioneering landscape design, in

Dutch for “lookout,” Kykuit (tours start at Kykuit Visitor Center at Philipsburg Manor, 914.366.6900), pronounced “kigh-cut,” presides 500 feet above sea level on 250 lush green acres. The six-story Georgian Revival mansion housed four generations of Rockefellers—from Standard Oil magnate John D. to New York Governor Nelson. Built in 1908 of local limestone and draped in wisteria vines, Kykuit’s non-ostentatious rooms seem modest compared to other Gilded Age estates; it’s the artwork, the gardens and the sight lines that take your breath away. Inside the entrance hallway, your eye immediately alights on a Tang dynasty bodhisattva figure transecting the magnificent view of the Hudson and Palisades cliffs beyond. Original artwork spans 2,000 years—from 100 B.C. Han dynasty pieces to Auguste Rodin sculptures in the garden to Andy Warhol silk screens of Nelson’s wife, Happy. Nelson amassed a spectacular 20th-century art collection, most of which is on view in the basement gallery. Works by Alexander Calder and Pablo Picasso share space with a glass display of old bottles the Rockefeller children dug up on the grounds. Outside, admire the Beaux Arts formal gardens, in which each garden is its own formal room WHERE G UEST B OOK

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SunnySIde, IrvIngton “If ever I wish for a retreat, whither I might steal from the world and its distractions … I know of none more prominent than this little valley,” so Washington Irving wrote of the lower Hudson Valley in “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,” the story of Ichabod Crane’s encounter with the Headless Horseman that draws thousands to this area around Halloween. Irving was the first American to make his living with his pen. After years abroad, he returned in 1835 and created Sunnyside (3 W. Sunnyside Lane, 914.591.8763). With stepped gables, Dutch roofs, Tudor chimneys and Moorish tiles, Sunnyside reflects Irving’s extensive travels. Guides lead you through simply furnished rooms occupied by Irving and his extended family—including Irving’s office with a daybed behind velvet curtains, an oak desk and his walking stick.

PHILIPSBurg Manor, SLeePy HoLLoW In 1750, Philipsburg Manor (tours start at Kykuit Visitor Center, 914.366.6900) was a bustling milling and trading complex and home to 23 enslaved Africans. The manor house dates back some 300 years, and guides in Colonial garb reenvision the life of those who worked the gristmill and concocted medicinal tinctures. It is the only living history museum dedicated to telling the story of slavery in the Colonial north. 110

BoScoBeL, garrISon Regarded as a prime example of clean, classic Federal-style architecture in the United States, Boscobel (1601 Rte. 9D, 845.265.3638) is the farthest north of these Hudson Valley estates, but well worth the scenic, hourlong train ride. Born in New York, but a British loyalist in London during the Revolution, Morris Dyckman planned to return to New York in style, but he died in 1806 before his country estate was completed. Boscobel owes its existence to his wife, Elizabeth, who finished her husband’s dream house, and to Lila Acheson Wallace, who funded a restoration and relocation of the home in 1956. While only a few pieces in the house are original to the Dyckmans, all are authentic and in the New York Federal style—from the white decorative wooden swags on the balcony to the furniture by cabinetmaker Duncan Phyfe. Outdoors, Boscobel’s 60-acre property features an herb garden, an alley of apple trees, a 1-mile-plus woodland trail, rustic gazebos and relaxing chairs. Leave time to linger in the 19th-century village of Cold Spring in the Hudson Highlands, chockablock with antiques shops and restaurants. Getting there: Metro-North’s Hudson Line trains out of Grand Central Terminal stop at these towns (followed by a short cab ride), or ask your concierge about car services.

Philipsburg Manor (above) sits next to a millpond in Sleepy Hollow. (Facing page, clockwise from top): Washington Irving’s bucolic estate, Sunnyside; Lyndhurst facade; Boscobel’s reconstructed kitchen.

