Page 1

The Official Publication of the Indiana Nursery & Landscape Association

Indiana Nursery & Landscape News Volume 78 • Issue 6

www.inla1.org

November/December 2018

Cover: INLA Award of Excellence 2017 Winner for Commercial Landscape Design/Build over $30,000 — Mark M. Holeman, Inc.

Training & Employment Issue Purdue’s New Immersive Short Courses Address Shortage of Qualified Workers

New Educational Opportunities Learning to Maintain Functional Stormwater Management Features Indiana’s Top Ten Pests and Pathogens Easier Digging? Plan on It.

9 Register Early and save! Early BirD Deadline: November 30 Follow us!

2019 Legislative Preview 7

Full Schedule in this issue

Boxwood Blight Found in Indiana 12


Turf and Landscape Seminar November 14–15, 2018 Daniel Turf Center West Lafayette, Indiana

This event is designed for intermediate and advanced turf professionals providing them with latest technology for managing turfgrass systems, and to maintain their pesticide applicators licenses. This intensive 2-day, hands-on workshop caters to both turf and landscape professionals since there is overlap in duties between these two industries. Instructors for this seminar are experts from Purdue across five different departments.

Over 60 attendees come to this annual 2-day workshop hosted each November. Multiple speakers will be present to help educate turf and landscape professionals. Attendees learn to identify live plants/seed and hear from over 10 different speakers on various topics pertaining to the turf and landscape industry. While classroom based, we integrate hands-on activities and short trips outside, when the weather allows, to increase active learning for attendees.

Complete event info /registration at www.mrtf.org Phone: 765-494-8039 • admin@mrtf.org • www.mrtf.org


Indiana Nursery & Landscape News Volume 78 • Issue 6 November/December 2018

Contents Training & Employment Issue Education & Business

13 Purdue’s New Immersive Short Courses Address Shortage of Qualified Workers

12

Education

14 New Educational Opportunities Indiana Nursery & Landscape News is the official publication of the Indiana Nursery & Landscape Association, Inc. (INLA) and is published bimonthly. Indiana Nursery & Landscape Association 7915 S. Emerson Ave., Suite 247 Indianapolis, IN 46237 Phone: 317-889-2382 Toll Free: 800-443-7336 www.inla1.org Publisher Rick Haggard, Executive Director, INLA 765-366-4994 • haggard.rick@att.net Editor and Ad Sales Mary Breidenbach, Cumulus Design 317-757-8634 • mary@ecumulus.com

EDUCATION

16 Learning to Maintain Functional Stormwater Management Features Community

18 Indiana’s Top Ten Pests and Pathogens

18

Business

20 Easier Digging? Plan on It.

Advertising Rates: Media Kit available online at www.inla1.org

9 Educational Program and Trade Show

Copy Deadline: First of the month preceding the month of the issue. Reprint permission granted if source is indicated. Views expressed in articles or editorials do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the association or its directors, but are those of the writer. Trade names used in articles are for identification only. No discrimination is intended toward similar products and the INLA does not endorse the use of the products mentioned. Subscriptions: Included with membership to the INLA. Nonmembers: $36.00 per year (six issues per year). For questions regarding subscriptions, please call INLA at 317-889-2382.

Cover Photo: Christian Theological Seminary, Community Terrace, Indianapolis. Photo Courtesy Mark M. Holeman, Inc.

Full Schedule in this issue See center insert!

Plus More! 2

President’s Message

4

Executive Director’s Message

6 Calendar 7

INLA News

7

2019 Legislative Session Preview

8

Remembering Gordon Hobbs (1927 – 2018)

10

INEF Announces 2018 Scholarship Recipients

12

Boxwood Blight Found in Indiana

21

Certification & Education

21

IAH Quiz! Earn CEUs

22 Advertiser List Classifieds Toolbox Talks 23

INLA Member Benefits

7

Photo: Massimo Catarinella/


President’s Message As my term as president comes to an end, I want to thank you for allowing me to be your president! I am honored to be the president who transitioned alongside our new executive director Rick Haggard, and I am honored to work with him in our respective roles. I will say we both have made some good changes to this board over the past two years, and I am excited to see this organization grow in the future! These next two months are what I consider our down time. Projects are usually sold for the year, weather is finally turning colder, and we have Brian Franco time to evaluate this past season along with planning for the upcoming year. Employees and their training are going to be the biggest concern for most as we all are looking for good, dependable employees. Belonging to this professional organization has many benefits, but most importantly is the Indiana Green Expo (IGE) educational program and trade show in January. I believe that this is becoming one of the best conferences around — as we see many surrounding states shut down their shows, our Indiana expo continues to grow each year. This year’s show is on track to sell out again with a full trade show. We are very fortunate to have Purdue University coordinate all of our education events — giving us the much-needed CEU’s that we all need. We have also reconfigured the educational sessions, so you will have more time to visit the trade show and attend the programs you want. Inside this issue is the IGE brochure, which contains the full education schedule, and everything you need to get registered. One thing most people do not know is the convention center ranks this show by how many hotel rooms we block off. The more hotel rooms that get reserved under our host hotel (The Westin), the better the deal we can get next year for the convention center exhibit hall selection. So please reserve your room with your registration and do it early. You will save money with early bird registration and help the show. Staying downtown after the awards ceremony allows more options to mingle with your colleagues. There are several groups of people that network after the awards ceremony, and staying downtown is a smart and responsible thing to do. And please consider donating items for the INEF auction. The auction helps support the scholarships we give and we hope you all support the auction this year. There are a few different articles in this issue that are very informative for all of us. One that sticks out is also sad to have in this issue and that is “Remembering Gordon Hobbs.” Gordon has helped me and many of you over the years and he will be missed. Also, you’ll find a good update from The Corydon Group on behalf of the Green Industry Alliance about the upcoming legislative session. The Corydon Group does a great job of keeping us aware of issues that might affect our industry. It has been a great couple year’s as your President. Please plan to be at the IGE and the free awards party on Thursday night. Everything happens for a reason, just make the best of it! Brian Franco, INLA President bfranco@francoland.com

2018 INLA Officers Brian Franco, President Franco Landscaping, Inc. PO Box 34156, Indianapolis, IN 46234 317-858-3858; Fax 317-858-8906 bfranco@francoland.com Dave LaFara, President-Elect Tiffany Lawn & Garden Supply 4931 Robison Rd, Indianapolis, IN 46268 317-228-4900; Fax 317-228-4910 david.lafara@tiffanylawn.com Dean Ricci, Vice President Ricci’s Landscape Management, Inc. 502 Norbeh Drive, Hebron, IN 46341 219-996-2682; Fax 219-996-2680 dean@rlminc.com Brian Julius, Past President Walnut Ridge Nursery & Garden Center 2108 Hamburg Pike Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-288-6691; Fax 812-288-1580 bjulius@walnutridge.com Rick Haggard, Executive Director & Publisher 3596 Linkside Court, Carmel, IN 46032 Office: 800-443-7336 Cell: 765-366-4994; Fax: 317-889-3935 haggard.rick@att.net • www.inla1.org

Board of Directors Jim Calvin (2018) Calvin Landscape • 317-247-6316 jim@calvinlandscape.com Kyle Daniel (2018) Purdue University, Nursery & Landscape Extension 765-494-7621 • daniel38@purdue.edu Kim Glass (2018) M.J. Schuetz Agency • 317-639-5679 kglass@mjsis.com Gabriel Gluesenkamp (2019) Designscape Horticultural Services 812-988-8900 • gabrielg@designhort.com

Education: January 9–11 • Trade Show: January 10–11 Indiana’s largest, most comprehensive green industry event of the year! Offering educational workshops and seminars and a two-day trade show. Full education schedule and show information in this issue and at www.indianagreenexpo.com 2

Indiana nursery & Landscape association • www.inla1.org

Mark O’Brien (2020) Cardno • 574-586-2412 mark.obrien@cardno.com Bob Wasson (2018) Wasson Nursery and Garden Center 765-759-9000 • bob@wassonnursery.com Shaun Yeary (2019) Greendell Landscape Solutions 317-996-2826 syeary@greendelllandscape.com


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Indiana Nursery & Landscape News • November/December 2018

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Executive Director’s Message Dear Industry Friends and Family,

Rick Haggard

As many of you are aware, I lost one of my dearest friends and extended family members on September 13, 2018 — Gordon Hobbs. There is a special tribute to Gordon in this edition of the Indiana Nursery & Landscape News, but to me he was one the true Indiana green industry legends and mentors. The entire Hobbs family treated not only me but almost every employee as a family member. Gordon, I cannot think of any other words than Thank You!

Now on to my latest ramblings … Indiana Green Expo: Fall and winter are quickly coming upon us and I am sure that many are trying to squeeze every last daylight hour in completing projects. But please remember that our 2019 Indiana Green Expo (IGE) will be held at the Indiana Convention Center on January 9–11, 2019. This is an excellent opportunity to get your Indiana Accredited Horticulturist(IAH) CEU’s and Office of Indiana State Chemist CCH’s credits before the potential early spring rush. There are several different topics that will be discussed as always, and we will be offering several workshops on January 9, 2019. Our trade show is already filling up quickly, as we are 15 booths ahead of were we where last year at this time. See the full IGE brochure in this issue! Please, if you plan on attending turn in your registrations early, and use our host hotel — The Westin Indianapolis. I know many of you like to use points at other locations; however, by using our host hotel and registering by the cutoff date, we can control our cost with this event better and in return minimize price increases.

New & Returning INLA Members Affiliate Butch Edwards (502) 876-1481 6610 Robison Rd Nabb, IN 47147 Joe Ramey (317) 341-3667 2798 S Arthur Rd Paragon, IN 46166 White’s Residental & Family Services (260) 563-1158 5233 S 50 E Wabash, IN 46952

Education: One of the issues I have a deep passion for is education in our high schools, career centers, and other vocational training. I have been working with the Indiana Department of Education (DOE) and Indiana Department of Workforce Development (DWD) to utilize our IAH program as an accepted certification for not only career centers, but other vocational programs. For many years our industry has been looked at as a career, but instead it is truly a profession. The correlation of DWD and DOE, is that DWD decides how much of a need there is in each profession/career and grants DOE a certain amount of dollars each specialized class, per student, is to receive at a career or vocational school. Sorry for all the acronym rhetoric! A very little-known fact is that over 1% of all workers in Indiana are involved in some form of the green industry. Some of these may be part-time or as a second income for the household. Indiana’s IAH program is now an accepted equivalent certification, in the Great Lakes states, plus Ontario, Canada. The national certification is now only utilized by 15 continental U.S. states. I am also trying to assist with other training in adult classes as well. When referring to your businesses, please say that you are a professional company in the Indiana Nursery and Landscape Association, and let your employees know they are working for a professional company. State of the industry report in Indiana. As I am sure everyone is aware, our professional green industry is seeing a great opportunity for growth. Labor is still one of the key detractors for many of our members in securing a dedicated labor force. I know many are reluctant to add more labor, for the sake of just adding bodies. According to Department of Workforce Development, the green professional industry is one of the fastest-growing sectors in need of labor. One of the biggest issues is finding trained labor, and Purdue is trying to help with this by offering a 2-week “short course” at the end of February 2019. Purdue is submitting the courses for approval by the Indiana Department of Workforce Development. With approval, companies may be able eligible to receive compensation if they meet certain requirements. Complete details of the new short courses are on page 13. Plus, Kyle will be available at the 2019 Indiana Green Expo to answer your questions. Keep It Green, Rick Haggard, INLA Executive Director

317-889-2382 or 800-443-7336 • Cell: 765-366-4994 • haggard.rick@att.net or rhaggard@inla1.org 4

Indiana nursery & Landscape association • www.inla1.org

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Indiana Nursery & Landscape News • September/October 2018

5


CALENDAR November 2018 3

Growing a diverse selection of native trees and shrubs

Indiana Native Plant & Wildflower Society Annual Conference Indianapolis, IN • IUPUI The 25th annual conference offers attendees many national speakers. http://www.inpaws.org/

13 & 15 IPLLA 2018 Athletic Fields & Grounds Manager Workshop Nov 13: Plymouth, IN • Swan Lake Resort Nov 15: Nashville, IN • Salt Creek Golf Resort Contact: Bob Andrews, 317-989-1208, rea@ thegreenskeeper.com CCHs available: 3A(1), 3B(5), RT(4) https://www.iplla.com/ 14–15 MRTF Turf and Landscape Seminar West Lafayette, IN • Daniel Turf Center • A two-day, hands-on workshop designed for both intermediate and advanced professionals in turf and landscape. CCHs available: 2(4), 3A(6), 3B(8), 5(5), 6(4), 7A(3), RT(4) https://mrtf.org/ 15

Automating and Innovating Tree Monitoring Techniques for the Nursery, Arborist, and Forester Webinar 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm EST https://www.americanhort.org/page/Events

29, MRTF Turf Herbicide Workshop + 2 workshops in December 12/4 & 11/29: Indianapolis • 12/4: Fort Wayne • 12/13: New Albany 12/13 This one-day workshop offers training in weed identification, integrated weed management, selecting the right herbicides, enhancing weed control, and updates on the latest weed research findings. NEW topics each year with all participants receiving a copy of the regional guide: Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals. CCHs available: 3A(7), 3B(7), 6(7), RT(4) https://mrtf.org/

Specializing in Root Pruning

December 2018 1

Deadline for INLA Awards of Excellence submissions and INLA Award of Merit nominations

19

IPLLA 2018 Winter Workshop Noblesville, IN • CCHs available: 2(2), 3A(2), 3B(4), RT(4) Contact: Bob Andrews, 317-989-1208, rea@ thegreenskeeper.com https://www.iplla.com/

January 2019 9–11

Educational Program: January 9–11, 2019 Trade Show: January 10–11, 2019

Indiana Convention Center, Indianapolis, IN Educational workshops, seminars, and the largest green industry trade show in the state. Presented by the Midwest Regional Turf Foundation and the Indiana Nursery & Landscape Association. Multiple CCHs available!

