Page 1

VOLUME 24, NUMBER 10 $2.00 October 2012

w w w. b u s j o u r n a l . c o m

AT DEADLINE

Ontario Convention Center Names CEO

UCLA Anderson Forecast Predicts Slow Economic Growth The California Forecast In the California Report, Senior Economist Jerry Nickelsburg examines how California’s exports and their volumes affect employment growth in the state. After establishing that exports are an important part of the California economy (if exports of goods were an independent sector, it would be one of the state’s top five),

SMG alongside the City of Ontario announced that Michael Krouse has been named president and CEO of the Ontario Convention Center & Visitors Bureau, effective immediately. In this capacity Krouse will oversee the day-to-day manage-

ment of the facility as well as play a key role in business development, helping to attract new conventions, meetings and events to the premier Ontario continued on page 22 MAIL TO:

What Makes a Top Employee? How to be the Best and Get Noticed!

Three Ways to Put Potential Customers to Work Pushing Your New B2B Product

Pg. 9

Pg. 20

THE REST OF THE STORY

Nickelsburg’s analysis reveals that “while California’s exposure to the international economy is substantial, the sensitivity of the California economy to international risk is only marginally above the national risk.” The current California forecast calls for the state’s unemployment rate to be at 7.9% and within 0.4% of the U.S. rate by the end of the forecast period. The forecast for 2012 calls for employment growth of 1.8%, 1.6% and 2.4% in 2012, 2013 and 2014 respectively. Payrolls will grow more steadily at 1.7%, 1.5% and 2.3% for the three forecast years. The unemployment rate will hover around 10.7% through 2012 and average 9.8% throughout 2013. In 2014, the forecast says the unemployment rate will drop to 8.5%, just shy of a percent higher than in the U.S. Michael Krouse

Special Sections

Pg. 31

ONT Report Finished The following excerpts are all from the report submitted to the Los Angeles City Administrative Officer by Acacia Financial Group, Inc.

The End of China’s Economic Marvel In a companion essay to the two forecast reports, UCLA Anderson Economist William Yu continued on page 13

Campbell Introduces the Defending American Taxpayers From Abusive Government Takings Act

John Campbell

Representative John Campbell (R-CA) has introduced The Defending American Taxpayers From Abusive Government Takings Act, legislation to stop reckless city and county governments from enacting profiteering schemes that seek to cash in on the plight of underwater homeowners through the arbitrary seizure of private home loans. Basing their claims on a rather untenable interpretation of eminent domain authority, local governments around the country have entered into agreements by which they seek to use federal continued on page 14

regarding Ontario International Airport. Concerned with the decline in passenger traffic at the airport (from 7.2 million in 2007 to 4.5 million in 2011) and what the city of Ontario sees as a residual effect on the region’s economy, Ontario initiated a dialogue with the City of Los Angeles (city), as well as a media campaign (known as “SetONTario Free”), to promote local control of the continued on page 18


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 2

October 2012


October 2012

BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 3

California Exports: How Much Do They Matter?

EXECUTIVE EXECUTIVE NOTES NOTES RONALD FREMONT NEXT VICE PRESIDENT OF UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT AT CAL STATE UNIVERSITY SAN BERNARDINO Dr. Ronald Fremont, who has a long and successful career in higher education and has served in a variety of important advancement positions, has accepted the position of Cal State San Bernardino’s next vice president of university advancement. He will replace Larry Sharp, who announced earlier in the summer that he would be stepping down from the vice president’s position. All thanked Larry for his exceptional service over the past two years. Dr. Fremont is an experienced and award-winning leader in strategic and campaign communication, advancement administration, publications and media relations, as well as public, community, alumni and governmental affairs. He has worked in higher education for many years, including 28 years at California State University campuses. He joins Cal State San Bernardino from Cal Poly Pomona, where his career has progressed in important administrative positions since 1988. He has been associate vice president for university relations there since 2003, managing the resources and services that have helped Cal Poly Pomona communicate with its various stakeholder groups. He worked closely with the university president on numerous campus-wide initiatives, including advocacy, governmental relations and community relations. He’s a continued on page 7

By Jerry Nickelsburg Adjunct Professor, UCLA Anderson School Senior Economist, UCLA Anderson Forecast Economic forecasts of the California economy ought to generate two important sets of data. The first is the forecast, which would highlight the likely gain or loss in employment, income and other important indicators of economic activity in the coming years. The second is the risk or uncertainty associated with the forecast. The uncertainty in the forecast affects the level of confidence in the accuracy and the range of possible deviations one might expect under less probable scenarios. Over the past year gridlock in Washington, a seemingly intractable crisis in the Eurozone, a double dip recession in the U.K. and a China in transition have all increased the uncertainty in the U.S. economy and consequently, the risk associated with both the California and the U.S. forecast. In the current quarterly U.S. forecast there is a projection of an increase in net exports in 2014; an increase which will finally drive GDP growth over 3% for a sustained period of time. But what if the Eurozone were to implode? Not the most likely future, but not out of the question either. In this California report we examine just how much the export of goods matters to California’s economic growth to get a sense of how to judge this forecast risk. Our findings are first, continued on page 13 that this is an important risk to con-

Internet Service Providers Serving the I. E. Ranked Alphabetically Company Name Address City, State, Zip.

E-mail Address Web Site Address

# Subscribers I.E. Year Founded I.E.

Three Major Services

rstephenson@att.com www.att.com

WND 1976

Wireless, Hi-Speed Internet, Y-Verse Television

gail.kodama@chartercom.com www.charterbusiness.com

WND

High Speed Internet, Phone, Cable TV

Top Local Executive Title Phone/Fax

1.

AT&T 1150 S. Olive St., Ste. 2000 Los Angeles, CA 90015

Randall L. Stephenson President/CEO (800) 750-2355

2.

Charter Business 12405 Powerscourt Dr. St. Louis, MO 63131

3.

Cruznet 215 E. Orangethorpe Ave., Ste. 333 Fullerton, CA 92832

hostmaster@cruznet.net www.cruznet.net

WND 1994

Unlimited Time 56K Dial-Up and ISDN Service, Full Service Web Hosting and Design, E-Commerce, High Speed Corp. Access Services: T-1, T-3 Leased Lines

Shahram Manighalam Director Network Operations (714) 680-6600/680-4241

Earthlink 1375 Peachtree St. Atlanta, GA 30309

presslink@earthlink.net www.earthlink.net

WND

4.

Internet, Web Hosting, T1/T3 Services

Kevin Brand Chief of Consumer Products (404) 815-0770

5.

Inland Internet 27192-A Sun City Blvd. Sun City, CA 92586

info@inland.net www.inland.net

N/A 1995

Unlimited Dial-Up Access, Web Design & Hosting, Business/Personal Accounts

6.

Keyway Internet Services 1030 N. Mountain Ave., Ste. 335 Ontario, CA 91762

support@keyway.net www.keyway.net

2,000+ 1995

Dial-Up/DSL Services Web-Hosting Services T1/T3 Services

David Hievert VP (909) 933-3650/933-3660

7.

Linkline Communications, Inc. 302 S. Milliken Ave., Ste. G1 Ontario, CA 91761

scaster@linkline.com www.linkline.com

10,000 1993

DSL/Hi-Cap Service, Dial-Up Service, Web Page Hosting

Steve Caster VP (909) 972-7000/972-7121

Qwest Communications International 445 S. Figueroa St., Ste. 2920 Los Angeles, CA 90071

lskadsen@qwest.com www.qwest.com

WND

Broadband

8.

9.

Ultimate Internet Access, Inc. 4120 Jurupa St., Ste. 212 Ontario, CA 91761

wzuber@uia.net www.uia.net

10,050 1996

Broadband, Managed Firewall, Hosting

Wes Zuber President (909) 605-2000/605-2900

10.

Vector Resources, Inc. 8647 Ninth St. Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730

info@vectorusa.com www.vectorusa.com

233 2005

IT Consulting and Management, Collaboration, Core & Wireless Networking

Pete Peterson GM (909) 931-1022/931-1633

Gail Kodama Sales Director (626) 430-3352

Nancy Kiren ISP Manager (760) 446-3501

Linda Skadsen President (213) 784-6003

N/A = Not Applicable WND - Would not Disclose na = not available. The information in the above list was obtained from the companies listed. To the best of our knowledge the information supplied is accurate as of press time. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and thoroughness of the list, omissions and typographical errors sometimes occur. Please send corrections or additions on company letterhead to: The Inland Empire Business Journal, P.O. Box 1979, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91729-1979. Copyright 2012 by IEBJ.


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 4

October 2012

I N D E X News and Features What Makes a Top Employee? How to be the Best and Get Noticed Nathan Jamail gives us three things a person can do to be a top performer on any team. These are the most common things said when leaders describe their top performers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Columns The Lists: Internet Service Providers Serving the Inland Empire. . . . . . .

3

Private Aviation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 9

Interconnect/Telecommunications Firms Serving The Inland Empire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

The Doctor is In: Ten Questions to Help You Check the Vital Signs of Your Client Relationships Most doctors firmly believe that certain types of regular screening tests and checkups are essential and help save lives. Andrew Sobel says that annual checkups can play a vital role in your professional health as well—especially with regard to client and customer relationships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Long Distance Companies Serving the Inland Empire. . . . . . . 20

Skills and Experiences Are Irrelevant When Hiring When a candidate shows up on Monday morning, you no longer care about all the things they have done. You only care about one thing, whether or not they can do the job you are hiring them to do. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Copier, Fax and Business Equipment Retailers in the I.E. . . . . 26 Editorial. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5

Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 & 29 Investments and Finance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8

Sales and Client Relationships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Financial Column. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Real Estate Notes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Human Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Leadership Skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Computer Column. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

The “Moneyball” Approach to Business Hiring If you’re building a championship team, you’re gauging how the individual athletes fit together; how their personalities, talents, drive and abilities will mesh to meet the team’s goals. It’s exactly what you need to build a winning corporate team. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Business Pet Peeves. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Restaurant Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Manager’s Bookshelf. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 New Business Lists: County of San Bernardino. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

The Top Meeting Pet Peeves That Plague Organizations Jean Kelley outlines the top five meeting pet peeves to avoid at all costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Vol. 24, No. 10, October 2012 — Inland Empire Business Journal is published monthly by Daily Planet Communications, Inc., 1801 Excise Street, Suite 111, Ontario, CA 19761. (909) 605-8800. Bulk rate U.S. postage paid, Ontario, CA, permit No. 1. Send address changes to: Inland Empire Business Journal, P.O. Box 1979, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91729. Information in the Inland Empire Business Journal is deemed to be reliable, but the accuracy of this information cannot be guaranteed. The management of the Inland Empire Business Journal does not promote or encourage the use of any product or service advertised herein for any purpose, or for the purpose or sale of any security. “Inland Empire Business Journal” trademark registered in the U.S. Patent Office 1988 by Daily Planet Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. Manuscripts or artwork submitted to the Inland Empire Business Journal for publication should be accompanied by selfaddressed, return envelope with correct postage. The publisher assumes no responsibility for their return. Opinions expressed in commentaries are those of the author, and not necessarily those of the Inland Empire Business Journal. Subscription payment must accompany all orders for the monthly journal or annual Book of Lists. Copyright 2012 Daily Planet Communications, Inc.

County of Riverside. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Executive Time Out. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

PUBLISHED BY Daily Planet Communications, Inc.

BOARD CHAIRMAN William Anthony

MANAGING EDITOR Ingrid Anthony

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Mitch Huffman

PUBLISHER’S ADVISORY BOARD Julian Nava, Ph.D., Former U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Barbara L. Crouch, Human Resource Consultant Cliff Cummings, Toyota of San Bernardino

Quotations on Problems It’s so much easier to suggest solutions when you don’t know too much about the problem. Malcolm Forbes No one is more definite about the solution than the one who doesn’t understand the problem. Robert Half All problems become smaller if you don’t dodge them but confront them. Touch a thistle timidly, and it pricks you; grasp it boldly, and its spines crumble. William F. Halsey A great part of this life consists of contemplating what we cannot cure. Robert Louis Stevenson

CORRESPONDENTS AND COLUMNISTS Henry Holtzman

Jerold Panas

Dan Adams

Cary Ordway

Larry Jacobson

Jerry Nickelsburg

J. Allan McCarthy

Nathan Jamail

Brad Remillard

Jean Kelley

Andrew Sobel

Pete Sardon

Andrew Martin

Mike Morrell

J. Allen Leinberger

Bill Anthony

STAFF Travel Editor: Camille Bounds Consultant: Mel Pervais

Art Director: Jonathan Serafin Sales: Mitch Huffman

CONTACT US William J. Anthony

Publisher & Producer

Ingrid Anthony

Managing Editor

Jonathan Serafin

Art Director

williamj@busjournal.com ingrid@busjournal.com jon@busjournal.com


October 2012

BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 5

College Loan Defaults By Andrew Martin, New York Times At a protest last year at New York University, students called attention to their mounting debt by wearing T-shirts with the amount they owed scribbled across the front – $90,000, $75,000, $20,000.

DEFAULTS AT AREA SCHOOLS School Borrowers In Default USC 85 UCLA 113 UC Irvine 58 Cal State Fullerton 191 Chapman University 85 Concordia University Irvine 16 Vanguard University 15 Soka University of America 1 University of Phoenix 35,049

Default Rate 1.6% 1.9% 1.7% 4.1% 2.3% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 18.8%

Source U.S. Department of Education 2009Cohort Default Rate Data

On the sidelines was a business consultant for the debt collection industry with a different take. “I couldn't believe the accumulated wealth they represent – for our industry,” the consultant, Jerry Ashton, wrote in a column for a trade publication, InsideARM.com. “It was lip-smacking.” Ashton says his column was meant to be ironic, but it highlighted undeniable truths: Many borrowers are struggling to pay off their student loans, and the debt collection industry is cashing in. As the number of people taking out government-backed student loans has exploded, so has the number who have fallen at least 12 months behind in making payments – about 5.9 million people nationwide. In all, nearly one in every six borrowers with a loan balance is in default. The amount of defaulted loans – $76 billion – is greater than the yearly tuition bill for all students at public two- and four-year colleges and universities, according to a survey of state education officials. To get the money back, the continued on page 38

EDITORIAL EDITORIAL Putting Money in the Wrong Places With tuition climbing, public universities should curb executive pay, building binges. The average California State University freshman in 2007 paid tuition of $2,772 per year. Incoming freshmen this year are paying more than double that amount – $5,472 annually plus significantly higher unit fees and other mandatory campus costs. In the past decade, the CSU system has increased fees by an annual average of 15 percent – with the heftiest hike, 32 percent, in 2009. Cal State students – often unable to sign up for required courses because of cutbacks – are disappointed that during a tough economic climate the CSU Board of Trustees approved pay increases for several incoming campus presidents. The raises restore a portion of the presidents’ salaries frozen in 2010, according to officials. They contend that the CSU system continues to face significant cuts amid California’s ongoing budget deficits. “We’ve been operating under difficult circumstances,” Brian Jenkins, Cal State Fullerton’s associate vice president of finance, told the Register. “We have had to learn to work more efficiently, with our people continuing to do more with less.” Yet, as tuition increases, so does administrators’ pay, which, at well over $250,000 a year for campus presidents, is already generous. To make matters worse – at least on students – the higher salaries kick in as trustees promise yet another tuition hike if Jerry Brown’s Proposition 30 fails in November. The initiative, an extortion campaign at best, would raise California’s sales tax 7.5 percent from 7.25 percent, and create four higher income-tax brackets for Californians earning from $250,000 to $1 million. For instance, Prop. 30 would impose a 10.3 percent tax rate on incomes of $250,000 to $300,000. That rate currently is paid only by those making at least $1 million a year. Yet our public universities have erected more than $161 billion in buildings – in many instances superfluous structures – during tough economic times. “It really baffles me. We see these new structures being built that are a complete waste,” said Sergio Murillo, a third-year finance student at Cal State Northridge. “I work 20 hours a week and already paid off one of my loans – so, yes, I question what’s going on with this wasteful spending.” California’s public universities and colleges are paying $1.1 billion a year in interest on a combination of construction bonds, according to the state’s independent Legislative Analyst’s Office. That’s more than double the interest tab of 10 years ago. Whether campuses are building as a result of voters approving bonds is beside the point. UC Riverside officials completed a $36 million building in 2010 and planned on putting up another structure – only to realize they didn’t have the funding to run the planned medical facility. Is it possible that taxpayers also cannot afford hefty CSU presidential compensation packages? There is an adamant unwillingness among public universities to change how they do things. Instead of canceling or postponing construction projects, or curbing presidential pay, the public university continues to raise questions about its competence. Reprinted with permission by the OC Register.


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 6

October 2012

MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT Change is a Process, Not an Event Five Tips for Successfully Navigating the “People” Side of Change By Curt Wang Is your organization rolling out a major change? Restructures, mergers, acquisitions, new systems and new business lines are the norm as companies move to respond to a more challenging and increasingly fast-moving, unpredictable business environment. When launching a significant change initiative, one of the biggest mistakes leaders make is to view the change as an event that happens at a single point in time. Accepting and then embracing change is a process not an event. No matter how well you craft your initial announcement to employees, this should be viewed as just one of many conversations to generate employee buy-in, not the end. People naturally have resistance to change; for many, buy-in is a process that may take days, weeks or even months to achieve. Expect immediate buyin at your own risk: at best you may achieve compliance without lasting commitment. Here are five tips that can help you increase your odds of success by focusing on the people side of change. One: Don’t judge individuals by their initial reaction. Give people time to come on board and process the change before judging their willingness to accept the change and be a team player. When making a big announcement on a major

change, recognize that the shock of the news will instantly start minds spinning over the personal ramifications. It is people’s natural survival instinct to immediately focus on the fear of loss or loss of control rather than to appreciate the potential benefits of a change. Don’t be surprised if some initial reactions are quite negative. Some individuals may need several weeks before going through the Kubler-Ross stages of grief: shock and denial, anger, depression, bargaining and acceptance. You may falsely judge that an employee won’t come on board with the change if you observe them while they are in the early stages. However, keep in mind that this does not mean that they will not eventually accept the change once they are able to process it.

you have had weeks or perhaps months to process the change yourself during what typically involves weeks or months of planning meetings.

staff that the change is positive, yet they are not fully committed themselves, messages from the manager will be perceived as disingenuous.

Three: Ask your staff how they feel about the change. When you ask employees what they think about the change, what you are asking is, “Is the change logical from a business perspective?” You may get a very positive response, which may fool you into believing the staff member is emotionally on board. However, one can think the change is rational and yet personally feel very threatened. Asking the staff member what they feel about the change may elicit a very different answer regarding their emotions, allowing you to better understand and address concerns.

Five: Identify and bring key opinion leaders on-board first. In every team, there are opinion leaders outside the ranks of management who other staff members take their cues from. There also are staff members who more quickly accept change or perhaps even embrace it. If you can early on enlist the key people who both embrace change and are opinion leaders, they can help set the tone for the group’s reaction to change.

Two: Realize that much of what you say immediately after making the announcement may not be heard. The shock of learning about major change can start people’s minds spinning. Lost in their own thoughts, people may not be clearly hearing and absorbing important details that you may be communicating. Leaders are always surprised to learn, after making a major announcement loaded with helpful and important information, how little was actually heard. Keep in mind that, as the leader planning the change,

Four: Allow your key managers to have time to process and accept change themselves, before they meet with their staff. Change needs to be cascaded down the organization. Executives need to bring their managers on board and then managers need to bring their staff on board. Because of legitimate fears about controlling news about change, managers often hold meetings with their staff before they have had a chance to process and accept the change themselves. If managers are working to convince their

Paradoxically, moving too fast can make your change initiative take longer. When you don’t take the time to build commitment, people act out of selfinterest and fear, resulting in decisions and actions that can slow down or even sabotage your change efforts. By recognizing that change is a process, you will be in a better position to successfully manage the “people” side of change, significantly increasing the odds of creating successful change. For additional information, please visit www.maketheleapcoaching.com or contact him at 888-848-3130 or curt@maketheleapcoaching.com.

City of Rancho Cucamonga City Council Hosts “Technology in Action” Workshop at Victoria Gardens Cultural Center The City of Rancho Cucamonga City Council will host a community workshop focused on the City’s use of technology on Monday, Oct. 15, 2012 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. The “Technology in Action” workshop will take place at Celebration Hall located in the Victoria Gardens Cultural Center at 12505 Cultural Center Drive. The “Technology in Action” workshop will allow attendees the opportunity to explore booths hosted by various City departments such as Police, Fire, Library, and Public Works Services to learn about how they deploy technology in the work that they do. This interactive, hands-on workshop will allow residents and students to learn about, and experience firsthand, how the City uses state-of-the-art technology daily to serve the community. The event will also feature raffle prizes and special give-away items, and will conclude with a debriefing with City Council and an opportunity for public comment. Participation in the technology workshop is free. For additional information, please contact Lori Sassoon, Deputy City Manager/Administrative Services, at (909) 477-2700, Extension 2400.


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 7

October 2012

Larry Rose Takes Over as Dean at CSUSB Summer, it seems, is the season for change, and change came in the shape of new deans. This fall, Larry Rose took over as dean for the College of Business and Public Administration. At a time when the international reputation of CSUSB’s business college is growing, the university reached halfway around the world to replace retired dean Karen Dill Bowerman. “Larry Rose has a clear vision on how we can capitalize on the burgeoning national and international reputation of our business college,” said Andy Bodman, Cal State San Bernardino provost and vice president of academic affairs. “He brings extensive experience as the leader of an accredited business school.” Larry Rose Rose assumed the deanship for the College of Business and Public Administration in midSeptember, having traveled from New Zealand, where he served as pro vice chancellor (executive dean) of the College of Business at Massey University. “I am excited to head a college at a recognized and proactive university with close ties to stakeholders across the Inland Empire,” said Rose. “This college is well placed to play a major role in enhancing the prosperity of the region.” Rose was a professor and pro vice chancellor of the College of Business at Massey since 2006. Before joining Massey in 1994, he completed a Ph.D. at Texas A&M University. He was a member of the faculty at San Jose State University and the University of Toledo before moving to New Zealand. Rose has advised on new financial product development, served on industry advisory committees commenting on financial market regulation, and founded and served on the boards of two U.S. federal credit unions. He has conducted supervisory exams for U.S. federal credit unions, testified on bank litigation matters and has served on government committees concerning the allocation of research funding in New Zealand.