Photos: PhiliPsburg Manor, historic hudson Valley; boscobel, laurie sPens; lyndhurst facade, lyndhurst collection; sunnyside, Karen sharMan

replete with terraces, pools, fountains or an allée of linden trees. Sculptures by modern giants like Louise Nevelson and Isamu Noguchi harmonize surprisingly in the classical spaces. Prefer historic autos to art? The cavernous coach barn holds pristine vehicles—from a 1907 Ford Model S to Nelson’s 1959 Chrysler limo. The Rockefellers’ reverence for art finds expression in an unassuming Baptist church. The Union Church of Pocantico Hills (555 Bedford Rd., 914.631.2069) contains stained-glass windows designed by modern masters. Henri Matisse designed the rose window and Marc Chagall’s windows illlustrate Bible stories with his characteristic floating figures. Knowledgeable docents tell the story behind each window—such as the moving ultramarine crucifixion, which honors Nelson’s son Michael, who died, tragically, on an anthropological mission.

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home-field advantage The venues where New York athletes play are so much more than mere stadiums or basketball courts. by Rich FisheR

In the vast, eclectic expanse of New York City, where competition for entertainment is fierce, professional sports have long maintained a superstar status. Not just the legendary players, but the equally hallowed stages upon which they perform. Whether completely empty or packed with enthusiastic fans, a renowned athletic arena breathes a life of its own, much like a famous theater or historical landmark. There is an immediate vibe upon entry. Memories produce tingles of excitement and nostalgia; ghosts of greatness seem to call out. New York has produced many of sports’ most recognizable venues, both past and present. The ones now in operation are worth a visit, as tours are offered at many, whether an event is being held or not. And those that are no longer here, like Ebbets Field and the Polo Grounds, will forever be woven throughout the Big Apple’s fabric, due to the history they created.

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PHOTOS; YANKEE STADIUM, NEW YORK YANKEES, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED; LOU GEHRIG, PHOTO STANLEY WESTON/GETTY IMAGES

Facing page: The New York Yankees host the Boston Red Sox at Yankee Stadium in May 2016. This page: July 4, 1939: Yankee legend Lou Gehrig delivers his farewell speech.

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OLD/NEW YANKEE STADIUMS When the original Yankee Stadium opened in 1923 in the Bronx, it was christened the House That Ruth Built because slugger Babe Ruth’s home-run prowess put enough cash in the coffers to construct it. By its closing in 2008, the stadium had hosted 37 World Series with New York winning 26. It was home to Hall of Fame royalty Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, Yogi Berra and Mickey Mantle, and a backdrop for iconic moments such as Gehrig’s tearful farewell speech and Reggie Jackson’s three home runs in the 1977 World Series, tying the Babe’s record for homers in a World Series game. The Derek Jeter-led Yanks immediately established a winning tradition in the new Yankee Stadium by winning the 2009 World Series. The updated version, built across the street from the original, has a dozen clubs, restaurants, lounges and food courts. The stadium also hosts the MLS New York City FC and college football’s Pinstripe Bowl.

SHEA STADIUM/CITI FIELD Opening in the shadow of the 1964 World’s Fair, Shea Stadium reflected a young Mets team that had played its first two years in the old Polo Grounds. It opened on April 17, 1964, featuring 21 escalators and a gigantic outfield scoreboard that provided information and entertainment. In 1969, led by manager Gil Hodges and Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Seaver, New York became the first expansion team (a new team added to a league) to win a World Series. In 1975, the Mets, Jets, Giants and Yanks played at Shea during Yankee Stadium’s renovation, marking the one time two MLB and NFL teams shared the same stadium. Citi Field opened in 2009. The exterior facade and main entry rotunda are throwbacks to Brooklyn’s Ebbets Field, and there is a Jackie Robinson Rotunda. Six clubs and restaurants, a food court and numerous concessions provide the eats. The Mets gave Citi Field its first championhip by winning the National League pennant in 2015.