Fax: (317) 994-5494

Full educational program in this issue.

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Registration now open — go to: http://indianagreenexpo.com/ or complete the registration form included in this issue.

Phone: (317) 994-5487 Toll free: (866) 766-8367

3339 W County Road 850 N PO Box 259, Lizton, IN 46149 6

22–24 Indiana Arborist Association Annual Conference Indianapolis, IN • Indianapolis Marriott East https://indiana-arborist.org/

Indiana nursery & Landscape association • www.inla1.org


INLA News

2019 Legislative Session Preview Jason Johnson,The Corydon Group – GIA Legislative Liaison The 2019 session of the Indiana General Assembly is a budget session – meaning that the legislature will be in session from January to late April (as opposed to mid-March in nonbudget sessions) and the largest legislative issue will be compiling a roughly $32 billion state biennial budget. Budget sessions are where we most often see tax changes and tax proposals to note for future years as the budget must be balanced per the state constitution and legislators seek revenue for any added expenditures from the state. The process for putting together the state budget begins before session commences in January. The Budget Committee, comprised of members of both the House and Senate fiscal leadership, will receive testimony from state government agencies and offices prior to January’s official start to session. It will last until the final hours of session as it is typically the last, or one of the last, bills to pass in late April. It is customary that the Governor will unveil his proposed budget early in session and for the first half of session testimony from the public will largely be based on the Governor’s proposal. Prior to the House passing the budget and sending to the Senate, they will offer their own version of the budget which will be sent to the Senate. The Senate will receive testimony from state agencies and the public at large as well and will draft their own version. In the final days of session, the Governor, House, and Senate must come to agreement on a final version which must then be passed by both the House and Senate and be signed by the Governor. Dating back to the 2011 session of the General Assembly, the Governor and majorities in the House and Senate have all been Republican, making the process less contentious than it can be with opposite parties controlling different stages of the process. Other major legislative issues that will continue to be worked on from the Administration and the legislature include reforms to the Department of Child Services, the opioid crisis, and workforce development. The green industry will be monitoring a number of issues through session that have impacts on our businesses. In the last two years, there has been an effort by the Indiana Office of the State Chemist and Seed Commissioner to have emergency rule making authority. Two years ago, we opposed the effort outright and last year we attempted to work with the Office on a compromise version that would have allowed industries directly affected by an emergency rule to provide consultation on the rule before it could be implemented. We anticipate this issue will come up again and we will continue to work with the Office when possible but also represent the hundreds of small businesses that could be affected by an emergency rule if not properly deliberated. We will continue to monitor legislation that would impact all aspects of our businesses, including: workforce development, taxation, and regulation. Green Industry Alliance Rick Haggard – President haggard.rick@att.net Cell: 765-366-4994

7463 West Ridge Road P.O. Box 189 Fairview PA 16415 800.458.2234 Fax 800.343.6819 e-mail: info@FairviewEvergreen.com FairviewEvergreen.com

2019 Indiana Legislative Session Begins: 01/14/2019 Ends: 04/21/2019

Photo Credit: Massimo Catarinella

Indiana Nursery & Landscape News • November/December 2018

7


INLA News

Remembering Gordon Hobbs (1927–2018) Gordon A. Hobbs, 91, of Avon, passed away September 13, 2018. He was born May 13, 1927 to the late Fred and Helen (Jones) Hobbs in Indianapolis, Indiana. He graduated from Purdue University with a B.S. in Horticulture in 1949, and a Masters in Plant Pathology in 1950. He was a U.S. Army veteran of the Korean War serving in the Chemical Corps from 1952–54. He owned and operated Hobbs Nursery, which has its roots and was established in 1812 in Salem, Indiana. Later in 1875 they moved to Bridgeport, Indiana. It became a 400 bare root and B&B operation until downsizing to a 15-acre, re-wholesale yard in 2002. They sold the business to Larry Becker, Becker Landscape, in February 28, 2006. Gordon continued full time to assist in the transition and finally retired at age 90. Gordon was active in many industry and civic organizations. In the field of industry he was Past-President of the following: Indianapolis Landscape Association (1961) and named an Honorary Member; Indiana Association of Nurserymen, (1968), where he received the Indiana Nurseryman of the Year in 1993, Award of Merit in 2007, and named Honorary Member; Wholesale Nursery Growers of America (1983-84); and American Association of Nurserymen 1993-94, elected to ANLA (AAN) Hall of Fame. He also served as Secretary-Treasurer for the American Nursery Credit Association (1971-88) and previously served on the Board of Directors from 1964-71. He was Chairman of AAN’s Executive Search Committee (resulting in the selection of the present EVP Bob Dolibois). He served brief stints on Auto Information and Crop Insurance Committees. He also served as the horticultural advisor for J. Everett North Central High School (1965-70) and the Indiana Reform School for Boys (1975-84). Norma and Gordon Hobbs His civic activities include Past President of both the Indiana Chamber of Commerce (1972), and Indianapolis Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution. He was on the Board of Directory of the Central Indiana Better Business Bureau (1963-69), including three years on the Executive Committee as Regional Vice President. He was Chairman (1982-84) of the local blood donor drive and eventually a 15-gallon donor.

To view a video tribute go to: www.hamptongentry.com/obituary/gordon-hobbs

Memoriams: Craig Regelbrugge, Washington, DC

Heartfelt condolences to Norma and the Hobbs family. Gordon was a wonderful gentleman, and touched so many lives (including my own). He was already on the board of the American Association of Nurserymen when I joined the staff at the end of 1989, and attained the presidency around 1993. He was committed, diligent, engaged, thoughtful, and articulate (chose his words with a precision not seen all that often among farmers). He had a great dry-wit sense of humor, and was always quick with a (usually corny) joke. In fact, those jokes even came over the fax machine and, later, email, accompanying some piece of official business. And speaking of corny, Gordon could do a first-rate Orville Redenbacher impersonation without even saying a word! On a serious note, he was a good friend and role model, truly an icon in this wonderful industry he helped to lead. We will fondly remember him and all his contributions over so many years.

Terry Light, Berry’s Garden Center, Danville, Illinois

Thank-you for the notice of Gordon’s passing. Our prayers and thoughts to the Hobbs family. When Steve and I started we were green, not very well polished, and certainly not wise in the landscape/nursery industry. Gordon (and Bob) were kind, tolerant and helpful. I learned so much about plants from him. I must say that I do not want to slight the yard men for their contribution. My plant I.D. was weak and Gordon always had an answer for whatever I might have brought over to him. I wish that I could have his self-control that he exhibited under stress. I am sure that he will be missed by his family, friends, and customers, and certainly by myself. With sincerity and sympathy,

Rick Haggard, former employee and Executive Director, INLA

(l to r): Fred Hobbs, Gordon Hobbs, Bob Hobbs, and Tom Hobbs 8

Indiana nursery & Landscape association • www.inla1.org

Gordon was a true genuine friend that I admired and respected as not only a mentor, but regarded him as my adopted father/ brother. Gordon, Norma, Tom, Bob and Mr. Fred instilled the passion in me to be the individual I have become within the green industry. I garnered more education from these, free of charge, than possibly what I could have attained at any university. No words can express my gratitude these individuals have bestowed upon me and my family’s life.


Indiana Nursery & Landscape News • November/December 2018

9


INLA News

INEF Announces 2018 Scholarship Recipients Rich Blankenship, INEF Scholarship Chair We are pleased to announce the following winners of the Indiana Nursery Endowment Fund (INEF) 2018 Scholarships: Hunter VanSoest From DeMotte, Indiana, Hunter attended Kankakee Valley High School and is enrolled at Purdue University majoring in Horticulture. Hunter received a monetary award from the INEF in the amount of $4.800. Lance Goecker From Crothersville, Indiana, Lance attended Brownstown Central High School and is enrolled at Purdue University majoring in Landscape Architecture. Lance received a monetary award from the INEF in the amount of $3,200. These are some of the largest scholarships we have ever awarded. The

INEF committee has agreed to distribute up to 80% of the monies raised from the INEF auction at the Indiana Green Expo in the winter and the Shooting for Scholarships summer fundraiser. The amount awarded is based off of the $10,000 raised at those events from last year. This is the result of our members’ generous support of the scholarship program, and we are exceedingly grateful for it. The students have been notified and have received the first payments. We will honor the 2018 scholarship recipients at the upcoming INLA Annual Meeting and Awards Ceremony held on Thursday, January 10, 2019, from 5:00 – 7:00 pm at the Indiana Convention Center immediately following the second day of the Indiana Green Expo. Please plan to come to the event and meet our two new recipients.

About the INEF Scholarship Fund

The Indiana Nursery Endowment Fund offers a scholarship each year to be awarded to one or more full-time students enrolling at Purdue University or Vincennes University in landscape horticulture. The scholarship recipient(s) receive two payments, provided they are still enrolled in landscape horticulture at Purdue University or Vincennes University and have achieved a “C” grade average.

2019 Auction Items Needed We are currently looking for auction items donations for the upcoming fundraiser auction at the Indiana Green Expo in January 2019. All proceeds benefit the INEF. To donate items, please contact Rick Haggard at haggard.rick@att.net or 765-366-4994. Or if you prefer, donate money to the fund directly using the form below.

Indiana Nursery Endowment Fund (INEF) Donation Form The Indiana Nursery Endowment Fund awards scholarships on behalf of INLA to deserving students enrolled at the two Indiana landscape horticulture programs recognized by the INLA — Vincennes and Purdue Universities. In 2016 INEF voted to make donations to other vocational or career center educational programs focused on the landscape/horticulture field. Your donations make this possible. General or memorial donations accepted. All donations are tax-deductible. DoNatIoN amouNt:

$50

Designation of Your Donation:

$100

$250

Other: $______________

General contribution In memory of: _____________________________________________________

Donor Information: Name: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Firm: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ City, State, Zip: _______________________________________________________________________________________________

Payment ___ check

Name on card: _______________________________________________

Questions: Call INLA, 317-889-2382

Billing address if different from above: (address, city, state, zip)

The INEF is a registered not-for-profit in the state of Indiana (#0007371900-000) and the federal government (#35-1907054). 10

___ credit card (circle one): MasterCard Visa Discover AMEX

Please make your check payable to “INEF” and mail to: Indiana Nursery & Landscape Association, 7915 S. Emerson Ave., #247, Indianapolis, IN 46237

Indiana nursery & Landscape association • www.inla1.org

Card number:________________________________________________ Expiration date:______/______

Security code: ________

____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________


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Indiana Nursery & Landscape News • November/December 2018

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INLA News

Boxwood Blight Found in Indiana Message from the Indiana Department of Natural Resources October 16, 2018 — The DNR Division of Entomology & Plant Pathology has discovered that a shipment of boxwood plants infected with boxwood blight was shipped to Indiana in May. This is important because boxwood blight (Calonectria pseudonaviculata) is a fungal disease that infests members of the popular Buxaceae family, and is often transported through the nursery trade. Hosts include Buxus (boxwood), Pachysandra (Japanese spurge) and Sarcococca (sweetbox). In total, 23 stores in Indiana received infected material in early spring (particularly “Graham Blandy” cultivar), and it’s possible that members of the public inadvertently purchased some plants. The fungus, which can lay dormant in drier conditions, can be found on all aboveground portions of the plant and presents itself as dark leaf spots. It causes rapid defoliation, which typically starts on the bottom of the plant and moves toward the

12

top. This fungal pathogen can move through sporulation in water and from dropped leaves. As a result, infection can spread to surrounding plants from a single infected plant. If you suspect one of your plants shows signs and symptoms of boxwood blight, please call (866) NO EXOTIC (866-663-9684) or contact your local inspector. For more information on this pathogen, see the Purdue Extension Boxwood Blight publication (Product: BP-203-W; https:// edustore.purdue.edu). In addition, the Virginia Boxwood Blight Task Force web page has Best Management Practices for nurseries to manage this disease (https://ext. vt.edu/agriculture/commercial-horticulture/ boxwood-blight.html). A DNR inspector found the plants at a national chain home and garden store in early October. The shipment originated at a nursery in Oregon. It was also sent to stores

Indiana nursery & Landscape association • www.inla1.org

Close-up of leaf spots; note light center and dark borders. Photo credit: A. Bordas, Virginia Cooperative Extension

in 11 other states. Upon confirmation of boxwood blight on these plants by the Purdue Plant and Pest Diagnostic Lab, the DNR required that the chain remove all boxwood from their shelves for disposal and that the stores mitigate the area through disinfection to ensure that the pathogen is no longer present and able to infect further shipments of plants. The DNR is currently surveying for boxwood blight in Indiana. To date, the DNR has not found the pathogen, except for a few interceptions like this one.


9 Educational Program & Trade Show

IndianaGreenExpo.com Corporate SpoNSorS

Education: January 9–11 / trade Show: January 10 & 11

Indiana’s largest and most comprehensive green industry event!

@ 3 Days of Excellent Education

by experts in their field / January 9–11 • 4 Certification Training Opportunities: - Concrete Paver Installer Certification (ICPI) - Indiana Accredited Horticulturist (IAH) - Pesticide Applicator Training (CORE) - Pesticide Applicator Training (3b Turf Management) • Spanish Educational Track Returns!

2-Day Trade Show / January 10–11 • New Product Showcase • Landscape Challenge — January 10 The competition returns! • Silent Auction — January 10 Benefits the INLA/INEF Scholarship

The Indiana Green Expo is presented in partnership by the Indiana Nursery and Landscape Association and the Midwest Regional Turf Foundation.