Executive Notes...

member of the university’s strategic planning committee and the alumni continued from pg. 3 association board of directors. Ron is well versed in the development and successful implementation of a comprehensive campaign, which will be of added importance as the university embarks on its upcoming 50th anniversary. He was a major part of the planning and execution of Cal Poly’s 75th anniversary campaign, and he also is credited with developing the strategy that brought the university several major donor gifts. Ron and his family live in San Bernardino County and he is very familiar with the Inland Empire, as well as the many challenges and opportunities facing the CSU and Cal State San Bernardino. With more than 60 regional and national professional awards to his credit, Ron earned his bachelor’s degree in English from UCLA, his master’s degree in education from Cal Poly Pomona and his doctor of education degree from the University of La Verne. PRESIDING JUDGE TAKES

continued on page 21


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 8

October 2012

DUFF & PHELPS/INLAND EMPIRE BUSINESS JOURNAL STOCK CHART THE GAINERS

THE LOSERS

Top five, by percentage

Company

Current Close

Physicians Formula Holdings Inc. (H) 4.88 Provident Financial Holdings Inc. (H) 14.06 Outdoor Channel Holdings, Inc. 7.20 Watson Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (H) 83.90 CVB Financial Corp. (H) 12.10

Beg. of Point %Change Month Change 4.26 13.19 6.98 81.35 11.95 Ticker

American States Water Company CVB Financial Corp. (H) EMRISE Corporation Monster Beverage Corporation Hot Topic Inc. Kaiser Federal Financial Group, Inc. Outdoor Channel Holdings, Inc. Physicians Formula Holdings Inc. (H) Provident Financial Holdings Inc. (H) Watson Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (H)

Top five, by percentage

0.62 0.87 0.22 2.55 0.15 9/21/12 Close Price

Company

Current Beg. of Point %Change Close Month Change

Monster Beverage Corporation Hot Topic Inc. American States Water Company Kaiser Federal Financial Group, Inc. CVB Financial Corp. (H)

14.6% 6.6% 3.2% 3.1% 1.3%

8/31/12 Open Price

%Chg. Month

52 Week High

54.70 8.81 43.72 15.40 12.10

52 Week Low

58.94 9.45 43.58 15.28 11.95

-4.24 -0.64 0.14 0.12 0.15

Current P/E

Ratio

-7.2% -6.8% 0.3% 0.8% 1.3% Exchange

AWR

43.72

43.58

0.3

45.40

32.20

17.5

NYSE

CVBF

12.10

11.95

1.3

12.95

7.28

14.1

NASDAQGS

EMRI

0.69

0.69

0.0

0.76

0.35

NM

OTCPK

MNST

54.70

58.94

-7.2

83.96

38.20

30.6

NASDAQGS

HOTT

8.81

9.45

-6.8

10.73

6.44

25.0

NASDAQGS

KFFG

15.40

15.28

0.8

15.74

11.00

19.1

NASDAQGS

OUTD

7.20

6.98

3.2

7.99

5.18

82.1

NASDAQGS

FACE

4.88

4.26

14.6

4.90

2.54

22.7

NASDAQGS

PROV

14.06

13.19

6.6

14.10

8.00

14.6

NASDAQGS

WPI

83.90

81.35

3.1

84.59

55.00

68.4

NYSE

Notes: (H) - Stock hit fifty two week high during the month, (L) Stock hit fifty two week low during the month, NM - Not Meaningful

Five Most Active Stocks Monster Beverage Corporation Watson Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Hot Topic Inc. CVB Financial Corp. Physicians Formula Holdings Inc.

40,637,620 12,830,420 9,974,250 8,809,950 2,392,860

D&P/IEBJ Total Volume Month

78,316,610

Monthly Summary 9/21/12 Advances Declines Unchanged New Highs New Lows

7 2 1 4 0

Duff & Phelps, LLC One of the nation’s leading investment banking and financial advisory organizations. All stock data on this page is provided by Duff & Phelps, LLC from sources deemed reliable. No recommendation is intended or implied. (310) 689-0070.


October 2012

BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 9

SELF-IMPROVEMENT SELF-IMPROVEMENT IN IN BUSINESS BUSINESS What Makes a Top Employee? How to be the Best and Get Noticed By Nathan Jamail In any economy, especially a tough one, thousands of companies are still looking to hire top employees. The real question is how does one become that top employee organizations and leaders are looking to hire? It is not experience, knowledge or background, though all of those are great benefits. Three things a person can do to be a top performer on any team: 1. Do what you love. 2. Maintain a positive attitude 3. Make your boss look good. This is more than a generic statement or a motivational blurb; rather, these are the most common things said when leaders describe their top performers. DO WHAT YOU LOVE Passion is the most powerful motivator of a person or team. More people will follow you, buy from you or promote

you because you are passionate than because you are smart or have experience. Passion can only be created when someone is doing something they believe in or love to do. This does not mean a person must be passionate about the product or service they provide; rather they must be passionate about their actual job responsibilities and serving their clients or team members. A misconception is that passion is a subjective thing to measure. How can the one thing that every top performer has be subjective? It can’t. Either a person has it or not. Everybody has passion—it is an emotion. The question is not whether someone has passion; rather it is, ‘are they doing what they are passionate about?’ If the answer is no, then make a change because without it, a person will never reach their true ability or desires. Action item: Write down

what you love to do from hobbies to activities. Does it relate to what you do in any way? If not, talk to your boss about your passions and ways you can incorporate them into your current role. They will appreciate the top performer you become when you are doing something you are passionate about. MAINTAIN A POSITIVE ATTITUDE Remember this—having a good attitude is as easy as always remembering to smile and take responsibility for everything both good and bad. It is never saying “it wasn’t my fault” or “it’s not my job” or blaming the company or competition for one’s failures. Rather, a person with the right attitude knows to be successful, you must first be grateful. To be the best, focus on how to have more fun and be

better at serving your clients, peers and subordinates. Remove the life suckers and gunslingers that shoot holes in every new idea and new opportunity by saying “it won’t work” or “it has never worked in the past.” Most people will tell another person something can’t be done because in reality they fear they themselves can’t do it. Having the right attitude is knowing you will determine your reality not by what has been done, but rather by what you will do. Action item: take the time each day to approach everyone around you and smile, encourage and expect the same in return. MAKE YOUR BOSS LOOK GOOD Working to please and impress will get a person promoted faster than tenure and continued on page 39

Private Aviation Ranked Alphabetically

Airline Address City/State/Zip

Types of Aircraft

Price

Top Local Exec. Title Phone/Fax E-Mail Address

1.

Air Palm Springs 145 N. Gene Autry Trail, Ste. 14 Palm Springs, CA 92262

Turbo Commander, Cessna 421, Piper Cessna, Helicopter

$750.00/hr $650.00/hr $325.00/hr Government Contract

Cinco Air Charter 7000 Merrill Ave., Ste. 17 Chino, CA 91710

Air Ambulance, Lite Turbo Prop.

$1,250/hr

2.

Ray Quino Director of Operations (909) 393-9036/(815) 301-2821 www.cincoaircharter.com

KMR/Guardian 1150 S. Vineyard Ave. Ontario, CA 91764

Columbia 400, Eclipse, Cessna C-340, Premier

$2,260/hr

3.

Bill Farley General Manager (909) 605-6366/605-6370 www.guardian-air.com

4.

Landells Aviation 69873 Silver Moon Trail Desert Hot Springs, CA 92241

Helicopter, Jets

$1,023.00/hr Varies

Jim Landells General Manager (760) 329-6468/329-7907 www.landellsaviation.com

5.

Threshold Air Charter, Inc. 8352 Kimball Ave., F350-3 Chino, CA 91710

Lite Jet, Mid Jet, Heavy Jet

$2,200/hr $3,200/hr $4,000/hr

Ivan Dodson Director of Sales (949) 463-7093/606-6319 ivan@flytti.com

6.

Western Air Charter 1805-D McKinley Ave. La Verne, CA 91750

Cessna 310, Cessna 421, Air Ambulance

$575.00/hr $850.00/hr na

Ken Smith Director of Operations (888) 662-5613/623-1766 kensmith@westernaircharter.com

Darrell Grosland Director of Operations (760) 322-1104/322-1204 www.airps.com

N/A = Not Applicable WND - Would not Disclose na = not available. The information in the above list was obtained from the companies listed. To the best of our knowledge the information supplied is accurate as of press time. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and thoroughness of the list, omissions and typographical errors sometimes occur. Please send corrections or additions on company letterhead to: The Inland Empire Business Journal, P.O. Box 1979, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91729-1979. Copyright 2012 by IEBJ.


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 10

October 2012

SALES SALES AND AND CLIENT CLIENT RELATIONSHIPS RELATIONSHIPS The Doctor is In: Ten Questions to Help You Check the Vital Signs of Your Client Relationships Many of us use annual checkups to keep tabs on our physical health each year. But Andrew Sobel says checking the vitals of your professional health is just as important. He suggests performing client relationship checkups. Most doctors firmly believe that certain types of regular screening tests and checkups are essential and help save lives. And most of us, no matter how much we despise devoting an hour or more to getting poked and prodded, dutifully go for an annual checkup each year. After all, our health is vital to our overall well-being and happiness. Andrew Sobel says that annual checkups can play a vital role in your professional health as well—especially with regard to client and customer relationships, which are the lifeblood of every business. “In fact, you should absolutely review the ‘health’ of your client relationships on a regular basis,” says Sobel, coauthor along with Jerold Panas of “Power Questions: Build Relationships, Win New Business, and Influence Others.” “Here’s why: Most clients vote with their feet. They don’t tell you they are unhappy—they simply start to give their business to your competitors. Client relationship checkups can help you gauge the health of these relationships, prescribe changes when necessary, and identify ways to further grow them.” Sobel recommends infusing your client health checkups with Power Questions. In his book Sobel explores dozens of questions that light fires under people, challenge their assumptions, help them see problems in productive new ways, and inspire them to bare their souls (which, of course, strengthens the bonds in the relationship). “All business interactions are human interactions,” he says. “And part of being human is acknowledging that you don’t know everything about everything—and that you certainly

don’t know everything about the other person’s needs. Questions help you understand these things more deeply, and they’re an essential tool when assessing the health of client relationships.” When client relationship checkups aren’t performed regularly, the relationships can take unexpected turns. Sobel tells the story of his client, a Fortune 100 company with a longstanding relationship with IBM. “IBM’s then-CEO Sam Palmisano decided to visit my client’s CEO,” tells Sobel. “A week ahead of the visit my client’s relationship manager for IBM called his counterpart to discuss the upcoming CEO summit between their companies. Apparently he did not get a return phone call during that week! The story goes that when Palmisano met with their CEO, he opened by saying, ‘My people tell me we have an “A” relationship with your organization.’ My client’s CEO responded, ‘Well, my team tells me your relationship with us is a “C.” Fortunately, this was a wakeup call for the IBM team to dramatically improve the relationship with Sobel’s client. Within a year, his client told him, the relationship was indeed an “A,” and today the company views IBM as a key trusted partner in operating their business. “IBM is a great company that has been quite innovative in the way it builds long-term client relationships,” says Sobel. “But as this story illustrates, even well-managed firms can dramatically misread the health of a key client relationship! The successful firms I work with all have some type of process in place to determine the health and strength of their

most important client relationships. They seek feedback at multiple levels. They access the client’s views using a variety of channels—through the relationship manager, during senior executive visits, using independent surveys, and in client forums (virtual and in-person).” As the IBM anecdote illustrates, client health “screenings” are necessary when managing client relationships. Here are 10 questions you should ask yourself when you are considering the health of your client relationships: 1. Do you have access? If there were such a figure as a “client relationship doctor,” Lloyds Banking Group Chairman Sir Winfried Bischoff would be the archetype. The former Schroders CEO and Citigroup chairman is a renowned trusted advisor who has calmly and wisely guided hundreds of CEOs through betthe-company transactions and deals. Last year Sobel asked Sir Win, “How do you know when a relationship is not going well?” His first response was, “If it’s taking a very long time to set up a meeting, that’s usually a bad sign!” “Can you actually get in to see important executives in your client’s organization?” asks Sobel. “Some leaders are notoriously busy, and it does take time to get on their schedule. But if you don’t have access, you may not be considered relevant! PS: If you think you have a good relationship, but the client says, ‘There’s nothing going on. It doesn’t make sense to meet,’ that’s still a bad sign. It means they don’t really value your ongoing insight and perspective.” 2. Do you and your client

trust each other to do things without extensive documentation, checks, and controls? Trust is the essential foundation of every long-term relationship. It’s the feeling that the other person will come through for you. It’s the belief that they will meet your expectations. It’s the confidence that they will demonstrate integrity, deliver competently, and focus on your agenda, not theirs. “When trust is present, you don’t need to constantly check up on the other person,” notes Sobel. “You don’t need to put in place endless controls and systems to monitor results. If your client is constantly micromanaging you, then they may not trust you, and you need to find out why.” 3. Does your client openly share information with you? In a healthy, trusting relationship, there is transparency. Does your client give you access to their plans and proposals? Do they freely share information with you, within the constraints of confidentiality? “When you’re a vendor, you get very limited access to information—it’s on a ‘need to know,’ restricted basis,” says Sobel. “When you’re a trusted advisor, your client treats you as part of the inner circle.” 4. Does your client confide in you and bounce ideas and decisions off you? Does your client ever call you up to run a new idea or potential proposal by you and get your opinion? Or do they make important decisions and then call you afterwards? “It’s not reasonable to expect them to discuss everything with you,” notes Sobel. “However, if they have an issue in your domain, and the relationship is a strong one, they continued on page 28


October 2012

BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 11

REAL ESTATE NOTES VOIT REAL ESTATE SERVICES DIRECTS NEW 85,000 SQUARE-FOOT INDUSTRIAL LEASE IN RIVERSIDE Voit Real Estate Services’ Inland Empire office has completed a new 52-month, 85,000-square-foot industrial lease in the Meridian Business Park located at 14530 Innovation Drive in Riverside. The lessee, Spectra Premium, an auto parts distributor, plans to fully occupy the Class A industrial building for its West Coast distribution operations, according to Ryan Miller, an associate in Voit’s Inland Empire office. Miller represented Spectra Premium as the lessee in the transaction. The lessor, GE Capital Real Estate, a premier commercial real estate company with $60 billion in assets globally, was represented by Walt Chenoweth, Frank Geraci, Juan Gutierrez and Patrick Wood of Voit’s Inland Empire office. According to Miller, Spectra Premium, headquartered in Canada, was seeking a high-quality building that could accommodate its distribution needs in order to relocate its West Coast operations from Ontario, CA. “Flight to quality is still underway in the Inland Empire,” says Miller. “Our client had been leasing a distribution center in Ontario, and we were able to assist them in moving to this newer facility, while still taking advantage of the market’s competitive lease rates.” Industrial lease rates will gradually increase over the next 12 to 24 months, Miller says, as the supply of industrial Class A inventory continues to decline. “As lease rates increase, we will see further stability in the Inland Empire industrial market,” Miller adds. WATSON LAND COMPANY LEASES 553,963 SQUARE FOOT INDUSTRIAL PROPERcontinued on page 25

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FINANCIAL COLUMN Owning a Small Business Carries Big Responsibilities By William J “Bill” Cortus, FIC Owning a small business can provide a great sense of accomplishment, pride and freedom. It also carries big responsibilities – and risk—for business owners and their families. Given the day-to-day demands of running a small business, it can be easy for owners to overlook the importance of protecting the true engine of their business: themselves and their employees. No amount of marketing prowess, entrepreneurial spirit, or “elbow grease” can make up for an untimely disability, the loss of a key employee or a lack of business continuation planning. Using appropriate financial strategies to protect one’s small business can help owners strengthen their bottom line and, just perhaps, sleep a little better at night. After all, business owners have a vested interest in protecting their vital investment. Here are some options to keep in mind. Business overhead expense insurance. This insurance helps business owners meet monthly business overhead expenses in the event they are disabled for a period of time. While that possibility may seem remote, statistics paint a different picture. According to the Life and Health Insurance for Education, nearly one in three women can expect to suffer a disability that keeps them out of work for 90 days or longer at some point during their working years. For men, the odds are about one in four. And, one worker in seven can expect to be disabled for five or more years before retirement. Business overhead expense insurance coverage can help keep a business open by paying approved expenses a business owner may incur while he or she is unable to work. This can help preserve client relationships, protect owners from depleting business assets to pay for overhead expenses—such as rents and employee salaries—to help the owner maintain a healthy credit record, and give owners time to recover or make alternative arrangements without the burden of financial worries. Key employee solutions. Small business owners are constantly faced with the challenge of recruiting and keeping good employees. This is especially true of small businesses where perhaps one or two employees have the knowledge and skills that would be extremely difficult for the business to replace. Financial tools exist to help protect businesses in this situation, offering tax savings for owners and rewarding employees who make the business what it is. These solutions include:

Expiration Date: Extended Card Validation (front or back right of card): Name: Company: Address (to send Journal): City, State Zip: Phone: E-mail: Make checks payable to: Inland Empire Business Journal P.O. Box 1979, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91729 For more information, call (909) 605-8800/Fax (909) 605-6688

• Key person life insurance, which protects businesses from the potential financial impact of a key person’s death. • Deferred compensation or salary continuation, which provides a valuable benefit to a key employee without increasing that person’s current income taxes and offers an incentive to stay with the small business. • A split dollar plan, which allows the owner and his or her employee to work as a team to obtain the employee’s life insurance with the cash value from the insurance growing on a tax-deferred basis that can be used as a retirement fund. • Major medical insurance and disability income insurance, which offer important protection for employees in the case of illness or disability. continued on page 17


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 12

October 2012

CLOSE-UP CLOSE-UP A Taste of Napa Valley Has Landed in the Inland Empire The HourGlass Art & Wine Gallery is a one-of-a-kind venue nestled in the heart of Rancho Cucamonga which has added a new level of elegance and sophistication to the Inland Empire. Owner artist, Stephen B. Cooper, along with wife, Diane, are definitely on to something and continue to make a major impact in the I.E. with The HourGlass and their highly favored and long-lived community restaurant of 18 years—the Redhill Bar B Que also located in the city of Rancho Cucamonga. The HourGlass stands unparalleled with captivating fine artworks proudly exhibited by both local and national artists which have been showcased in some of the most prominent art galleries throughout the country. The HourGlass Wine & Art Gallery is widely known for its relaxing ambiance, social gatherings and red carpet events. Several featured acclaimed artists highlighted at The HourGlass Art & Wine Gallery include: Dr. Samella Lewis, world renown author, historian, and philanthropist; Greg "The Glassman" Holder, a former professional athlete, known for his signature style of sand carvings and intricate detail of immortalizing distinct images in glass; Steven James Collins, well known photographer and activist, in collaboration with Dr. Kenneth Morris Jr., the great, great, great grandson of Booker T. Washington and Frederick Douglas (art which focuses on their continued plight to abolish modern day slavery and human sex trafficking). The owner of The HourGlass Art & Wine Gallery, Stephen B. Cooper, is a self-taught artist and is noted for his commissioned art pieces on seascapes, landscapes, as well as his

detailed celebrity oil portraits. After years of postponing his artistic pursuits to focus on his family and career, Stephen B. Cooper has vastly emerged as a reputable artist and has generated quite a buzz within the art community. Nestled in the heart of Rancho Cucamonga, with the beautiful picturesque backdrop of the San Gabriel Mountains, The Hourglass Art & Wine Gallery is also available for weddings, retirement parties, book signings, holiday parties and other events. Visit HourGlass Art & Wine Gallery and enjoy “UnWine” happy hour, wine tast-

12 noon to 12 midnight. Sundays are available for private parties only. For further information regarding The Hourglass Art & Wine Gallery, please contact Diane Cooper at (909)941-9300, or info@hourglass.com.

ings, live jazz, and the inspirational poetry of “Spoken Word.” The HourGlass Art & Wine Gallery is located at 8200 Haven Avenue, Suite 103 (S/W Corner of Foothill Boulevard and Haven Avenue) in Rancho Cucamonga. Hours of operations are Mondays -Thursdays 12 noon to 9 pm, Friday and Saturday

early passion and talent for drawing grew while studying art forms, muscle structure and coloring of horses pictured in books. He created picture after picture until he had perfected each breed—Palomino being his favorite. While studying at Claremont High School his art instructors encouraged his work and there he developed

About Stephen Bryan Cooper Born in 1955, in San Antonio, Texas, Stephen Cooper moved to Pomona, California with his family in 1963. A self-taught artist, his passion for drawing began around age 5 when he asked his father to draw a picture of a tiger. His

his talent for drawing and painting. He studied at the Art Institute of Design in Pasadena which further enhanced his talent and love of art. His natural ability for detail and definition in the characters he drew was remarkable. As a single parent, his focused shifted to establishing his career as a Peace Officer with the State of California and raising his two children. His time for art became less and less, but the passion and talent remained. After several years, now a grandfather and newly re-married, he picked up his pencil and paint brushes and, as if not missing a beat, he began creating masterful pieces. During time spent in Italy in 2007, Stephen observed first-hand the extraordinary works of Michelangelo at the Sistine Chapel in Rome. Being held as one of the most famous art galleries in the world, the artistic wonders left Stephen with a profound sense of what man is capable of achieving. Stephen works in both oils and pastels, blending his colors to creating gentleness in his pieces. He illustrates a variety of subject matters from wildlife, seascapes and landscapes, as well as portraits. He paints beautiful scenes that give insight into himself through his paintbrush and use of color. Currently residing in Rancho Cucamonga, just minutes away from the vast San Bernardino Mountains and rocky shores of the Pacific Ocean, Stephen finds inspiration for his continued beautiful artwork. He is living his dream where he and his wife, Diane, have opened a gallery. The HourGlass Art & Wine Gallery, located in Rancho Cucamonga, will be exhibiting Stephen’s work along with other established and emerging American and international artists.


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 13

October 2012

economic conditions in UCLA Anderson... discusses California... China. In an essay titled, “The End continued from pg. 1 of China’s Economic Marvel,” Yu says that a prognostication the Forecast made last December about China’s economy has proved true. “We predicted that China would experience a ‘hard landing’ and expect that it will be worse than the free fall in the 2008 financial crisis because their stimulus medicine will not work this time.” Yu anticipates that China’s economic hard landing will be on-going through 2013 and that China’s threedecades-long period of rapid growth will end in 2012. Yu explains that the structural change in China’s economic growth was both natural and inevitable; that if China continues its current investment spree, it will delay, but exacerbate, the hard landing in 2013 and 2014; that growth in Chinese consumption is the key to avoiding long-term stagnation; and that China’s GDP growth decline from 10% to 5% will result in a growth reduction in U.S. GDP of only 0.2%. The economy continues to muddle through at a very sluggish pace as it has since the nadir of the Great Recession in mid-2009. In general real GDP growth has been in a 1-3% channel and it is now operating at the lower end of the range. Specifically, we are forecasting real GDP growth of 1.3% in the current quarter and 1.5% in the fourth quarter. Nevertheless, as we get into 2013, growth will ratchet up to above 2% and 2014 could very well put the run rate of GDP growth in excess of 3% as economic activity is buoyed by strength in residential and nonresidential construction and a rebound in export growth. Tepid GDP growth, combined with a structural adjustment in the economy, has caused employment gains to be modest. As a result, the unemployment rate has stayed above 8% for three and a half years. With several quarters of 1-2% growth ahead of us we do not expect the unemployment rate to dip below 8% on a quarterly basis until the first quarter of 2014. Simply put, job growth on the order of 160,000 a month in 2013 will not be sufficient to make any real dent in the unemployment rate. However, as job growth accelerates to 200,000 a month in 2014 the unemployment rate will begin to meaningfully improve. The economy is being held back by a still over-leveraged consumer and that is working to dampen consumption, a slowdown in corporate investment spending, a softer export environment and a pall of policy uncertainty with respect to fiscal policy and regulation. Aside from working off the hangover caused by the debt binge of 2003-07, consumers are being plagued by a decline in real household income. Although the economy can and did grow in the face of stagnant median income in the 2000s, weakness in median income is certainly no help. According to Sentier Research, a new economics consultancy founded by two former Bureau of the Census senior staffers, real median household income has declined by 5% since early 2008 and is still 2% below where it was when the economy bottomed in June 2009.