WEST SIDE TENNIS CLUB/USTA BILLIE JEAN KING NATIONAL TENNIS CENTER The US Open moved in 1915 from Rhode Island to the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills, Queens, in the belief that the large population of metropolitan players 114

Clockwise from bottom left: New York Knick John Starks famously “dunking” the ball over Chicago Bulls Michael Jordan and Horace Grant; fans swarm the field at Shea Stadium after the Mets win the World Series on Oct. 16, 1969; Citi Field today; the New York Knicks court at Madison Square Garden, the “mecca of basketball.”

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imAgES; citi fiEld, NEW YoRK mEtS; mAdiSoN SQUARE gARdEN, ANNA hAS

JoRdAN, tom bERg/WiREimAgE; ShEA StAdiUm, Ed clARitY/NY dAilY NEWS ARchivE viA gEttY

PhotoS: JohN StARKS doiNg “thE dUNK” ovER thE hEAdS of hoRAcE gRANt ANd michAEl

and fans would help develop the sport in America. After moving to Philadelphia for three years, the Open returned in 1924 to a newly constructed West Side Tennis Club. In 1978, the event moved to Flushing Meadows-Corona Park’s USTA National Tennis Center, also in Queens, renamed in 2006 to honor Billie Jean King, four-time Women’s Singles Champion. The complex includes Arthur Ashe Stadium, which replaced Louis Armstrong Stadium as the event’s main venue in 1997 and recently installed a retractable roof. There is also the 6,000-seat Grandstand. While the playing surface has changed from grass to clay to its current hard-court status, one constant has been outstanding play. The 21st century has belonged mainly to Venus and Serena Williams, sisters who each won two crowns from 1999-2002: Serena has won four more since, including three straight from 2012-14.

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN Sitting above the railroad tracks of Penn Station, Madison Square Garden has seen it all. For many years, MSG has WHERE G UEST B OOK

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Above: Arthur Ashe playing Tom Okker of the Netherlands at the US Open in Forest Hills on Sept. 8, 1968. Right: Serena Williams reacts after beating sister Venus in the women’s singles quarterfinal match at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in 2015.

PhotoS: arthur aShe at the uS oPen in foreSt hillS, 1968, bettmann/contributor; Serena williamS at the uS oPen at the uSta billie jean king national tenniS center, 2015, uSta/Pete StaPleS

been called the “mecca of basketball,” and yet the historic first Ali-Frazier fight took place there in 1971 with Frank Sinatra shooting ringside photos for Life magazine. The New York Rangers, Ringling Bros. Circus, Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show and four presidential conventions have also called the Garden home, making it easy to see why it’s known as “The World’s Most Famous Arena.” With its famed concave ceiling, the current structure (the first was built in 1879) opened in 1968 at 4 Penn Plaza in Midtown Manhattan. For college basketball, the Garden hosts the St. John’s Red Storm, the NIT Final Four and the Big East Tournament. In professional basketball, the 1993 play-offs between the hometown Knicks and Chicago Bulls produced “The Dunk,” when John Starks threw down a ferocious left-handed slam over Michael Jordan and Horace Grant. The Knicks lost the 1994 finals to Houston in seven games as MSG became part of one of the most bizarre nights in television history: As Game 5 unfolded at the Garden, O.J. Simpson went on his freeway chase with the Los Angeles police. NBC affiliates began split-screen coverage of both the game and the chase taking place 3,000 miles away. W H E R E G UESTBO O K

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Jerry’s on Jerry Seinfeld on the good, the bad and the ugly of NYC. (Not that there’s anything wrong with that.)

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It was an extraordinary feat to have created a show—the 1990s TV comedy, “Seinfeld”—that popularized so many phrases, they have become part of the common lexicon of the American public. “Seinfeldisms” need no explanation—at least not for the 62 percent of Americans who watched the show. Expressions such as “yada yada yada,” “master of my domain” and “no soup for you!” carry with them instant, hilarious memories of episodes from what was arguably (I, for one, would argue it) the funniest sitcom ever on television. All this from a 34-year-old comic from Massapequa, New York (a town which Seinfeld has quipped is “Indian for by the mall”), who, along with Larry David, had an idea in 1988 for a show, centered in Manhattan, “about nothing.” Here are some other Seinfeld observations about NYC.—Lois Levine

ON HUMOR: Humor is really a New York invention. All

humor emanates from New York. All people in New York are funny and get funnier as they get older, and everyone outside New York gets less funny.