Developing a

Plan for Growth

Join the conversation #IGE19 Follow us @INGreenExpo


featured speakers »

Janna Beckerman Purdue University

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Brian Bressler Medinah Country Club

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Joe Becovitz Office of the Indiana State Chemist

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Matt Kraushar Indiana Department of Transportation

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Bert McCarty Clemson University

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Zak Peterson Milwaukee Brewers

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Kyle Daniel Purdue University

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Steve Foltz Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Gardens

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Cale Bigelow Purdue University

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Josh Friell The Toro Company

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Rick Latin Purdue University

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Eduardo Medina Davey Tree

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Lindsey Purcell Purdue University

Dan Dinelli North Shore Country Club

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Bill Hendricks Klyn Nurseries

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Rosie Lerner Purdue University

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Ross Braun Purdue University

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Harold Enger Spring-Green Lawn Care

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Ben Jackson Columbus Crew

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Jeff Ling Arborwise, LLC

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Thom Nikolai Michigan State University

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Zac Reicher Bayer CropScience

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Aaron Patton Purdue University

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Doug Richmond Purdue University

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Joe Roberts University of Maryland

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Ariana Torres Purdue University

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Cliff Sadof Purdue University

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Fred Whitford Purdue University

Nina Shishkoff Foreign Disease-Weed Science Research Unit ARS/USDA

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Stephanie Woodcox Purdue University

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Sam Steel National Association of Landscape Professionals

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David Zlesak University of Wisconsin — RW


Workshops Wednesday, January 9

thursday, January 10

Workshop A

Workshop F

Concrete paver Installer Certification Course

(two-day course) Greg Ambrose, United Hardscapes January 9: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm January 10: 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Workshop B

Mental health First Aid (two-day course) Jane Horner and Marcia Parcell, Purdue University January 9: 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm January 10: 8:00 am – 12:00 pm

For contractors involved in residential and commercial installation of interlocking concrete pavements, the Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute (ICPI) Concrete Paver Installer Certification is THE industry recognized program for the professionals committed to industry guidelines for segmental concrete pavement installation. This two-day course equips individuals currently employed in the concrete paver installer industry with training and tools to properly install interlocking concrete paving systems. |In addition, participants have the opportunity to pursue certification at the end of the workshop, as well as potential industry recognition in the future.

Mental Health First Aid will educate on signs and symptoms of a variety of mental health disorders such as anxiety, depression, substance use, suicide, and trauma. Participants will learn how to assist those in need during specific situations in an attempt to get an individual appropriate help from a health professional. This workshop may be of particular interest for those looking for ways to better support employees and co-workers. It may also help when navigating challenging circumstances taking place in one’s own life or among family and friends. The class is limited to 30 participants. A minimum of 12 registrations is required for the workshop to be held.

pesticide Applicator Training (CorE) No EXAM Fred Whitford and Cheri Janssen, Purdue University and Joe Becovitz, Office of Indiana State Chemist 8:30 am - 3:15 pm A step in becoming a certified Pesticide applicator in Indiana is to pass the CORE examination. This workshop covers pesticide laws, pesticide formulations, applicator safety, environmental protection, label comprehension and laws pertaining to pesticide use. This workshop prepares attendees to take the CORE exam. NO Exam will be given at the workshop. You will schedule your own exam time on a separate date. At the workshop, attendees will be informed on where to take the exam. Passing the core exam is required to become a registered technician (RT) or for anyone who applies restricted use pesticides on their own farm property (private applicator). A minimum of 20 registrations is required for the workshop to be held.

Workshop C

Developing Weed Control programs for Turf & Landscape Areas Aaron Patton and Kyle Daniel, Purdue University

1:00 – 4:00 pm CCH = 3a: 3.0, 3b: 3.0, 6: 3.0, RT:3.0

A common question that we get is why didn’t the herbicide work and kill the weed? This workshop will help you better understand the biology of common turf and landscape weeds and how to improve your weed control by better understanding herbicide activity. Proper application timing, herbicide mode of action, surfactants, formulations, spray volume, antagonism, and much more will be discussed. We will create and analyze weed control programs together as a group in order to help you understand the fundamentals for building successful weed control programs. Participants will receive a copy of the newly revised 2019 edition of “Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals” full of color pictures covering the identification of 118 weed species.

Workshop D

Indiana Accredited horticulturist (IAh) review and Exam Jim Messmer, Vincennes University, retired 1:00 – 5:00 pm CCH = 3a:1.0, RT:1.0

1:00 – 3:00 pm: IAH Review (additional fee) 3:00 – 5:00 pm: IAH Exam As an educator and experienced IAH facilitator, Jim will aid you in preparing for the afternoon exam. There will be ample time for questions and individual attention. The review is also a great refresher for those already certified — earn IAH CEUs by attending. Contact the INLA (800-443-7336) for program materials which are an additional fee.

Workshop E

Diagnostic Challenges: Is My Tree Dying and Why? Tom Creswell, Rosie Lerner, and Cliff Sadof, Purdue University 1:00 – 4:00 pm CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:3.0, 3b:1.0, RT:3.0

Participants in this hands-on workshop will learn the steps in problem diagnosis, including tips for proper identification of the host as well as key symptoms and signs to help identify specific plant diseases. Identifying disease problems in trees and shrubs can be a daunting task. There are many look-alike problems and expression of symptoms is a dynamic process — with symptoms changing in appearance over time. This interactive session will provide an overview of a stepwise approach to problem solving. Hands-on diagnosis of samples will put into practice the diagnostic process. This hands-on workshop will conclude with a review of the samples, emphasizing the importance of proper plant identification and recognition of common insects and diseases for accurate diagnosis of problems on trees and shrubs.

Friday, January 11 Workshop G

pesticide Applicator Training (Category 3b Turf Management) No EXAM Fred Whitford, Aaron Patton, Glenn Hardebeck, Doug Richmond, Cheri Janssen, Joe Becovitz, Purdue University and Office of the Indiana State Chemist 8:30 am – 4:00 pm The second part in becoming certified to apply pesticides to turf in Indiana is to pass the 3b examination. This workshop covers the management of turf and its pests (weeds, insect, disease) as well as a review of pesticide laws and mathematics. This workshop prepares attendees for the 3b exam. NO Exam will be given at the workshop. You will schedule your own exam time on a separate date. At the workshop, attendees will be informed on where to take the exam. The 3b exam is required for commercial applicators (for hire, not for hire and government employees) and businesses using pesticides (weed killers, insecticides, fungicides, etc.) or fertilizers on turf (lawns, golf courses and athletic fields). A minimum of 20 registrations is required for the workshop to be held.


Thursday, January 10 openInG TUrf SeSSIon 8:30-10:00 am purdue University research and program Update Aaron Patton, Cale Bigelow, Rick Latin, Doug Richmond, and Yiwei Jiang, Purdue University CCH = 3b:1.5, RT:1.5

openInG LandSCape SeSSIon 8:15 – 9:15 am mixing Chemicals: Steps to ensure Compatibility and effectiveness Fred Whitford, Purdue University CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, 3b:1.0, 5:1.0, 6:1.0, 7A:1.0, RT:1.0 9:15 – 9:30 am Indiana Green expo welcome Kyle Daniel, Purdue University and Brian Franco, INLA

Lawn Care 11:00 am – 12:00 pm new herbicides Coming Soon Aaron Patton, Purdue University CCH = 3a:1.0, 3b:1.0, 6:1.0, RT:1.0

GoLf 11:00 am – 12:00 pm Tree Care on the Golf Course Jeff Ling, Arborwise CCH = 3a:1.0, RT:1.0 12:00 - 1:00 pm — Lunch break 1:00 – 2:00 pm The Golf Course as an environmental asset — my Story at north Shore Country Club Dan Dinelli, North Shore Country Club CCH = 3b:1.0, RT:1.0 2:00 – 3:00 pm nematodes? In Indiana? Zac Reicher, Bayer CropScience CCH = 3b:1.0, RT:1.0 3:00 – 4:00 pm Greens reconstruction: from old, Tired poa push-up Greens to Sand-based rootzones with “new Genetics” Dan Dinelli, North Shore Country Club CCH = 3b:1.0, RT:1.0 4:00 – 5:00 pm managing Bentgrass Greens in Stressful environments Bert McCarty, Clemson University CCH = 3b:1.0, RT:1.0

12:00 - 1:00 pm — Lunch break 1:00 – 2:00 pm Technology and Sustainability in Turf management Josh Friell, The Toro Company 2:00 – 3:00 pm Is Glyphosate Safe to Use? Bert McCarty, Clemson University CCH = 3a:1.0, 3b:1.0, 5:1.0, 6:1.0, RT:1.0 3:00 – 4:00 pm why you Can’t Sell Harold Enger, Spring-Green Lawn Care 4:00 – 5:00 pm panel discussion: handling a Tough Summer Bob Andrews, The Greenskeepers; Bob Avenius, TruGreen; Gary Crum, Lawn Tamer; Harold Enger, Spring-Green Lawn Care; Aaron Patton, Purdue University CCH = 3b:1.0, RT:1.0

LandSCape InSTaLLaTIon and maInTenanCe

SpanISh TraCk 8:30 – 9:00 am Bienvenida e introducciones / welcome and Introductions Ariana Torres, Purdue University 9:00 – 10:00 am habilidades utiles para navegar la industria agricola de eeUU / Useful skills to navigate the U.S. agricultural labor market Ligia Matousek, Luis Gomez, and Boris Castro, Corteva AgroSciences 10:00 – 11:00 am prevención de un accidente / accident prevention Eduardo Medina, Davey Tree • CCH = 2:0.5, 3a:0.5, RT:0.5 11:00 am – 12:00 pm Gestión de defoliadores y Sanidad arbórea / management of defoliators and Tree health Cliff Sadof, Purdue University CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, RT:1.0 1:00 – 2:00 pm General Session — see Landscape Installation Maintenance 1:00 pm listing for details

1:00 – 2:00 pm General Session — determining the oSha Standards and regulations That apply to your Green Industry Company Sam Steel, National Assoc. of Landscape Professionals CCH = 2:0.5, 3a:0.5, 3b:0.5, 5:0.5, 6:0.5, 7A:0.5, RT:0.5

2:00 – 3:00 pm entendiendo las plantas para un manejo más efectivo Understanding Landscape plants for more effective management Ana Gabriela Morales, Purdue University CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, RT:1.0

2:00 – 3:00 pm Boxwood Blight: Safeguarding production and home Gardens Nina Shishkoff, Foreign Disease-Weed Science Research Unit, ARS/USDA • CCH = 3a:1.0, RT:1.0

3:00 – 4:00 pm Como manejar los conflictos en las pequeñas empresas / Conflict management in small businesses Maria Marshall, Purdue University CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, RT:1.0

3:00 – 4:00 pm plants for pollinators Joel Fisher, Cardno CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, 3b:1.0, 6:1.0, RT:1.0

4:00 – 5:00 pm diagnóstico de problemas de plantas / diagnosing plant problems Ivan Grijalva, Purdue University CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, RT:1.0

Trade Show hoUrS Today: 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

SporTS TUrf 1:00 – 2:00 pm 1, 2, 3 Cultivate! Cale Bigelow, Purdue University • CCH = 3b:1.0, RT:1.0 2:00 – 3:00 pm watchout: Gray Leaf Spot and other Turf diseases Rick Latin, Purdue University • CCH = 3b:1.0, RT:1.0 3:00 – 4:00 pm making a Lot out of a Little: Using a Tight Budget to maximum Turf Quality Josh Blackmore, Carmel Dad’s Club• CCH = 3b:0.5, RT:0.5 4:00 – 5:00 pm panel discussion: managing fields at high School Level Matt Dudley, Avon High School; Andy Gossel, Covenant Christian High School; Tom Mahaney, Bishop Chatard High School; and Josh Weigel, Noblesville Schools CCH = 3b:0.5, RT:0.5

pLanT maTerIaL 2:00 – 3:00 pm rose Growing Challenges and emerging Solutions David Zlesak, University of Wisconsin-RW CCH = 3a:1.0, RT:1.0 3:00 – 3:45 pm hints for happy hydrangeas Rosie Lerner, Purdue University 3:45 – 4:30 pm Impatiens downy mildew: what to do now, what to expect in the future Nina Shishkoff, Foreign Disease-Weed Science Research Unit, ARS/USDA • CCH = 3a:0.75, RT:0.75

InVaSIVe SpeCIeS 2:00 – 3:00 pm Updates on Invasive Species from the Idnr Megan Abraham, Indiana Department of Natural Resources • CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, 6:1.0, RT:1.0 3:00 – 4:00 pm purdue extension: a Community Toolbox for Local Invasive Species management Kara Salazar and Steve Yaninek, Purdue University CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, 5:1.0, 6:1.0, RT:1.0 4:00 – 5:00 pm methods for Controlling woody Invasive plants Lenny Farlee, Purdue University CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, 6:1.0, RT:1.0

VeGeTaTIon manaGemenT 1:00 – 2:00 pm protecting pollinator friendly plants and other native Species when removing Invasive weeds Joel Fisher, Cardno • CCH = 3a:1.0, 6:1.0, RT:1.0 2:00 – 3:00 pm application equipment and Techniques for right of way and other natural areas Matt Kraushar, Indiana Department of Transportation CCH = 3a:1.0, 3b:1.0, 6:1.0, RT:1.0 3:00 – 4:00 pm Selecting adjuvants to enhance weed Control Bryan Young, Purdue University CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, 3b:1.0, 5:1.0, 6:1.0, RT:1.0 4:00 – 5:00 pm noxious weed Control on roadsides Matt Kraushar, Indiana Department of Transportation CCH = 6:1.0, RT:1.0


Special Events on Thursday, January 10 TrADe SHOw OpenS TODAy! 10:00 am – 5:00 pm, Hall D

MrTf Annual Meeting and Awards Ceremony 5:00 – 7:00 pm, Convention Center Join us for the presentation of scholarship and other MRTF announcements. We will honor Rick Latin with the 2018 MRTF Distinguished Service Award.

