Page 1

ISSUE 15 / MAY 2018 / FREE

ARTS / COMMUNITY / FASHION / FOOD & DRINK / MUSIC

END OF AN ERA FOR SCALLY & TROMBONE SURVIVAL: THE INSPIRATION OF A LOCAL ABORIGINAL ARTIST 42 YEARS OF 3CR • INTERVIEW WITH CITY CALM DOWN'S DRUMMER

THIS IS MELBOURNE’S INNER NORTH


LIVE MUSIC - BOOZE - FUNCTIONS - BEER GARDEN

WEDNESDAY 9TH - BLUES JAM

HOSTED BY JULIAN JAMES * WE HAVE A KIT & KEYBOARD... BYO THE REST *

THURSDAY 10TH - DAY DREAMERS

CLEAN CUT SOCIETY - SPLIT PICK - THE GARNEDDIES * FUN TIMES WITH ALT ROCKERS *

FRIDAY 11TH - DISILLUSIONED

THE NINTH DIMENSION - BLACK HEART BREAKERS AGORA - WAX CACTUS - CAPWARD BACK * 6 PUNK BANDS... ONE HUGE NIGHT *

SATURDAY 12TH - HANGAR 18

NEWTOWN STORY - FRANK JAMES - SUPER CANNES * ROCK!!! ALL THE WAY FROM NEW ZEALAND *

FRIDAY 18TH - SIORE

“RELEASE ME TO THE SEA” SINGLE LAUNCH

SEREN SPAIN * SOULFUL INDIE POP. TIX FROM EVENTBRITE *

SATURDAY 19TH - SECTAPE

THE SEX PILLS - HONEYBONE - CECIL TURBINE * FUZZ... SPUNK... ROCK! *

FRI 25TH - AMBERYSE & THE MOTION BELOW THE MOTION BELOW “WORMTONGUE” SINGLE LAUNCH

WORDS OF ELIZABETH - EMECIA - ABOVE THE FALLEN * A NIGHT OF METALCORE. TIX FROM OZTIX *

SATURDAY 26TH - NOWHERE ELSE “INNOCENCE LOST” EAST COAST TOUR

THE BALLS - THREE QUARTER BEAST - GUERILLA FUNK * ALT ROCK, HARD ROCK, STONER ROCK, PROGCORE * HAPPY HOURS WED & THURS 5PM-7PM SAT 1PM-5PM $4 POTS - $5 BASICS

EVERYDAY UNTIL 8PM Open 5 nights a week

- $5 W INES

$8 SELECTED PINTS

WWW.WHOLELOTTALOVEBAR.COM

524 LYGON ST, BRUNSWICK EAST. PH 9386 8808

cnr Albion & Holmes


MANFRED’S SHOE LOUNGE

HANDMADE MENS AND LADIES ENGLISH SHOES P:9329 0715 | M:0425 750 860 | 62 ERROL STREET NORTH MELBOURNE 3051 WWW.MANFREDSSHOELOUNGE.COM.AU | FREE SHIPPING AUSTRALIA WIDE

Proud Stockist OF ENGLISH MADE JEFFERY WEST, BARKER, HARLOD & LOAKE FOOTWEAR


ARTS PAGE 7

COMMUNITY PAGE 8

FASHION PAGE 14

MUSIC PAGE 16

• SURVIVAL: THE INSPIRATION OF LOCAL ABORIGINAL ARTIST ROBBIE JOSEPH

• COMMUNITY NEWS

• WHAT’S ON

• WHAT’S ON

• END OF AN AREA FOR SCALLY & TROMBONE

• INTERVIEW WITH CITY CALM DOWN DRUMMER LEE ARMSTRONG

• RADICAL PAST TO

RADICAL PRESENT 42 YEARS OF 3CR

EDITOR’S LETTER Welcome May! The memories of summer feel a little more distant now, but we find relief that winter is not quite upon us. To some, it might feel like a bit of an in between time, but for us inner northern dwellers, there’s always more to keep us entertained and happy!

Editor & Co-Founder - James Fox Head Designer & Co-Founder - Declan Hooper We would not have been able to create Inner Circle Magazine without the hard work and dedication of all involved. Thank you!

As always, we hope you enjoy our latest exploration of Melbourne’s inner north!