On traffic: There’s no “other way” in New York.

On the East Village: Here they wear a lot of black, and nobody calls their parents on Sunday.

On the Statue of Liberty: I am for open immigra-

On eating the Black-and-White Cookie (invented in New York): The key to eating a black-

Everybody goes every way all the time.

Photo: slaven vlasic/getty images for tribeca film festival

lessly, but he’s got a cabdriver’s license, I can see it right there.” I don’t know what you need to get a cabdriver’s license. I think all you need is a face.

tion, but that sign we have in front of the Statue of Liberty: “Give us your tired, your poor, your huddled masses.” Do we have to specify “the wretched refuse?” Why not just say, “Give us the slow, the people that can’t drive, people that have trouble merging, that don’t signal, that can’t parallel park, that have bad penmanship, that don’t return calls …” ? In other words, any dysfunctional, defective slob that you can somehow cattle-prod onto a wagon, send them over. We want them!

On Columbus Circle: When they changed the traffic

pattern around Columbus Circle, many of us in the area thought it was going to be rerouted into an endless circle, an attempt perhaps to try and just flush us back to where we came from.

On the hipsters in Brooklyn: If they really were

hipsters, how could there be so many of them?

On NYC cabs: People say, “He’s driving fast and reck-

and-white cookie is you want to get some black and some white in each bite.

On Downtown: I always thought about living Downtown, but then I would think, “What would my grandparents say, who busted their whole lives to get out of there?” I just couldn’t do it to them. On the changing retail scene: A large part of my life is walking up and down Broadway and Columbus Ave. and trying to remember what store used to be where. Look at that place over there. That’s a Madison Ave. boutique. What is it doing over here? On Zabar’s: Ah, Zabar’s. You cannot have comedy

without Jewish people and whitefish.

On NYC living: What does it take for someone to move

out of a great apartment in NYC? Nothing. Nothing will make you move.

WHERE G UEST B OOK

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find the center of paradise

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Apple Store Cartier Fendi Forever 21 Harry Winston Hermès Jimmy Choo kate spade new york Loro Piana Omega Boutique Rolex Boutique Salvatore Ferragamo Tory Burch Tourneau Valentino partial listing

ONE UNFORGETTABLE EXPERIENCE Step into The Royal Grove and discover the rich legacy of Helumoa, Waikīkī’s historic coconut grove in the heart of Royal Hawaiian Center. We invite you to enjoy our celebration of dance, music and Hawaiian traditions while you shop our 110 distinctive stores and 30 unique dining destinations.

Open Daily 10am –10pm Kalākaua Avenue and Seaside Waikīkī 808.922.2299 RoyalHawaiianCenter.com FREE WIFI

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LOOK BOOK We present a stylish array of must-buy items—decorative and functional, indulgent and essential, antique and recently made—for your shopping pleasure.

E D E N FIN E A RT

ME TR O P OLI TAN FI NE ARTS AND ANTI QUES

Clockwise from left: The René Lalique Deux Figurines Clock (price upon request), circa 1926, features two female figures with a floral wreath etched in glass. Metropolitan Fine Arts and Antiques, 10 W. 57th St., 212.974.2584, metroantiques.com Dazzling earrings designed by Qayten ($9,400) are exquisitely crafted with shimmering diamonds in 18-karat white, yellow or rose gold. Available exclusively at Maurice Badler, 485 Park Ave., 800.622.3537, badler.com

MAU RI C E B ADL E R

“Campbell Soup” (price upon request) by Tommy measures 49 x 38 inches. Eden Fine Art, 437 Madison Ave.; 470 Broome St., 212.888.0177, eden-gallery.com Bossa Nova ($695-$1325) from RIMOWA. Several model sizes available, each covered with high quality cowhide and finished with decorative stitching. 535 Madison Ave., 212.758.1060, rimowa.com R IM OWA

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S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