Housing Rebound As we noted last quarter, the one bright spot in the economy is the long-awaited rebound in housing construction. Led by multifamily construction, housing starts are ramping up from 612,000 units in 2011 to 763,000 units this year and just under one million units in 2013. By 2014, we anticipate that housing starts will be in excess of 1.3 million units. The growth in housing will account for about a full percentage point in GDP growth by 2014. The strength in housing is being underpinned by gradually rising home prices, record low mortgage rates, improved household formations and continued on page 38 modest employment growth.

tinued employment gains in California and second, that the continued from pg. 3 export risk for California is greater than that in the U.S. as a whole, but not much greater. The purpose behind this analysis is to give some perspective on our most-likely-outcome forecast. Since the beginning of this recovery, job growth has been painfully slow. Therefore, downside international risk has the potential of swamping growth and turning California’s current, faster-than-the-U.S. job growth negative. The next section of this article presents our analysis of the importance of exports and changes in export volumes to employment growth in California. This is followed by a retrospective on labor markets and our September forecast. The forecast this quarter is slightly weaker than our previous one. The weakness stems primarily from slower U.S. economic growth due in part to the new European recession. However, qualitatively our outlook for California is unchanged from three months ago. Exports and Jobs in California There is no doubt that exports are an important part of the California economy. Total direct exports of goods from California are 8.1% of the state’s GDP with manufactured computers and electronics accounting for 30% of that total. When we contrast this with the shares of GDP ordered by NAICS sector, what we find is that if exports of goods were an industrial sector by itself, it would be one of the top five sectors in income generation in the state. Some of the direct exports counted in the official statistics include indirect exports from other states, for example copper ores

from Nevada, and some California exports are not counted as they are indirectly exported through other states, such as sophisticated composite structures on Boeing aircraft exported through Everett and Charleston. However, the magnitude and month-to-month changes in goods exports represented by official direct export statistics provides a good measure of overall export-oriented economic activity. Although we will only analyze goods exports in this article, exports of services such as foreign tourism, education of non-U.S. nationals, engineering and consulting services and the delivery of health care services to foreign citizens, represent another significant component of California’s export economy. For the U.S. the value of services exports is about one half that of goods, however there are no state-by-state statistics on services. But it is not the volume of exports as much as how changes in the volume affect employment that is of interest when we examine the risk of our “most likely scenario” California forecast. This is because it is changes in the demand for goods and services that create or eliminate jobs in a dynamic economy. To set this stage, consider export fluctuations during the last two continued on page 19 business cycles. In general, the vari-


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 14

Darrell Mansfield—Blowin’ Harp and Singing the Blues By Pete Sardon Darrell Mansfield originally wanted to be a guitar player and picked up a guitar as a teenager and played it left handed. Having been blessed with a gift of vocal talent, he was attracted to the vocals of his generation and would sing and play along with the recordings of the Beach Boys, The Beatles and other pop groups. That was until he bought the English band Free’s album. Paul Rodger’s vocals resonated with Darrell more than the more popular Mick Jagger as his soulful voice sounded a bit like Aretha Franklin but he was definitely male.(Paul Rodgers later sang with the band Bad Company.) Darrell decided that this style of vocalization was the way he wanted to sing. Darrell Mansfield Simultaneously he was also learning to sing the songs of groups like Blind Faith and The Allman Brothers. At college he was washing dishes in the cafeteria and singing some of these songs when a drummer walked up to him and asked him if he’d like to jam with his group as he thought that he was singing better while washing dishes than the band’s singer was in their performances! After jamming with the band, the original singer was fired and Darrell was hired as their new singer and was doing their vocals while playing either the cowbell or tambourine. It also helped that he had memorized the words to most of the current songs of the day and this versatility made him even more valuable to the band. Their lead guitarist occasionally played harmonica and suggested to Darrell that he try to learn harmonica so that he could focus just on his guitar playing. He gave Darrell his blues harp and simply said, “Play this” as he showed him a couple of blues licks. Darrell said that he began to blow the harmonica and in about 10 minutes he had it down! Darrell was able to see and feel the notes and chords of the harmonica in his head and could actually visualize the sounds that he could make before they were even played—it was as if he was one with this diminutive but powerful Blues instrument. Another ever more serendipitous and unique talent playing the Blues harp was in store for Darrell Mansfield many years later. He related it to me as follows: “I was in Illinois at a gig with Larry Howard and he had an old saxophone player with him. I stood next to the sax player as I wanted to cop some of his licks. At the end of the night we had a long jam and the sax player would play a run and I would mimic it back and he kept going higher and higher and I kept up with him. Finally, the sax player hit one long note. I hit that note with him and I began to run out of breath so I got down on my knees to free up my diaphragm for more air and suddenly began breathing through my nose while blowing the harp with my mouth and found that I could hold the note as long as I wanted! The sax player just looked at me and then the audience and threw his hands up in the air! I had figured out how to do ‘circular breathing’ (very few musicians have this gift—Kenny G is one of continued on page 30

October 2012

Campbell Intro...

taxpayer dollars to seize distressed home loans and fund unconventioncontinued from pg. 1 al loan modifications. The Defending American Taxpayers From Abusive Government Takings Act will preserve and uphold the rule of law, protect the taxpayer from abusive crony capitalism, defend against misguided wealth redistribution conspiracies, and facilitate the recovery of the American housing market. In an astonishingly large and expansive interpretation of eminent domain authority, several local governments have proposed plans to override property rights in a scheme that is specifically designed to make money for over-leveraged cities. Not only will cities and counties benefit from this wealth redistribution plot, private consulting firms purporting to be experts on eminent domain have partnered with local governments in order to profit from this abuse of power, as well. Even more egregiously, the underwriter for the unpaid principal balance in this scheme will not be private financiers, as proponents for the eminent domain plan claim, but the American taxpayer. “There is no question that we need to take steps to assist American homeowners in distress,” said Rep. Campbell, “but, these steps must not undermine rule of law, must not engage in corruptive and abusive practices, must protect the American taxpayer, and must not further degrade the housing market. The eminent domain programs in question are atrocious, corruptive, irresponsible and unconstitutional. We do need to fix the housing sector, but it must be done in a way that does not break the law and does not enrich undeserving, politicallyconnected entities in cities and counties with unsustainable budget deficits.” While the legality of a city or county’s use of eminent domain for this purpose is tenuous and yet to be determined, it is equally unclear if Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac would be guaranteeing or purchasing loans modified through these programs. It is also unclear if non-qualified borrowers will have their modified mortgages held in portfolios or securitized. Additionally, the unsubstantiated nature of these programs present significant risks of corruption, theft, waste and abuse of power. For example, Campbell notes, by the terms of the program, it would appear to be in a city’s financial interest to appraise the properties underlying seized mortgages as low as possible in order to increase their potential profit. Finally, these programs will dramatically hurt the markets they are employed in as they will virtually destroy private lending in these cities and counties for years to come. As an alternative to the eminent domain program, Rep. Campbell and Rep. Gary Peters (D-MI) have introduced H.R. 5940, the Preserving American Homeownership Act. This bill would direct FHFA to establish a program to pilot principal reduction programs for loans owned or guaranteed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The Defending American Taxpayers From Abusive Government Takings Act currently awaits consideration in the House Committee on Financial Services.

Legislation would prevent unconstitutional seizures of distressed home loans by local governments

The Defending American Taxpayers From Abusive Government Takings Act: What It Does: Protects Taxpayers’ Investment: If the seizing of mortgage loans through eminent domain becomes widespread, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will sustain losses of up to 30% in their private-label residential mortgage-backed securicontinued on page 26


October 2012

BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 15

SUCCESS AT WORK I’m Smart! Why Can’t I Get Ahead? 8 Reasons Why Opportunity Never Knocks on Your Door You feel like you do everything right. You work long hours. You’re at the boss’ beck and call. And yet, everyone around you seems to get richer and to gain more success, while you’re stuck in the same old cubicle. Vickie Milazzo explains what needs to change in order for you to reach wicked success. You’re a hard worker. You stay late at the office and never complain. You’re your boss’ go to person on big projects, and you never let him down. You’re always taking on extra responsibility even when your plate is spilling over. And yet, your career trajectory is as flat as a board. Meanwhile, you can’t help but notice the coworkers who put in fewer hours than you but who’ve managed to get themselves promoted over you. Or that friend of yours whose long-shot cupcake bakery idea turned into a huge success. Or the countless wealthy businesspeople featured in the business magazines and blogs you read religiously who seem to have reached even greater success over the past few years despite the down economy. Of course, you’re tired of merely scraping out an existence, but you’ve concluded real success is all about luck, and you just don’t have any. Wrong! Says Vickie Milazzo. She explains that if you want to achieve her brand of wicked success, it’s all on you. Luck doesn’t have anything to do with it. “I guarantee that the successful people you see every day don’t have anything you don’t have,” says Milazzo, author of the New York Times bestseller “Wicked Success Is Inside Every Woman.” “There is no single factor that prevents success or one that guarantees it. If you aren’t driven by your passion or continuously working toward important goals, then of course, you’re going to feel stuck in one place. But when you focus on your goals, plan your steps forward and have a little more faith in yourself, you can achieve wicked success.” The first step, according to Milazzo, is to hold up a mirror and really examine what you’re putting in at work. “Long hours don’t always mean you’re more productive than everyone else,” says Milazzo. “If you are working longer hours and still getting nowhere, it is important to objectively assess the value of your output. “For example, how much time do you spend complaining? Do you have to discuss every issue ad infinitum no matter how small? Are you a high maintenance or low maintenance employee? Are you stealing time from the company to manage your personal life and counting it as work? Figure out how to become truly productive and to continuously make progress toward project goals. The success you seek will follow.” If you’re still stumped as to why success has eluded you, read on as Milazzo explains as few success obstacles and how to get around them. You underprice yourself. You’d love to ask for more money but frankly, you’re afraid to. The economy still isn’t great so I’d better lie low, you reason. This just seems like common sense. But settling for less than you’re worth is a big mistake—even in the wake of the Great Recession. continued on page 28


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 16

October 2012

HUMAN HUMAN RESOURCES RESOURCES Skills and Experiences Are Irrelevant When Hiring A candidate’s ability to apply their skills is what counts By Brad Remillard Just to clarify, the word is “irrelevant.” It doesn’t read “not important.” There is a difference between something being relevant and being important. Of course, having the right skills and experiences are important to performing the job, just not rele-

vant when hiring. Skills and experiences are simply the tools one brings to the job. It is one’s ability to use these tools effectively that counts. Just because you have a hammer and saw in your garage, doesn’t make you a fine finish carpenter.

Since most people have been taught interviewing is about the candidate’s skills and experiences, the interviewer tends to ask a lot of questions about their past. For example, “What have you done in this area?” or “Have you ever done _____?” Those trained in behavioral interviewing will take those same questions and convert them into asking for an example such as, “Give me an example where you have done X” or “Tell me about a time when you had X as an issue.” All of this may be good to know, but the fact is you really don’t care about any of this. When a candidate shows up on Monday morning, you no longer care about all the things they have done. You only care about one thing, whether or not they can do the job you are hiring them to do. That is all you really care about. Nothing else matters anymore. They may have the best skills and all the right experiences, but if they can’t effectively apply them to do your job, then you really don’t care about their skills and experiences. Have you ever hired a person that had all the right skills and experiences? They interviewed well, had all the right answers, their resume read like the job description, and after you hired them they fell flat on their face? This has happened to just about everyone who has ever hired. Why does this happen? It’s usually because the person’s skills and experiences are not primary indicators of their ability to do your job. These are at best secondary indicators and more often than not, misleading indicators. Yet, these are the indicators that most hiring managers rely on. Instead, focus the interview on the primary reason for inter-

viewing which is, “Can they do your job?” The key to successful hiring is having a methodology that puts the candidate in the job BEFORE you hire them. It is not about determining if the candidate has the right tools. It is about determining if they can use those tools effectively to get your job done. This is why behavioral interviewing often falls short. Behavioral interviewing was once a quantum leap forward in how interviewing was performed; however, it too has run its course. Great interviewing is more than getting examples of the past. It is about doing your job. The tag line for behavioral interviewing, “past performance is an indicator of future performance” isn’t always the case. A good hiring methodology shifts the focus from the person’s skills and experiences to how they will use these to do your job. If they can’t use these effectively in your company and your position, then they may be a great person but they aren’t the right candidate. This is why a person with all of the right skills and experiences often falls flat on their face. So how do you put the candidate in the job BEFORE you hire the person? 1. Stop asking questions that start with “have, what, have you, tell me about a time when, etc.” These are all fine to know but they should be used for probing after the example and not for the example. That is a huge difference. The famous, who, what, when, where and why questions are for probing deep and not for opening questions. 2. “How” questions should be used for the opening question. One of the biggest challenges facing hiring managers is getting them to shift to asking continued on page 39


October 2012

BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 17

Owning a Small...

Business continuation and valuation. Having the right insurcontinued from pg. 11 ance in place can help small business owners transition their business to the next generation of ownership. For example, a buy-sell agreement identifies a buyer or potential buyer of a business and the conditions under which the sale will occur. This may help settle estates and provide an income stream to beneficiaries. It also helps establish a fair, reasonable price

for the business and generates an acknowledged business value for federal estate purposes. A qualified attorney can help a small business owner draw up a buy-sell agreement. Once in place, the agreement can be funded through several means, including an arrangement with life insurance or disability income buyout insurance on the owner. Working with qualified professionals, including an attorney, tax continued on page 38 professional and financial profes-

Interconnect/Telecommunications Firms Serving the Inland Empire Ranked by Number of Employees in the Inland Empire Company Name Address City, State, Zip

Employees: Inland Empire Companywide

Year Established in Inland Empire

Offices: Inland Empire Companywide

Major Brands Carried

Top Local Executive Title Phone/Fax E-Mail Address

Verizon 1200 Lakeview Canyon Rd. Thousand Oaks, CA 91362

2,600 25,000

1952

1.

5 3 Headquarters

Adtran, Alcatel-Lucent, Cisco, Nortel

Charter Business 12405 Powerscourt Dr. St. Louis, MO 63131

300+ 16,000

na

2.

6 268

Charter Business Internet, Charter Business Phone, Charter Business TV

TelePacific Communications 9166 Anaheim Pl., Ste. 100 Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730

57 1,200

1996

1 35

WND

3.

Phillip Ross President (909) 945-8218/945-8255 www.telepacific.com

Vector Resources, Inc. 8647 Ninth St. Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730

27 429

2005

4.

1 7

Cisco, Avaya, HP, Aruba, Berk-Tek, Panduit, TE Connectivity

Pete Peterson GM (909) 931-1022/931-1633 ppeterson@vectorusa.com

TW Telecom 3281 Guasti Rd., Ste. 350 Ontario, CA 91761

26 2,850

1993

4 75

WND

5.

Dan Cross Sales Manager (909) 605-5734/456-3650 www.twtelecom.com

Edison Carrier Solutions 4900 Rivergrade Rd. Building 2B, First Floor Irwindale, CA 91706

25 110

1999

1 3

Accent Computer Solutions Inc. 8438 Red Oak St. Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730

24

1995

2

VoIP, Toshiba, Cisco

7.

Marty Kaufman President (909) 481-4368/481-4376 info@teamaccent.com

Business Telecommunications Systems 549 W. Bateman Cir. Corona, CA 92880

20 N/A

1981

8.

1 1

Shoretel, Toshiba, LC Allworx, Avaya, Tadiran

Larry Lavorgna President (951) 272-3100/493-3033 www.bts1981.com

Extenda Communications, Inc. 14141 Covello St., Ste. 6A Van Nuys, CA 91405

20 30

1970

1 2

VoIP, MyIntel, Samsung

9.

Russell Schmidt President (800) 640-2411/(818) 785-6623 cs@teamextenda.com

Phone Systems Plus 12780 Court St., Ste. C Poway, CA 92064

12

1986

10.

NEC, Microsoft, Novell

Ron Kohl President (888) 552-2600/(858) 679-3910 work@psplus.com

Triton Communications, Inc. 663 Brea Canyon Rd. Walnut, CA 91789

12 25

1982

1 2

NEC

11.

Voipcom Inc. 3281 E. Guasti Rd., Ste. 700 Ontario, CA 91761

10

1992

1

12.

Nortel Networks, Toshiba, Allworx, Samsung, VolP System

Inter-Tel Technologies, a Mitel Co. 1251 E. Dyer Rd., Ste. 100 Santa Ana, CA 92705

2 990

1982

13.

0 32

Inter-Tel AVT, Active Voice, Toshiba, Mitel

University Communications 15068 Avenida Flores Chino HIlls, CA 91709

2

1985

1

14.

AT&T, Lucent, Norstar Medridan, Toshiba

6.

2

John Stratton President (800) 201-1452 www.verizon.com Gail Kodama Sales Director (626) 430-3352 gail.kodama@chartercom.com

3,600+ Fiber route mile network for high capacity data transport. Lisa Swenerton SONET, Managed Wavelength, Dark Fiber, Cell Site Backhaul, GM and Wireless Site Development (626) 543-8156 www.edisonconnect.com

Vito M. Tasselli President (909) 594-5895/598-2832 vito@tritoncomm.com Diana Saldivar President (888) 673-6933/(909) 483-1938 sales@voipcominc.com.com Charles Oakley Vice President of Operations (714) 283-1600/283-2600 www.mitel.com Gale Medina President (800) 244-2217/597-7198 gamedina@verizon.net

N/A = Not Applicable WND - Would not Disclose na = not available. The information in the above list was obtained from the companies listed. To the best of our knowledge the information supplied is accurate as of press time. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and thoroughness of the list, omissions and typographical errors sometimes occur. Please send corrections or additions on company letterhead to: The Inland Empire Business Journal, P.O. Box 1979, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91729-1979. Copyright 2012 by IEBJ.


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 18

ONT Report...

airport in the belief that a change of ownership and control would continued from pg. 1 increase the passenger traffic and improve the regional economy. To that end, in December 2011, the City of Ontario presented to the City, through Los Angeles World Airports (LAWA; Department), a conceptual proposal valued at $246 million, to transfer the operations and fee title of the airport to Ontario in return for (1) a $50 million “Transaction Payment” to be paid to the City’s General Fund, (2) assumption or payment of the airport’s $71 million existing bond indebtedness, and (3) repayment of up to $125 million in Passenger Facility Charges (PFCs) to the LAWA using future PFC revenue. The CAO has prepared this report to help identify and analyze the potential options for future ownership, operation, and management of LA/ONT. To assist with evaluation of the operations, the CAO obtained the services of Acacia Financial Group, INC. (Acacia), a financial advisory group selected by way of a competitive process. The Acacia team includes William Blair & Company and AXIS Consulting, Inc., collectively referred to as the “Acacia Team.” Through our review of the information provided by Acacia, LAWA and the City of Ontario, we believe the best course of action would be to pursue an option that would achieve the goals of all parties. While the conceptual proposal by the City of Ontario has limitations, as explained later, it does provide a vehicle in which to open a dialogue between the City and Ontario and pursue commonalities between parties. To that end, we recommend that the City of LAWA explore a potential acquisition by the City of Ontario and/or the Ontario International Airport Authority of LA/ONT, subject to the required FAA approvals. The City should bring together the City of Ontario, County of San Bernardino, Ontario International Airport Authority (OIAA), and other primary stakeholders to discuss common goals in an effort to increase economic growth across the region. All participants could potentially achieve their objectives and goals by consummating a transaction with the City of Ontario and/or the OIAA, and by providing certain financial and operational benefits to LAWA to enhance needed transportation infrastructure at LAX. Though LA/ONT is financially self-supporting, the region’s unique demographics, the airport’s 37 percent decline in passenger traffic between 2007 and 2011; its Cost-Per-Enplaned-Passenger— considered by the industry as an indicator of an airport’s efficiency— being the highest of the region’s medium-hub airports; and reduced revenue from concessions, parking, and rental cars, present LAWA with distinct challenges to the successful operation of LA/ONT. It is within that context that the options for changes in the way the Airport is operated and managed are presented in this and the Acacia Team’s report should be viewed. City of Ontario Proposal for Transitioning Airport to Local Control The Dec. 14, 2011 letter to the LAWA from the City of Ontario, proposed that the operations and fee title to the LA/ONT be transferred from the City of Los Angeles to the City of Ontario. The primary terms of the transfer include: • Paying to the City of Los Angeles’ General Fund a $50 million Transaction Payment, unrelated to the airport’s valuation and not to be construed as a payment for purchase; rather, the payment would be to defray the City’s costs of transferring the airport back to Ontario. • Assuming, or retiring, approximately $71 million in existing

October 2012

bond debt and an other LA/ONT-related financial obligations, including indemnification of any and all liability pertaining to those obligations. • Paying LAWA, in years when the Cost-Per-EnplanedPassenger (CPE) to airlines operating at LA/ONT is $5.00 or less, up to one-third annual LA/ONT PFC Collections up to a cumulative amount equal to the amount of LAX PFC collections contributed to capital projects at LA/ONT (estimated by Ontario to be $125 million). • Entering into an Employee Protection and Transition Services Agreement to protect LAWA employees, including their pension and retirement benefits and obligations, for a minimum period. • Refraining from imposing any operating restrictions, caps, curfew, aircraft type bans on, and any other barriers to, future growth at the airport. • Maintaining all current operating covenants for the airport, as well as terminating or revising the original 1967 JPA. The City of Ontario believes that, by transferring the ownership and management of LA/ONT to Ontario, It would (1) return an economic asset to local control; (2) further the concept of Southern California airport’s regionalization; (3) increase passenger traffic; (4) eliminate a potential conflict of interest; (5) reduce freeway congestion; and (6) allow LAWA to focus its efforts exclusively on LAX. Because the proposal did not contain full details on the proposed transaction, it is difficult to ascertain the total value of the transfer proposal. Conclusion A change in ownership could potentially benefit all interested parties. As one of the goals is to enhance airport regionalization, the City should bring together the interested parties to discuss the common goal of increasing economic growth across the region. All parties can potentially achieve their objectives by consummating a transaction with Ontario and its partners, and by providing resources to LAWA to enhance needed infrastructure at LAX. It is important to also note that in order to ensure a seamless transition of the ownership or management of the airport, consideration must be given to other stakeholders’ (e.g., airlines and air cargo companies) views early in the process and the effect that such a transition would have on their operations. The FAA’s review of the process and its effect on the airlines operating from LA/ONT, as well as the overall compliance with FAA requirements, would also have to be considered. In addition, there may be other concerns (e.g., legal , financial, regulatory, etc.) that may require the services of outside legal counsel, financial analysts, and the regulatory agencies in order to facilitate the sale of lease of the airport to another party. As previously mentioned, as part of any discussion of the transfer, lease, or sale of the LA/ONT, consideration must be given to the $70.57 million bond defeasance and $128 million repayment of the LAX PFCs. In addition, consideration should be given to (i) the airport’s land value and the potential for future growth, when estimating the fair and reasonable valuation of the airport and (ii) ensuring the cost of any city employee protection and compensation program arising from a transaction is not directly or indirectly borne by LAWA or the City. LAWA’s own consultant valuation placed the upper end of the range at over several hundred million dollars. The final value will be determined through negotiations between the parties but should not be less than the fair and reasonable recovery of LAWA’s investment.