Events on Thursday Opening Ceremony ribbon Cutting 10:00 am • outside Hall D

inLA Annual Meeting and Awards reception

inLA Scholarship Silent Auction 10:00 am – 5:00 pm Trade Show Floor 7th Annual Landscape Challenge 10:30 am – 1:30 pm Trade Show Floor new product Showcase 10:00 am – 5:00 pm Trade Show Floor

Thursday January 10

Lawn Care

5:00 – 7:00 pm, Convention Center Features landscape and special achievement awards. A don’t miss event for INLA members! Landscape Challenge Winner announced PLUS an auction of challenge product. wOrKSHOpS Workshop F: Pesticide Applicator Training (CORE) • 8:00 am – 5:00 pm workshop A (day 2): Concrete paver installer Certification Course • 8:00 am – 5:00 pm Workshop B (day 2): Mental Health First Aid • 8:00 am – 12:00 pm

SportS turf

GoLf

VeGetation MGMt

inStaLLation MaintenanCe

inVaSiVe SpeCieS

pLant MateriaL

Opening LAnDSCApe SeSSiOn 8:30–9:00 am

9:30–10:00 am 10:00–10:30 am 10:30–11:00 am 11:00–11:30 am 11:30 am–12 pm

Opening Turf SeSSiOn

2019 Trade Show Opening Ceremony (10:00 am, Hall D) Ribbon cutting with Fred Whitford and sponsors opens the Indiana Green Expo 2019 Trade Show. New Herbicides Coming Soon

Trade Show Open until 5:00 pm (Hall D) Visit with new and familiar vendors plus check out the New Product Showcase, the Landscape Challenge, and more.

Tree Care on the Golf Course

2:00–2:30 pm 2:30–3:00 pm 3:00–3:30 pm 3:30–4:00 pm 4:00–4:30 pm 4:30–5:00 pm

Bienvenida e introducciones Habilidades utiles para navegar la industria agricola de EEUU

Prevención de un accidente Gestión de Defoliadores y Sanidad Arbórea

Lunch Break / Trade Show Open

12:30–1:00 pm

1:30–2:00 pm

Mixing Chemicals: Steps to Ensure Compatibility & Effectiveness and IGE Welcome Indiana Green Expo Welcome

Purdue University Research & Program Update and Indiana Green Expo Welcome

12:00–12:30 pm

1:00–1:30 pm

SpaniSh traCk

l

8:00–8:30 am

9:00–9:30 am

Rick Latin

Technology and Sustainability in Turf Management

The Golf Course as an Environmental Asset

1, 2, 3 Cultivate!

Protecting Pollinator Friendly Plants When Removing Invasive Weeds

Is Glyphosate Safe to Use?

Nematodes? In Indiana?

Watchout: Gray Leaf Spot and Other Turf Diseases

Application Equipmt and Techniques for ROW and Other Natural Areas

Boxwood Blight: Safeguarding Production and Home Gardens

Updates on Invasive Species from the IDNR

Rose Growing Challenges and Emerging Solutions

Why You Can’t Sell

Greens Reconstruction

Using a Tight Budget to Maximum Turf Quality

Selecting Adjuvants to Enhance Weed Control

Plants for Pollinators

Purdue Extension: Toolbox for Invasive Species Management

Hints for Happy Hydrangeas

Panel: Handling a Tough Summer

Managing Bentgrass Greens in Stressful Environments

Panel: Managing Fields at the High School Level

Noxious Weed Control on Roadsides

generAL SeSSiOn Determining the OSHA Standards and Regulations That Apply to Your Green Industry Company

Methods for Controlling Woody Invasive Plants

Impatiens Downy Mildew: What to Do Now, What to Expect

Entendiendo las plantas para un manejo más efectivo Como manejar los conflictos en las pequeñas empresas

Diagnóstico de problemas de plantas


FRIday, JanuaRy 11 Lawn Care 8:00 – 8:45 am Cultural practices Impact weed populations Quincy Law, Purdue University CCH = 3b:0.75, 6:0.75, RT:0.75 8:45 – 9:30 am Consumer preferences in Lawns Ross Braun, Purdue University 9:30 – 10:00 am — Break 10:00 – 11:00 am Update from the Indiana State Chemist’s office Joe Becovitz , Office of the Indiana State Chemist CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, 3b:1.0, 5:1.0, 6:1.0, 7A:1.0, RT:1.0 11:00 am – 12:00 pm The Social and environmental Impact of Turfgrass in an Urban Setting, Thom Nikolai, Michigan State University CCH = 3b:0.5, RT:0.5 12:00 - 1:00 pm — Lunch break 1:00 – 2:00 pm mixing Chemicals: Steps to ensure Compatibility and effectiveness, Fred Whitford, Purdue University CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, 3b:1.0, 5:1.0, 6:1.0, 7A:1.0, RT:1.0

GoLf 8:00 – 9:00 am Understanding and developing practices that Influence Turf microbiology Joe Roberts, University of Maryland CCH = 3b:1.0, RT:1.0 9:00 – 10:00 am The Top 10 reasons to Lightweight roll Thom Nikolai, Michigan State University CCH = 3b:0.5, RT:0.5 10:00 – 11:00 am precision management: Sensors, measurement, and Big data Josh Friell, The Toro Company 11:00 am – 12:00 pm The added Value of organic amendments in Traditional Systems for enhancing Golf Course fairway Turf Joe Roberts, University of Maryland CCH = 3b:1.0, RT:1.0

norThern TUrf

2:00 – 3:00 pm Summer Stress 2018: what did we Learn? Cale Bigelow, Purdue University • CCH = 3b:1.0, RT:1.0

1:00 – 2:00 pm State Chemist office Update Joe Becovitz, Office of Indiana State Chemist CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, 3b:1.0, 5:1.0, 6:1.0, 7A:1.0, RT:1.0

3:00 – 4:00 pm The return of the Japanese Beetle Doug Richmond, Purdue University CCH = 3a:1.0, 3b:1.0, RT:1.0

2:00 – 3:00 pm Current Topics in Turf disease Control Rick Latin, Purdue University CCH = 3b:1.0, RT:1.0

LandSCape InSTaLLaTIon and maInTenanCe 8:00 – 9:00 am Update from the State Chemist office Joe Becovitz, Office of the Indiana State Chemist CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, 3b:1.0, 5:1.0, 6:1.0, 7A:1.0, RT:1.0 9:00 – 10:00 am management of defoliators and Tree health Cliff Sadof, Purdue University CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, RT:1.0 10:00 – 11:00 am — Break 11:00 am – 12:00 pm General Session — Improving the mental health of Communities Stephanie Woodcox, Purdue Extension 12:00 - 1:00 pm — Lunch break 1:00 – 2:00 pm General Session — promoting and Inspiring people to pursue Careers in plants Susan Yoder, Seed Your Future 2:00 – 3:00 pm Tough plants for Tough places Bill Hendricks, Klyn Nurseries • CCH = 3a:1.0, RT:1.0 3:00 – 4:00 pm plant parts: a panel discussion with Iah master horticulturalists Gabriel Gluesenkamp, Designscape; Rick Haggard, INLA; George Brenn, Four Seasons Nursery; Jim Messmer, Vincennes University (retired); and Kyle Daniel, Purdue University • CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, RT:1.0 4:00 – 5:00 pm Tree preservation: what planners, planters and principals need to Know, Lindsey Purcell, Purdue Univ. CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, RT:1.0

3:00 – 4:00 pm your Course as the Local Classroom: first Green Ryan Cummings, Elcona Country Club and Randy Brehmer, The Fort Golf Course

Trade Show hoUrS Today: 9:00 am - 1:00 pm

SporTS TUrf 8:00 – 9:00 am weed Control in athletic fields Bert McCarty, Clemson University CCH = 3b:1.0, 6:1.0, RT:1.0 9:00 – 10:00 am Steps to Growing high Quality Turf in a Tough Climate Zak Peterson, Milwaukee Brewers • CCH = 3b:1.0, RT:1.0 10:00 – 11:00 am Bringing the Lab to the field: a practical Look at Turfgrass diagnostics, Ben Jackson, Columbus Crew 1:00 – 2:00 pm The Brief yet Complete history of pesticides Thom Nikolai, Michigan State University CCH = 3b:1.0, 6:1.0, RT:1.0 2:00 – 3:00 pm painting athletic fields Brian Bornino, Purdue University

SoUThern TUrf 1:00 – 2:00 pm diagnosis and management of Common pathogens on warm Season Turfgrass in the Transition Zone Joe Roberts, Univ. of Maryland • CCH = 3b:1.0, RT:1.0 2:00 – 3:00 pm Using pigments and Colorants on dormant warm Season Turf Ross Braun, Purdue University • CCH = 3b:0.5, RT:0.5 3:00 – 4:00 pm managing annual Bluegrass & Zoysiagrass Seedheads Aaron Patton, Purdue University • CCH = 3b:1.0, RT:1.0

hardSCapeS pLanT maTerIaL 8:00 – 9:00 am The american rose Trials for Sustainability (a.r.T.S.) program and winning rose Cultivars David Zlesak, University of Wisconsin-River Falls CCH = 3a:1.0, RT:1.0

8:00 – 9:00 am natural Stone: definitions, Classifications, applications, & Inspirations David LaFara, Tiffany Lawn and Garden 9:00 – 10:00 am professional advice from the hardscape pros Robert Johnstone & Russ Stout, Edgewood Building Supply

9:00 – 10:00 am — Break 10:00 – 11:00 am Chamaecyparis for midwest Gardens Bill Hendricks, Klyn Nurseries 11:00 am – 12:00 pm General Session — see Landscape Installation Maintenance 11:00 am listing for details 12:00 - 1:00 pm — Lunch break 1:00 – 2:00 pm General Session — see Landscape Installation Maintenance 1:00 pm listing for details 2:00 – 3:00 pm The Best Trees and Shrubs for all Seasons — winter, Spring, Summer and fall! Steve Foltz, Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Gardens 3:00 – 4:00 pm plants for pollinators — which ones are the Best? Steve Foltz, Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Gardens CCH = 3a:1.0, 6:1.0, RT:1.0 4:00 – 5:00 pm a pox on Box, Janna Beckerman, Purdue University CCH = 3a:1.0, RT:1.0

eQUIpmenT TeChnICIanS 8:00 – 9:00 am Lets drive: Use Google drive to enhance your equipment maintenance Brian Bressler, Medinah Country Club 9:00 – 10:00 am Safety Basics for Small Business Rob Willman, State Safety and Compliance, LLC 10:00 – 11:00 am Turning Something old Into Something new: adding on to equipment for more efficient work Brian Bressler, Medinah Country Club 11:00 am – 12:00 pm factors affecting Cut Quality & aftercut appearance Bill Stone, John Deere Golf 1:00 – 2:00 pm why we have to adapt to Tier IV Technology Bill Stone, John Deere Golf 2:00 – 3:00 pm Correctly Using a multimeter to diagnose Issues John Lumkes, Purdue University


FridAY HiGHLiGHtS

tree cAre

Production

8:00 – 9:00 am the urban Heat island and tree care Carrie Tauscher, IDNR • CCH = 3a:1.0, RT:1.0 9:00 – 10:00 am Pruning for Performance and Prevention Lindsey Purcell, Purdue University 10:00 – 11:00 am earth, Wind, and Fire . . . Jeffrey Ling, Arborwise, LLC • CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, RT:1.0 11:00 am – 12:00 pm General Session — see Landscape Installation Maintenance 11:00 am listing for details

8:30–9:00 am 9:00–9:30 am 9:30–10:00 am 10:00–10:30 am 10:30–11:00 am 11:00–11:30 am 11:30 am–12 pm

Cultural Practices Impact Weed Weed Control in Athletic Fields Populations

9:00 – 10:00 am Work Less, Play Hard, Build to Sell Adam N. Linnemann, The Green Executive

10:00 – 11:00 am Microbials and other Soil Amendments: Are they Worth it? Lori Hoagland, Purdue University

10:00 – 11:00 am — Break

GoLf

Practices that Influence Turf Microbiology

nortHern GoLf

2:00–2:30 pm 2:30–3:00 pm 3:00–3:30 pm 3:30–4:00 pm 4:00–4:30 pm 4:30–5:00 pm

2:00 – 3:00 pm How to Manage conflict to Get to resolution Maria Marshall, Purdue University 3:00 – 4:00 pm Question and Answer from an industry Leader Adam N. Linnemann, The Green Executive

equipment inStaLLation teCHniCian maintenanCe Indiana State Chemist Office Update

Professional Advice from the Hardscape Pros

Management of Defoliators and Tree Health

Safety Basics for Small Business Adding-on to Equipment for More Efficient Work

pLant materiaL

tree Care

produCtion

BuSineSS/ marketinG

The A.R.T.S. Program and Winning Rose Cultivars

The Urban Heat Island and Tree Care

Developing a Weed Mgmt Plan for Your Nursery

Online Marketing Strategies for Green Industry Businesses

Pruning for Performance and Prevention

What Nurseries Need to Know about SANC

Work Less, Play Hard, Build to Sell

Earth, Wind, and Fire . . .