WE MP E R O G E R D U B U IS

Clockwise from left: Stretch lambskin Queen dress ($6,650) shown with stretch suede over-knees Lacey gaiters ($1,200) from Jitrois, 959 Madison Ave., at E. 75th St., 917.239.0933, jitrois.com The striking 18-carat Chandelier earrings ($17,225) by Wempe feature 88 brilliant cut diamonds, 4.66 ct., VVS. 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000, wempe.com

PHOTO: CITISHOES, PAUL GELSOBELLO

B LOOMI NGDAL E ’ S

Excalibur Automatic Skeleton watch ($63,600) by Roger Dubuis has an edgy look with a forged carbon case, 545 Madison Ave., 212.651.3773, rogerdubuis.com Alden’s 45152C Color 8 Shell Cordovan with Commando Sole ($774) from Citishoes, plus styles from Edward Green, Church’s, Gaziano & Girling, Paraboot Mephisto and other fine brands, 445 Park Ave., 212.751.3200, citishoes.com

JI TROI S

C I T I S H OE S

Adorned with the Italian house’s trademark Vara bow, this streamlined Salvatore Ferragamo shoulder bag ($1,150) is perfectly poised to carry your look from morning to midnight. Bloomingdale’s, 1000 Third Ave., E. 59th St. & Lexington Ave., 212.705.2000, bloomingdales.com WHERE GUEST B OOK

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LOOK BOOK

T H E S H OP AT NB C ST U DI OS

Clockwise from left: Andy Denzler’s “Fashion Nurse, 2016” ($50,000). Oil on canvas, measures 70.9 x 59.1 inches. At Opera Gallery New York, 791 Madison Ave., 646.707.3299, operagallery.com “The Tonight Show starring Jimmy Fallon” wooden bow ties ($66 each) at The Shop at NBC Studios, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, enter on Sixth Ave., 212.664.2754, theshopatnbcstudios.com

OPERA GALLERY

The Newbury, an ultra-versatile ankle boot ($495) from rag & bone, 11 E. 68th St., 646.517.7586, and nine other NYC locations, rag-bone.com Caspian Sea Gold Osetra Caviar (starting at $295) from Caviar Russe, 538 Madison Ave., 800.2.CAVIAR, caviarrusse.com Top: Highway in yellow and gray ($98/yard); bottom left: Butterfly Garden ($40/yard); bottom right: Squiggle Cut Velvet in fuchsia ($120/yard). Zarin Fabrics, 69 Orchard St., 212.925.6112, zarinfabrics.com

C AV I AR RU SS E

R AG & B O N E

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SINCE WHERE GUESTBOOK NEW YORK IS AN ANNUAL PUBLICATION, THERE IS A POSSIBILITY THAT THE ITEMS SHOWN IN THE “LOOK BOOK” PAGES, WHILE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT PRESS TIME, MAY BE OUT OF STOCK. THE PRODUCTS FEATURED, HOWEVER, PROVIDE A FINE REPRESENTATION OF THE OVERALL QUALITY OF THE STORES’ MERCHANDISE OR GALLERIES’ ARTWORK. ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

S C U LLY & S C U LLY

VOI LÀ CHOCOLAT

Clockwise from left: Purchase Chef Toury’s exclusive creations like this adorable French Bulldog ($18) and Signature Truffles ($22.50-$40), or make your own treats at Voilà Chocolat. 221 W. 79th St., 212.920.8799, voila-chocolat.com

ISA IA

MAU RI C E B ADL E R

Gracious breakfast tray ($165), exclusively at Scully & Scully. Upper acrylic tray removes and wooden tray underneath can be angled for reading. 504 Park Ave., 212.755.2590, scullyandscully.com Luxurious, suede-trimmed blanket ($3,495) at Isaia, 819 Madison Ave., 212.262.6798, isaia.it The Platinum Wempe Chronometerwerke Tourbillon (price upon request) features an anti-reflective Toric-shaped Sapphire crystal and screw-down crown sapphire crystal case back. Manual winding movement, 40 hours Power reserve. 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000, wempe.com Earrings of Fire designed by Bez Ambar ($22,675) feature perfectly matched princess cut and Blaze diamonds in 18-karat white gold. Exclusively at Maurice Badler, 485 Park Ave., 800.622.3537, badler.com WE MP E