October 2012

BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 19

LEADERSHIP LEADERSHIP SKILLS SKILLS Using Fear to Your Advantage in Leadership By Larry Jacobson There you are, standing at the helm of your sailboat in the midst of the worst storm of your life. You hold tight to the wheel as the boat flies off the top of a 30-foot wave. The noise sounds like a wounded animal as it howls through the rigging. All you really want to do is go down below, crawl into a bunk, pull the covers up over your eyes and wish it all away. But then you look at your crew and see them looking at you with eyes as wide as saucers with fear, and you’re jolted back to reality: you’re the captain, the leader. Fear is contagious, and the last thing you need is a team frozen with fear. You need people who are inspired and motivated. Does this sound like the last time you gave a presentation to your sales force? What are you afraid of in your daily business life? Making a sales call to a particularly tough prospect? Having an all-important conversation with someone you work with? Starting your own company? What if you could do these things with new heightened senses? Imagine how those looking to you for leadership will see your prowess. When you’re afraid, whether at sea or standing in front of your co-workers lead-

California...

ing them to the next corporate challenge, you have three choices: • Ignore your fears and hope they go away. In fact they don’t go away, but often come back stronger than before because you haven’t dealt with them. You must address your fears in your personal or business life or they will gnaw away at you until you do something about them. • Face your fears and stand up to them—stare them down and struggle as to who will win. You can try that in 30foot seas in the middle of a storm, but fear will quite possibly win. How many times have you sat in the lobby of a prospect waiting for your chance to give your presentation? Did your fears go away just because you wanted them to? No, because you have to do more than face your fears. • Use fear to your advantage. Embrace your fears. First you must recognize the fear. Don’t deny it. Know you’re afraid. You know what it feels like—that “on your toes” feeling, adrenalin pumping, palms sweating, heartbeat increasing… It’s at this point you must stop and have a little chat with yourself. You have to decide who is going to win here: Fear or you. Then comes the hard part: accepting the fear, letting it

ation in exports from California, driven primarily by variations in the continued from pg. 13 demand for computers and electronics, has been more acute than that for the U.S. In the 2001 recession (2000Q3 to 2002Q1) U.S. exports fell by 16% while California exports fell by 27%. This was because the dot-com/Y2K/internet bust was more than a domestic event with world demand for computers and software plummeting. In the 2008 recession, the drop in the U.S. was comparable, -27% compared to California’s -25%. In the latest recovery period (2010Q1 to 2012Q1) California outpaced the U.S. in export growth 44% to 34%. One of the consequences of any recession is an attempt by firms to become more efficient and drive down costs. Today that means adopting more sophisticated technology, a California specialty. This

in and embracing it. Why should you embrace fear? Fear is nature’s way of making you focus on the task at hand. It sharpens your senses and makes you more alert. And it makes you aware of what could happen next. In the case of this storm at sea, you are indeed focused on how you’re going to get out of this safely. The heightened senses you experience from fear is what many adventurers have learned the hard way. Imagine if you could go through a storm, a sales presentation or a speech to your company with: • More focus • Sharpened senses • More alertness • More awareness By embracing your fears, you are given these heightened skills and senses as a gift. Who wouldn’t want their mind more focused when giving a sales presentation? When you recognize and accept the fear, rather than try to overcome it, consciously remind yourself of your newly elevated senses. Tell yourself, “Yes, I’m afraid, but I know it’s making me sharper so I’m going to do a better job at leading this meeting.” Once you’ve done this consciously a few times, the process will happen by itself. Your brain will

become accustomed to channeling the fear into success. Leaders don’t let fear guide their decisions but rather, they guide the fear. To use fear to your advantage, you must embrace it and know it’s there with you. It’s like that little red devil sitting on your shoulder. He’s along for the ride but you no longer give him any say or any control. You have transferred its power to you. You are more focused, your senses are sharpened, and you are more alert and aware. You no longer have to pay fear the time of day. There has never been a more fearless man in modern history than General George S. Patton who said, “There is a time to take counsel of your fears, and there is a time to never listen to any fear.” We are all afraid of something. The question is what we do about it. Don’t be afraid to embrace your fears. Don’t listen to the wind as it howls through the rigging. Grab hold of the skills fear can provide to you; get behind the wheel and start steering. For more information please visit www.LarryJacobson.com, email Larry at Larry@LarryJacobson.com or call 510-500-4566.

foreign technology and computer systems product demand has been a significant component of the overall tech boom and together with domestic demand for equipment and software has been the engine of growth propelling California, with all of its problems with government, taxation and regulation, to the head of the job growth class in the company of states such as Texas, Oklahoma and Nebraska. But the size and variability of exports raises the question we tackle here. How sensitive is the California economy to changes in the world economy? Elsewhere in this publication, William Yu argues that Chinese growth, if not negative, is in retreat. In many parts of Europe, growth is indeed negative as a double dip recession has set in and the future of the Eurozone remains a risk of our U.S. forecast. As it turns out, California has considerable exposure to China and Europe. Together they make up one continued on page 25


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 20

October 2012

SALES SALES AND AND MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT Powered by Prospects: Three Ways to Put Potential Customers to Work Pushing Your New B2B Product (Without Putting Them on the Payroll!) According to Dan Adams, “traditional” B2B product launches are a thing of the past. And if you’re still relying on them, you’re probably putting forth too much time, effort, and even money. His new e-book explains how to get the most out of your product launches by making your prospects do more of the heavy lifting. (And bonus: They’ll even enjoy it!) In the world of consumer goods, the harder you work, the better your product launch. Makes sense, right? You might assume that the same principle also holds true for B2B product launches…but if so, you’d be wrong. In fact, if your product launches aren’t delivering exciting results, there’s a good chance you’re working too hard. Dan Adams explains. “It’s true: The B2C product launch equation goes out the window with B2B product launches,” confirms Dan Adams, author of the new, free 26-page e-book “12 New Rules of B2B Product Launch”

(www.b2bproductlaunch.com/e book) and president of Advanced Industrial Marketing, Inc. “Compared to end consumers, your B2B buyers are more insightful, interested, rational, and fewer in number. If you don’t put them to work and take advantage of their clearheaded wisdom from start to finish, chances are you’ll end up wasting a lot of time and effort, and your new product launch won’t be what it could be.” Adams knows what he’s talking about. In fact, his proprietary B2B product development process—New Product Blueprinting—is built on a sim-

ilar partner-with-your-prospect principle. But while it deeply involves the potential customer in “early stage marketing,” that’s only part of the story. Adams says your prospects should play a vital role in every stage of your product launch marketing process. “In today’s world, most B2B transactions occur when the customer finds the supplier—not the other way around,” says Adams. “So to a large extent, you can throw the aggressive product pitch out the window and instead focus your efforts on making it easy for prospects to find you, learn about your prod-

uct, do business with you, and eventually, help spread the word about your company.” Here are three ways to start putting prospects to work for you: Tip #1: Be Findable. Think less about helping your sales reps convince prospects. Think more about helping prospects find your product when they are ready. Research by MarketingSherpa (www.marketingsherpa.com) shows that customers now find suppliers—not the other way around—in 80 percent of B2B transactions. “B2B buyers like to continued on page 27

Long Distance Companies Serving the Inland Empire Listed Alphabetically Name Address City/State/Zip

# Employees: I.E. Companywide

# Offices: I.E. Total

Local Contacts: Residential Business Repair

Service Area/ Calling Areas

Local Address

(800) 288-2020 (800) 750-2355

Nationwide

1375 Camino Real, Ste. 120 San Bernardino, CA 92408

Top Local Executive Title Phone/Fax E-Mail Address

1.

AT&T 1150 S. Olive St. Los Angeles, CA 90015

n/a 244,000

2.

Charter Business 12405 Powerscourt Dr. St. Louis, MO 63131

300+ 16,000+

6 268

(888) GET-CHARTER (800) 314-7195 (800) 314-7195

Nationwide (in select states)

7337 Central Ave. Riverside, CA 92504

Dialtone Services LLC 56925 Yucca Trail, Ste. 406 Yucca Valley, CA 92284

1 15

1 2

N/A (888) 483-4020

California

3.

56707 Desert Gold Dr. Yucca Valley, CA 92284

Sprint/Nextel Communications, Inc. 11 301 E. Ocean Blvd., Ste. 2000 55,000 Long Beach, CA 90802

1 140

na

Nationwide

4.

3535 W Tyler St. Riverside CA 92503

5.

TelePacific Communications 515 S. Flower St. Los Angeles, CA 90071

57 1,200

1 35

(909) 945-8180 (909) 945-8180 (909) 945-8180

L.A., Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego Counties

9166 Anaheim Place, Ste. 100 Rancho Cucamonga CA 91730

Phillip Ross President (909) 945-8218/945-8255 pross@telepacific.com

Time Warner Telecom Calif., Inc. 60 430 N. Vineyard Ave., Ste. 150 1,000 Ontario, CA 91764

3 31

(909) 605-5734 (888) 363-2067

Worldwide

6.

3281 Guasti Rd., Ste. 350 Ontario CA 91761

Robert D. Marcus President/CEO (909) 605-5734/456-3650 rmarcus@twtelecom.com

Verizon 140 W. St. New York, NY 10007

5 3

(877) 300-4498 (800) 201-1452 (800) 483-2000

Nationwide

7.

15505 Sand Canyon Ave. Irvine CA 92618

John Stratton President (805) 372-6969 jstratton@verizon.com

n/a 244,600

Randall L. Stephenson President/CEO (909) 884-7861 rstephenson@att.com Gail Kodama Sales Director (626) 430-3352 gail.kodama@chartercom.com Ron Sweetman President (760) 369-1015 www.dialtoneservices.com Dan Hesse CEO (951) 352-6100 dhesse@sprint.com

N/A = Not Applicable WND - Would not Disclose na = not available. The information in the above list was obtained from the companies listed. To the best of our knowledge the information supplied is accurate as of press time. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and thoroughness of the list, omissions and typographical errors sometimes occur. Please send corrections or additions on company letterhead to: The Inland Empire Business Journal, P.O. Box 1979, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91729-1979. Copyright 2012 by IEBJ.


October 2012

Executive Notes...

OFFICE IN SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY continued from pg. 7 Judge Marsha G. Slough will assume the office of the presiding judge of the Superior Court of San Bernardino County effective Sept. 1, 2012. Judge Slough has been a Superior Court judge in San Bernardino County since her appointment by Governor Gray Davis in 2003. She has most recently been the assistant presiding judge while also hearing a daily civil calendar in the San Bernardino District. Judge Slough’s previous assignments included a term as the presiding judge of the San Bernardino County Juvenile Court. Judge Slough received her bachelor of arts degree in 1980 from

BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 21

Ottawa University, Ottawa, Kansas and her juris doctor degree in 1986 from the Whittier College School of Law. Prior to her appointment to the bench in 2003, Judge Slough was a civil trial attorney and has been a member of the American Board of Trial Advocates since 1998. NEWS FROM CITIZENS BUSINESS BANK Christopher D. Myers, president and chief executive officer of Citizens Business Bank, has announced the appointment of the following bank executives: • Robert Rivera to the position of assistant vice president and title manager of the bank’s loan documentation and servicing department in Ontario. Rivera’s professional career incorporates over 23 years of title and real estate experience with a background in underwriting, title and lending operations and customer service. Prior to his appointment with Citizens Business Bank, Rivera was a manager with Lawyers Title Company in their title curative department where he was responsible for managing foreclosures, management and program development. • Nancy Hannah to the position of vice president and payment operations support manager of the bank’s operations management department in Ontario. Hannah’s professional career incorporates over 23 years of banking experience with a background in branch operations, item processing and computer conversions. Prior to her appointment with Citizens Business Bank, Hannah was the vice president of operations for Arrowhead Credit Union, where she was responsible for managing check imaging processes, fraud detection and prevention and card services. • Day Starns to the position of assistant vice president and technical application analyst of the bank’s network support department in Ontario. Starn’s professional career incorporates over 10 years of information technology experience with a background in network support and troubleshooting. Prior to his appointment with Citizens Business Bank, Starns was a network administrator with Hidden Manna Corp. where he was responsible for daily backups, computer maintenance and user support.


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 22

Ontario...

facility. The City owned facility is procontinued from pg. 1 fessionally managed by SMG, the world leader in venue management, marketing and development with a specialty in operations of municipal facilities throughout the U.S. “With his more than two decades of experience, Michael has a proven track record of success in the hospitality and convention center business,” said Bob McClintock, senior vice president operations at SMG. “While working through a rigorous selection process, Michael's experience increasTraycee Mayer ing yearly convention bookings in the City of Los Angeles made him the ideal choice for this position. I'm confident that the City of Ontario will benefit substantially from Michael’s expertise.” Most recently Krouse served as the senior vice president of sales and client services for Los Angeles continued on page 23

October 2012


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 23

October 2012

Ontario... continued from pg. 22 Tourism & Convention Board (LATCB) making him responsible for managing the organization’s meetings and convention sales and client services departments. In that position he also had direct oversight of the Los Angeles Convention Center Citywide Convention Sales.

“The Ontario Convention Center and Visitors Bureau is a well-respected institution, and I am truly honored that SMG and the City of Ontario have entrusted me to build upon their success,” said Krouse. “Having been directly involved with the nation’s 16th largest convention center, I have become keenly aware of the success and reputation SMG has earned at so

many of these venues. I am proud to join their team in helping to grow Ontario's market share.” “Ontario’s economy benefits greatly when companies and groups bring their events to our City, so finding a CEO capable of attracting new business to our area was a key focus in our search for a president/CEO,” said Ontario City Manager,

Chris Hughes. “I feel confident that Michael is the right guy for the job and that together with our longtime partner, SMG, Ontario will experience growth as the region’s ideal location for events and conventions.” Krouse spent over 20 years in a variety of senior hotel sales management positions. He was Interstate Hotels and Resorts vice president of sales and marketing and Hilton Hotels Corporation regional director of sales and marketing – west for more than 13 years. Krouse has a Certified Association Sales Executive (CASE) certification from the Professional Convention Management Association (PCMA), a Certified Meeting Professional (CMP) certification from the Meeting Professionals International (MPI) and has earned the title of Certified Hospitality Marketing Executive (CHME) from the Hospitality Sales and Marketing Association International. Krouse has served as a Board Member of the UCLA Extension Executive Hotel Program and Creativity Advisory Council and Los Angeles Hotel/Motel Association. He is also a member of the Professional Convention Management Association (PCMA), American Society of Association Executives (ASAE), Meeting Professionals International (MPI) and the Convention Industry Council (CIC). Completing Ontario’s dynamic leadership team, SMG is also pleased to announce that Traycee Mayer has been promoted to the position of general manager of the Ontario Convention Center. Traycee has previously worked with SMG at the Long Beach Convention Center and had most recently served as the assistant general manager at the center. Traycee’s depth of experience and familiarity with the Ontario landscape make her the ideal choice to work alongside Krouse.


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 24

October 2012

Darlene Tarnoski—Murrieta Resident and Member of the NAFE Success Up Menifee, NAFE Affiliate Network Wins the NAFE 2012 Women of Excellence ACE Award. The National Association for Female Executives harbors some of the most hard-working, productive, innovative women in the nation and across the globe—women committed to serving and enriching their workplaces, their communities, and the world. Each year in New York, NAFE Women of Excellence Awards honors the achievements and accomplishments of NAFE members in their careers, businesses and communities. Winners are chosen for their vision, courage, compassion, proven success and generosity as demonstrated by how they help other women succeed. This event to present the winners will take place Dec. 13, 2012 at the Yale Club, where more than 200 corporate business executives, influential

community leaders, business time member of the Menifee women and entrepreneurs will Success Up NAFE Affiliate gather for the annual NAFE Network that meets the 2nd Women of Wednesday of Excellence Gala each month at A w a r d s Boston Billie’s Breakfast in New Restaurant in York City to Sun City at honor these win11:30 a.m. ners and learn Darlene is a from their inspirdynamic woman ing stories. who works tireAt this prestilessly for the gious event Women Against Darlene Tarnoski C h i l d will be honored Trafficking nonas the: profit she found2012 Women ed (www.womenagainstchildof Excellence Darlene Tarnoski trafficking.com) ACE Award and is so deserving of this Winner. award. Darlene and her husband, All the members of the Rob, are longtime Murrieta resiNAFE Southwest Riverside area dents. She is a mother and an are thrilled to have a winner for entrepreneur, and also a long-

the 2012 NAFE Women of Excellence Awards, and one that is so deserving makes it even more exciting. Check out her website and you will see why this woman was selected over the large number of nominations received for this category. Below is a description of the award she was nominated for and won: • NAFE Ace Award for a NAFE member who has helped NAFE networks grow and thrive and who has made notable contributions to NAFE and her community. • Also one winner of the NAFE Women of Excellence Award is chosen for each of the following 10 categories and the winners come from all over the U.S. and globally. NAFE is the largest global business women’s continued on page 35


October 2012

California...

quarter of all direct exports from the state. continued from pg. 19 To understand the implications of a slowdown in China and the Eurozone and exports more generally, we need to separate out the effects that are nationwide and those that are particularly Californian. To do this we simulated the California employment model for various scenarios. For example, we estimate, using our U.S. forecast model, that a deeper Euro-crisis than is in our baseline forecast will result in a decline in U.S. GDP growth of from -0.5% to -1.0%. Historical experience suggests that changes in California growth rates are of approximately the same magnitude as U.S. growth rate changes. A -1.0% decline in U.S. GDP is estimated to result in 165,000 fewer jobs in California. The basic model relates changes in employment to the domestic and foreign demand for California goods and services including government, and investment in equipment and software. By incorporating direct exports into the model we are able to ask whether or not California has an unusually high exposure to this risk relative to the U.S. as a whole. The simulations reveal that while California’s exposure to the international economy is substantial, the sensitivity of the California economy to international risk is only marginally above the national risk. To put this in perspective, a 1% decline in U.S. GDP due to a Eurozone collapse and a 20% decline in U.S. exports to the Eurozone, would only result in an increase in California’s unemployment rate of 1.1% and an expected increased differential between California’s unemployment rate and the U.S. of only 0.1%. These results do not negate the fact that California’s exports are

extremely important to the health of California’s labor markets. The 165,000 jobs lost are manufacturing and trade jobs and are of a size equal to the better part of last year’s employment gains. Moreover, the number of jobs lost in California is larger than the simulations would suggest as tourism from abroad and sales of services to foreigners, both important activities in the California economy, would diminish along with manufacturing and the trade in goods. International risk is an important part of our current U.S. and California economy and ought to be viewed with concern. However, historical experience tells us that focusing on the national risk is sufficient in understanding the confidence we put in the likelihood of our California forecast results. Employment Retrospective and Forecast Since the beginning of the recovery in employment in January of 2010, California has outperformed the rest of the U.S. in job creation. That trend continued over the last 12 months. In fact, only Nebraska with, an energy boom, a small labor force, an astounding 6.8% rate of job creation and full employment has outperformed California. In the last three months the geography of job gains in the Golden State have been more widespread than in the past. The bi-furcated economy, divided between the coast and inland, though it still exists, is becoming a little less pronounced as job gains in the San Joaquin continued on page 30 Valley, The Sacramento Delta and

BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 25

Real Estate...

TY TO M. BLOCK & SONS IN REDLANDS continued from pg. 11 Watson Land Company has leased a 553,963-square-foot industrial property to M. Block & Sons at Watson Commerce Center in Redlands. M. Block and Sons is a leading provider of end-to-end supply chain solutions for the retail market. Located at 26597 San Bernardino Avenue, the property will be used for the warehousing, distribution and logistics of third party goods. The building is a part of Watson Land Company’s Legacy Building Series which is an initiative to develop and offer highly flexible, ClassA industrial facilities with distinctive architectural detail. Watson’s Legacy Buildings are designed to offer maximum efficiency and flexibility for both distribution and manufacturing operations. The facility will be LEED-certified with 108 dock high, loading doors and two yard areas at 185 feet. The building is currently under construction with a completion estimated this month. Watson will be working with RGA Architects of Irvine and Millie and Severson General Contractors of Los Alamitos to finalize the design and construction of Watson Commerce Center Redlands. The facility is strategically located in San Bernardino County due to its close proximity to the Los Angeles and Long Beach ports and major population centers of Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino and Riverside counties. Frank Griffin, Peter McWilliams and Jordan Quinn from Jones Lang LaSalle represented M. Block & Sons in the transaction. Watson Land Company was represented by Tom Taylor, Steve Bellitti and Summer Coulter from Colliers International. MEDLINE INDUSTRIES LEASES 148K-SQUAREFOOT FACILITY Medline Industries inked a lease for a 147.7k-square-foot distribution facility in Redlands. Medline, a privately held national manufacturer and distributor of health care supplies and services, plans to fully occupy the building, located at 1455 Research Drive, north of I-10 and east of Mountain View Avenue, for its distribution operations. This is an expansion for Medline Industries, which was seeking additional warehouse space in close proximity to its existing 405k-square-foot distribution center in San Bernardino. This building is a Class A warehouse facility located within a masterplanned business park. Juan Gutierrez, Frank Geraci, Walt Chenoweth, and Patrick Wood of Voit Real Estate Services handled negotiations for the property owner, BlackRidge Real Estate Group/ Verde Realty. Medline Industries was repped by Chuck Belden of Cushman & Wakefield. PATHFINDER PARTNERS SPENDS $10.5 MILLION ON RIVERSIDE APARTMENT PROPERTY San Diego-based Pathfinder Partners LLC has acquired Tuscan Townhomes, a luxury, townhome project in Riverside, for $10.55 milion. The 63-unit ($167.5k/unit) property is located at 11511 Magnolia Avenue north of the 91 Fwy at Pierce Street. Pathfinder and its operating partner, Stratford Partners, plan to implement a $240k program to upgrade townhome interiors, as well as improve common area amenities. Pathfinder specializes in making opportunistic investments in real estate properties and defaulted loans. Tuscan Townhomes, a gated community, was completed in 2009 and is currently fully leased. All units are two-story, twobedroom, two-and-a-half-bath continued on page 30


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 26

Campbell Intro... continued from pg. 14

October 2012

ties held in their portfolios. The legislation will limit the extent to which taxpayer dollars are put at

risk going forward. Defends America’s Retirement Savings: Current and future retirees own significant amounts of private-label RMBS through various investment funds, including those held by public and private pensions, 401(k)s, IRAs, and other savings vehicles. These

Americans do not deserve their retirement savings being diminished to pay for the short-sighted objectives of local politicians, and the legislation will help to prevent these unnecessary losses going forward. Preserves the Rule of Law: The strength of private contracts has helped to provide nearly $14 trillion of mortgage loans to American homeowners. When local governments to use eminent domain to seize mortgages, they are breaking a continued on page 35

Copier, Fax and Business Equipment Retailers in the Inland Empire Ranked by Sales Volume 2011 Company Name Address City, State, Zip

I.E. Sales Volume 2011

Offices (IE) Companywide Headquarters/Yr. Est. (IE)

Employees (IE) Companywide

Products/ Lines

$25 million

1 6 Cypress/1977

40 260

Sharp Copiers, Fax, Color Copiers, Xerox High Volume Copiers, HP Printers

Top Local Exec. Title Phone/Fax E-Mail Address

1.

SoCal Office Technologies 8577 Haven Ave., Ste. 110 Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730

IKON Office Solutions 25814 Corporate Center Dr. Redlands, CA 92374

$22.5 million

2.