Microbials and Other Soil Amendments

Chameacyparis for Midwest Gardens

Factors Affecting Cut Quality and Aftercut Appearance

GenerAL SeSSion Improving the Mental Health of Communities

• • • Trade Show Closes at 1:00 pm • • •

12:30–1:00 pm

1:30–2:00 pm

1:00 – 2:00 pm General Session — see Landscape Installation Maintenance 1:00 pm listing for details

Natural Stone: Use Google Definitions, Drive to Enhance Classifications, Your Equipment Applications, etc. Maintenance

Added Value of Organic Amendments

12:00–12:30 pm

1:00–1:30 pm

HardSCape

Percision Bringing the Lab to the Field: Mgmt: Sensors, Turfgrass Measurement, & Diagnostics Big Data

Impact of Turfgrass in an Urban Setting

12:00 - 1:00 pm — Lunch break

3:00 – 4:00 pm nursery update from the idnr Megan Abraham, Indiana Department of Natural Resources • CCH = 3a:1.0, RT:1.0

Consumer Lawn Steps to Growing The Top 10 Preferences High Quality Reasons to Turf in a Tough Lightweight Roll Climate Indiana State Chemist Office Update

11:00 am – 12:00 pm General Session — see Landscape Installation Maintenance 11:00 am listing for details

2:00 – 3:00 pm caught with Your Plants down? Janna Beckerman, Purdue University CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, RT:1.0

3:00 – 4:00 pm creating a culture of Safety! What works What doesn’t! Plus creating a Visitor Safety Plan! Jud Scott, Jud Scott Consulting Arborist

8:00–8:30 am

9:00 – 10:00 am What nurseries need to Know about SAnc Eric Biddinger, IDNR, SANC • CCH = 2:1.0, 3a:1.0, RT:1.0

1:00 – 2:00 pm General Session — see Landscape Installation Maintenance 1:00 pm listing for details

2:00 – 3:00 pm 5 changes in Landscape Appraisal Jeffrey Ling, Arborwise, LLC

SortS turf

8:00 – 9:00 am online Marketing Strategies for Green industry Businesses Ariana Torres, Purdue University

12:00 - 1:00 pm — Lunch break

1:00 – 2:00 pm General Session — see Landscape Installation Maintenance 1:00 pm listing for details

Lawn Care

BuSineSS And MArKetinG

8:00 – 9:00 am developing a Weed Management Plan for Your nursery Kyle Daniel, Purdue University • CCH = 3a:1.0, 6:1.0, RT:1.0

11:00 am – 12:00 pm General Session — see Landscape Installation Maintenance 11:00 am listing for details

12:00 - 1:00 pm — Lunch break

Friday January 11

Trade Show 9:00 am - 1:00 pm WorKSHoP G: PeSticide APPLicAtor trAininG (3B) neW Product SHoWcASe

SoutHern GoLf

Mixing The Brief Yet Chemicals: Complete History Compatability & of Pesticides Effectiveness

Indiana State Chemist Office Update

Warm Season Why We Have to Turfgrass in Adapt to Tier IV Transiztion Zone Technology

Summer Stress 2018: What Did We Learn?

Current Topics in Turf Disease Control

Pigments & Colorants on Dormant Warm Season Turf

Your Course as the Local Classroom: First Green

Managing Annual Bluegrass & Zoysiagrass

Return of the Japanese Beetle

Painting Athletic Fields

Correctly Using a Multimeter to Diagnose Issues

GenerAL SeSSion Promoting and Inspiring People to Pursue Careers in Plants

Tough Plants for Tough Places

Best Trees and Shrubs for All Seasons

5 Changes in Landscape Appraisal

Caught How to Manage Conflict to Get to with Your Resolution Plants Down?

Plant Parts: Panel Creating a Culture Plants for Discussion with of Safety! Nursery Update Pollinators: IAH Master What works! from the IDNR Which Are Best? Horticulturists What Doesn’t! Tree Preservation: What You Need to Know

A Pox on Box

Question and Answer from an Industry Leader


Expo DEtails IndIana Green expo Headquarter Hotel The Westin Indianapolis 241 W. Washington St, Indianapolis, IN 46204 317-262-8100

Staying at the IGE Headquarter Hotel is important to the success of the overall event and each participating not-for-profit organization.

• Reservations are available online at: https://tinyurl.com/yb8xc3xp • If contacting the hotel directly, ask for the “Indiana Green Expo rate.” • Rate: $109 single/double; $125 triple; $135 quad plus estimated taxes of 17%; early departure fees may apply • Reservation Deadline: 5:00 pm, December 9, 2018

parking • Street Meters are available up to 2 hours for $2. Meters now take credit cards, however they have new restrictions. • Or visit the following websites for downtown parking maps. Parking prices vary from $10 to $26 per day. www.visitindy.com or www.icclos.com

Conference location Indiana Convention Center — Hall D 100 South Capitol, Indianapolis, IN 46225 Maps and directions visit www.icclos.com

Exhibitors Accurate Laser Systems, Inc. ........... 317-714-2273

Indiana Nursery and Landscape Association .................................... 317-889-2382

Syngenta ............................................ 317-431-3318

J. Frank Schmidt & Son Co..............503-663-4128

Tiffany Lawn & Garden Supply .......317-654-5105 Tri State Foliage Inc. ........................ 513-825-1885

Ameri-Turf ........................................ 765-378-0256

John Platte Nursery Sales, Inc. / Perennials Plus ............................. 317-867-5504

Automatic Supply..............................317-697-2474

Kankakee Nursery .......................... 800-344-7697

Blue Grass Farms of Indiana .......... 765-649-1012

Knox Fertilizer Company .................219-871-4076

Brehob Nurseries LLC ...................... 317-877-0188

M&K Truck Centers ...........................616-583-1811

Cardno...............................................574-586-2412

M.J. Schuetz Insurance Services .... 317-548-3937

Caudill Seed Co. ..............................502-583-4402

McGavic Outdoor Power Equipment ...................................... 317-691-0513

Advanced Turf Solutions /J&D Turf ........................................ 317-842-1088 American BioChar Company ........ 269-663-2224

CISCO Companies, The .................... 317-357-7013 DOW AgroSciences...........................317-727-2241 Eason Horticultural Resources ...... 859-578-3535 Goodmark Nurseries .......................815-653-9293 Grasshopper Company .................. 620-345-8621 Greendell/Musselman Landscape Solutions .........................................317-431-3857 Greenleaf Nursery Company .........918-457-2200

Mid-State Truck Equipment ............317-849-4903 Midwest Regional Turf Foundation ................................... 765-494-8039 Millcreek Gardens LLC ................... 800-948-1234 Northland Farms LLC ...................... 616-846-1477 PBI-Gordon........................................317-432-6195 Power Equipment Distributors...... 800-624-2932 Pro/Angle Bunker Sand ................. 440-298-3232

Harrell’s LLC .....................................863-687-2774

Pro-Ap By Frick Services ................ 630-740-0677

Hortech, Inc. .....................................616-842-1392

Purdue Plant & Pest Diagnostic Lab ....................................................... 765-494-4641

IDNR Division of Entomology & Plant Pathology .......................................317-232-4120

Twixwood Nursery ...........................269-471-7408 Unilock ..............................................630-892-9191 Vermeer Midwest ............................. 317-842-1040 Vine & Branch, Inc. .......................... 317-846-3778 West Side Tractor Sales ....................317-544-3411 Winding Creek Nursery ..................269-838-4813 Woody Warehouse Nursery ........... 317-994-5487

Midwest Groundcovers ................... 847-742-1790

Greenworks Commercial (Conniff Sales) ........................................................ 765-935-9177

Hortica, a brand of the Sentry Insurance Group ........................................................800-851-7740

Tenbarge Seed Co., Inc. ...................812-768-6157

Reading Rock, Inc............................. 513-874-2345 Redox .................................................208-678-2610

Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant ..................17-300-0182

SCP and Superior Pool Products Distributors ................................... 317-549-9598

Indiana Mulch & Stone LLC ............. 317-414-8183

Site One Landscape Supply............ 317-770-8950 Studebaker....................................... 937-405-5588

traDE show schEDulE SEt up Wednesday, January 9 10:00 am – 5:00 pm Late arrivals must register with IGE office (317-889-2382) prior to move in. thursday, January 10 6:30 am – 9:00 am SHOW HOuRS thursday, January 10 10:00 am – 5:00 pm Friday, January 11 9:00 am – 1:00 pm ExHIbItOR MOvE Out Friday, January 11 1:00 – 6:00 pm


RegISTRATION

NEW EARLY BIRD registration deadline: November 30, 2018

PRE-REGISTRATION Mailed deadline: December 17, 2018 PRE-REGISTRATION Online deadline: December 19, 2018

for Indiana Green Expo 2019 / January 9–11, 2019 Registration also online at www.IndianaGreenExpo.com

Must be postmarked by thes dates to receive reduced rates.

Please complete the items below by typing or printing neatly OR register online. Company:_________________________________________________________________ Address___________________________________________________________________ City____________________________________State _________ Zip Code ____________ Phone___________________________________Fax_______________________________ Membership (check all that apply): INLA MRTF None

Rates after deadlines above: Members: $185 / Nonmember: $235

SAvE WITH THE NEW EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION Hurry! Must Register by November 30

If for any reason you are unable to attend, all registration fees will be considered a donation to the MRTF and INLA, not-for-profit organizations.

1-Day Registration

Full Registration

One-day of Education and Trade Show Check the day you will join us.

Both days of education plus Trade Show

Attendee Name

Please include first and last names. List attendee email address below.

(attach copies if more than 5 registrants)

1. email: 2. email: 3. email: 4. email: 5. email:

Early Bird Register by November 30

Pre-Registration Postmarked by December 17 or online by December 19

Member

Nonmember

Member

Nonmember

$125

$175

$155

$205

$125

$175

$155

$205

$125

$175

$155

$205

$85

$175

$155

$205

$85

$175

$155

$205

Additional Costs:

Nonmember $130

Member $130

Thu.

Thu.

Thu.

Fri.

Fri.

Fri.

Fri.

Thu.

Thu.

Thu.

Thu.

Fri.

Fri.

Fri.

Fri.

Thu.

Thu.

Thu.

Thu.

Fri.

Fri.

Fri.

Fri..

Thu.

Thu.

Thu.

Thu.

Fri..

Fri.

Fri.

Fri..

Thu.

Thu.

Thu.

Thu.

Fri..

Fri.

Fri.

Fri.

Free

Free

Free

Free

Free

Early Bird

Pre-Registration

Register by November 30

Postmarked by December 17 or online by December 19

Member

Nonmember

Member

Nonmember

Workshop A: Concrete Paver Installer Certification Course (Wed. & Thu) **

$350

$350

$350

$350

Workshop B: Mental Health First Aid (Wed./pm & Thu./am)

$80

$105

$90

$115

Workshop C: Weed Control Programs for Turf and Landscape Areas (Wed./ pm)

$60

$85

$70

$95

Workshop D: Indiana Accredited Horticulturalist (IAH) Review and IAH Exam (Wed./ pm) *** +

$30

$50

$30

$50

Workshop E: Diagnostic Challenges – Is My Tree Dying and Why? (Wed./ pm)

$60

$85

$70

$95

Workshop F: Pesticide Applicator Training (CORE) / No Exam (Thu.) **** +

(Must register through The education Store @ 765-494-6794)

Workshop G: Pesticide Applicator Training (Category 3b - Turf Management)/No Exam (Fri.)**** +

(Must register through The education Store @ 765-494-6794)

TRADE SHOW ONLY PASSES — First 4 people are $30/ea, the 5th+ are $20/ea. (Only applies if all are from the same company)

$30 FRee! RSVP here

FRee! RSVP here

MRTF Reception (Tue., 5:00 pm, Westin)

FRee! RSVP here

FRee! RSVP here

INLA Membership — complete application on back of this page

see chart on back

MRTF Membership — complete application on back of this page

$160

* Requires proof of enrollment and discount is limited to students studying horticulture, landscape management, turf management, or similar discipline. ** Workshop A is a two-day advanced ICPI course — January 9 & 10. *** Contact INLA office for certification program registrations at an additional cost — 800-443-7336. *** You must register through The Education Store @ 765-494-6794. + You will not be registered for these workshops unless you call the phone numbers as directed in the footnotes.

OR

Complete and fax to: 765-496-6335 Scan and email to: admin@mrtf.org

OR

Pay by Credit Card: Visa, Mastercard, Discover and American Express are accepted at https://www.regonline.com/2019ige Questions call: 765-494-8039

#

Total

$30

INLA Reception (Tue., 5:00 pm, Convention Center)

Complete and mail to: Indiana Green Expo PO Box 2285 West Lafayette, IN 47996-2285

Total

Nonmember $170

Thu.

Attendee # from above

(of an accredited University) *

Postmarked by December 17 or online by December 19

Register by November 30 Member $100

Student

Pre-Registration

Early Bird

Total Amount Due $

Office Use Date Rcvd: _________________ Check/PO#: _______________ $ Amt.: ____________________


MEMbErship

To recieve member pricing for the Indiana Green Expo join either the INLA or MRTF using the form below. Fill out the appropriate section for the organization of your choice and add your membership fee to the registration form on the other side.