Editorial Assistant: Eleanor van Driel Online Editor: Nina McQueen Design Assistant/Consultants: Nicola Hooper, David Hooper Online Contributors in April: Nina McQueen, Ruby Syme, Quincy Malesovas, Tobias Handke, Bianca Sciessere (The Glitter Bug) Nina McQueen, Ruby Syme, Quincy Malesovas, Tobias Handke, Print Columnists: Bianca Sciessere (The Glitter Bug) Simon Wraight, Nina McQueen, Ruby Syme, Quincy Malesovas, Tobias Handke. Photography: Robbie Joseph (Survival: The Inspiration of Local Aboriginal Artist Robbie Joseph), Photography provided by 3CR (Radical Past to Radical Present 42 years of 3CR), Photography provided by Scally & Trombine (End of An Area for Scally & Trombine), Mclean Stephenson (Interview with City Calm Down Drummer Lee Armstrong & cover photography) Special thanks to: Rachel Kirby & James Mackenzie (3CR Radio), Robbie Joseph, Christina Theodorou & Jerry Wolveridge (Building No. 2), Lee Armstrong (City Calm Down), Burhan Tatai (Asas Perfume), Ali Khorsand (Hyper Panda), Jamie Mumford (Barnes Brunswick), Elizabeth Arabica (Arabica Lounge), Sydney Road Brunswick Association

James Fox - Editor & Co-Founder, Inner Circle Magazine

Special thanks also reserved for all our advertising partners.

Acknowledgement of Traditional Owners of the Land:

Publisher: Inner Circle Magazine - innercirclemagazine.com.au To contribute, head to: innercirclemagazine.com.au/about/contribute For advertising enquiries, contact: advertise@innercirclemagazine.com.au

Music fans will enjoy our interview with City Calm Down drummer and Carlton local Lee Armstrong. The band have exploded in recent months, and with there latest album Echoes in Blue recently released, we find out a little more about life in the band. Our latest exploration of the north also champions some of the less represented members of our local community. We meet local Aboriginal artist Robbie Joseph as he tells us about the inspiration behind his art and his experiences of growing up locally. We also catch up with Rachel Kirby and James Mackenzie of local radio station 3CR, based on Smith Street, as they explain how the radio station has championed, supported and entertained local communities and minority groups in Melbourne for over 40 years.

“We, at Inner Circle Magazine, would like to acknowledge that the land we meet on is the traditional lands for the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nations, and that we respect their spiritual relationship with their country. We would like to acknowledge the Wurundjeri people as the custodians of the Melbourne region, including Melbourne’s inner north, and recognise that their culture and heritage is still important to the Wurundjeri people today. We wish to pay respect to their Elders, both past and present, and further acknowledge the important role that Indigenous people continue to play within our communities.”

Get In Contact With Us: Instagram: @innercirclemagazine Facebook: facebook. com/innercirclemagazine Twitter: twitter.com/innercirclemelb Email: contact@ innercirclemagazine.com.au Printed by Ellikon Printers on PEFCTM certified laser paper made from 30% recycled waste and using vegetable inks. This document has been produced to international environmental management standard ISO14001 by a certified green printing company using recycled paper.

ABBOTSFORD / BRUNSWICK / CARLTON / COLLINGWOOD / FITZROY / NORTHCOTE / NORTH MELBOURNE / PARKVILLE


Myth

IN.CUBE8R GALLERY AND EMPORIUM Chances are if you've pottered down Smith Street on a Thursday evening you've spotted this little treasure trove bustling with people. The gallery holds fortnightly exhibitions where young emerging artists come together to exhibit works that fit into a theme, and their opening nights are always a good time. Every visitor receives a complimentary drink on arrival, entry into a free Raffle & 10% off anything in store... but only for 2 hours a fortnight! We've listed the next few openings below so you can pop these free and fun events to your calendar! Full show details available at incube8r.com.au

May 18 - 29 (opening May 17, 6-8pm)

Melbourne artists expose us to their favourite myths

Almost Solo V.6 June 1-12 (opening May 31, 6-8pm)

Giacinta Bliek, Michal Mainzer, Shannon Mary, Helen French each exhibiting bodies of work.

POP June 15-26 (opening June 14, 6-8pm)

No room for beige here

Alkanofer Collective June 29 - July 4 (openings June 28 & 5 July, 6-8pm)

Group show of Alkanofer Collective Members.