1 17 Irvine/1974

95 860

Copiers, Fax, High Volume Duplicators, Color Graphics, Networking Specialists, Lg. Format, Canon, Ricoh, Sharp, Oce, Xerox

Konica Minolta Business Systems 1003 E. Briar Rd., Ste. 120 San Bernardino, CA 92408

$20.7 million

3.

2 91 New Jersey/1965

84 5,000

Konica Minolta Digital Solutions, Black, White & Color

Burtronics Business Systems 216 S. Arrowhead Ave. San Bernardino, CA 92408

$10 million

1

50

4.

Konica, Ricoh, Riso, Hi-speed Duplicators, Wide Format Copiers, Networking Specialist, Minolta Lanier

Dennis Short President (909) 885-7576/388-2124 www.burtronics.com

Caltronics 6229 Santos Diaz St. Irwindale, CA 91702

$10 million

5.

1 3 Irwindale/1995

30 200

Konica Digital Software Solutions

Ryan Geeting Sales Manager (626) 334-0383/969-4421 www.caltronics.net

Innovative Document Solutions 26855 Jefferson Ave. Murrieta, CA 92562

$8 million

2

24

6.

San Bernardino/1957

Scott Crain Vice President, Sales (800) 769-2679/(909) 476-2406 www.socal-office.com Mark Coyle Vice President, Sales (909) 796-5060/796-5065 www.ikon.com Linda Turner General Manager (909) 824-2000/888-1819 lturner@kmbs.konicaminolta.us

Authorized Canon Copier & Digital Products Dealer

Murrieta/1989

Kevin W. Heitritter President (951) 676-8885/461-1194 www.idscanon.com

National Ram Business Systems, Inc. 8949 Rose Ave. Montclair, CA 91763

$6.7 million

7.

2 2 Montclair/1978

32 32

Kyocera, Digital Copiers, Hewlett Packard Printers

Roland Martinez, Jr. CEO (909) 621-9554/621-2891 rjmartinez@rambusiness.com

Advanced Copy Systems, Inc. 571 E. Redlands Blvd. San Bernardino, CA 92408

$5+ million

1

23

8.

Authorized Sharp Copiers Fax Network Printers

Walter G. Ferguson President (800) 442-5333/(909)889-3602 acs.walter@verizon.net

Desert Business Machines, Inc. 42-471 Ritter Cir. Palm Desert, CA 92211

$2.4 million

1 1 Palm Desert/1973

22 22

Savin, Mita Copiers, Xerox, Fax, Lexmark Printers & Typewriters, Neopost Mailing Equipment, Computers & Networks

Integrated Business Solutions 10. 8926 Benson Ave., Ste. 5 Montclair, CA

WND

2 5

2 5

Digital Copiers & Fax Machiness

Office Depot 11. 8160 Day Creek Blvd. Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91739

WND

12 1,200 Delray Beach, FL/1986

WND WND

Xerox Copiers & Printers, Canon Fax, Copiers & Printers, Brother Fax & Printers

Reliable Office Solutions 12. 3570 14th St. Riverside, CA 92501

WND

1 2 Riverside

23 23

Canon, Ricoh, Savin, Okidata, Brother, Xerox, Destroy-It, Computer Supplies

Jeff Eshelman President (951) 682-8800/682-0110 jeff@reliable-05.com

Toshiba Business Solutions 13. 3281 E. Guasti Rd., Ste. 500 Ontario, CA 91761

WND

1 300 Irvine/1998

45 300

Authorized Toshiba Dealer

Gavin Brown Sales Manager (909) 390-1421/390-6280 www.toshiba.com

9.

San Bernardino/1978

Bob Solomon President (760) 346-1124/346-1944 info@desertbiz.com Russell Varing President (866) 204-8021/(909)920-0166 russellvaring@ibssocal.net Roger Amparary District Manager (909) 463-1262 ramparary@officedepot.com

N/A = Not Applicable WND - Would not Disclose na = not available. The information in the above list was obtained from the companies listed. To the best of our knowledge the information supplied is accurate as of press time. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and thoroughness of the list, omissions and typographical errors sometimes occur. Please send corrections or additions on company letterhead to: The Inland Empire Business Journal, P.O. Box 1979, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91729-1979. Copyright 2012 by IEBJ.


October 2012

BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 27

Powered by...

research, analyze, and make rational group decisions,” explains Adams. continued from pg. 20 “You can either make their job difficult or easy by how you choose to conduct your product launch. Easy looks like this: Your B2B prospect does a Google search using his favorite keyword, and a top hit has some content he finds interesting…which happens to be linked to your website. “To make this work, you have to be accessible and interesting,” he continues. “Send out news releases full of content that will appeal to readers (and editors) of online magazines, journals, and blogs. Include both a link to your website and the keywords your prospects will likely use in their Google searches. When prospects search, they’ll find articles that lead them to your website. If your website is packed with interesting presentations, videos, comparisons, etc., they could spend an hour doing the work your sales reps normally do.” Tip #2: Stimulate “Word of Mouth.” A kind word about your product launch from a trusted colleague or expert will be far more convincing than a spiel from your sales rep. Consider these six approaches from Adams’s e-book: • Identify and promote to industry thought leaders. Send product launch information to VIP editors and bloggers. • Promote to people already in groups—e.g., trade shows and conferences—so they can discuss your product. • Seek opinions from industry experts: Commission lab tests…seek evaluations…create advisory panels. • Gain testimonials from respected early adopters. Get advance samples in the hands of willing customers. • Locate the key decision influencers at prospect companies and build relationships with them. • Make it easy for these decision influencers to tell their colleagues about your product with leave-behind presentations and sales aids, e-mails with links to interesting videos, and newsletters and other literature rich in content. Tip #3: Use Their Hot Buttons. Here’s some great news: You don’t have to blindly choose your new product launch message and media mix, and then cross your fingers and hope for the best. You can and should let your prospects help you! To get the message right, Adams recommends uncovering customers’ hot buttons during the same “voice-of-the-customer” interviews you (hopefully) used to help design your new product. “Then, shamelessly use their specific language in your advertising copy—for example, as keywords to attract their Google searches,” he explains. “In fact, my company, AIM, has B2B interviewing software that lets you data-mine customer comments for this exact purpose. And while you’re studying prospects’ language to design your product launch, ask them this simple question as well: ‘How does your company learn about new ideas?’ This will help you understand the media preferences—trade shows, seminars, websites, email, etc.—of your target market so you can optimize your media mix.” If you just put prospects to work with these three steps, will you have a great new product launch? Nope. There’s still plenty of work left for you and your hardworking sales force. But it sure makes sense to let prospects carry much of the load. And here’s the really good news: When you put your B2B prospects to work, they actually like it. “Basically, you’re making it easy for them to do what they naturally do,” notes Adams. “They’re going to research new ideas. They’re going to share their opinions with colleagues. And they’re going to give advice to suppliers clever enough to ask for it. Bottom line: You’ll have a much better product launch when you recognize that your B2B prospects are willing and able to help you with it.” For more information, visit www.b2bproductlaunch.com/ebook.

The end of the legislative session has brought a “mixed bag” of results to our citizens. Both good and bad (unfortunately a lot of bad) bills were passed and sent to the Governor for his signature. Right now, we will continue to play the waiting game – waiting to see which bills the Governor signs into law or vetoes. Below are a few bills that deserve the Governor’s veto pen. AB 889 (Ammiano)—Unionizing Babysitters Across California AB 889 is one of the best examples of a “Nanny State” bill that I can think of from this session. This bill essentially calls for the unionization of moms, grandmas, older sisters, and the neighborhood babysitter; hitting homeowners with wage and hour requirements that currently only apply to businesses. In an effort to come to the rescue of babysitters everywhere, AB 889 steps in and forces excessive standards, dealing with calculating overtime wages, meal and rest breaks, along with sleep periods. In the end, moms and dads in our neighborhoods will have to make sure they hire two babysitters to comply with California law. It looks like our Nanny State is babysitting the babysitters…. AB 1436 (Feuer)—Same Day Voter Registration This bad bill allows people to register to vote and then vote on the day of an election with no proof of identity, no proof of address and no proof of residency. The same day voter will be required to provide a driver’s license or social security number but will still be permitted to vote if the numbers do not match the database. The lack of safeguards in this bill opens the door to greater voter fraud and threatens to disenfranchise those who actively participate in the election process. The integrity of the ballot box is just as important to the credibility of elections as access to it. While the author claims that this “will provide election results that more fully reflect the will of the people,” he seems to ignore the fact that the will of the people has already been made quite clear on this issue. In 2002, Proposition 52 asked the voters of California if they wanted same day voter registration—Proposition 52 failed by a large margin. Today, 71% of voters want to show some form of personal identification when registering to vote. SB 1234 (De León)—Forced Retirement Savings This bill would force businesses to provide a one-size fits all approach to retirement savings managed by our broken state government. In other words, SB 1234 requires businesses to provide retirement savings to their employees regardless of whether a business can afford to offer this benefit. This would result in fewer jobs available because businesses will need to pay for retirement savings instead of hiring additional employees. Again, this will be managed by a California government agency. AB 1081 (Ammiano)—Handcuffing Local law Enforcement AB 1081 will effectively make California a “sanctuary state.” This will undermine the safety of Californians. AB 1081 would put these jurisdictions in direct violation of federal law. While immigration is a federal responsibility, over the years, the federal government has joined with state and local law enforcement agencies to set up effective policies and partnercontinued on page 39


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 28

The Doctor is...

will most likely draw you in before reaching their final conclusions.” continued from pg. 10 5. Are you the first person the client calls when they need something in your area of expertise? “This is an essential litmus test of a healthy relationship: loyalty,” explains Sobel. “If the client views you as interchangeable with other suppliers, then you’re a vendor, and you’ll be subjected to constant price pressure as the client continually shops around.” 6. Are you treated with respect—like an important advisor? This is hard to quantify, but you usually will know in your gut if this is the case. “I had a client who I felt didn’t value me,” says Sobel. “He asked me to help teach his senior partners how to be better trusted advisors to their clients. But ironically, he didn’t want a trusted advisor himself—he wanted an arms-length ‘expert’ who would be at his beck and call. I finished the project and moved on.” 7. Is working with this client a satisfying, rewarding experience for you and your team? Some clients just drain you. They are overly demanding, they check up on your every move, and they basically drive you crazy. “Sometimes, you’re also stuck with a client who is too low in the organization to really appreciate the impact you have,” notes Sobel. “This is not a healthy relationship! Life is too short—if you can’t fix a situation like this quickly, you should get out and double-down on more promising clients.” 8. Is the relationship economically rewarding for you? You could have a great personal relationship with a client, but for a variety of reasons be losing money on the work! “Sometimes, weak profitability is your fault—you have underestimated the scope of the work or underpriced it,” says Sobel. “But sometimes it’s a sign of a client who knows the cost of everything and the value of nothing.” 9. Are you having an impact and helping to improve your client’s business? In the best relationships, you have a clear and positive impact on the client’s organization. You help the client improve their business. “If, for whatever reason, this is not happening—it’s a warning sign,” notes Sobel. “Are you working on peripheral issues that are not really important to the client? Are you stuck too far down in the organization? Is the client ignoring your recommendations? Is your good advice simply falling on deaf ears?” 10. Is your client referring you to friends, colleagues, and other organizations that could use your expertise? Active wordof-mouth referrals, arguably, are the ultimate sign of a good relationship. “Are you getting referrals?” asks Sobel. “Would your client give them to you if asked? How enthusiastically would your client recommend you? A testimonial is one thing—it’s passive—but an active referral is a sign of a very different level of satisfaction and delight with your services!” “Just as you shouldn’t make assumptions about or neglect your own health, you shouldn’t do so when it comes to the health of your client relationships,” says Sobel. “Each year, go through this checklist and rate each of your relationships. Are you weak, average, or strong on each of these 10 points? Better yet, rate yourself and then ask these same questions to your client. Then, compare the answers. Through quality communication and thoughtful power questions, you can strengthen your client relationships and add value to them at the same time.” www.BergmanWindowWashing.com

For additional information visit www.andrewsobel.com.

October 2012

I’m Smart! Why...

“In fact, if you’re in the running for a new job or promotion, it might continued from pg. 15 even cost you the opportunity,” says Milazzo. “When I’m hiring, I actually weed out candidates who underprice themselves because I assume they won’t perform at the level I expect. In my eyes and in the eyes of many other CEOs, job candidates actually lose credibility when they underprice themselves. “Many people mistakenly think they’re doing their employers a favor by not pushing for more or that they’ll be more appealing if they don’t ask for what they’re worth,” she adds. “The bad economy might be the current excuse, but I believe most underpricing occurs because many employees and job candidates just aren’t comfortable asking for what they think they’re worth.” You’re viewed as a commodity. Commodities are easy to obtain and easy to replace. And that’s certainly not how you want to be perceived at your job—whether you’re an employee, a leader, or an entrepreneur. After all, if the people you’re working with know that others share your skill set, they won’t have any reason to pay you more or give you advanced opportunities. They’ll be in control, not you. Do everything you can to ensure that you aren’t seen as interchangeable or dispensable. “Don’t shrink into your chair and become the invisible employee,” advises Milazzo. “Do what you need to do to stand out. Get in continued on page 32 the middle of everything and bring

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BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 29

MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT The ‘Moneyball’ Approach to Business Hiring Expert Offers Tips for Creating Championship Teams Great coaches take into consideration an athlete’s talent and heart when they’re building a team, but they consider group dynamics, too, says entrepreneur J. Allan McCarthy. “It’s not just a matter of getting the fastest, strongest and smartest players on your side,” says McCarthy, an international scaling expert and author of “Beyond Genius, Innovation & Luck: The ‘Rocket Science’ of Building High-Performance C o r p o r a t i o n s ” ( w w w. m c c a r t h y a n d a f f i l iates.com). “If you’re building a championship team, you’re gauging how the individual athletes fit together; how their personalities, talents, drive and abilities will mesh to meet the team’s goals. It’s exactly what you need to do to build a winning corporate team. As Michael Jordan, put it, ‘Talent wins games, but teamwork and intelligence win championships.’ ” In the 2011 film “Moneyball,” Coach Billy Beane picks his players based on analysis and evidence, says McCarthy, who has worked

with hundreds of companies. He doesn’t ever just “go with his gut.” McCarthy provides key points for building a successful, effective team: • Lead with a team, not a group: A team of leaders behaves very differently than a group of leaders. Many companies don’t know the difference. “It comes down to clear goals, interdependencies and rules of engagement,” McCarthy says, Every corporation claims to hire only the best and the brightest but it is evident that getting the best and brightest to function as a team can be a challenge. • Know your goals: McCarthy cites Bill Gates— “Teams should be able to act with the same unity of purpose and focus as a well-motivated individual.” Many big-name CEOs like to say their talent runs free with innovative ideas. “It makes for compelling literature,” McCarthy says. But would that work on the football field? Corporations need their personnel to think out-of-the-

box but also act in a prescriptive culture—to work within a system in order to achieve common objectives. • Not everyone can be the coach – or the quarterback: The problem with executives is that they all want to lead and none want to follow, McCarthy says. A team made up of executives is like a group of thoroughbred stallions confined to a small space called an organization—plenty of kicking, biting and discord. Thoroughbreds don’t naturally work well as a team. Better to define responsibilities that build a “foxhole mentality,” wherein one person has the gun, the other the bullets, McCarthy says. It’s in the best interests of both for each to succeed. • The strongest teams are adept at resolving conflict: Hiring the best and the brightest should create a diverse, competent group—but inevitably these stallions generate friction that can sabotage company progress. So, sensitize team members to the early warning signs: know-it-all atti-

tudes, multi-tasking during team meetings, exhibiting dominant behavior, not responding in a timely fashion or engaging in avoidance. Agree, as a team, on how to mutually manage and minimize counterproductive behaviors as they surface. • Create individual and team agreements: Here is where the “rubber meets the road” – it’s the final stage of planning who will do what for team objectives, as well as a collective agreement on team rules and interdependencies. Ask individuals to openly commit to what they will do, and how the team is to function. The public declaration stresses employee obligation and collaborative management. “We live in a 21st-century economy where speed and efficiency is a top priority, and that often means a ‘shoot first, ask questions later’ mentality,” McCarthy says. “But you get the team that you plan for, not necessarily what you pay for. If time is money, then I’d invest it in creating and building a championship team.”


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 30

Darrell...

them) and it separates the men from the boys.” continued from pg. 14 Darrell’s choice of harmonica is the Hohner Special 20 and uses them during his live gigs. Hohner has listed Darrell as one of the top 10 harmonica players in the world and features his picture on their packages of their Blue Midnight and Hot Metal harmonicas. He was featured last year at the Hohner booth at the NAMM show and it was one of the highlights of the show, having been lucky enough to have witnessed it. Darrell has also been invited to the NAMM jam on Saturday of the four-day event this January and will be playing with Craig Erikson, an Iowa Blues Hall of Famer, as they will be releasing a new Rock/Blues album around December, just prior to January’s NAMM Show. Walter Trout will also be playing on the new album with Darrell so it should be a must buy for our readers. The new album is yet untitled. Hohner has also invited him back to perform at their NAMM booth again. Our readers who attended the past two Battle of the Blues Harps surely remember Darrell Mansfield’s performances there. For recording, Darrell has custom harmonicas made by Joe Fiisko who uses brass and special aged wood to get outstanding tone out of his harps. Darrell even had Joe make him two special harmonicas that were curved a bit as it conformed more to the shape of his mouth. He used this unique harp in his performance on the Jimmy Kimmel show and even gave Jimmy Kimmel his second harp as a gift! (Eat your hearts out Jay Leno and Conan O’Brien—when Darrell was on your shows you got nada!) Darrell believes that the greatest electric Blues Harp player of all time was Little Walter and he actually played the harp upside down! Darrell, although he loves all of the styles of Blues Harp that preceded him, has developed his own specific sound and encourages new harp players to also find their own sound. One of Darrell’s best stories that he shared with me was when he was at a festival in Norway and The Blind Boys of Alabama were opening for him. On their last song, they started singing, “People Get Ready” which is one of Darrell’s signature songs, unbeknownst to them, Darrell’s joined them up on stage with his harp and vocals in the song and he said their rendition was the highlight of the festival. After the song, Clarence Fountain, one of the Blind Boys of Alabama, grabbed Darrell’s long hair, felt it and then said, “Tell me you’re not white!!!” as he thought that his powerful vocals were those of a black man. I guess Paul Rodgers’ influence on Darrell’s singing has been successful! Please check out Darrell Mansfield’s website at darrellmansfield.com for his tour dates, discography and other very interesting facts about his wonderful musician and human being. Darrell also provided the entertainment for Operation Cupid’s reception and dinner which married seven military couples and accompanied by their guests at the Hilton Hotel Ontario Airport.

Real Estate...

luxury townhomes averaging 1.2k square feet. Each features a direct continued from pg. 25 access garage, washer/dryer, granite countertops, central heat and air conditioning and top-of-theline appliances. According to Lorne Polger, senior managing director of Pathfinder Partners, the community represents an attractive investment in an appealing location. “Riverside is one of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in California – with easy access to Orange, Los Angeles and San Bernardino counties – and housing prices here are finally on the upswing,” Polger said. “We believe this is the strongest submarket within the area, and we were able to purchase the project at significantly below replacement cost,” he continued.

October 2012

California...

the Inland Empire are beginning to eat into the hole created by the continued from pg. 25 housing bust and 2008 recession. However, as of July, seven counties had unemployment rates below the U.S. rate; all coastal counties, and 21 counties had unemployment rates in excess of 13%; all inland counties including Riverside, Fresno and San Joaquin Counties. From a sectoral perspective the 2012 gains are also widespread. Both tech heavy and lower skilled sectors gained jobs with the only significant job loss being generated in the government sector and the lagging logistics industry. All of this adds up to a California that is on the mend and growing consistent with our forecast for the past year. Although the unemployment rate has stayed persistently high and there exist structural problems, unless there is a further slowing of the U.S. economy, the state’s unemployment rate should be converging on the nation’s unemployment rate over the next two years. Though we look at the risks in the forecast discussed here and believe they are slightly higher than before, the current forecast is not radically different from three months ago. The forecast is for continued, but slightly slower gains in employment through 2012. Faster growth in 2013 and 2014 means a steady decrease in the unemployment rate in California and an increasing trajectory towards singledigit unemployment. We expect California’s unemployment rate to be at 7.9%, and within 0.4% of the U.S. rate, by the end of the forecast period. Our forecast is for employment growth of 1.8%, 1.6% and 2.4% in 2012, 2013 and 2014 respectively. Payrolls will grow more slowly, at 1.7%, 1.5% and 2.3% for the three forecast years. Real personal income growth is forecast to be 0.9% in 2012 followed by 2.2% and 3.1% in 2013 and 2014 respectively. The unemployment rate will hover around 10.7% through 2012. Unemployment will fall through 2013 and will average approximately 9.8% approximately the same as our last forecast. In 2014 we expect the unemployment rate to drop to 8.5%, just shy of a percent higher than our U.S. forecast. The Tuscan acquisition marks another key milestone in Pathfinder’s steady expansion. Since its inception in 2006, Pathfinder has acquired more than $500 million in defaulted commercial real estate loans and REO properties and currently owns and operates several thousand residential units and several hundred thousand square feet of office and retail space in California, Colorado, Arizona, Washington, Florida, Texas and Oklahoma. The firm is actively seeking investment opportunities in major markets in the western United States. 1ST COMMERCIAL REALTY GROUP AWARDED MANAGEMENT ASSIGNMENT FOR CHINO SPECTRUM MARKETPLACE 1st Commercial Realty Group was recently awarded the property management assignment for Chino Spectrum Marketplace, a 580k-square-foot retail center located in Chino Hills. Located at Hwy 71 and Grand Avenue, this centrally located power center is anchored by Target, Old Navy, Petco, Chick’s Sporting Goods, TJ Maxx, Ross, Michael’s, Staples and several national and regional retail and restaurant chains. Founded in 1989, 1st Commercial Realty Group is a “Management Focused” commercial real estate company providing full service property and asset management for owners of retail, industrial, office, medical and mixed use properties throughout the western U.S. CAPSTONE SPENDS $4.4

continued on page 35


October 2012

BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 31

COMPUTER COMPUTER COLUMN COLUMN The Rest of the Story By J. Allen Leinberger Last month I discussed the anticipated announcement about the iPhone 5. Since then just about every media outlet has overwhelmed you with their in-depth coverage. Other stories, like the predebate presidential campaign have taken second or third position. But there is other news that came out from the “Great Apple Sales Pitch” of Sept. 12th. For one thing, they announced a new iPod Touch. The iPod Touch, if you don’t know, is just like the iPhone with one exception. It’s not a phone. (But it does make WiFi calls—see below). Other than that, it does just about everything the iPhone does. It’s the same size. Both are thinner and lighter than last year’s. It runs most of the same apps. It has a camera that’s almost as good as the iPhone (5 megapixels compared to 8). Battery life is difficult to judge because the iPhone’s battery is measured by talk time and the iPod Touch is measured by audio and video playback time. They both come with 32- and 64-gigabyte hard drive capacity. And they both require the new “Lightning” plug which is smaller than the 30-pin plug that the earlier models have. (Adapters cost $29.95.) If it makes a difference, the iPhone has an A6 chip while the iPod Touch has an A5. The iPhone comes in black or white. The iPod Touch comes in several colors and has a strap on the back. Apple claims that the new iPod Touch is “engineered for maximum funness.” Then there is the iPod Nano. It is described as “completely renanoed.” It is thinner and lighter than its past versions. Like the iPod Touch and the iPhone, it has a touch

screen. Its earplug is now on the bottom instead of the top. The Nano comes with Bluetooth 4.0 built in. It also picks up FM radio signals. (Why not AM? How can I get the game?) All three—the iPhone, the iPod Touch and the Nano, now come with a new ergonomic earpod (formerly ear buds). Ergonomic means it’s supposed to fit your ear better. Of course, that’s what they said about the old ones. As I have written here before, a good set of headphones vastly improves the sound. All three still hold photos. Only the Nano does not take pictures, but you can load them onto it. What else got overlooked in the news? The operation system has been upgraded. The standard is now iOS6. It is compatible with iPad 2 and 3, the 4th and 5th generation iPod Touch and the iPhone back to the 3GS. It’s new, and upgraded features include better maps, improved Siri voice control, Facebook, Shared Photo Streams, Passbook, Face Time (video phone), phone function over WiFi, and Safari. Personally, Siri and I don’t get along, so any improvement is welcome. The Facebook function is now interconnected to your photos, maps, game center and even Ms. Siri.