INDIANA NURSERY AND LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION (INLA) MEMBERSHIP Sign up my company for: _____ Active Member: Any individual, partnership or corporation engaged in a business or profession closely allied to the nursery industry or who is actively engaged in a wholesale/retail nursery business or actively engaged in a landscape/maintenance business who majority of business is nursery related within the state of Indiana. (See fee chart below.) _____

Associate Member: Any individual, partnership or corporation engaged in a business or profession closely allied to the nursery industry or any individual, partnership or corporation based outside the state of Indiana who is engaged in the nursery industry. $175.00

_____

Affiliate Member: Any individual who is not directly engaged in the nursery industry but who holds a position in education, research, literature, public office or civil service or community group engaged in horticulture activities or any retired active members. $55.00

Active Member Schedule of Dues (Based on the volume of business done in the previous year.) Class A .........$1,000,000 plus ............................ $340.00 Class B .........$500,000 to $1,000,000 .............. $275.00 Class C .........$250,000 to $500,000 ................. $210.00 Class D.........$0 to $250,000 ............................. $175.00 Associate Member ..........$175.00

MIDwEST REgIONAL TURf fOUNDATION (MRTf) MEMBERSHIP MRTF is a 501(C)3 non-profit committed to the support of turfgrass research and education at Purdue University for the betterment of the turf industry. Sign up my company for: _____ MRTF Membership .................$160 To download the complete application, visit www.mrtf.org or contact MRTF at: Midwest Regional Turf Foundation PO Box 2285, West Lafayette, IN 47996 765-494-8039 • admin@mrtf.org Please complete the following and PRINT CLEARLY. For more than one new member, please make copies of this form. Name __________________________________________________________ Company _______________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________________ State _____________________________________ Zip ______________________________________

Affiliate Member............. $55.00

Phone (______) _____________________________________________

To download the complete application visit www.inla1.org or contact them at: Indiana Nursery and Landscape Association 7915 S. Emerson Ave., #247, Indianapolis, IN 46237 800-443-7336 • info@inla1.org

Fax (______) _______________________________________________ Email _____________________________________________________ Amount enclosed $___________

Include this application along with payment and your completed Indiana green Expo registration form to: Indiana Green Expo, PO Box 2285, West Lafayette, IN 47996-2285

Education crEdits All programs are eligible for Indiana Accredited Horticulturist (IAH) and Landscape Industry Certified (CLT-E) continuing education units (CEUs). Other continuing education units requested from this program include: • American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) • Golf Course Superintendents Association of America (GCSAA) • Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute (ICPI) • International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) • Master Gardener Continuing Education Credits (CECs) are available on request. • National Concrete Masonry Association (NCMA) • Pesticide recertification credits for Michigan, Ohio, and Kentucky were also requested.

Total CCH’s requested from the Office of the Indiana State Chemist Sessions Attended

2

3a

3b

5

6

7A

RT

All Lawn Care Sessions * All Golf Turf Sessions * Sports Turf Sessions * All Plant Materials Sessions ** All Installation/Maintenance Sessions ** Production (Friday) Vegetation Management (Thursday) Spanish Session (Thursday) Invasives Session (Thursday) Tree Care (Friday) Turf One Day (Thursday) Turf One Day (Friday) Nursery/Landscape One Day (Thursday) Nursery/Landscape One Day (Friday) Workshop C: Developing Weed Control Programs for Turf and Landscape Areas (Wed.) Workshop E: Diagnostic Challenges (Wed.)

2 1

5 2

10 10 8

3 1

2 1

4 1 2

4 1 1

5 1 2 1 4 1 4

1

3

1 2 3 1

2 3 5 2

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 4 4 4 4

5 2 1 5 3 1 2 5 5

1

4 7.5 4 3 6 3 2 2 3 6 6

5 5 3 1

3

3

3

1

3

* CCH totals include attendance at the Turf Opening Session from 8:30 – 10:00 am on Thursday, January 10. ** CCH totals include attendance at the Landscape Opening Session from 8:15 – 9:30 am on Thursday, January 10.

3 1

2 2 1

3 3


OPPOrtunItIES Exhibit at IGE! There’s still time to reserve a booth. The two-day trade

show provides the perfect atmosphere for turf, lawn and landscape professionals to meet with vendors and view the newest products and technology. Trade Show features: • 150+ exhibitors • Over 2,000 visitors • New Product Showcase • Trade Show Lounge in center of exhibitor hall To learn more go to www.indianagreenexpo.com and download the exhibitor packet or call Rick Haggard at 800-443-7336. Reserve your booth by December 8 to be included in the IGE Show Program.

Advertise in the Indiana Green Expo Show Program

2019 Educational Program and Trad January 9–11, 2019 | www.Indiana GreenExpo.com

Distributed to over 2,000 Expo attendees, the Show Program contains all the details about the Expo including detailed exhibitor information. People rely on this pocketsized program to guides them through three action-packed Expo days. Great way for companies, whether exhibitors or not, to heighten their presence among attendees. Reasonably-priced color and black/white ad options available. For ad pricing, visit the Indiana Green Expo website — www.indianagreenexpo.com or contact Mary Breidenbach at mary@ecumulus.com.

e Show

|

Developing a

Plan for Grow th

@

TRADE SHOW HOURS January 10: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm January 11: 9:00 am – 1:00 pm NEW PRODUcT SHOWcASE See products on pages 37–38. ANNUAl lANDScAPE cHAll ENGE Thursday, 10:30 am – 2:30 pm Trade Show Floor AWARD REcEPTIONS — INlA & MRTF Thursday, January 10, 5:00 – 7:00 pm

SPonSorS:

ExPo PrESEnTEd by:

#IGE19

9

Additional Opportunities for Exhibitors NEw PRoDucT SHowcaSE Bring attention to your special products during the show by entering them in the New Product Showcase — a special area of the trade show floor. Items are also highlighted in a special section of the show program. Visit www.indianagreenexpo.com for more information. SPoNSoRSHIPS There are many levels of sponsorships to choose from. All will increase your exposure but more importantly show your support for a strong Indiana green industry. Learn more about sponsorship opportunities at www.indianagreenexpo.com.


9

indianaGreenexpo.com

Educational Program & Trade Show education: January 9–11 / trade show: January 10 & 11

reGister early & save early BirD deadline: November 30, 2018 Pre-reGistration deadline: Mail by December 17, 2018 Online by December 19, 2018

@

who shoulD attenD? Business Leaders Garden Centers Landscape Management Golf Course Superintendents Turf Managers Grounds Managers Lawn Care Professionals Arborists Landscape Architects Designers Wholesale Growers Greenhouse Growers

Corporate SpoNSorS

Educators Turf Producers Extension Educators Irrigation Installers College & High School Students interested in the Green Industry Vegetation Managers Master Gardeners Garden Clubs Pesticide Applicators Government Agencies

Developing a

Plan for Growth


November/December 2018

Training & Employment Education & Business

Purdue’s New Immersive Short Courses Address Shortage of Qualified Workees Kyle Daniel, Purdue University As we all know, finding qualified workers in the Green Industry is more difficult than any previous time in recent memory. With unemployment at such low levels, it doesn’t appear this is going to change in the near future. Unfortunately the green industry is not alone in finding employees that are qualified. Due to this shortage of workers, the Indiana Department of Workforce Development is offering grants to employers for up to $5,000 per trained employee who is trained, hired, and retained for six months, up to $50,000 per employer after completing approved training programs. Information about the grant program can be found at www.nextleveljobs.org. To meet the demand for educating leading agricultural industries, Purdue University Extension is developing several short courses that will be submitted to the Department of Workforce Development for approval. These short courses include the areas of landscape management, controlled environment agriculture, crop production, and animal production. The Landscape Management Short Course is an immersive, condensed, intensive entry-level educational experience for personnel in the green industry, as well as those with experience seeking best management practices in the areas of business and landscape management. Topics covered include diagnostic training, best management practices for pruning, planting, plant selection, weed control, hardscape installation and maintenance, and more! Marketing is also addressed, including offering tips and advice on making your organization stand out in a busy marketplace. The Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA) Short Course is an immersive, condensed, intensive entry-level educational experience for personnel in the Controlled Environment industry, as well as those with CEA experience seeking best management practices in the areas of business and horticulture will also find the CEA Short Course useful. The Short Course covers several production systems and associated crops common in CEA production, including greenhouse production systems, vertical farming, hydroponics, aquaponics, high tunnels, and more! Business plans and marketing are also discussed in this program, offering advice on how to help your organization get ahead in a crowded marketplace. Landscape Management Short Course: February 18–22 and February 25–March 1, 2019 More information: www.hort.purdue.edu/landscapemanagementcourse Controlled Environment Short Course: February 4–8 and 11–15, 2019 More information: www.purdue.edu/hla/extension/ceagcourse

Questions about these courses can be emailed to Kyle Daniel at daniel38@purdue.edu.

Indiana Nursery & Landscape News • November/December 2018

13


Education

New Educational Opportunities Landscape Specific Construction Course For the first time, you can take the 10-Hour Construction Course with landscape industry specific education. You and your team will receive the 10-Hour Construction completion course card and a certificate from NALP. The NALP designed/OSHA-approved course provides owners, supervisors, project managers, and field employees with in-depth information on the recognition, avoidance, abatement, and prevention of workplace hazards in addition to information regarding workers’ rights, employer responsibilities, and filing a complaint. For upcoming courses go to http://www.landscapeprofessionals.org/ nalp/safety-risk-management/osha10-hour-course.aspx.

Greenhouse Training Online Courses University of Florida IFAS Extension (UF) offers online training courses designed to help greenhouse workers make better crop management decisions. Fourweek certificate courses available in English and Spanish. More information at: https://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/training/

ICPI Launches Free Concrete Paver Continuing Education Courses

Landscape Industry Certified TechnicianExterior Exam — Available Online, January 1, 2020

The Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute (ICPI) launched three free continuing education courses about concrete pavers hosted online by AEC Daily, one of the largest sources of continuing education for design professionals. The courses are approved by AIA/CES, LA CES™ and other organizations for continuing education credits toward professional licensure. The courses are: • Structural Design of Interlocking Concrete Pavers (ICP) for Municipal Streets and Roadways • Inspection of Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement (PICP) Systems • Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement (PICP) Maintenance

The National Association of Landscape Professionals has announced that beginning January 1, 2020, the Landscape Industry Certified Technician-Exterior test will be available online, enabling anyone to access it from anywhere. This is the only one of the seven Landscape Industry Certified designations that doesn’t offer online testing. Currently, the Landscape Industry Certified Technician-Exterior test is given via a written and hands-on testing that is delivered by 15 state licensee partners. The test is not available in the other 35 states, making it expensive and difficult for every landscape professional to get a TechnicianExterior certification. After extensive review, a panel of experts deemed it necessary to remove the barriers to access and make the testing readily available to everyone. With the change, the hands-on and written tests, which are currently administered in 15 states, will be available until December 31, 2019, but after that time testing will be administered through the National Association of Landscape Professionals using an interactive and secure online platform. The new online test will adhere to the same rigorous standards and will be based on the same material as the current handson and written test. NALP will partner with state and affiliated organizations to promote the Landscape Industry Certified TechnicianExterior testing. People currently pursuing Landscape Industry Certified Technician-Exterior testing should contact the state association they are working with and should complete the testing by December 31, 2019. After that date, they can take the online test through NALP.

To access the courses, designers can visit www.aecdaily.com (link is external) and search for “ICPI.” For additional ICPI resources, designers can visit www.icpi.org/designers.

Quality Michigan Grown Nursery Stock Balled & Burlapped 4’-16’

Colorado Spruce Norway Spruce White Spruce Serbian Spruce Black Hills Spruce White Pine Canaan Fir “Where Quality & Value Prevail!” Concolor Fir Gobles, MI Fraser Fir

1-888-MI-TREES 269-628-4308

Also ask us about:

* Seedlings & Transplants * Cut Christmas Trees, Wreaths & Roping

Website: www.mitrees.com 14

E-mail: info@mitrees.com

Indiana nursery & Landscape association • www.inla1.org


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BOBCAT OF INDY 2935 Bluff Road Indianapolis, IN 46225 866-442-3052

BOBCAT OF INDY NORTH 4489 S. Indianapolis Road Whitestown, IN 46075 317-769-4946

www.bobcatofanderson.com • www.bobcatofindy.com Bobcat ®, the Bobcat logo and the colors of the Bobcat machine are registered trademarks of Bobcat Company in the United States and various other countries. 18-B049

Indiana Nursery & Landscape News • November/December 2018

15


Education

Learning to Maintain Functional Stormwater Management Features A Critical Role (and Opportunity) for Landscape Maintenance Companies Scott Minor, White River Alliance Since the minute humans began altering the landscape, we have impacted our water resources. The scale of those impacts today is more widespread than ever before, even as our dependence on water resources becomes more complicated. In Indiana, for instance, we use more water for energy production than any other state — a quantity issue.1 And for the Hoosiers who get their drinking water from surface sources like reservoirs and rivers, we have to reckon with the fact that over 60% of those sources are considered impaired by the standards set by the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) — a quality issue.2 Most of those impairments are from bacteria loads that originate in fecal contamination. Incidentally, those are the same waters we like to recreate in.