Idol July 13-24 (opening July 12, 6-8pm)

A show of wonderful fan art

Galactic July 27 - August 7 (opening July 26, 6-8pm)

Join us – fellow space-cadets – as we travel to outerspace together

IN.CUBE8R GALLERY IS LOCATED AT 321 SMITH STREET FITZROY VIC 3065. MORE INFO WWW.INCUBE8R.COM.AU


Inner Circle Magazine • Arts

Issue 15 • May

SURVIVAL Th e Inspiration of Local Aboriginal

Artist Robbie Joseph Written By Ruby Syme For many people, art is a form of expression. It conveys a feeling, an idea, a passion or a statement. For local Aboriginal artist Robbie Joseph, art is all this and more. Not only is it a means of expressing his creativity and connection to nature, it’s also an important way for him to share his Indigenous culture with the community. Painting and creating helps to keep his Indigenous traditions and stories alive and it’s an essential part of sharing this culture with younger generations. “It always comes back to [that],” Robbie explains. “You’ve gotta spread the word, it's a survival. I teach my kids, my kids will teach their kids, and we will pass it down. You have to keep reliving it every day and giving our kids opportunities to do that too. We have to keep teaching them stories about everything that makes us who we are. It’s the foundations of where we’ll be in another 50 to 100 years. We’re the ones doing it now.” He draws on this history in his work, says Robbie, seeking inspiration from stories he’s been told and taught over the years. “I’m also inspired by past experiences and am really at one with nature all the time,” he explains. “Living in such a unique landscape is really special.” Growing up in Fitzroy, Robbie’s connection to art started at a very young age. “I

started creating art in primary school and I’ve pretty much been doing it all my life,” he says.

and they'll show me. It helps me paint the way I’m painting.”

“I stopped for a while in my teenage years and in my early 20’s when I took up football, but I’ve come back to it over the last couple of years.”

“[My work] is a mix of everything and it’s me as well.”

“I always knew I would do art. I’ve always had an artistic feeling in my life. When he’s painting, Robbie explains that he goes in his own direction, letting his creative instinct dictate what he creates. There’s always a story behind his work, he explains, and sometimes it comes off the top of his head. “I’ll be painting and look at it afterwards and be like ‘wow what’d I do there!’ Sometimes I just go off on my own path.” The style of his work, says Robbie, is “anything and everything.” “It’s anything I enjoy looking at. I’m painting an elephant at the moment,” he laughs. He’s also inspired by other Aboriginal artists and the work they create. “I like the traditional art styles and the aboriginal art styles that I’ve been taught. I’ve had a few other artists teach me bits and pieces that I incorporate into my own artwork. If I need to, I’ll ask somebody ‘how do you do this’

With so many different influences, Robbie says he’s got plenty of opportunities to explore and push into different directions. Right now, he’s learning how to paint landscapes, something he’s finding an exciting journey. His connection to nature helps here, he explains, and he’s enjoying finding inspiration from where he grew up. It’s the artistic environment in Fitzroy and the inner north is also something Robbie finds hugely inspiring. “Seeing all the artwork that’s going on around Fitzroy and the inner city, and seeing the street art up is just amazing,” he says. In fact, street art has presented an exciting way for Robbie to share his work and culture directly with the community. “I’m really trying to work my way into learning how to airbrush and go down that direction,” he explains. “[With airbrushing] people can look at your artwork in the street and go ‘oh wow.’” It’s the opportunity for Robbie’s paintings, creations, stories and culture to be out there for the entire inner north to see.

Page 07 • Arts


Inner Circle Magazine • Community

Issue 15 • May

COMMUNITY NEWS Written by Quincy Malesovas

Happy May, Melburnians! Whether you hail from the inner north or simply wander over here from time to time, we have a whole slew of event suggestions for you over this next month. Don’t worry that the weather is cold and the days are short– our round up of community events are so bright and cheery, you may just forget all about your winter blues!

on at bars and venues all around the north, both paid and free.

But before we get into what’s to come this month, let’s take a moment to highlight the best of April.

Those looking to get involved in their local government may enjoy the Victorian Socialists Campaign Launch at Grace Darling on the 12th. There will be live music costing a donation upon entry with proceeds going to support the campaign.

The month started off with Ability Fest in association with the Dylan Alcott Foundation at Coburg Velodrome. It was a great success– especially considering this was the event’s first (but certainly not last) time running. Melbourne International Comedy Festival had us laughing all month long, with improv, stand up and all sorts of other performances on offer until April 22. Then, at the end of the month, Queen Victoria Market turned 140 (!) and had a street party to celebrate. Now, in May, there’s much more in store to keep you busy. If imbibing in Melbourne’s best brews is your idea of a good time, you can’t miss Good Beer Week, from May 11-20. There are events

If you prefer wine to beer, check out the Italian Food and Wine Festival on May 27. It is held at the Royal Exhibition Building and features vino tasting, cooking demonstrations, pop-up restaurants, and much more.

If that wasn’t enough of an SJ fix for the month, the Human Rights Arts and Film Festival is sure to cover your bases. It runs from May 3-17 and embraces storytelling by way of film, art and music. Finally, around the same time (from May 3-20), is Next Wave. This festival mostly takes place in and around Brunswick; It highlights emerging Australian artists within all mediums. Many of Next Wave’s events are free and open to the public.