Shared Photo Stream lets you share your pictures with selected friends over their units without asking them to come over on Sunday afternoon to watch your slides of Disneyland. The streaming does not count against your iCloud storage and it works over WiFi and cellular networks. Passbook connects all of your movie tickets, boarding passes, retail coupons, gift cards and more. When you scan your iPhone or iPod Touch, it even lets the computer at Target know you’ve come into the store with a coupon. FaceTime also now works on the iPad, the iPhone and the iPad Touch. And since it works on WiFi, it is not counted against your phone company minutes. Neither is your WiFi phone function. The phone function now also lets you ignore calls and either run a “Do Not Disturb” function or send you a text to remind you to call them later, maybe. It also lets you know if the call is important. The Mail function now identifies the messages you have been waiting for, and the ones you aren’t. It lets you add photos and videos. The Safari function has been improved, and this is good news. Of all

of Apple’s recent programs, Safari stands fairly low. It does what Firefox and other web connectors do, but it just doesn’t have the popularity. I’m told that no more than 10% of the people use it. It’s rather like the iWorks programs that are supposed to be the equivalent of Microsoft Office. Just not as well received. The iOS6 system will be available for download this month. Maybe already. As for the iPhone 5, Will Ferrell’s Funny or Die web site listed a few features that were not included, it and should be. They include: 1. The moment you turn on your new iPhone 5, it emails all of your contacts to inform them of your smug new purchase. 2. Siri is now known as “Sir,” forcing you to treat it with respect every time. 3. The new iPhone 5 will self-destruct upon the release of the iPhone 5S. 4. Every April 1, a Samsung logo will appear where the iconic Apple is, much to the delight of nobody. There were more but they were tasteless. Anyhow, come back next year at this time for my column on the iPhone 6.


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 32

I’m Smart! Why...

new ideas to the table. Build relationships throughout the company. continued from pg. 28 If you’re able to make yourself invaluable and leverage the things that make you unique, you’ll also make yourself impossible to replace. And when that happens, you’ll be in control of your own price.” You downplay your accomplishments. It can be hard to toot your own horn. But if you don’t announce your own achievements, you can bet that no one else is going to do it for you. With humility, make sure that you’re keeping your name, your accomplishments, and your skill set in front of everyone. “Make sure you’re getting the recognition and credit you’ve earned,” notes Milazzo. “If you still have doubts, consider that announcing your accomplishments validates the investments others have made in you. Your boss, for example, wants to know that she bet on a winner when she hired you!” You don’t network with big players. Generally, we tend to gravitate toward people who are similar to us: people who think similarly, who find similar things fun, and who are in similar walks of life. That’s fine when it comes to your friendships, but you need to aim higher when it comes to networking. More than 60 percent of people find jobs through networking, for example, and you can bet that most of them didn’t achieve this goal because they knew someone at the bottom of the pecking order. “No, I’m not advocating snobbery,” Milazzo clarifies. “It’s normal to gravitate toward people who are the same as you—but in business, one of the main reasons people don’t get ahead is that they don’t get out of their groups. Make every effort to meet people who are a rung or two higher than you on the professional ladder. If you impress someone who is more successful than you are, they’ll have a lot more influence than someone whose position is equivalent to yours.” You doubt your abilities. It’s highly unlikely that you’ll reach any goal you set for yourself if you don’t believe with your whole heart that achieving it is possible. Among other things, you won’t be confident enough to take calculated risks if you don’t believe that the limitations in front of you are surmountable. Anytime you find yourself entertaining doubts or trying to limit what you think is possible, remind yourself of your past successes. Let them infuse you with pride and bolster your resolve. “Believing you can do it—whatever ‘it’ is—is 90 percent of the win,” assures Milazzo. “When I walked into my first meeting with a potential client, my legs were literally shaking. I forced myself to remember that this attorney needed specialized knowledge that only I—a critical care nurse—could give him. That reminder didn’t banish all of my nervousness, but it did enable me to make the points I wanted. And I walked out of that meeting with my first client. I learned that when you expand what you’re willing to believe about yourself, you can transform who you are and what your life looks like.” You need a mentor. There are two ways to develop the skills, habits, mindsets, etc. that you’ll need to achieve wicked success. The first is to go it alone and learn by trial and error in the school of hard knocks. The second (much smarter) path is to learn from others who have encountered and surmounted problems that are similar to your own. That being the case, surround yourself with as many mentors as possible and practice the skills they pass on to you. “I’ve been in business for three decades, and I still learn every day from my students, staff, writers, speakers, business experts, and more,” shares Milazzo. “And in the early days of growing my business, I devoured every book on business strategy I could find, even though none were aimed precisely at the niche I was creating.

October 2012

Aggressive learning is a competitive advantage in achieving any desired goals.” You are too bogged down in the little things. In today’s world, we’re constantly sabotaged by nonproductive energy wasters. There are emails to read. Facebook statuses to update. Receipts to locate for that already-late expense report. Dishes to be washed. Files to be organized. And on, and on, and on. These are the easy, albeit often unproductive, tasks that make us feel good. They may not get you any closer to accomplishing your greater goals, but at least you’ve checked a couple of things off your to-do list. “Unfortunately,” says Vickie Milazzo, “this addiction comes at a high price, because that cheap check-mark high is guaranteed to frustrate, overwhelm, and stress you out in the long term. By majoring in minor things, we never get to our big commitments. Breaking these addictions opens the door to achievement. Remember, what you engage and focus on is where you will yield results.” You aren’t going after your BIG goals. When is the last time you set a goal and really went after it? Milazzo encourages people to identify their “Big Things”—those goals that connect to their passionate vision. Then choose one to schedule their day around. For example, your Big Thing might be to get promoted. So today you might agree to take on a high-profile work project in order to put you in the running for that promotion. “Set a target date for each of your Big Things,” says Milazzo. “And begin working steadily toward achieving each of them. Start strong and you’ll experience genuine elation from achieving real goals and solving real problems.” “You can’t snap your fingers and suddenly become successful,” says Milazzo. “And the successful people you envy weren’t able to do that either. They worked for it. They set big goals. They didn’t settle for small-time achievements. Wicked success can be yours too if you make the same big commitments.” When Planning Your 2012 Advertising Budget, Consider...

THE INLAND EMPIRE BUSINESS JOURNAL

For Advertising Information Call (909) 605-8800 or visit www.busjournal.com


October 2012

BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 33

BUSINESS BUSINESS PET PET PEEVES PEEVES The Top Meeting Pet Peeves That Plague Organizations By Jean Kelley Tell most business people that there’s another meeting on their agenda, and you’ll likely see them shake their head, roll their eyes, and mumble something under their breath. That’s because nearly all meetings succumb to a few pet peeves – those annoying meeting happenings that derail the meeting’s purpose, waste time, and cause friction and frustration among attendees. While all types of meetings fall prey to pet peeves, it’s the process-oriented, information sharing meetings that most business people dislike…and that are the most common. Even though the role of this sort of meetings is to keep others informed and to learn how what they’re doing fits in the big picture, many people leave these types of meetings feeling confused, aggravated, and sometimes overwhelmed. This is a huge problem for business, because if a meeting isn’t informative at the very least and enjoyable at the most, then the company is wasting a lot of money getting people together. Additionally, if your meetings aren’t on the mark, you’ll get the reputation for holding poor meetings, which erodes morale and productivity. To ensure your meetings are effective, informative and enjoyable, be aware of the top five meeting pet peeves and avoid them at all costs.

Pet Peeve #1: Not Having an Agenda or Not Sticking to One The top three rules for Toastmasters are to start the meeting on time, end it on time, and always have an agenda. This rule should be true for business meetings too. Having an agenda is not only simple courtesy; it also tells attendees that the meeting has a goal and will be productive. An agenda gives the meeting facilitator control over the meeting’s flow, keeps the meeting on task, and reduces confusion among participants. Realize that the agenda does not need to be elaborate; a simple bullet list of topics is all you need to prepare. Remember to send the agenda out a day or so before the meeting so attendees can prepare. And if you forget to send it out early, bring copies of the agenda to hand out when the meeting starts. On meeting day, stick with the agenda. If a topic comes up in conversation that is not on the agenda, offer to address that topic after the meeting. This way you keep the meeting on schedule and don’t derail the meeting’s purpose. Pet Peeve #2: Lack of Facilitation Some people mistakenly believe that meetings run on their own – that all you have to do is get a group of people

together in a room and they’ll automatically produce good results. Wrong! Getting the people together is the easy part; leading them in a productive discussion takes skill. That’s why solid meeting facilitation is so critical. The facilitator’s job is to control the flow of the meeting, to help attendees work together, to provide structure to the meeting, and to get everyone involved. When attendees are allowed to have their cell phones ringing during the meeting, when one or two people are permitted to dominate the conversation, or when it’s acceptable for key people to not contribute to the discussion, good facilitation is lacking. Therefore, make sure all your meetings have an effective facilitator at the helm. Pet Peeve #3: People Arriving Late to the Meeting How many meetings have you arrived to on time, only to have the meeting start late as everyone waits for others to show up? Even worse, if the meeting does start on time, it restarts 10 minutes later when a few people straggle in. Rather than continue with the meeting, the facilitator attempts to bring the late comers up to speed by rehashing everything that was just covered. But why penalize the people who arrived on time? A better

approach is to close the door when the meeting starts and put a note on the door that says, “Meeting in Progress.” Those who arrive late will know to sneak in as inconspicuously as possible…and, hopefully, they won’t make the same mistake next time. Additionally, unless the late person is the boss, don’t restart the meeting later. When meeting start times are enforced and honored, people will make the effort to be on time. Pet Peeve #4: Using PowerPoint™ When It’s Not Needed PowerPoint is an essential business tool, but it’s not effective for all meeting types. Unfortunately, many people believe that ALL meetings require the use of PowerPoint. Not true! Typical information sharing meetings require a facilitator asking questions and everyone contributing in roundrobin style. Watching someone read PowerPoint slides is not how these meetings should run. After all, if people simply needed to read pages of text, you could just send them the file and skip the meeting completely. Of course, if your informational meeting needs more of people’s senses involved, then use PowerPoint to add that visual component. Likewise, if you’re combining everyone’s data and showing it in chart or continued on page 38

For Planning 2012 Advertising, Marketing, and Publicity With The Inland Empire Business Journal

2012 EDITORIAL SCHEDULE EDITORIAL FOCUS NOVEMBER • Retail Sales • Industrial Real Estate • Commercial R.E./Office Parks • Educational Services Directory DECEMBER • Financial Institutions (3rd Quarter, ’12) • Top Ten Southern California Resorts • Temporary Placement Agencies

SUPPLEMENTS

LISTS

• Human Resources Guide • Executive Gifts • Building and Development • New Communities

• Commercial R.E. Development Projects • Commercial R.E. Brokers • Fastest Growing I.E. Companies • Mortgage Companies • Title Companies

• Health Care • Professional Services Directory

• 2013 “Book of Lists” • Business Brokerage Firms


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 34

October 2012

RESTAURANT RESTAURANT REVIEW REVIEW San Pedro Eats After the Iowa Visit No better way to work up an appetite than four or five hours on a big ship at sea (even if the ship is tied to a dock and not moving). We found two restaurants in San Pedro that will please even the most demanding diner…..The Whale & Ale as well as Limani Taverna. The Whale & Ale The Whale & Ale is the only authentic British restaurant in the South Bay of Los Angeles. It is entirely oak-paneled with a long oak bar, brass fittings and balcony. Live music on Fridays in the piano bar. The menu includes many favorites dishes of England such as English sausage rolls wrapped in puff pastry….Yorkshire pudding cups…..pan roasted venison chop, and if you like fish, eight ounces of Scottish salmon cut and fried in Bass Ale Batter with English chips.

The Whale & Ale is located at 327 West 7th Street in San Pedro. Reservations are recommended by calling (310) 8320363. Limani Taverna The Limani Taverna is a traditional Greek restaurant that will not disappoint. Milan, the owner, and Costa, the chef, will make you feel like family and,

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4231 Win eville Road Mira L oma, C A 91752 ( 951) 685-5376 or (951 ) 360- 9180 w w w.gallean ow in e ry.c om Tour the Historic Winery weekends from 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm or by appointment Listed in the National Register of Historical Places

as long as they have the ingredients in stock, will prepare any Greek dish you request. A few of their popular dishes are: Salad: Horiatiki (tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, onion and feta) Grilled Specialties: Souviakia (choice of pork or chicken over pilaf) Roasts and Traditionals: Melitzanosalata (roasted eggplant, bell pepper, onion, garlic, parsley, olive oil) Skordalia (potato, garlic, lemon juice, olive oil) Fava (yellow split peas, sweet onion) Hot Items on Menu: Dolomades Gialanyzi (ground lamb and beef, mixed with rice, onions and herbs) Keftedes (grilled beef and lamb patties) Spanakopita (spinach and feta in phyllo dough) Saganaki (flamed kefalotyri

cheese with brandy) Grilled Delights and Traditional: Mousaka (layers of potato, eggplant, ground beef) Desserts: Baklava

Limani Taverna Gulaktoboureko (baked Greek custard) continued on page 35


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 35

October 2012

Real Estate...

MILLION ON PALM DESERT PROPERTY continued from pg. 30 San Diego-based Capstone Advisors purchased a four-building, 57.9k-square-foot showroom/retail/industrial/flex project in Palm Desert for $4.35 million ($75/sf). The property was purchased from the lender who had taken ownership of the property after a loan default. The purchase price was a substantial discount to the construction cost. During the due diligence period, Capstone Advisors worked in conjunction with the seller and listing broker to execute new leases and lease extensions for more than 40 percent of the property. As a result, the project is now 76 percent leased to a variety of quality tenants including Palm Desert Cyclery, Lifetouch Portraits and All Custom Golf Carts. The four-building project features a prime central location along Country Club Drive near the intersection of Washington Street and I-10. Tenants benefit from easy access to both the east and west ends of the Coachella Valley via I-10, as well as to central Palm Desert, La Quinta and Hwy 111 from Washington Street. Two of the four buildings front the heavily travelled Country Club Drive, offering excellent customer visibility for retail users, while the remaining two buildings offer well located and flexible industrial and office space. In the transaction, Capstone Advisors and the seller were both represented by Wilson Johnson Commercial Real Estate of Palm Desert. Wilson Johnson will also handle leasing and property management. INLAND EMPIRE INDUSTRIAL SALE COMES IN AS JUST OVER $11 MILLION A 180k-square-foot industrial building in Rancho Cucamonga sold for $11.07 million ($61.50/sf). Built in 1983, the property, located at 11167-11177 White Birch Drive, south of Foothill Boulevard and west of Milliken Avenue, is situated on 5.17 acres and is fully occupied by Steelscape and Puratos Bakery. Mark Zorn, Richard Schwartz and Brad Yates of the Ontario office of Colliers International represented the buyer, Denverbased DCT Industrial Trust, an institutional investor and owner of industrial real estate. The seller, Quagletti M J & P Trust, a private investment entity that was repped by Mike Quagletti with Industrial Realty. LEE & ASSOCIATES INLAND EMPIRE NORTH TO HANDLE LEASING AND ASSET MANAGEMENT FOR BARSTOW OUTLETS Lee & Associates Inland Empire North has been named the exclusive leasing representative and asset manager of the 328.3ksquare-foot Barstow Outlets in Barstow. The Barstow Outlets is comprised of 24 free-standing buildings along a landscaped, open-air corridor. Situated on almost 49 acres at 2552 Mercantile Way, the center’s tenants include Levi’s, Vans, and Pacific Sunwear. The multi-tenant shopping center offers ample parking, easy access to Lenwood Road and Mercantile Way and is within minutes of Interstates 15 and 40 freeways. According to Elizabeth Brown, executive vice president at Lee & Associates Inland Empire North, the leasing/management team will begin work to lease available space, market and promote the property and upgrade mechanical, operational and visual elements. “Repositioning of this center is a dynamic opportunity to bring this property in line with what the consumer is looking for in the 21 century,” Brown said.

Campbell Intro...

private contract agreed to by homeowners and their lenders. This continued from pg. 26 undermines confidence in our nation’s housing finance system, making it harder and more expensive for future homeowners to borrow money. The legislation will ensure that homeowners and lenders can rely on existing contract law. How It Works: Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac: Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac’s charters are amended to prohibit them from purchasing mortgage loans originating in counties where a municipality has seized a mortgage loan through the power of eminent domain within the previous 10 years. Federal Housing Administration: The National Housing Act is amended to prohibit the Federal Housing Administration from guaranteeing mortgages originating in counties where a municipality has seized a mortgage loan through the power of eminent domain within the previous 10 years. Veterans Administration: The Veterans Administration is prohibited from making, insuring, or guaranteeing mortgage loans within counties where a municipality has seized a mortgage loan through the power of eminent domain within the previous 10 years.

Darlene...

network. Soon the complete winners list will be posted on the NAFE website www.nafe.com.

continued from pg. 24 Other Award Categories : Woman of Achievement, Outstanding Entrepreneur, Mentorship Award, Community Service, Rising Star, Service to New York City, Activist Award, Global Women’s Champion, Health Care Champion, Digital Trailblazer Darlene can be reached at adifference@live.com or 951-4406330.

Restaurant... continued from pg. 34

On Saturday nights, Limani Taverna offers entertainment and

music for its customers. Limani Taverna is located at 301 West 6th Street in San Pedro. Reservations are necessary by calling (310) 833-3033.


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 36

October 2012

MANAGER’S MANAGER’S BOOKSHELF BOOKSHELF “The Secret Language of Influence: Master the One Skill Every Sales Pro Needs,” By Dan Seidman; AMACOM, New York, New York; 2012; 198 Pages; $17.95. Author Dan Seidman is a globally known speaker, consultant, and trainer on the subjects of selling and influencing people. He’s probably best known for using a technique that psychologists call “pattern interrupt,” or if you’re old enough to remember, neuro-linguistic programming (NLP). NLP is a technique that was pioneered in psychotherapy by Dr. Milton Erickson and subsequently modeled by Richard Bandler and John Grinder in a variety of business situations including sales and organizational change management—all of which sounds like the book is going to be either minimally useful or dreadful. Surprise! It’s not boring, and it’s especially helpful in reaching today’s buyers. And, according to Seidman, as well as many others in selling, “Influence occurs at a level just below the buyer’s awareness. That’s important because today’s buyer is savvy—and too familiar with traditional selling techniques. When you begin to customize diaologues, tailoring your words to the person you are dealing with, you will discover a way to have a casual, comfortable, and customized conversation that gives both you and the buyer a unique decision-making experience.” Here’s one sales example of pattern interrupt that Seidman offers to a prospect after failing 46 times to get a response to his voicemail. “Congratulations! This is Dan Seidman of corporate recruiting. You have earned our company’s prestigious Most Elusive Prospect Award. We have called you 46 times— today makes 47—and you have never returned a single call. I

just wanted you to know that nobody in our entire database with thousands of companies, has ever ignored us as frequently as you. Thanks for not calling. And congratulations on your award.” Seidman then hangs up, and quickly receives a call back from the prospect. The discussion begins with the prospect saying that Seidman is a “stupid jerk.” It ends with the comment that Seidman is not to contact the prospect’s firm again. Seidman has just enough time to say that he’s sorry before the prospect hangs up. Five minutes later, the prospect again calls him with her own apology, adding, “Yes, she does use services like ours. Then she asks if I would please come to see her next week, to talk about our offerings. Yes, she became a client, and no, my VP never did hear about my cold calling strategy.” The author’s approach is logical, lively, and filled with humor. In addition, there’s a considerable amount of practical advice for salespeople, both newcomers and veterans, throughout the book. One of the best is in Chapter 13, Strategic Listening. Seidman does more than simply note that new salespeople should be careful about showing how anxious they are to begin their sales pitch. The author goes into considerable detail about what makes a good listener and why great listeners tend to outsell both their coworkers and competitors. He states: “If you want to improve your listening skills, get and stay curious. Be curious like a child who is fascinated by the

world around her a world that abounds with new colors, sounds, words and experiences. Listen for word choices, images, and ideas. “Great sales professionals are great listeners. They pick up nuances from buyers that others miss. Practice these skills at home and at work in order to put them into play in front of buyers.” Perhaps the real strength of the book rests on who’s doing the reading. Like most books about selling, the majority of the

chapters are focused on those who are on the front line of sales. Seidman does more than that. He also has ideas for sales management and for senior executives concerning sales and product training. “The Secret Language of Influence” is a banquet of ideas and approaches for a wide variety of salespeople, managers, and customer service representatives. It’s certainly more than worth the price of reading. —Henry Holtzman

Best-selling Business Books Here are the current top 10 best-selling books for business. The list is compiled based on information received from retail bookstores throughout the U.S.A. 1. “Reverse Innovation: Create Far From Home, Win Everywhere,” by Vijay Govindarajan and Chris Trimble (Harvard Business Review Press…$30.00) (1)* How to make innovation happen in emerging markets. 2. “Bailout: An Inside Account of How Washington Abandoned Main Street While Rescuing Wall Street,” by Neil Barofsky (Free Press…$26.00) (3)* How and why TARP saved banks while abandoning everyone else. 3. “Three Simple Steps: A Map to Success in Business and Life,” by Trevor Blake (BenBella Books…$12.95) (4)* Why some people succeed in any economic conditions. 4. “It Worked for Me in Life and Leadership,” by Colin Powell (with Tony Koltz) (HarperCollins Publishers…$27.99) (2)* How to succeed in the workplace and elsewhere. 5. “Unintended Consequences: Why Everything You’ve Been Told About the Economy is Wrong,” by Edward Conard (Penguin Group…$27.95) (5)* An explanation why economic planning rarely works as planned. 6. “The Energy Bus: 10 Rules to Fuel Your Life, Work, and Team with Positive Energy,” by Jon Gordon (John Wiley & Sons…$21.95) (**) How to motivate individuals and build them into successful teams. 7. “Leading Culture Change in Global Organizations: Aligning Culture and Strategy,” by Daniel Denison, Robert Hooijberg, Nancy Lane, and Colleen Lief (John Wiley & Sons…$34.95) (7)* How and why business culture impacts on business performance. 8. “Strengths Finder 2.0: A New and Updated Edition of the Online Test From Gallup’s Now, Discover Your Strengths,” by Tom Rath (Gallup Press…$22.95) (8)* Discover your strengths and integrate them with your career. 9. “Steve Jobs,” by Walter Isaacson (Simon & Schuster…$35.00) (7)* The story of a modern Thomas Edison. 10. “The Start-up of You: Adapt to the Future, Invest in Yourself, and Transform Your Career,” by Reid Hoffman and Ben Casnocha (Crown Publishing…$26.00) (10)* Managing your career as if you were starting a new business. _______________________________________________________ *(1) -- Indicates a book’s previous position on the list. ** -- Indicates a book’s first appearance on the list.