How did we get here? One way to put it is that we have traded long-term resource security for short-term expediency. Our transportation system is highly efficient, with its roads and parking lots; yard maintenance comes down to the easy cultivation of lawns, America’s largest crop3; and development projects are rarely asked to place much value on the natural systems they replace or impact. Each of these practices externalize the costs of stormwater management. All those roads and parking lots push enormous quantities of polluted water into our waterways; those yards shed fertilizer, pet poo, and other chemical pollutants; and all of those wetlands and forests lost to development took with them the landscape’s capacity to soak up and filter stormwater. There are regulations to address runoff and pollution, but it’s pretty clear that they are insufficient to the task. Want proof? Ask a water utility about the cost of treating surface water for drinking water. It’s going to get expensive … soon.4 And all of this is occurring at an accelerated rate when the onset of a changing climate is predicted to bring significantly more rain than in the past.5 Truth be told, there are a thousand ways our modern lifestyle choices adversely impact our water resources. Landscape professionals play a part in two big ones: sediment and erosion control and residential landscaping (all those lawns). The number one pollutant by volume in Indiana waterways is sediment. The sediment alone impacts everything from habitat conditions to water quality, since that sediment carries with it a cocktail of bacteria, viruses, heavy metals, road salts, yard chemicals, goose poop, and more. Those pollutants largely account for why 74% of Indiana’s waterways do not support full-body recreational contact according to IDEM.6 A large portion of the sediment hitting our waterways comes off of construction sites. And while controlling sediment and erosion is a major aspect of state construction site regulation (Rule 5), it remains a challenge in practice. It is critical that the people doing the work understand how, when, and which erosion and sediment control practices to use. These aren’t the rules of some bureaucratic taskmaster but an attempt to protect our most vital resource. Protecting our water quality and quantity is a landscape-level undertaking. The approach is simple in concept: prevent polluted runoff during construction, and once the site is built out, infiltrate the water where it falls. To that end, green infrastructure best management practices (BMPs) like rain gardens and bioswales have proliferated in the past few years, and they are critical strategies if we want to have any success protecting water resources and restoring critical elements of the water cycle. Thinking about landscaping in terms of the water cycle is vitally important. Infiltration-focused practices not only help recharge our aquifers but also keep polluted runoff from entering our waterways. The simplest way to get stormwater into the ground is (continues next page) 16

Indiana nursery & Landscape association • www.inla1.org

Educational Opportunities Stormwater Landscape Maintenance Training The White River Alliance, in conjunction with local municipalities, designed the Stormwater Landscape Maintenance Training Seminar in order to help homeowners associations, landscape contractors, and land developers understand local maintenance requirements and how to read O&M manuals in order to avoid corrective action. The goal is to maintain properly functioning stormwater treatment facilities in order to prevent flooding, pollution, and other stormwater-related impacts. This routine maintenance will keep infrastructure costs down in the long run. The Stormwater Landscape Maintenance Training Seminar is offered annually in early December from 8:30 am to 3:30 pm. Lunch, snacks, and workshop materials are provided. The Trained Individual Contractor Certification Program This program provides training and testing for those responsible for the management of Rule 5-permitted construction projects in Indiana, also known as a “Trained Individual.” The program is designed to provide contractors with the knowledge to better manage their Rule 5 construction sites and stay in compliance with local stormwater ordinances. Two tracks available: basic and advanced. Both Trained Individual Certification Trainings are offered on the same day typically in late February or early March at the Hamilton County Fairgrounds in Noblesville. The workshop runs from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm. Lunch, snacks, and workshop materials including a manual are provided. For more information go to https://thewhiteriveralliance.org or email info@thewhiteriveralliance.org


through the root channels created by native plants, the backbone of most green infrastructure practices. It probably does not come as a surprise that we can counteract some of the damage we did by eliminating natural landscape features by simply reintroducing them. Take trees, for instance. A study performed by the United States Forest Service found that even a small, 9-year-old Callery pear tree intercepted 67% of the stormwater from a ½-inch rain event (as an aside, let’s avoid using those invasive trees; there are better species that will perform well enough)7. In fact, it is estimated that as much as 65% of stormwater runoff can be managed by strategies within residential developments.8 This is good news when you consider that a one-inch storm on a one-acre parking lot produces about 27,000 gallons of runoff. Plus, the benefits of trees and other plant materials goes beyond stormwater impacts, helping clean and cool the air, raise property values, sequester carbon, provide wildlife habitat, and more. Some communities now require or incentivize new developments to include postconstruction BMPs that incorporate green infrastructure features. But ask any landscape professional what the largest drawback is to green infrastructure, and they are likely to say maintenance. When possession of new developments passes to a permanent owner like a homeowners association, so does the maintenance burden of those BMPs and the legal responsibility to insure the BMPs long-term function. This transition has been handled with varying success, but where it fails, the benefit to our water resources that was tied to those features is lost, and the owner is at legal risk. Understanding what these features are, how they function, and how to maintain them is a critical role (and opportunity) for landscape maintenance companies today. Going forward, professionals that employ practices that guard against soil erosion and utilize the power of native plants will be seen as key players in the fight to protect our water resources. Remember, water is the resource we all rely on to produce our energy, irrigate our crops, wash our clothes, float our canoes, and, of course, quench our thirst. We all take a little piece of the pie when it comes to pollution and ample supply, and we can all assume some responsibility to steward it. As landscape professionals, we are on the frontlines of this challenge. Doing our part is not just smart practice but a matter of professional integrity.

Growing High Quality Plants, People, and Relationships

SERVING GARDEN CENTERS AND LANDSCAPERS SINCE 1978

References 1

https://www.indianachamber.com/news-resources/studies-reports/indianas-water-supply-economic-development/

2

https://www.in.gov/idem/nps/4014.htm

3

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00267-004-0316-2

4

https://msutoday.msu.edu/news/2017/affordable-water-in-the-us-a-burgeoning-crisis/

5

https://ag.purdue.edu/climate/indiana-impact/

6

https://www.in.gov/idem/nps/files/ir_2016_report_apndx_a_rev.pdf

6

https://www.in.gov/idem/nps/files/ir_2016_report_apndx_a_rev.pdf

Annuals Peonies Combo Planters Perennials Grasses Proven Winners® Hardy Ferns Succulents Herbs Vines Now growing Proven Winners® shrubs

USDA Forest Service Research at the Western Center for Urban Forestry, Davis, CA Xiao, Q.; McPherson, E.G.; Ustin, S.L.; Grismer, M.E. 2000. “A new approach to modeling tree rainfall interception.” Journal of Geographical Research Atmospheres, 105: 29173-29188. 7

8

https://wrrc.arizona.edu/publications/water-harvesting/how-trees-can-retain-stormwater-runoff

About the Author Scott Minor is a landscape architect and environmental planner with Empower Results and the White River Alliance in Indianapolis.

Delivery Services POP Materials

Custom Growing

p. 800-948-1234 • f. 877-964-6446 www.millcreekplants.com sales@millcreekplants.com 15088 Smart Cole Road, Ostrander, OH 43061

Indiana Nursery & Landscape News • November/December 2018

17


Community

Indiana’s Top Ten Pests and Pathogens Highlight of Common Problems Reported in Indiana Nurseries in 2018 Ren Hall, Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Entomology & Plant Pathology Every year at the end of the nursery growing season, Nursery Inspectors with the Indiana Department of Natural Resources Division of Entomology & Plant Pathology (IDNR DEPP) put together a “Top Ten” list of their most commonly encountered pests and pathogens.

White Pine Weevil One of the most commonly reported insect pests in Indiana this year was the white pine weevil. White pine weevils favor white pine and Norway spruce as hosts, but they have been reported on up to 20 host species including pines, spruces, and Douglas fir. Adult white pine weevils are about half a centimeter in length with a long rostrum (snout) and irregular patches of rusty brown and white on the wings and body. New adults emerge between late June and September to feed on trees, then burrow into the leaf litter at the base of the trees to hibernate around late October. They resume activity in early spring, moving to the top of the tree to feed on bark near terminal buds. At this time, the adult beetles mate and the females begin to lay eggs in the cavities left in the bark where they feed, depositing a few eggs in each cavity. Each female can lay up to 200 eggs. Eggs take a little more than a week to hatch and then the larvae bore under the bark to begin feeding. Larvae are legless, cream-colored grubs that can grow up to a centimeter in length. They move down the leader as they feed, and eventu-

White pine weevil larva and feeding damage on Norway spruce. Photo credit:

Vince Burkle, IDNR DEPP.

18

White pine weevil damage on Norway spruce. Photo credit: Kristy

Table 1: Top Ten Pests and Pathogens Reported by Nursery Inspectors in 2018 Northern Region*

Southern Region*

Insects

Diseases/Abiotic

Insects

Diseases/Abiotic

Japanese Beetle

Needle Cast

Japanese Beetle

Powdery Mildew

Mites

Leafspots

Mites

Rusts

Aphids

Apple Scab

Aphids

Leafspots

White Pine Weevil

Powdery Mildew

Flea Beetle

Needle Cast

Galls

Botrytis

Bagworm

Botrytis

Thrips

Tar Spot

Scales

Apple Scab

Bagworm

Drought Stress

Lace Bug

Nutrient Deficiency

Leafhopper

Rusts

Thrips

Drought Stress

Flea Beetle

Nutrient Deficiency

Leafhopper

Freeze Damage

Scales

Herbicide Injury

Boxwood Leaf Miner

Leaf Scorch

* The northern half of Indiana is in Hardiness Zone 5, the southern half is in Hardiness Zone 6.

can be found by slicing open symptomatic shoots, and there will be 2- to 3-millimeter circular holes in the stems when adults emerge. With a keen eye, you may also spot evidence of feeding damage by adult beetles in the spring by looking for resin droplets near the top of the tree. White pine weevil damage rarely kills trees, but death of the terminal leader will cause one or more lateral branches to take over, which can cause a crooked or forked tree. Additionally, infested trees become more susceptible to other insect pests and diseases. Control of white pine weevil can be achieved with a combination of sanitation and chemical treatment. For successful control of any pest, understanding phenology (the timing of life stages) is crucial. Infested branches should be pruned off and destroyed when weevils are in the larval or pupal stages (before adults emerge in late summer). Chemical control with insecticides can be effective at controlling the adult stage of the white pine weevil when it is active in early spring and again in Adult white pine weevil late summer through fall.

ally pupate in summer. The pupae form in chambers called “chip cocoons” made of shredded wood fibers, from which the adults emerge to begin the cycle anew. There is one generation of white pine weevils per year. Although the adults also feed on trees, most damage to the host is caused by larval feeding. The larval form tunnels as they move down and around the shoot, and aggregated feeding can cause girdling on affected branches. Symptoms of infestation in early to mid-summer when larvae are present include wilting and curling (“shepherd’s crooks”) on new growth, needles browning, and eventual death of the infested leader and lateral branches near the top. Later in the summer, chip cocoons

White pine weevil pupae (chip cocoons) on Serbian spruce. Photo credit: Ken Cote, IDNR DEPP.

Stultz, IDNR DEPP.

Indiana nursery & Landscape association ••www.inla1.org www.inla1.org

excised from a blue spruce leader. Photo credit: Eric Biddinger,

IDNR DEPP.

(Indiana’s Top Ten Pests continues on page 20.)


Indiana Nursery & Landscape News • November/December 2018

19


Indiana’s Top Ten Pests and Pathogens (continued from page 18) Multiple generations of the Powdery Mildew fungus can occur in one year, One of the most common with many species producing plant pathogens noted by new generations of spores inspectors this year was powevery 4 to 6 days. When dery mildew (it was on every temperatures begin to drop in nursery inspector’s “Top Ten” fall, production of spores stops, list!). Powdery mildew is not Powdery mildew on ninebark. and the fungus overwinters actually a single fungal species. Photo credit: Ken Cote, IDNR DEPP. on dead leaves and plant In fact, there are anywhere debris. Certain environmental conditions from 125 to 300 species of powdery mildew make powdery mildew growth more likely, in a number of different genera depending including warm days and cool nights during on which expert you ask. Thousands of host periods of dry weather as well as crowded plant species are susceptible to powdery host conditions and planting in the shade. mildews, including trees, shrubs, perennials, Cultural and chemical annuals, herbs, succulents, and practices can be used to control grasses. Some species are host-spepowdery mildew. Use resistant host cific and only infect a single plant plant cultivars when possible. Plant species, whereas others can affect host species with enough space many species of plants. All species for adequate air circulation and of powdery mildew are obligate light penetration. Most powdery parasites, meaning they require mildew species cannot germinate host plant tissue to grow. in free water so overhead watering Different species of powdery may help inhibit further infection, mildew look different under a Powdery mildew but keep in mind that many microscope, but to the naked eye on sage. Photo credit: Ren Hall, other plant diseases thrive in wet most appear as powdery white funIDNR DEPP. conditions. Removal of infected gal growth on plant leaves as well host plant material can prevent the fungus as stems, flowers, and fruit. It can form in from overwintering (do not compost plant small dusty patches or cover whole leaves in material infected with powdery mildew). a thick coating in severe infections. Infection Chemical fungicides may be used to protect with powdery mildew can cause stunting, healthy plants from infection with powdery chlorosis, decreased growth rate, decreased mildew, but leaves that are already infected yields, premature leaf death, and disfigured cannot be cured with fungicides. Fungicides and discolored fruit. Severity of damage to typically need to be reapplied at regular host plants ranges from mild (mostly aesintervals throughout the growing season to thetic) to lethal depending on the species. be effective. As with any pesticide, check In spring, powdery mildew spores that the product is labeled for use on the are released from previously infected plant host plant and the disease organism, and material and carried by wind to new hosts. follow all instructions on the label, including The spores germinate and penetrate the safety precautions and dosage. plant tissue within a matter of hours.

Interested in learning about common nursery problems or want to know more about what inspectors are finding in your area? Subscribe to our weekly review at www.in.gov/dnr/entomolo/9413.htm. Questions about pests or pathogens in your nursery? Contact the Nursery Inspector for your county or visit our website, www.in.gov/dnr/entomolo/. About the Author: Ren Hall (rhall@dnr.IN.gov) is the Nursery Inspector and Compliance Officer for the following counties: Benton, White, Warren, Fountain, Tippecanoe, Clinton, Montgomery, Boone, and Hendricks. She joined IDNR DEPP in August 2017. 20

Indiana nursery & Landscape association • www.inla1.org

Business

Easier Digging? Plan on It. Indiana and Kentucky 811

Indiana and Kentucky 811 are pleased to announce two ways to assist in the effective and safe implementation of largescale excavation projects, or any job that requires extensive or complex design and engineering. The Design Tool or Design Tool Inquiry, is a great early step and starting point. It must be completed online, and there are no restrictions on linear feet. This is a way to informally exchange planning information between you and member facility operators in the area in which you are planning a project. It is then up to you if and when you contact each of these operators, and how you then exchange facility information with them. The Design Ticket, on the other hand, is a more specific and formal process, and works best after a Design Tool Inquiry has been submitted. Like other formal locate requests, the Design Ticket may be completed online or by phone. It is restricted by the same linear footage limits as a standard dig ticket, and member facility operators have 10 full working days to respond. Keep in mind, though, that with either a Design Tool Inquiry or Design Ticket, a traditional locate request must still be submitted before digging with care. These two initiatives are meant to ease the complexity of the pre-dig design process, broaden communication channels, and, most importantly, keep everyone digging safely.