Inner Circle Magazine • Community

Nile Show presenter, Aziza Hussein

A community hub, a political platform and an activist’s arena, 3CR is a radio station with a difference. Established in 1976, the station has been giving a voice to local communities and minority groups ever since. With over 125 radio programs broadcast from the Smith Street studios each week, 3CR is a dynamic space where those often underrepresented in the media can have a say. There are programs from refugees, human rights activists, live music fanatics and feminist groups, as well as LGBTIQ focussed shows and content from a variety of language groups. And that's just to name a few. Though it’s 42 years since the station was established, 3CR is still the ever-diverse voice it has been since the beginning. Today, over 420 volunteers access the station weekly, and 3CR has journeyed from a radical past to a radical present.

underrepresented communities, established and new, to have a voice. Our programming is incredibly wide and representative, we have some programs that have been on air for decades, as they remain as relevant today as they did 40 years ago”. Even the way each program is selected enhances the inclusive, diverse quality that makes 3CR unique. “We approve ideas, not individuals,” explains Rachel, “meaning that once a show is approved, different people can come and go within that program.” “To see different people come and go within a show, over more than 40 years, is a testament to our type of programs. Because the shows themselves represent communities and ideas, they draw people from those communities and campaigns to them.”

“We’ve consistently been a radio station that supports a diverse range of people, communities and ideas,” says Station Manager Rachel Kirby.

3CR’s programs are representative of our communities, Rachel explains, and over the 42 years of programming, it’s even possible track the changing cultural groups within Melbourne.

“From the very beginning we have prioritised support and access for

“To begin with we had a number of Latin American shows. We had

the first migrants from Chile who came out after the coup who did a show called Chile Libre,” Rachel says “The new community would tune in every week to hear information they needed to hear in Spanish. They were talking about things you needed to know to establish your life here in Melbourne but also were reporting direct reporting on what was happening to families in Chile.” Another of 3CR’s long-term programs, on air since 1992, is LBTIQ show, In Ya Face. Current host James Mackenzie has been on-board since 1997 and loves everything 3CR and their programs stand for. “It's an unbelievably diverse organisation. You can talk to environmental activists, trade unionists, indigenous people, people into live music people from refugee backgrounds… it's a real melting pot of diversity and that's what really appeals to me,” he says. “3CR gives communities a voice to effect positive social change for themselves, allied communities and broader society. It’s an issues based organisation here, an activist’s hub. It’s got a very interpretive approach to issues and it’s very committed to addressing social disadvantage.” James also loves the sense of community that comes from volunteering at 3CR. “Doing radio gives you an incredible sense of camaraderie especially when it’s around issues in the community,” he explains.

“It’s just wonderful coming in, going into studio every week, digging deep and talking from the heart. 3CR is a wonderful space.”

RADIOTHON Operating entirely on minimal government funding and volunteer efforts, 3CR relies on support from the communities and groups they represent. The annual Radio-Thon (4-17 June) provides an opportunity for listeners, activists and community groups to contribute to the running of station. This year’s theme is ‘Fight for Your Mic’, and each program in 3CR’s grid will present a bumper edition of their show, promoting their message to listeners and encouraging them to donate. “This is our annual fundraising event, so we reach out to our community of listeners and supporters and ask them to financially support the station,” explains Rachel.

“If we want to give space to these often underrepresented voices and stories that 3CR does, then we need certain finances do that.” James too, reiterates the importance of the Radio-thon to keep 3CR going financially. “We really rely on our community of listeners, the activist community and the community within the station networks to get behind us, donate and keep the radio live,” he explains. Page 09 • Community


Heading into the warehouse studio out of the hustle of Brunswick and Johnston Street and into a space infused with the steamy aroma of chai tea , you’ll feel your soul sink into a warm sense of peace as you’re welcomed into Ashtanga Yoga Centre of Melbourne. For over 25 years, Fitzroy locals have hailed this urban retreat for it’s professional and welcoming nature not only because of the high quality of instruction (from yoga basics right up to expertise level) , but also to ease the stresses and strains imposing on the daily mind. For those exasperated over work or personal troubles; feeling too unfit or bored of the gym, Ashtanga Vinyasa Yoga is the logical solution to bring positive balance to the mind and body.

The Centre focuses on an ancient practice that incorporates intelligent sequencing of postures with specific breathing and linking movements that increases strength, flexibility and vitality. The practice adheres to your pace – to learn the sequence, moving with your own breath to sink deeper into your individual space rather than straining to stay in rhythm with anyone else in the class. There are times suited to the community as a whole and classes including beginners courses and intensive workshops open for all schedules and lifestyles.

An Iconic Fitzroy experience not to be missed!