October 2012

California...

rolling and pitching in the waves with various smells wafting in the continued from pg. 43 air. Still, having just come back from touring the replica of the Mayflower, we could see that ships have come a long way since the 17th century. The USS Iowa is historic in many ways. For example, the ship has hosted more U.S. presidents than any other battleship. The ship had a bathtub put in specifically for Franklin D. Roosevelt to use during his lengthy voyage over to meet with Stalin, Churchill and Chiang Kai Shek at the Tehran Conference. Presidents Ronald Reagan and H.W. Bush also have been hosted on the ship. During World War II, the USS Iowa was active in both the Atlantic and Pacific, although the majority of its missions were fighting the Japanese, bombarding various Japanese-held islands during a number of campaigns that lasted throughout the war. The ship was hit by enemy fire, and there is a place on the tour where you’ll see a dent put in one of the gun turrets by enemy artillery. The USS Iowa was also active in the Korean War and on patrol during the Cold War and post-Cold War period. The USS Iowa made world headlines on April 19, 1989 when the Number Two 16-inch gun turret exploded, killing 47 crewmen and causing significant damage to the turret. There was some question about the cause with two investigations later concluding two different causes. At first the US Navy concluded that a crew member, who died in the explosion, had deliberately caused it. Congress then did an investigation and determined that too much powder in the gun barrel likely caused the event, causing the Navy to re-open its investigation. However, the Navy ultimately decided that the cause could not be determined.

BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 37

At a Glance Where: The USS Iowa Museum is located in San Pedro, just south of Los Angeles and adjacent to Long Beach. The ship is berthed close to the cruise ship terminal and is next to the Los Angeles Maritime Museum, which also features interesting artifacts and history if you have some extra time. What: The USS Iowa is a fascinating look at one of the country’s most historic naval vessels and brings a true appreciation of what life was like for our sailors during World War II and the decades following. The ship has been turned into a museum that includes a carefully mapped out tour route taking you through many points of interest on the ship. In general you’ll want to allow about an hour to 90 minutes to take the tour. When: This tour can be done any time of the year, although parts of it take you out on the decks and it probably would not be advisable to take on a rainy day. Fortunately for visitors to the USS Iowa, this part of California doesn’t get much rain. Why: This tour is all about the history, the ingenuity of those who build our Navy ships, and the sense that so many of our Naval heroes have sacrificed so much to be at sea, whether during peacetime or time of war. When you get up-close and see what goes into operating this vessel, everyone in your family will appreciate the experience. How: For more information on the USS Iowa, please visit www.pacificbattleship.com or phone 1-877-446-9261. If you want to stay in the area overnight, resort-style accommodations are nearby at the Doubletree by Hilton San Pedro, 1-310-514-3344. Or for a super overnight stay, try the nearby Queen Mary, 1-562-435-3511. USS Iowa (BB-61) was the lead ship of her class of battleship and the fourth in the United States Navy to be named in honor of the 29th state. Owing to the cancellacontinued on page 39


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 38

UCLA Anderson...

Conclusion continued from pg. 13 The economy continues to muddle through in a 1-3% growth environment that will keep the unemployment rate painfully high. Although not contracting, consumer spending, exports and business investment will remain sluggish. In addition, federal purchases weighed down by a high debt load are contracting. The one bright spot is the beginning of the long awaited rebound in housing. The big near-term risk comes in the form of the fiscal cliff where a too rapid fiscal consolidation could very well trigger a recession in early 2013.

October 2012

College Loan... continued from pg. 5 to hunt down defaulters.

Department of Education last fiscal year paid more than $1.4 billion to collection agencies and other groups

ECONOMIST CONTACTS: Edward Leamer, Director UCLA Anderson Forecast (310) 206-1452 , edward.leamer@anderson.ucla.edu David Shulman, Senior Economist UCLA Anderson Forecast (908) 295-6121, davids5355@aol.com

Owning a Small... continued from pg. 17

sional, can assist small business owners in determining and implementing the options most appropri-

ate for their needs. About Inland Empire by the Inland Empire Financial Consultants Thrivent Financial is represented in the Inland Empire by the Inland Empire Financial Consultants, which includes Bill Cortus at 3333 Concours St. Building 8 Suite 8100 Ontario, CA 91872, phone: 909-945-4996, website: www.thrivent.com/plg/inlandempire. CA Insurance ID #0D96803 About Thrivent Financial for Lutherans Thrivent Financial for Lutherans is a not-for-profit, Fortune 500 financial services membership organization helping approximately 2.5 million members achieve financial security and give back to their communities. Thrivent Financial and its affiliates offer a broad range of financial products and services including life insurance, annuities, mutual funds, disability income insurance, bank products and more. As a not-for-profit organization, Thrivent Financial creates and supports national outreach programs and activities that help congregations, schools, charitable organizations and individuals in need. For more information, visit Thrivent.com. Also, you can find us on Facebook and Twitter. Insurance products issued or offered by Thrivent Financial for Lutherans, Appleton, WI. Not all products are available in all states. Securities and investment advisory services are offered through Thrivent Investment Management Inc., 625 Fourth Ave. S., Minneapolis, MN 55415, 800-847-4836, a FINRA and SIPC member and a wholly owned subsidiary of Thrivent Financial for Lutherans. Thrivent Financial representatives are registered representatives of Thrivent Investment Management Inc. They are also licensed insurance agents of Thrivent Financial. Bank products and trust services are offered through Thrivent Financial Bank, (Member FDIC, Equal Housing Lender), a wholly owned subsidiary of Thrivent Financial for Lutherans. Insurance, securities, investment advisory services, and trust and investment management accounts are not deposits, are not guaranteed by Thrivent Financial Bank, are not insured by the FDIC or any other

form, PowerPoint is great. The Top Meeting... graph But don’t use PowerPoint just for continued from pg. 33

the sake of it. Know why you’re

using it, and then do it right. Pet Peeve #5: Listening to Unprepared or Ineffective Speakers Nothing is worse than listening to a monotone speaker who says “um” or “ah” every other word…or having someone start their portion of the meeting by saying, “I really didn’t prepare anything for this, so let’s just wing it.” While everyone should speak and offer ideas at these meetings, some people may have to give more thoughtful, polished information. These people should be identified beforehand so they have time to prepare. This is crucial, because in most organizations, to be promoted you must have solid public speaking skills. Additionally, if someone simply isn’t good at giving presentations, no matter how much preparation he or she does, that person needs to get support and training to become more effective. Granted, no one wants to tell a colleague, “You need to work on your public speaking skills,” but offering support to others will not only make meetings more effective, it will also make the company stronger. Do Your Part Business meetings are a mainstay in our work-world, so no matter what you think of them, they’ll never go away. Knowing this, isn’t it time we all work to avoid the top meeting pet peeves? If we all do our part, we can make meetings more enjoyable, more productive, and more meaningful for everyone involved. And that’s one kind of meeting everyone will love to attend. For additional information, email jkelley@jeankelley.com or go to www.jeankelley.com. federal government agency, and may go down in value. For additional important disclosure information, please visit Thrivent.com/disclosures.


October 2012

BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 39

Skills and...

What Makes a...

Mike Morrell...

California...

continued from pg. 16 “How” questions. After that you can then begin probing with the five W’s. For example, “How would you decrease costs by 10%?” “How would you increase gross margins by X%?” “How would you go about implementing a complete systems upgrade of our ERP system?” “How would you increase market share in your territory?” Then probe deeply with the five W’s. 3. Now the interviewer is shifting the interview from skills and experiences to having the candidate explain how they would apply these to do the job. If the candidate can’t apply their skills and experiences in the new job, then one has to question whether or not they are the right person regardless of skills and experiences. The reason most hiring processes fail is because it is easy for a candidate to talk about their skills and experiences. Some might even embellish in this area. It is significantly different to explain how they would apply those skills and experiences in your company, with your culture, your resources, your budget constraints and all the aspects that make your company unique from the company they are leaving or just left.

continued from pg. 9 experience. A top performer focuses on doing what is right and exceeding their boss’s expectations, promoting their leadership’s culture and delivering results. Always be willing to help others to succeed knowing the better you can at helping others, the more valuable you become. When a person focuses on making the boss look good, they should never worry about being perceived as an opportunist, they should only focus on making their boss look good. The key is to focus on having the right attitude, being passionate about your job and serving your leader and the team. Action item: Look at your job expectations and add to them. If your boss says to be in the office by 9 a.m., try to be there by 8:30 a.m. at the latest. If your boss says to contact 50 prospects in a week, your goal should be 75. Most importantly, do these with integrity. Not only will your boss look good, but you will see results!

continued from pg. 27 ships. If AB 1081 is signed into law, it creates a serious legal problem for each of our local officers. Many public safety organizations have contracts with the federal government to perform certain duties. This means they are at risk of cancellation or repayment of millions of federal dollars. In our current economic climate, this would be very harmful to our local governments and would certainly increase the costs of law enforcement. Though these challenges stand before us, we do have many options to help turn our state around. Let’s start by restoring our Constitutional principles, and limiting the power government has over us. Our government was designed to work FOR us, not against us and should be our servant not our master. Remember, California still has more going for us than any other state – great weather, deep water seaports for trade, a $32 billion a year agriculture industry, and just over the hill from there is the Silicon Valley leading the world in technology developments to name just a few things. But affecting us negatively are high taxes, overregulation, and bad bills. Many in government believe that government should be bigger and dictate policies to us; instead, government should be working to represent and protect our liberties. We must elect leaders who will defend and will protect our freedoms and will return California to the greatest state. Turning our state around and returning our communities to the thriving economies we once knew will take each of us exercising our civic responsibilities vigorously. The first thing we can do is call or email the Governor and ask him to veto these harmful measures. You can email him though his website at www.gov.ca.gov or call his office at 916-445-2841.

continued from pg. 43 tion of the Montana-class battleships, Iowa is the last lead ship of any class of United States battleships, and was the only ship of her class to have served in the Atlantic Ocean during World War II. During World War II, she carried President Franklin D. Roosevelt across the Atlantic to Casablanca en route to a crucial 1943 meeting in Tehran with British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Josef Stalin. She has a bathtub—an amenity installed for Roosevelt, along with an elevator to shuttle him between decks. When transferred to the Pacific Fleet in 1944, Iowa shelled beachheads at Kwajalein and Eniwetok in advance of allied amphibious landings and screened aircraft carriers operating in the Marshall Islands. She also served as the Third Fleet flagship, flying Adm. William F. Halsey’s flag at the Japanese surrender in Tokyo Bay. During the Korean War, Iowa was involved in raids on the North Korean coast, after which she was decommissioned into the United States Navy reserve fleets, better known as the “mothball fleet.” She was reactivated in 1984 as part of the 600ship Navy plan, and operated in both the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets to counter the recently expanded Soviet Navy. In April 1989, an explosion of undetermined origin wrecked her #2 gun turret, killing 47 sailors. Iowa was decommissioned for the last time in 1990, and was initially struck from the Naval Vessel Register in 1995. She was reinstated from 1999 to 2006 to comply with federal laws that required retention and maintenance of two Iowa-class battleships. In 2011, Iowa was donated to the Los Angelesbased non-profit Pacific Battleship Center. Editors Note: For a few restaurant suggestions in San Pedro, see our “Restaurant Review” on page 34.

For more information, please visit www.bradremillard.com.

Every professional has the opportunity to get promoted and be number 1, but only a few will actually do what it takes to get there. Visit www.NathanJamail.com or contact 972377-0030 for additional information.

Inland Empire Business Journal

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BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 40

October 2012

NEW BUSINESS A+ ACADEMEY CENTER 1119 WEST I ST. ONTARIO, CA 91762

LEWIS MECHANICAL 1333 RECHE CANYON RD. 606 COLTON, CA 92324

AMERITEK CONSULTING 1119 WEST I ST. ONTARIO, CA 91762

MAGIC ICE CREAM 1312 SOUTH BAKER AVE. ONTARIO, CA 91762

ABBA INSURANCE SERVICES 226 E. HOLT BLVD. ONTARIO, CA 91761

MAKEITHAPPEN REALTY 118 E. AIRPORT DR. STE. 203 SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92408

AIDOO INTERNATIONAL 1738 NORTH D ST. SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92405 ALL STAR TOBBACO & MARKET 5464 MORENO ST. MONTCLAIR, CA 91763 CABO LOGISTICS 9194 CONIFER LN. STE. A RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91730 CASH 4 GOLD 158 E 40TH ST. SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92337 CERTIFIED SECURITY SYSTEM 13838 WOODBINE DR. VICTORVILLE, CA 92395 DORIS MAKEUP ACADEMY 9131 CITRUS AVE. STE. G FONTANA, CA 92335 EMPIRE REAL ESTATE GROUP CO 12223 HIGHLAND AVE. STE. 106-267 RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91739 HATFIELD WHOLESALE 8560 VINEYARD AVE. STE. 212 B RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91730 HUNTER VALINTINE 1048 WEST 26TH ST. SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92405

MARYS HAIR STYLING 1483 E FOOTHILL BLVD. UPLAND, CA 91786 MIMIS TAX 13096 YORBA AVE. CHINO, CA 91710 MT. VERNON LAUNDRY 739 N MT VERNON STE. 400 SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92411 PAYLESS AUTO GLASS 1700 WEST FOOTHILL BLVD. UPLAND, CA 91786 PROVIDENT CHOICE INSURANCE SERVICES 2674 AKRON ST. SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92407 RAID’S ONE STOP AUTO REPAIR 297 E 5TH ST. SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92410 RONIN MARTIAL ARTS 8188 ARCHIBALD AVE. RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91730 SENIOR RESOURCE CENTER 1276 ORE LN. BIG BEAR CITY, CA 92314 SONORA MOTORS 2587 VIEWRIDGE DR. CHINO HILLS, CA 91709 STIRRUP PUPPETS 61373 SANDALWOOD TRL. JOSHUA TREE, CA 92252

IDENTITY3 11788 FAIRWAY DR. YUCAIPA, CA 92399

TESS INDUSTRIES 1411 NORTHSTAR ST. SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92407

INTERIOR APPEAL 14790 BUGLE CT. FONTANA, CA 92336

THE ZAB HOME LLC 11495 SHAHAPTAIN AVE. HESPERIA, CA 92345

JOURNEY TO EMPOWERMENT 7746 HOLLAND PARK STREET CHINO, CA 91708

VML EVENTS & RENTALS 31498 PLEASANT DR. RUNNING SPRINGS, CA 92382

KINGS LAW ADVOCACY 14726 RAMONA AVE. STE. 410 CHINO, CA 91710 L AND L FORKLIFTS 7349 MILLIKEN AVE. STE. 14069 RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91730

VYVEO 14612 NEVADA CT. FONTANA, CA 92336 YOUR MARKET 739 N MT VERNON STE. 500 SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92411

County of San Bernardino

YUCAIPA PHYSICAL THERAPY 33492 OAK GLEN RD. STE. H YUCAIPA, CA 92399 2 DAM FLY INK 1006 TRIBUNE ST. STE. A REDLANDS, CA 92374 2020 LENS OPTICAL 12345 MOUNTAIN AVE. STE. X CHINO, CA 91710 ADVANCE DISPOSAL CO. 17105 MESA ST. HESPERIA, CA 92345 ADVANCE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 26546 POPPY CT. LOMA LINDA, CA 92354 ALBERTO'S TRANSPORTATION 17821 IVY AVE. FONTANA, CA 92335 ALL IN ONE EXPRESS 3045 S ARCHIBALD AVE. STE. 144-H ONTARIO, CA 91761 AM FIT-NESS 14930 FERNLEAF ST. FONTANA, CA 92336 BULLDOG PAVING 9237 ARCHIBALD AVE. RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91730 C.S. CONSTRUCTION 8132 PAISLEY AVE. HESPERIA, CA 92345 C&M PASTRY DISTRIBUTOR /BON APPETIT 7697 WATERBURRY PL RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91730 CAFE MILAGROSO #1 1119 W. KING ST. SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92410 CASH FOR GOLD 14190 BEAR VALLEY RD. VICTORVILLE, CA 92392 CHEAP PLUMBER AND ROOTER 16219 SENECA RD. VICTORVILLE, CA 92395 DCM LOGISTICS 13146 WARM SANDS CT. VICTORVILLE, CA 92394 EMPIRE ATHLETIC TRAINING 13911 SAN SEGUNDO DR. RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91739 EMPIRE HEALTH CLEANING SERVICES 14351 PARKWOOD DR. FONTANA, CA 92337

FABRICAKETION 13641 CENTRAL AVE. STE. F CHINO, CA 91710

PACIFIC CREST HEALTH FOODS 6014 PARK DR. WRIGHTWOOD, CA 92397

FOOTPRINTS CHRISTIAN BOOKSTORES 34840 YUCAIPA BLVD. YUCAIPA, CA 92399

PARK MAGNOLIA APARTMENTS 416 THE TERRACE REDLANDS, CA 92374

FRIENDS OF THE LIGHTHOUSE YOUTH ORCHESTRA 42153 BIG BEAR BLVD. BIG BEAR LAKE, CA 92315

PC-FIX 9400 BASELINE RD. STE. A RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91701

GUYTRE GLOBAL MERCHANSIDE 8681 ENCINITAS AVE. FONTANA, CA 92335

PC-TEACH 9400 BASELINE RD STE. B RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91701

HIGHLAND COINLESS LAUNDRY 2102 E. HIGHLAND AVE. SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92404 HODGE-BASSETT DAYCARE INC 3248 SHEPARD LN. SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92407 INDEPENDENCE SENIOR LIVING ASSISTANCE 13879 SAGASSUM CT. HESPERIA, CA 92344 IRON GATE PHOTOGRAPHY 12933 LA COSTA CT. HESPERIA, CA 92344

RESUME’S CREATED 354 13TH ST. SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92405 SCOOTER TRAMPS 16638 TRACY ST. VICTORVILLE, CA 92395 SIMPLY ME WITH ELEGANCE C.O.G.I.C. 15240 SUNNY POINT ST. VICTORVILLE, CA 92394 SPECTRUM REAL ESTATE NETWORK 3873 SCHAEFER AVE. STE. F CHINO, CA 91710

ISPOT BUSINESS CENTER 17344 MAIN ST. HESPERIA, CA 92345

SPORT CLIPS 14230 CHINO HILLS PKWY STE. D CHINO HILLS, CA 91709

LAX SPA 12345 MOUNTAIN AVE. SUITE U CHINO, CA 91710

SPORTOYS MX 14784 SANTA FE TRAIL VICTORVILLE, CA 92392

LIGHTHOUSE YOUTH ORCHESTRA 41275 BIG BEAR BLVD. BIG BEAR LAKE, CA 92315

SURF 321 13893 CENTRAL AVE. CHINO, CA 91710

LOMA LINDA SELECT RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES 25612 BARTON RD. STE. 326 LOMA LINDA, CA 92354 MARINE & RV SYNTHETICS 11145 SHETLAND AVE. MONTCLAIR, CA 91763 MAS ENTERPRISES 10575 BB POPLAR ST. LOMA LINDA, CA 92354 MB SMOKE SHOP 5525 PHILADELPHIA ST. STE. F CHINO, CA 91710 MORE MONEY TAX RETURNS 223 E 21 ST. STE. 17 SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92404 NO I IN TEAM 16969 EDGE GATE DR. RIVRESIDE, CA 92504

SWEEPOMANIA INTERNET CAFE 213 BARSTOW RD. BARSTOW, CA 92311 THE BUTLER SCHOLTE COMPANY 404 NEW YORK ST. STE. 7617 REDLANDS, CA 92375 THE HAT 857 N. CENTRAL AVE. UPLAND, CA 91786 TLT CONSULTING 13089 PEYTON DR. STE. C140 CHINO HILLS, CA 91709 TRIFECTA 1574 W. BUFFINGTON ST. UPLAND, CA 91784 TRIO SMOKE 318 W. FOOTHILL BLVD. UPLAND, CA 91786

UNIQUE NON-EMERGENCY MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION 13179 COUNTRY CT. VICTORVILLE, CA 92392 VICTORVILLE HYDROPONICS 14178 HESPERIA RD. VICTORVILLE, CA 92395 A-Z WHOLESALE 494 W. HIGHLAND AVE. SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92405 AA EQUIPMENT 4811 BROOKS ST. MONTCLAIR, CA 91763 ACCESS PM 215 N RIVERSIDE AVE. RIALTO, CA 92376 APPLE VALLEY MOBILE NOTARY 16340 CROWN VALLEY DR. APPLE VALLEY, CA 92307 B. MESA, LLC. 9688 PHELAN RD. PHELAN, CA 92371 BELLA’S BOUTIQUE 35009 YUCAIPA BLVD. YUCAIPA, CA 92399 BRAVO'S FAST TRUCKING 6863 PERSIMMON ST. CHINO, CA 91710 CAL CANT 11105 REDWOOD AVE. FONTANA, CA 92337 CENTRO LEGAL DE JUSTICIA Y LIBERTAD 10722 ARROW RT. STE. 218 RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91730 CJ TIRE BROKER 35708 GEMWOOD LN. YUCAIPA, CA 92399 DEVICEFIXIN 12127 MALL BLVD. STE. A-202 VICTORVILLE, CA 92392 ETIWANDA GARDENS 7576 ETIWANDA GARDENS RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91739 FREEDOM AND JUSTICE LAW CENTER 10722 ARROW RT. STE. 218 RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91730 GARDNER MEDICAL SPECIALTIES, INC 5061 CALYPSO CT. ALTA LOMA, CA 91737 GREEN EARTH RECYCLING 15555 MAIN ST. HESPERIA, CA 92345


October 2012

BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 41

NEW BUSINESS JJ LARIS 12976 CACTUS CT. HESPERIA, CA 92344 JOHN SUTTON TRANSPORTATION 2751 RECHE CANYON RD. STE. 181 COLTON, CA 92324 KUKA TATTOO SUPPLY 1916 DUKE ST. REDLANDS, CA 92374 LACEY’S SEXXY SECRET'S 1075 FOISY ST. SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92408 LADIES FIRST CLEANING SERVICE 1904 E LYNWOOD DR. STE. 116 SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92404 LOUIE’S CHICKEN CAFE 3938 GRAND AVE. STE. B CHINO, CA 91710-5489 LUCAS SPECIALTY ROCK AND SAND CO 11105 REDWOOD AVE. FONTANA, CA 92337 LUCAS GRANULES 11105 REDWOOD AVE. FONTANA, CA 92337

M.J & ASSOCIATES SIGNINGS 1660 KENDAL DR. STE. 187 SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92411 MARISCOS DEL PACIFICO 14755 FOOTHILL BLVD. UNIT A FONTANA, CA 92335 MGV SYNERGETIC ENTERPRISES 14315 QUAIL CT. FONTANA, CA 92326 MONTESSORI ACADEMY OF UPLAND 235 E. FOOTHILL BLVD. UPLAND, CA 91786 MULLENS FLOWERS 496 W. HIGHLAND AVE. SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92405 OGGI’S PIZZA & BREWING CO. 19201 D BEAR VALLEY RD. APPLE VALLEY, CA 92308 PK SERVICES 7360 EUGENIA DR. FONTANA, CA 92336 QUEST PROPERTIES 1911 COMMERCENTER STE. 407 SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92408