For more information on these two new iniatives, go to https://indiana811.org/.


Certification & Education

IAH Quiz

Each quiz will be worth a .5 (one-half) CEU! The Indiana Accredited Horticulturist Committee is pleased to provide you an opportunity to earn CEUs (continuing education units) in each issue of the Indiana Nursery and Landscape News. The IAH quiz offered in each issue can be completed by anyone who is an “Active” (current) IAH (initial or masters). Each quiz will be worth a .5 (onehalf) CEU (continuing education unit) for the completion of the bi-monthly quiz with a pass rate of 80%. Over a 2-year period, you could earn up to 6 CEUs if you take and pass every quiz! The INLA office will grade the quiz. Questions and answers have been provided by the IAH committee. Thank you and good luck studying! The Indiana Accredited Horticulturist Committee Chair - George Brenn, Four Seasons Landscaping Nursery Committee Members - Brian Bunge, LaPorte County Nursery - Gabriel Gluesenkamp, Designscape Hort Services - Wayne Gruber, Niemeyer’s Landscape Supply - Jim Messmer - Melissa Mravec, Allen Landscape - Jodie Overmyer, Price Nurseries

IAH Quiz: November/December 2018 Due: December 31, 2018

Complete the quiz and mail or fax to INLA by the deadline above. Be sure to write your name, IAH number, and contact information on the bottom of the quiz when submitting. If additional space is needed, please attach the extra paper to this form and submit together. Mark your answers. 1. When watering a lawn, it is best to _______ ________ instead of ________ ________. 2. Mower blades may require sharpening more than once each year. T or F 3. _________ is the nutrient primarily responsible for promoting vegetative growth. 4. The best time to fertilize your lawn is in ________. 5. Generally speaking, a “full feeding of lawn food supplies _______ of N per 1,000 sq. ft. 6. Thatch is a layer of dead grass clippings caused by not bagging when mowing. T or F 7.

_______ _________ is the best method of alleviating compacted soils in lawns.

8. Annual grassy weeds are best controlled with a ____ - ________ herbicide which should be applied prior to __________ of the weed seeds. 9. The key to success with any “weed killer” is to apply to ________ ________ ________. 10. Post emergent herbicides are also known as ________ _________. 11. White grubs are the _______ _______ of beetles and chafers 12. The best time to control grubs in turfgrass is when they are _________ , usually within a few weeks after the emergence of _________. 13. Moles eat more earthworms than grubs during any given year. T or F

Interested in taking the IAH Exam? The next exam is scheduled for January 9, 2019, at the the Indiana Green Expo / Workshop D. Details in the IGE Brochure in this issue or online at www.indianagreenexpo.com.

Name:_____________________________________________________________________________ IAH No.:___________________________________________________________________________ Phone:____________________________________________________________________________ Email:_____________________________________________________________________________ Fax: 317-889-3935 or Mail: INLA, 7915 S. Emerson Ave., #247, Indianapolis, IN 46237 Answers: Please contact the INLA office if you would like to receive the answers or find out your results to any previous IAH quiz.

Indiana Nursery & Landscape News • September/October 2018

21


Toolbox Talks

Getting Ready for Winter Work www.safetytoolboxtopics.com Here are some reminders about dressing for the weather and staying strong, healthy, and safe: • Two big concerns of working outdoors in cold weather are frostbite and hypothermia. Both can occur at higher temperatures than many people realize. For example, exposed skin can start to freeze at just 28 degrees Fahrenheit (-2 degrees Celsius) and deep frostbite can cause blood clots and even gangrene. Hypothermia is a potentially fatal condition caused by loss of body temperature, even in winter conditions people might not consider particularly nasty. Symptoms include fatigue, nausea, confusion, lightheadedness, and profuse sweating. Without medical treatment, the victim can lose consciousness and die. • Wear the right gloves for the work you are doing. Gloves should have enough insulation to keep you warm and prevent frostbite, but be thin enough so you can feel what you are doing if you are manipulating controls or tools. Gloves that are too thick can also make your hands and wrists work too hard trying to hold on to objects, causing repetitive strain injury. • Dress in layers of lightweight clothing which keep you warmer than a single layer of heavy clothes. Remove layers as necessary to prevent overheating and perspiring, which can lead to chills or hypothermia later. Remember that wet clothing is 20 times less warm than dry clothing. Wear a hat and you’ll stay much warmer when working in cold conditions. As much as half your body heat can go up in steam off the top of a bare head. Protect your ears from frostbite as well by wearing a hat that will cover your ears, or use ear muffs.

Advertisers Blue Grass Farms of Indiana.................................................12 www.bluegrassfarms.net Bobcat of Indy.................................................................5, 15 www.bobcatofindy.com Brehob Nurseries, LLC.................................outside back cover www.brehobnursery.com Calvin Landscape................................................................22 www.calvinlandscape.com Fairview Evergreen Nursery...................................................7 www.fairviewevergreen.com Indiana Irrigation Co...........................................................17 www.indianairrigation.com INLA Membership Challenge........................ inside back cover MacAllister Machinery Co., Inc............................................19 www.macallister.com Midwest Regional Turf Foundation...............inside front cover www.mrtf.org Millcreek Gardens................................................................17 www.millcreekplants.com Reynolds Farm Equipment.....................................................3 www.reynoldsfarmequipment.com Shade Trees Unlimited...........................................................7 www.shadetreesunlimited.com Tiffany Lawn & Garden Supply..............................................4 www.tiffanylawn.com Unilock................................................................................11 www.unilock.com

• While donning a scarf or muffler might help keep your neck warm in the cold weather, it could also kill you if you work near rotating machinery. Check your winter wardrobe for entanglement hazards such as loose sleeves and dangling drawstrings.

Wahmhoff Farms Nursery....................................................14 www.mitrees.com

• Keep your safety eyewear from fogging up in the cold. Investigate anti-fog coatings and wipes to see if these products are appropriate for your eyewear. If you have to keep taking off your safety eyewear because it fogs up, it isn’t protecting you.

Woody Warehouse Nursery, Inc.............................................6 www.woodywarehouse.com

West Side Tractor Sales..........................................................9 www.westsidetractorsales.com

• Look at the soles of your winter footwear. Your shoes or boots should have adequate tread to prevent slips and falls on wet or icy surfaces. For extremely slippery situations, you can attach clogs or cleats to your footwear. Slow down when walking across slippery surfaces and be especially careful on ladders, platforms and stairways. • Eat winter-weight meals. This does not mean a high-fat diet, but one with enough calories and nutrients to give you the fuel you need. Start with a breakfast of whole grain cereal and toast. • Get plenty of rest. Working in the cold and even traveling to and from work in the winter takes lots of energy. Cold weather can strain your heart, even if you aren’t overexerting yourself, so be sure to pace yourself when lifting heavy objects or shoveling snow. • Traveling? It pays to carry blankets or sleeping bags, matches, candles, a snow shovel and sandbags, a flashlight, and nonperishable food such as cereal bars, in case a winter storm sidelines you in your vehicle. 22

Indiana nursery & Landscape association • www.inla1.org

Looking to purchase existing business Landscape, Lawncare, Tree and Shrub Care, or Irrigation Business in Indianapolis or surrounding counties. Call Jim Calvin, Calvin Landscape 317-247-6316


INLA Member Benefits In an attempt to make your membership of greater value to you and your company, the Membership Committee is happy to present the INLA member benefits. While we hope you find INLA membership valuable for all the education, business, and networking opportunities, I think you’ll agree it sure doesn’t hurt to have a few perks. We are grateful for the many companies both new and returning (M.J. Schuetz, Sunbelt Rentals, and Littler) that have created some very outstanding offers for the INLA membership. Be sure to take advantage of these offers today and make contact with these businesses. They support the INLA and they support a strong Indiana green industry. We hope to keep adding benefits throughout the year and will announce them in the magazine, on the website, and in the eNewsletter as they come available. Have a great year and enjoy the new benefits! Sincerely, Kim Glass, INLA Membership Committee Chair

10% off any new purchases or calibrations Accurate Laser Systems Contact: Bill Rawn, 317-714-2273 brawn@accuratelasersystems.com

Buy an Exmark riding mower and receive $150 off a Stihl or Echo product. Limit one mower. Offer not available for fleet purchases. Bobcat of Indy / Anderson / Bloomington / Indy North bobcatofindy.com

10% discount on container plant orders over $3,000.00. This is an ongoing benefit and not a one-time discount. Cardno Native Plant Nursery cardnonativeplantnursery.com

Littler $100 contribution split between the INEF Scholarship and ILA Frits Loonsten Scholarship after a purchase of a new and/or used vehicle. Applies to purchases at Greenfield location only. Dellen Automotive Family Contact: Linda Mabee 317-462-5591

Littler Dial-A-Lawyer: Free 15-minute consultation with a labor lawyer.

Receive two FREE hours of graphic design work ($170 value) with the purchase of your first print or marketing project of $500 or more (new customers only).

Example: employment practices, handbook, wages, etc.

Five Stones Marketing Contact: Jon Carr 317-344-9499 or Troy Austin 317-344-9296 fivestonesmarketing.com

Littler Labor Lawyer Contact: Alan McLaughlin 317-287-3523

More INLA Member Benefits on next page


Clip & Save

More Member Benefits!

Sunbelt Rentals in Fishers Automatic 10% discount on commercial insurance. Contact us today for quotes on Commercial Business, Bonding, Life, and Personal Lines insurance. M.J. Schuetz Insurance Services Contact: Kim Glass 317-548-3937, kglass@mjsis.com

Receive $100 off an order of $500 or more. Valid at any location in Indiana. Valid to first-time customers only. This is a one-time offer. SiteOne Landscape Supply siteone.com

15% discount on landscaping equipment. Must have charge account. Sunbelt Rentals in Fishers Contact: Loren Gentry 317-849-2119 Loren.gentry@sunbeltrentals.com sunbeltrentals.com

Quality Michigan Grown Nursery Stock

“Where Quality & Value Prevail!” Gobles, MI First-time Customers Truckload Only 10% discount on B&B Trees WAHMHOFF FARMS NURSERY

10% discount off any garden transactions. Applies at all locations: Fishers, Muncie, and Union City

888-MI-TREES or 269-628-4308

mitrees.com

Wasson Nursery Contact: Bob Wasson 317-588-1530

Receive a $500 gift card for future rental equipment, attachments, Stihl, or Scag mowers with purchase of a John Deere compact construction machine. West Side Tractor Sales Contact: Bill Price, 765-447-6933 bprice@westsidetractorsales.com

New INLA Member Benefit Partner Profile

Service First Processing Makes Accepting Credit Cards Simple, Efficient, and Profitable Service First Processing (SFP) is a leading provider of credit card and ACH/ check processing services. We make accepting credit cards simple, efficient and more profitable for your company. NAHAD and SFP have put together a special “members only program” that is guaranteed to reduce your cost of credit card processing while improving your level of service and support.

This new program will enhance your company’s profitability: 1. SFP will provide your company with a savings proposal based on your unique business processing needs and our consultative analysis. 2. This program offers you a 60-day trial period during which you will be provided with the necessary equipment and training.

• Ten percent (10%) Member Rebate • 60-day Trial Period • Equipment Loaner Program • Member help line: 855-632-9862 • Free “AccessOne” Reporting Tool

Service FIrst Processing Contact: 855-632-9862 SFProcessing.com

3. In addition to your initial cost reduction, ten percent (10%) of the net processing revenue that SFP generates from your account will be rebated back to you on an annual basis.

INLA Members can call 855-632-9862 for program information. Service First Processing | SFProcessing.com 4401 N Federal Highway Suite 101, Boca Raton FL, 33431

Additional member benefits will be announced as they come available. Please check the INLA website — www.inla1.org — for most up-to-date list.


WIN!

Two Full Registrations to Indiana Green Expo 2019! (Indiana Green Expo January 9–11, 2019)

How to win

The company that brings in the most new members will win TWO Indiana Green Expo (IGE) full registrations for the January 2019 convention. Full registration to the 2019 IGE includes both days of educational seminars plus trade show entrance — a $350 value! In case of a tie, we will split the winnings — one 2019 IGE full registration to each company.

Ready, Get set, Go! The Challenge runs from July 1, 2018 – November 30, 2018

one new membeR

During this challenge the INLA membership committee challenges each INLA member to bring one new member into the association. We all win if we grow our membership. Let’s build a stronger green industry.

questions? Please contact either Kim Glass, 317-639-5679 or Rick Haggard, 765-366-4994

www.inla1.org

For INLA membership information, online application, and a current list of members, visit www.inla1.og.


brehobnurseries.com

Visit our website to...

· Check current pricing & availability · Create, save & modify plant lists for each project · Email questions to our sales staff · Use your smartphone to download our free mobile app

Westfield 4867 Sheridan Rd | Westfield, IN 46062 317.877.0188 | 877.829.0188

Indianapolis

4316 Bluff Rd | Indianapolis, IN 46217 317.783.3233 | 800.921.3233

Indiana Nursery & Landscape News, November/December 2018  

Training & Employment Issue — Purdue's New Immersive Short Courses Address Shortage of Qualified Workers; New Educational Opportunities; Lea...

Indiana Nursery & Landscape News, November/December 2018  

Training & Employment Issue — Purdue's New Immersive Short Courses Address Shortage of Qualified Workers; New Educational Opportunities; Lea...