Level 1, 110 - 112 Argyle St, Fitzroy | www.ashtangamelbourne.com.au


Written By Bianca Sciessere PHOTOGRAPHY By Michael Gordon Hill

Inner Circle was thrilled to attend the launch party for Building No.2 last week. The golden sunset through the warehouse windows amplified the already warm feeling of the space. These same windows provide the uplifting natural light that gives Building No. 2 its appeal for businesspeople from all professions. Between glasses of champagne and gourmet nibbles, guests talked both business and pleasure while wondering through the offices on show. Proud owners Christina Theodorou and Jerry Wolveridge mingled, sharing the journey of Building No.2 and accepting genuine compliments on the beauty and feel of it. Jerry says meeting new members has been a highlight of the process. ‘As our membership grows we are learning to cater

for the needs of our growing community, and that’s been fantastic.’ The unique characteristics of the old CSIRO building were the inspiration behind Building No. 2. ‘We were inspired by the building and the idea that we could create something on a smaller scale to meet our member’s needs, we could create a more intimate work space,’ he says. Building No. 2 has memberships for one off visits or ongoing Dedicated Desks and FlexiDesk Membership as well as Private Offices. It is fully equipped with anything you would need for a successful day at the office. Make an enquiry today by visiting building2. com.au.

1/9 Byron Street Collingwood • 03 7018 3222 • building2.com.au


HIDDEN GEMS ALONG

There are plenty of goodies to be found along Sydney Road if you know where to look. No doubt you have your favourite op-shops, cafes, bars and gift shops, but what about when you want to try something new? We bet there are some hidden gems you’re yet to discover! Here’s our pick of Sydney Road discoveries… unique, fresh and different, they may well become your new favourite haunt.

BARNES BRUNSWICK

HYPER PANDA

20/459- 475 Sydney Road – Jamie Mumford

641 Sydney Road – Ali Khorsand

Filled to the brim with clays, resins, waxes and plaster Barnes really is “where creative people shop.”

A superstore chock full of Middle Eastern goods, you’ll never walk out of Hyper Panda empty handed.

There’s a particular focus on sculpting, moulding and casting supplies, and the store caters to anyone from artists, students and jewelers to hobbyists and those in the film industry.

You can find everything here, from laundry products to tea, spices and dried fruits.

“Our products are more specialised than other art stores due to our [specific] focus,” explains Jamie. “Our sculpting supplies include sculpting clays, polymer clay, waxes and tools [and we] have a large range of silicones for all possible mould making requirements. We also stock several types of casting materials.” Something else you won’t find at most art shops, are the product samples dotted throughout the store. Resin jewellery, resin art, moulds and sculptures all showcase what it’s possible to make with Barnes products. And the staff at Barnes are a standout too. “Our staff are artists and makers, so we’re able to give practical tips as we all use the products ourselves,” says Jamie. “If you have an idea for a project, we’re able to give you advice about the products you’ll need, as well as how to use them.”

“There’s over 2000 items in the store,” says owner Ali, 99% of these coming from the Middle East. “Our products come from overseas, Saudi, Dubai, Iran and Turkey,” he explains. “This is the only shop selling some of these products in Australia. What we have you can’t find in Coles or Aldi.” Everything is different to the Australian products people are used to, says Ali, and everything is high quality. Sydney Road was the perfect place to open the store, he explains, with most people in the area having moved overseas. “It’s also near to the university and city,” says Ali, “and we have many students coming from university to here, direct to buy our goods.” For those visiting the shop this month, expect plenty of new, exciting goodies to catch your eye. “We are getting ready for Ramadan so we’ll be refreshing our stock,” explains Ali. “There’ll be some items coming from Middle East and we’re talking with suppliers to bring new items for Ramadan time.”

ASAS PERFUME

ARABICA LOUNGE


ARABICA LOUNGE

ASAS PERFUME

587 Sydney Road – Elizabeth Arabica

654 Sydney Road – Burhan Tatai

After a night out that’s a little bit different? Or just want to relax and enjoy some great service and shisha? Arabica Lounge is the spot to go.

If you’re looking for a fragrance that’s a little more interesting than Chanel No. 5, Asas Perfume is the place to go.

Choose from the array of unique shisha flavours, settle back on the comfortable cushioned couches and enjoy! The store has a great ambience, says Elizabeth, and “the energy is very relaxed and inviting.” “When people leave they always say it’s the best experience they’ve had.” Aside from shisha, Arabica Lounge also stocks Egyptian made hookahs, pipes and other goodies. “We sell everything you need for the shisha,” says Elizabeth. There’s also sister store Café Coco close by, which offer a more traditional experience, with backgammon and cards. No matter which you choose to visit, you can be sure you’ll be back again!

