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One Grip is Not enough! > To play tennis well, more than one grip is needed. You need at least three: one for the forehand, one for the backhand and one for serving. > The last world class players who played with one grip (continental) were the Australians of the 60’s & 70’s: (Laver, Roche, Rosewall, Stolle). > The primary reason one grip (continental) was effective for them was that the major tournaments during their era - Wimbledon, US Open and Austalian Open - were played on grass. Grass courts produce a low bounce that is best dealt with using a continental grip. > Players today have only rare opportunities for play on grass. Hard courts are most common with clay and HAR-TRU courts being the second most common. These surfaces produce a higher bounce that is better handled with grips other than continental. > Additional drawbacks of the continental grip are that it requires exceptional racquet skills, good timing and a strong wrist and forearm. Novice, intermediate and occasional players are inconsistent with a single grip, miss hit often and are susceptable to tennis elbow.

YOU NEED AT LEAST (ONE FOR FOREHAND, B ACKHAND AND SERVE)


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Forehand

grips

Grip One > Eastern

Grip Two > Semi-Western

Grip Three > Full Western


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Backhand Grips

Grip One > Eastern

Grip Two > Two Hand

Grip Three > Two Hand Variation


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Serve Grip

Grip One > Continental

Designed by Roger Boyer, for use by RSFTC and InnerCity Tennis/Kidspeed

1 Grip is Not Enough!  

To play tennis at a high level you need 3 grips: one for forehand, backhand and serve.