SENIOR RESOURCE CENTER 41191 BIG BEAR BLVD. BIG BEAR LAKE, CA 92315

TRINITY CLEANING SERVICES 19727 ROSEMARY ST. APPLE VALLEY, CA 92308

SHARP STYLE 19052 MADRONE ST. HESPERIA, CA 92345

US SIGN CO. 583 E. FOOTHILL BLVD. STE. 4 & 5 UPLAND, CA 91786

SMOG MAPS 2235 E. 4TH ST. ONTARIO, CA 91764 STYLE AND ELEGANCE BEAUTY SALON 10808 FOOTHILL BLVD. STE. 160-158 RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91730 SUPERIOR MEDICAL SUPPLY 1525 N. D ST. STE. 14 SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92405 SUVEG CELLARS 37296 IRONWOOD DR. YUCAIPA, CA 92399 THE 10 BARBER SHOP 1399 W. COLTON AVE. STE. 8 REDLANDS, CA 92374 TIME WARNER CABLE 550 N. CONTINENTAL BLVD. EL SEGUNDO, CA 90245

NEW BUSINESS CAPITAN POOL/SPA SERVICE 31325 AVENIDA VALDEZ CATHEDRAL CITY, CA 92234 RAPID SERVE ATTORNEY SERVICES 73220 COLONIAL DR. THOUSAND PALMS CA 92276 BENUS 82227 HWY 111 STE. D-2 INDIO, CA. 92201 WASHINGTON CLEANERS 72817 DINAH SHORE DR. STE. 101 RANCHO MIRAGE, CA. 92270 SANDPIPER INN 12800 FOXDALE DR. DESERT HOT SPRINGS, CA. 92240 HUTCH'S UPHOLSTERY REPAIR 58 OAKTREE DR. RANCHO MIRAGE, CA 92270 LEAFCREEK LAND CO. 590 E RAMSEY ST. STE. 300 BANNING, CA 92220

QUALITY LANDSCAPE DESIGN 52-350 AVE. NAVARRO LA QUINTA, CA 92253 R-RIVAS TRUCKING 49091 RIO RANCHO CT. COACHELLA, CA 92236 MY COMPUTER EXPERT 40392 EASTWOOD LN. PALM DESERT, CA 92211 MYCOMPUTEREXPERT.C OM 40392 EASTWOOD LN. PALM DESERT, CA 92211 PRISCILLA’S CAKES 43581 SMURR ST. INDIO, CA. 92201 CERTIFIED SMOG 81-780 HWY 111 INDIO, CA 92201 DESERT CLASSIC AUTO EXPO ITALIANO 47037 MARRAKESH DR. PALM DESERT, CA 92260 DESERT CLASSIC TOUR CLASSIQUE 47037 MARRAKESH DR. PALM DESERT, CA 92260

County of San Bernardino

XANADU CELLPHONE ACCESSORIES 8938 SAGE CT. RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91701 A.B.L.E. A BETTER LEGAL EXPERIENCE 33783 LIBERTY RD. YUCAIPA, CA 92399 ALAPALM ANIMAL HOSPITAL 8068 PALM AVE. HIGHLAND, CA 92346 BLACKWATCH PUB 497 B N. CENTRAL AVE. UPLAND, CA 91786 BRONZE N’ BEAUTIFUL 5364 BUCKSKIN DR. FONTANA, CA 92336 CAPITU PLACE 16309 MERRILL AVE. STE. A FONTANA, CA 92335

CARDENAS MARKETS CONSTRUCTION DEPARTMENT 2501 E. GUASTI RD. ONTARIO, CA 91761 CEL ENTERPRISES 720 N MOUNTAIN VIEW AVE. SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92401 CREPES OF WRATH 1877 CAPRI AVE. MENTONE, CA 92359 DODD’S ADULT RESIDENTIAL FACILITY 1576 W. 8TH ST. SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92411 DON LEWIS INVESTIGATIONS 1514 N. YUCCA RIALTO, CA 92376 FEREGRINO REALTY 15159 CRANE ST. FONTANA, CA 92336 FIVE STAR CLEANING 16442 ELAINE DR. FONTANA, CA 92336-1919 FOR THE FAMILY 3043 SANIT ANDREWS ST. ONTARIO, CA 91761

FRANK LENTO DBA T & T REAL REAL ESTATE 7022 OAK COVE CT. OAK HILLS, CA 92344 GTO SERVICES 1166 S RIVERSIDE AVE. STE. 18 RIALTO, CA 92376 HELPING HANDS REALTY 7022 OAK COVE CT. OAK HILLS, CA 92344 IBARRA ENTERTAINMENT 1329 JANES WAY COLTON, CA 92324 MVA SOLUTIONS 1329 JANES WAY COLTON, CA 92324 INDEPENDENT EQUIPMENT SERVICE 13383 11TH ST. CHINO, CA 91710 INSIGNIA MEDICAL MANAGEMENT GROUP 2664 MACADAMIA CT. CHINO HILLS, CA 91709 J.P. INTERNATIONAL 2456 MESA TERRACE UPLAND, CA 91784 LA CABANA SPORTS BAR 2410 ARMORY RD. BARSTOW, CA 92311

County of Riverside

DESERT CLASSIC VINTAGE AUTO RACES - SPEEDWEEK 47037 MARRAKESH DR. PALM DESERT, CA 92260

TRANSCEND SPA CENTER 27464 COMMERCE CENTER DR. STE. B TEMECULA, CA 92590

DESERT CLASSIC VINTAGE CAR AUCTION 47037 MARRAKESH DR. PALM DESERT, CA 92260

FSI ENERGY SERVICES 14419 VETERANS WAY STE. 1 MORENO VALLEY CA 92553

KIKOS AUTO REPAIR 45-116 COMMERCE ST. STE. 8 INDIO, CA 92201

PERRIS PROFESSIONAL 1640 RUBY DR. STE. 77 PERRIS CA 92571

CREATIVE TECHNOLOGIES 48-870 VIA ESTACIO, INDIO, CA 92201

TO THE TOP ENTERTAINMENT 13589 RED MAHOGANY DR. MORENO VALLEY CA 92553

JUST IN TIME DELIVERY SERVICE 45776 COCO PALM DR. INDIO, CA 92201

LOADED NUTRITION 7056 ARCHIBALD AVE. STE. 102-257 CORONA, CA 92880

SMOKIN JAY’S GIFT SHOP 45776 COCO PALM DR. INDIO, CA 92201

BMP CAPITAL FUNDING 20863 SUNDROPS LN. WILDOMAR, CA 92595

DEL CAMPO PROMOTIONS 84711 AVE. 51 STE. E103 COACHELLA, CA 92236

SUSHI YA 18434 MOSS RD. RIVERSIDE CA 92505 BIGCOUNTRY RECOVERY 3727 VALLEY VIEW AVE. NORCO CA 92860

DECISION PERFECTA 3765 JURUPA AVE. STE. A RIVERSIDE, CA 92506 DON LEON TORTILLAS 469 E. BLAINE ST. CORONA, CA 92878 JENNY’S DONUT 630 S. STATE ST. SAN JACINTO, CA 92583 RIVERSIDE CONSERVATORY 14962 OLD GROVE RD. RIVERSIDE, CA 92504 SMART TRANSPORT SERVICE 6681 LUCRETIA AVE. MIRA LOMA CA 91752 ARMED FORCES REALTY GROUP 43402 BUSINESS PARK DR. TEMECULA, CA 92590 AMERICAS COUNTRY STORE 1004 SIXTH ST. NORCO, CA 92806 AMERICAS COUNTRY STORE 1004 SIXTH ST. NORCO, CA 92806

ZOLLIC & FAMILY REAL ESTATE AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 11801 PIERCE ST. STE. 240 RIVERSIDE CA 92505 ZOLLIC REAL ESTATE 11801 PIERCE ST. STE. 240 RIVERSIDE CA 92505 INK CHAMBER 620 INDIAN HILLS CIR. PERRIS CA 92570 J&R LIMO & SEDAN SERVICES 6876 OLD PEAK LN. CORONA, CA 92880 RELIABLE HOME & OFFICE REPAIR 8814 MESA OAK DR. RIVERSIDE CA 92508 G C ROOFING 901 MARION AVE. HEMET CA 92543 R&D DOGGIE GIFT BASKETS 43275 HACIENDA ST. STE. J HEMET CA 92544


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 42

October 2012

NEW BUSINESS R&D DOGGIE GIFT BASKETS 43275 HACIENDA ST. STE. J HEMET CA 92544 CHRISMAN OPTOMETRIC CENTER 1302 W. FLORIDA AVE. HEMET, CA 92543, HEMET EYECARE ASSOCIATES 1302 W. FLORIDA AVE. HEMET, CA 92543, D. N. W. QUALITY SYSTEMS 988 W. CRESTVIEW CORONA CA 92882 CHAVEZ TRUCKING 950 N. STATE ST. STE. B HEMET, CA 92543 BARGAINMIND PRODUCTS 13600 PALOMINO CREEK DR. CORONA, CA 92883 BARGAINMIND PRODUCT SERVICES 13600 PALOMINO CREEK DR. CORONA, CA 92883 APG CO. 4872 PINNACLE ST. RIVERSIDE CA 92509 PACINOS NEW YORK PIZZA 39112 WINCHESTER RD. STE. 107 MURRIETA, CA 92563

BAGMASTERS FACTORY DIRECT 1160 CALIFORNIA AVE. CORONA CA 92881

TEMECULA WINE MAGAZINE 31670 SERRENTO DR. MURRIETA, CA 92563

MENIFEE TIRES AND AUTOMOTIVE CENTER 26920 NEWPORT RD. MENIFEE, CA 92584

FED-CHEK 41571 CORNING PL. STE.105 MURRIETA, CA 92562

SPACIFIC ESTHETIC STUDIO 41830 SIXTH ST. TEMECULA, CA 92590

PYTHON GUARDS 1760 W 6TH ST. STE. 100 CORONA CA 92882

LEP GRAPHICS 38340 INNOVATION CT. STE. 502 MURRIETA, CA 92563

COMMERCIAL CREWS 41571 CORNING PL. STE. 105 MURRIETA, CA 92562

B.A.B.E 21535 PALOMAR ST. STE. D WILDOMAR, CA 92595

LAS PALMITAS 65-115 GLORIA CIR. MECCA, CA 92254

WESTCOAST MATTRESS DIRECT 7715 SOLVANG RIVERSIDE, CA 92503

R&E 1 STOP INSURANCE & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 2131 N PERRIS BLVD. STE. C-3-A PERRIS, CA 92571 ROOM TO DANCE 3485 UNIVERSITY AVE. RIVERSIDE, CA 92501

VIP WIRELESS OF RIVERSIDE 1788 UNIVERSITY AVE. STE. 108 RIVERSIDE CA 92507

BEST AT BEAUTY ENHANCEMENT 21535 PALOMAR ST. STE. D WILDOMAR, CA 92595

VALLEY GOLD & COIN 30951 HANOVER LN. STE. 1608 MENIFEE, CA 92584

SOCAL SUPERCONDUCTOR 256 SOLANA ST. SAN JACINTO, CA 92582

BLING THINGS AND MORE 31971 WHITETAIL LN. TEMECULA, CA 92592

VINEYARD HOMECARE 41041 VINTAGE CIR. TEMECULA, CA 92591

DESERT ELDER LAW CENTER 44-750 VILLAGE CT. PALM DESERT CA 92260

MOD5 ENGINEERING 13091 WILD SAGE LN. MORENO VALLEY, CA 92555

PREMIUM WASH SYSTEMS 1433 LINDEN ST. STE. L RIVERSIDE CA 92507

TEMECULA BLAZE 29738 VALLE VERDE TEMECULA CA 92591

HOUSE HUNTERS REALTY 42205 SAGEWOOD ST. MURRIETA, CA 92562

JOE RIVERA REALTY 6754 MONTCLAIR DR. RIVERSIDE, CA 92504

ACE 1 FIRE EXTINGUISHER SERVICE INC. 765 S. SAN JACINTO SAN JACINTO, CA 92583,

ALL STAR IRRIGATION & TURF CARE PRODUCTS 37 MARRICOPA CT. PALM DESERT, CA 92211 WORTHINGTON TERRACE 1666 SAGEBRUSH RD. PALM SPRINGS, CA 92262 NEEDI SUPPLY 68845 PEREZ RD. STE. H19 CATHEDRAL CITY, CA 92234 BAHAMA MAMA FROZEN YOGURT 67730 E. PALM CANYON DR. CATHEDRAL CITY, CA 92234 B.M. FROZEN YOGURT 67730 E. PALM CANYON DR. CATHEDRAL CITY, CA 92234 DESERT FOOD MART 13525 PALM DR. BLDG. 4 DESERT HOT SPRINGS, CA 92240

STEVE’S AFFORDABLE AUTO 1655 E SIXTH ST. STE. A-5A #108 CORONA CA 92878

BROTHERS TIRES 81-854 INDUSTRIAL PL. STE. 11 INDIO, CA 92201

PINEDO TREE SERVICE 22827 KINROSS LN. MORENO VALLEY CA 92557

HARMONY HOUSE 34917 STACCATO ST. PALM DESERT, CA. 92211

PROMOTIONAL DESIGN CONCEPTS.COM 1049 W. LA CADENA RIVERSIDE, CA 92501

LESTER’S POOL SERVICE 73095 SAN NICHOLAS AVE. PALM DESERT, CA 92260

MAGNOLIA COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER 9380 MAGNOLIA AVE. RIVERSIDE CA 92503

B. LAMONT TRANSPORTATION SERVICES 4115 BALLANTREE ST. LAKE ELSINORE, CA 92530

RAINBOW PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 24361 POSTAL AVE. STE. 1 MORENO VALLEY CA 92553

KINFOLK ENTERTAINMENT 24323 JACKSON AVE. STE. 732 MURRIETA, CA 92562

R.P ASSOCIATES 53019 SWEET JULIET LN. LAKE ELSINORE, CA 92532

VGI WRAPS 11626 STERLING AVE. STE. G RIVERSIDE CA 92503

JAMBA JUICE #1282 40930-A CALIFORNIA OAKS RD. MURRIETA, CA 92562

County of Riverside

VGI GRAPHICS 11626 STERLING AVE. STE. G RIVERSIDE CA 92503

THINGS FORGOTTEN 6692 BROCKTON AVE. RIVERSIDE CA 92506 THINGS TO REMEMBER 6692 BROCKTON AVE. RIVERSIDE CA 92506 FRAUSTO PROTECTION PRIVATE SECURITY 777 SMITH RD. HEMET, CA 92544 DOCPRIN’S INNER GENERATOR, LLC 41774 MAYBERRY HEMET, CA 92544, MAD FORMATTER 58175 BLISS RD. ANZA, CA 92539 RAINSTORM PRESS 58175 BLISS RD. ANZA, CA 92539 ICAMPUSTIMES 41690 ENTERPRISE CIR. BLDG. N STE. 208 TEMECULA, CA 92590 KEEP IT CLEAN 42200 MORAGA RD. STE. 30G TEMECULA, CA 92591 DESERT HEAT CUSTOM ACCESSORIES 41731 CORPORATE CENTER CT. MURRIETA, CA 92562 KELLY MANUFACTURING 41731 CORPORATE CENTER CT. MURRIETA, CA 92562 PACIFICA ENDEAVORS LLC 29931 ST. ANDREWS DR. MENIFEE, CA 92584 INMOTION DESIGN GROUP 7036 MACKINAW CT. MIRA LOMA CA 91752 CONTRERAS FAMILY CLEANING SERVICES 2602 TWINLEAF LN. CORONA CA 92881 JEWELRY AND COIN 44535 BEDFORD CT. TEMECULA, CA 92592 BENEDICTO PRODUCE 571 CRANE ST. STE. B LAKE ELSINORE, CA 92530

PONDO BAR & GRILL 27126 SHADEL RD. MENIFEE, CA 92586 ITS ALL ABOUT U.... MASSAGES BY ME 5675 TROTH ST MIRA LOMA CA 91752 YAYA’S FISH TACOS 36671 LONGBRANCH AVE. MURRIETA, CA 92563 YAYA’S RESTAURANT 36671 LONGBRANCH AVE. MURRIETA, CA 92563 DREAM WORKS CONSTRUCTION 2974 CODY CT. RIVERSIDE CA 92503 MEMORABLE NIGHTS 4703 MINNIER AVE. RIVERSIDE, CA 92505 ROOFTOP BARBEQUE 29381 OWL CREEK CT. MENIFEE, CA 92584 DIOENOS DESIGNS 25077 RIDGEMOOR RD. MENIFEE, CA 92586 D’S DESIGNS 25077 RIDGEMOOR RD. MENIFEE, CA 92586, WETINK CUSTOM SCREEN PRINTING 549 GRECO CT. STE. H SAN JACINTO, CA 92583, RAW COOKIE NIRVANA 20809 BRADLEY WAY SUN CITY CA 92586

ABRASIVES, INC. 873 W. 4TH ST. STE. D BEAUMONT, CA 92223 INLAND HOMES 23396 MOUNTAIN SONG LOOP MURRIETA, CA 92562 CIEL BIJOU BOUTIQUE 13680 ESTELLE ST. CORONA, CA 92879 VALLE VISTA LIQUORS INC. 44023 E. FLORIDA AVE. HEMET, CA 92544 BELLA DOORS 13308 RUNNING DEER RD. MORENO VALLEY CA 92553 MICKEYS LIQUOR 44161 E. FLORIDA AVE. HEMET, CA 92544 DE LUZ FARMS & NURSERY 22250 CORTE BONITA TEMECULA, CA 92590

PLATINUM PLUMBING CA 31324 EMPEROR DR. CANYON LAKE, CA 92587 AGAPE MEDICAL MANAGEMENT 3763 ARLINGTON AVE. STE. 201 RIVERSIDE, CA 92506 BAYOU BLISS 10959 MAGNOLIA AVE RIVERSIDE CA 92505 A CUT ABOVE LAWN & LANDSCAPE 30148 MAUROUX CT. MURRIETA, CA 92563 HOT SPRING SPAS OF PALM DESERT 41905 BOARDWALK STE. P & Q PALM DESERT, CA 92211 UNITED STATES BBQS 41905 BOARDWALK STE. P & Q PALM DESERT, CA 92211 UNITED STATES BBQS SPAS & FIREPLACES 41905 BOARDWALK STE. P & Q PALM DESERT, CA 92211

D.L.C. CONTRACTORS 25483 MORNING DOVE WAY MORENO VALLEY CA 92551

UNITED STATES HOT TUBS 41905 BOARDWALK STE. P & Q PALM DESERT, CA 92211

ELITE INVESTMENTS 3625 BANBURY DR. STE. 16E RIVERSIDE CA 92505

DESERT SUPER SITTERS 291 E. MEL AVE. STE. 312 PALM SPRINGS, CA 92262

AQUAHILLS 3433 REVERE RD. RIVERSIDE, CA 92503

MACROE INDUSTRIES 267 SANTA BARBARA CIR. PALM DESERT CA 92260

POLARIS HOMES 5201 WAINWRIGHT CT. RIVERSIDE, CA 92507

VANITY HAIR SALON 80-120 HWY 111 STE. 2 INDIO, CA 92201


October 2012

BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 43

EXECUTIVE EXECUTIVE TIME TIME OUT OUT California Getaways—USS Iowa By Cary Ordway If you’re looking for a chance to walk through history, you could hardly do better than Southern California’s latest tourist attraction the battleship USS Iowa, a vessel with a World War II pedigree as well as a rich history fighting America’s enemies for many decades. Visiting a warship like the USS Iowa is a perfect family adventure and appeals to dad’s fascination with all things military yet has enough wow factor to please the kids. Even mom can appreciate the ship’s contribution to history and will grow more and more fascinated as she gets an up-close look at how our fighting men live when they are on the high seas. The USS Iowa was built in 1940 and had a long tenure serving our country 50 years in all. It was once called the World’s Greatest Naval Ship mainly because of her big guns, speed, armor and the modern components. The USS Iowa just opened for business this summer at its new location in San Pedro, practically next door to the Los Angeles cruise ship terminals. It’s a floating museum that has been carefully planned to give visitors a good look at many of the ship’s features including the interior living and working spaces and the weapons’ systems. The current tour is just the first of many that are planned to be offered as the ship undergoes more refurbishing to allow access to more locations on the ship. Future tours will focus on still more parts of the ship such as the big guns or other weapons’ systems but the current tour does provide a good overview of much of the ship’s interior and exterior. Along the tour route, you’ll have museum representatives giving you information on what exactly you’re seeing and they’ll

answer any questions you have. There are also descriptions and explanations posted in the various areas of the ship as well as a number of displays for you to review at the end of the tour. And the tour exits through a gift store with lots of interesting merchandise related to the USS Iowa. Be forewarned this is not a tour for someone who has mobility problems. There are many stairs—most of them

straight up and down—that connect the various decks of the ship. We noticed one senior citizen having to literally be pushed up the first set of stairs and then offered a seat where one of the tour representatives advised against continuing any further. But if you can climb a 10-foot ladder, you’ll be okay—there are plenty of things to hang on to and, while there are many different sets of stairs, none of them has a lot of steps. The tour also is linear in the sense that once you start on the tour you’re either going to go all the way through it or all the way back to get off the ship. You can’t pick and choose sections you want to see although you can spend a little longer time in some areas if you prefer. When we were there it was a busy Sunday, so it was like following a line of USS Iowa (BB-61) fires her people through 16-inch/50-caliber guns on 15 August 1984 during a building with a firepower demonstration after many rooms, her modernization. nooks and cran-

nies and stairs. One of the most interesting spots we noticed on this first tour was the ship’s bridge and command center where it’s fascinating to see that even back in World War II, the ship’s designers had designed a safe room with thick steel armor where the captain and other officers could retreat and still operate the ship while being protected from enemy fire. The line slowed down quite a bit in this area where visitors took their time to observe the controls and enjoy the forward view from the tower. Another highlight was where the tour route takes visitors to the forward section of the bow, past two of the ship’s three incredibly big gun turrets, each housing three long 16-inch guns. If you’re taking pictures, the money shot is right from the bow looking back at these guns. It’s also interesting to note that one of these turrets was involved in a 1989 explosion that killed 47 sailors—an event that was big news all over the world. The tour takes you through officer’s quarters and you’ll step right into the captain’s cabin which isn’t quite like a suite on a major cruise ship, but still pretty spacious and inviting compared to the cramped quarters elsewhere on the ship. There is an officer’s recreation area that features a big-screen TV, lounge chairs and other nearby areas to relax or socialize with other officers. You’ll also see the mess area where the ship’s sailors took their meals—an area not unlike a school lunch room, only a lot more compact because of limited space on the ship. One could imagine how unpleasant it might be for cooks who were confined to a claustrophobic kitchen with low ceilings, continued on page 37


BUSINESS JOURNAL • PAGE 44

October 2012

INLAND EMPIRE BUSINESS JOURNAL

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October 2012  

Volume 24 Number 10

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