BARNES BRUNSWICK

HYPER PANDA

They’ve been on Sydney Road for three years now, and owner Burhan loves that his store can offer something a little different. “What we have is very unique and very different to what you see in Australia,” he explains. “It’s very different to what you see in Myer and David Jones and that’s what attracts people to the shop.” Everything comes from Dubai, Burhan explains, which is “why it’s really different.” Aside from men and women’s perfumes, in oriental and western scents, Asas Perfume also stocks a huge range of oil perfume, incense, creams, sprays and Arabian oud. There are always new additions in store, so pop in and discover your new signature scent today. Article By Ruby Syme This article is sponsored by Sydney Road Brunswick Association. Find out more at sydneyroad.com.au


Inner Circle Magazine • Fashion

Issue 15 • May

WHAT’S ON - FAHION

END OF AN ERA

Written by Ruby Syme

eco.mono Pop-up Shop 57 Elgin St, Carlton May 1st - 6th

Come down to browse through a collection of sustainable monochrome clothing. With a variety of pieces from brands leading the way in ethical fashion, this is a great place to pick up some ‘feel-good, statement pieces

Sisters Market 10th Anniversary 233 Sydney Road, Brunswick May 26th

Celebrate Melbourne’s local designers at this 10 year extravaganza. Get ready for handmade accessories, clothes and winter goodies.

FITZROY INSTITUTION SCALLY AND TROMBONE ARE CLOSING. SINCE OPENING IN SEPTEMBER 1986 THEY HAVE PROVIDED JOY FOR THREE GENERATIONS IN ART-TO-WEAR HATS AND JEWELLERY MADE IN-HOUSE AND BY LOCAL MAKERS. “I am the accidental retailer” says Lou Scally. “Coming to Fitzroy around 1978 to work in the street school (FCYC) and later in the performing arts so making things was a way to survive. Growing up with mum, a teacher of the manual arts gave access to various skills in many mediums. Fitzroy then was derelict and forgotten. There were three functioning shops in the block and many buildings were burnt out, boarded up and squatted.”

Fitzroyalty’s accessory destination since 1986

JUDE Modern Artisan Fashion launches 'Tourmaline' A/W 18 Collection

Jude Flagship Store: 252 Johnston Street, Fitzroy May 25th 6.30 - 9.30 PM

You are cordially invited to the official release of the Autumn/Winter '18 Collection. Please join the designers and makers of the label on this special collection launch night of personal styling, light refreshments, and an installation of this season's editorial campaign amidst the new designs. RSVP : by Monday 21 May 2018 to info@designbyjude.com

for the seriously smart and stylish

233 & 235 GERTRUDE ST, FITZROY

MENS’ BARBERING 03 9078 8507 Shop 2, 73 Lygon Street Brunswick East

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Issue 15 • May

for 7 cents and hand cut their chips themselves. The Italian deli sold the best ham and cheese rolls that are still discussed with wonder today. Lou worked in many venues in many capacities… sets, costume, camera, props, lighting, runner, front-of-house, dresser and trained up in silversmithing at night school. Brunswick Street had great parties on top of shops and down laneways. The best were at 331 hosted by Lu Scacej and Dave Cahill. Lou took over the lease and Scally and Trombone was born. We fell down the hill when prices went up in Carlton. Fitzroy had lots of space… warehouses and old factories, as well as cheap shops to rent. Shared houses with all types of artists…painters, poets, performers in theatre and film, musos, crafters… we all helped each other with shows. Banana Lounge, Flying Trapeze, Comedy Caf, Marijuana House, Roar Studios, Handspan all became exciting venues.

At that time there had not been a hat shop open in Melbourne for 30 years….the trade was dying out with the passing of the older generation and skills being lost. Lou applied herself to learning millinery and hat-making. A background in jewellery leant towards a decorative rather than sculptural style, a new combination of these arts. Now there are many milliners, many styles and people have learnt how to wear hats again.

The hotels were still traditional drinking houses, so venues were created in retails spaces. There were a couple of speak easies that appeared, one in an old still room under Victoria Street. There was a moment when people had secret cafes at home, happenings. Cairo Cocktails at the Champion was a volatile blend of “old Fitzroy” downstairs and “new” upstairs… as volatile as the cocktails.

The Fringe evolved from a small collective and the first Parade an anarchic stroll along the street. No traffic control, council or police presence. Year by year it grew. Scally and Trombone won Best Float three times. First with a giant jewellery box complete with dancing ballerina over two bicycles. It was heavy, so two punk pixies pushed. The following year a giant hat over a Fiat Bambino. It looked great but had poor driver visability… it won too. Then a motorised bathtub…a mermaid driving with a baby mermaid in the trailer behind and bubbles.