WHERE GUEST B OOK

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advertisers index Hornblower cruises—Attraction ........... 18, 19, 91

citishoes—Footwear/Men & Women ...... 68, 123

Kinky Boots—broadway Musical ....................... 63

Isaia—Men’s Apparel & Accessories................125

The Lion King—broadway Musical ................... 33

Jitrois—Apparel & Accessories .........................123

The Phantom of the Opera— broadway Musical ........................................... 39

Maurice badler—Jewelry & Timepieces.... 15, 29, 122, 125

Top of the Rock™ observation Deck at Rockefeller center ® —Attraction .......16, 17

osswald Parfumerie + luxury Skincare boutique—Perfume & Skincare ................... 72

Wicked—broadway Musical ...............................43

rag & bone—Apparel & Accessories...........5, 124

boxers NYc .............................................................. 77

SERvIcES

RIMoWA—luggage ........................................ 7, 12 2

caviar Russe ................................................... 83, 124

blazing Saddles—bike Rentals & Tours...........117

Roberto coin—Jewelry ......................................... 21

Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse ............... 85

carmel car & limousine Service......................127

Roger Dubuis—Timepieces ....... 123, back cover

Kellari Taverna ........................................................ 75

Dr. Jan linhart—Dentistry ................................... 95

Scully & Scully—Home Decor & Gifts ................................................... 12, 13, 125

Annex Markets ........................................................ 76 Eden Fine Art .............................................10, 11, 122 Metropolitan Fine Arts & Antiques ..............................................22, 23, 122 opera Gallery.................................................. 41, 124

DINING bond 45 Italian Kitchen & bar ............................ 81

Mastro’s Steakhouse ..............................................91

Dr. Jeff Rosenberg—chiropractic..................... 73

Morton’s The Steakhouse .....................................91

EmpireclS—Transportation ............................... 67

ENTERTAINMENT/ATTRAcTIoNS

Grand central Partnership—Midtown Improvement District ...................................... 71

Aladdin—broadway Musical ................................61 Beautiful: The Carole King Musical—broadway Musical ................................................................ 65 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory The New Musical—broadway Musical ......................... 35 Chicago The Musical—broadway Musical....... 37

126

Seiko—Timepieces ................................................... 9 The Shop at Nbc Studios—Apparel & Gifts ......................................................... 31, 124

Salon Ziba—beauty ...............................................69

The Shops at columbus circle— Retail & Dining ................................................. 27

Starbright Floral Design—Florist ......................70

voilà chocolat—chocolate & Gifts ...........74, 12 5

SHoPPING

Wempe—Gifts, Jewelry & Timepieces ..... Inside Front cover, 1, 2, 123, 125

bloomingdale’s—Apparel & Home Decor.....123, Inside back cover

Zarin Fabrics—Textiles .............................. 107, 124

photo: the lobby of the Metropolitan opera house in new york City, Jonathan tiChler/Metropolitan opera

ART, ANTIQUES & collEcTIblES

W H E R E G UESTBO O K

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10/31/16 11/1/16 12:16:54 4:34:33 PM PM


Mr. Clean Pretty techno-nifty for almost 90 years ago: On May 1, 1931, President Herbert Hoover pressed a button in Washington, D. C., that signaled the instantaneous activation of the Empire State Building’s illumination system, officially “turning on” the lights of what was then the world’s tallest skyscraper. Ever since, workers (like the window washers, above, photographed on Jan. 26, 1932) have kept this emblem of New York City immaculate, often at great peril. Prior to the 1950s, window washers like these would strap themselves in leather harnesses and hook themselves to the sides of the windows to do their job, standing on the tiny window sills for leverage. 128

photo: Bettmann/getty images

PARTING SHOT

W H E R E G UESTBO O K

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Where GuestBook New York - 2017 Edition