The Black Cat. Tony Edwards and Henry Maas. A bit of European intellectual made great toasted sandwiches. The fish and chip shop near the brothel sold potato cakes

Moira Finucane, Tim Scally, Tom Lycoss, Edwina Entwisle, Maude Davey, Steven Sculley, Maj Green and Ewan Cameron. Fanny and Willy by Barry Solomon. Eventually the parade was policed and the verandah stage ended. Scally and Trombone continued to create artistic events. Ian de Gruchy presented projections on the window while the shop was renovated. Black Hole Theatre did 100 paintings in 100 hours, an art marathon. Then The Experiment 70x70, small works. A shopfront exhibition “Lobal Frontears” for the Comedy Festival consisted of favourite earings borrowed from Sue Ingleton, Hot Bagels, Nancye Cain, Mark Little, Patcho-the-clown, Susy Dee, Vanessa Posso, Gerry Conolly, Wendy Harmer, Jean Kitson, Eve Glenn, Dasha Ross, Liz Baille, Sally Swain, Lilly Bragg, Fifi L’amour, Hannie Rayson, Jane Clifton, Ponch Hawkes, Rachel Berger, Barry Solomon, Freya Povey and Helen Noonan. Whoever stole Eve Glenn’s…return them please. Through the shop Lou has participated in the arts in many ways and provided accidental theatre on a retail stage. “if you look at the lie of the land and see the sometime creek running down Fitzroy Street, across Brunswick Street to the lagoons at Alexander parade, feel the sun shing on this north facing hill, imagine the lightly wooded environment that once stood here, it is obvious there has always been people sitting around eating, telling stories, joking, dancing and singing with friends and family. Probably always will. All stock reduced to sell out.

The parade got bigger. Thousands came to watch. Over the next decade or two Scally and Trombone presented theatre to the street from the verandah of the shop. So many artists and shows performed…Theatre of Death by Maj Green and Ewan Cameron. The Cobra’s Itch and Twixt by Dan Witten, Theresa Blake, Ruth Bauer and Scott Grayland. This Woman Is Partial To Nudity by Maude Davey. Crying In Public Places. Ten minute theatre with

Memories free. 233 Gertrude Street, Fitzroy. Seven days till the end of May.

Page 15 • Fashion


Issue 15 • May

Inner Circle Magazine • Music

WHAT’S ON - MUSIC Written by Tobias Handke

Mama Kin Spender Howler, Brunswick May 3rd

Mama Kin and Tommy Spender team up for a night of stripped back offerings.

Lady Leshurr

The Corner, Richmond May 4th Pint sized UK rapper returns for what’s sure to be an energetic night of rapid-fire raps

The Weather Station

Northcote Social Club, Northcote May 11th

Rising Toronto artist brings her bold and emotional storytelling to the North.

The Cherry Dolls

The Curtin Hotel, Carlton May 19th

The Cherry Dolls celebrate the release of new single “Black & Blue.”

MUSIC NEWS

Written by Tobias Handke April saw a good mixture of local and international bands come through the inner north. Oh Mercy returned and delighted fans with new material at Howler, Alex The Astronaut & Stella Donnelly sold out two shows at The Corner and talented Tassie artist Maddy Jane wowed crowds with an intimate showing. On the international side of things Swedish sisters First Aid Kit delivered the goods with two sold out performances, Jake Bugg played an exclusive acoustic show and heavy rocker Wednesday 13 had the Corner shaking at the foundations. The great music continues in May with a massive selection of top-notch gigs for punters to choose from. High on our list of local acts you don’t want to miss are Jack Ladder and Middle Kids. Ladder returns with his band The Dreamlanders to launch fifth album Blue Poles at The Corner Hotel Friday May 18 while rising stars Middle Kids, having sold out their first show, have announced a second on Wednesday May 23 at The Corner. Other live events we recommend for the month of May include Alex Cameron at the Croxton Bandroom Thursday May 3, American emo rockers Circa Survive at The Corner Hotel Friday May 25 and Tropical Fuck Storm playing three shows at Howler Thursday 10, Friday 11 and Saturday 12 of May. Page 18 • Music

wRITTEN By Nina McQueen pHOTOGRAPHY BY Mclean Stephenson Two years in the making, but well worth the wait, City Calm Down’s highly anticipated latest album Echoes in Blue hit streaming and buying platforms less than a month ago and the response has been nothing short of pure success. Fans have flooded discussion boards with messages of adoration and awe over the 12 tracks, including ‘In This Modern Land’, which has already clocked up over half a million listens on Spotify, and the short film that has fans falling for ‘Joan, I’m Disappearing’. Taking on their biggest Australian tour to date later this winter, the four-piece band is proving their dynamic musical brilliance even after ten years. We chatted with drummer and Carlton local Lee Armstrong before the release of their uniquely entrancing second album about life within a successful, dedicated band, as well as life within the inner north.


Inner Circle Magazine • Music

Issue 15 • May

I actually spent quite a bit of time this summer at Edinburgh Gardens in Fitzroy North, just sitting around, not doing much at all – just hanging out with friends down there. It’s such a good spot on a sunny day; few drinks in the park, it’s very cool. Maybe that, and then I spend a lot of time down at The Empress (Fitzroy North), that’s my favourite pub. Favourite coffee spot? Ohhh, I don’t wanna give too many details away, but I normally frequent Green Park [known now as park st in Carlton North] I normally just go there or somewhere local around here. There’s a really good place called Babajan (Carlton North) – they make…the best coffee, it is so good! Cannot recommend enough.

Echoes In Blue is releasing in two weeks, how do you plan on celebrating? Yeah! So… God, I haven’t even thought about it. I think we’ll pretty much just be rehearsing; preparing for our overseas shows. But I’ll definitely be excited when it’s out, though. It’s been such a long time coming with this one. Will really just be happy that it can be out. So if this album was a person, what kind of person would they be if they rocked up to a party? [laughing] If they rocked up to a party… I don’t know, maybe someone a little bit older – maybe our age. Getting to your 30s and…yeah, not really a party album. Maybe more of a ‘sit at

home and think about things’ kind of thing. ‘Joan, I’m Disappearing’ has had an amazing response so far. Do you think this will remain as the top hit from the album? Or if not, do you have an idea of what might be? Um, I’m not really sure. ‘Joan’ has been my favourite since we wrote it – probably the standout track for me anyway; the one I keep going back to. I think there’s still some other great tracks on there. There’s a lot of different stuff on there that will fancy different people. But for me, ‘Joan’ is still my favourite track. So you’re a Carlton local; what would your ideal day be spent in Carlton/the inner north?

[City Calm Down] covered Foals ‘Spanish Sahara’ in the past. If you returned to Like a Version what would your next tune be? We talk about this sometimes, like if we ended up doing it again, what would be one to do? It’s always so hard, because I find a lot of our music taste is quite different; I listen to a lot of old rock and stuff. I’ve always wanted to cover ‘Blue Monday’ but it’s a bit too close to home I think [laughing]. So over the past decade of City Calm Down’s existence, is there a particular memory/moment that’s been implanted in your mind that seems so surreal? Probably playing Splendour main stage was one of the bigger ones. We played on the… Sunday? But we went up on the Friday, so we’re all feeling a little worse for wear, and it was a massive show with a good turnout, so… bit nervous, bit hungover, and I just have this great memory of waking up in the morning thinking I was just going to throw up but then playing a show and feeling so good after it. Yeah, that was a good show.

Have you had any strange fan encounters? Um, yeah I guess we have. I’m trying to think of a specific one without pinpointing anyone. I haven’t really had any personally, myself. I know Jack’s been pulled up a couple of times in the city walking home from work and he found it quite bizarre that people recognise him. One this other week; this woman pulled him up and Jack’s a lawyer by day, so he’s dressed in a suit, coming home from work, and this lady pulled him over and started chatting to him. Whereas I play the drums so I guess I don’t get recognised at all but for Jack it’s probably a bit weird when people are coming up to him like that. So you’ll be taking on some shows in Europe before touching back down in Melbourne. Is there a certain pressure when you’re overseas compared to here? They’re such different shows because I mean we’re not playing massive crowds over there but here the shows, I would say, are pretty decent size so… it’s kind of weird. It’s like going into a time warp because it’s like playing the shows that we’ve played in Australia however many years ago… it’s this weird dynamic when you’re going in between the two – it’s two different worlds. But I mean, both have their positives and negatives: smaller shows, I think, you can get a bit more of a connection with the audience – it’s a little more intimate and I like that. But obviously bigger shows, there’s this huge energy behind it – gets the blood pumping.

You can get your own blood pumping on 15th June at Forum Theatre. For tickets head to www. songkick.com Echoes In Blue is available now to buy and stream. Page 19 • Music


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Inner Circle Magazine Issue 15 2018  

Inner Circle Magazine, dedicated to documenting the social and cultural pursuits of Melbourne’s inner north, and inspired by the vibrant loc...

Inner Circle Magazine Issue 15 2018  

Inner Circle Magazine, dedicated to documenting the social and cultural pursuits of Melbourne’s inner north, and inspired by the vibrant loc...

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