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YOUR TRUSTED TRUTH SOURCE

August/September 2017

Wits women developing South African education through research in their field Vaal University appoints new VC Xolani Mkhawanazi UWC – Access To Success: Helping others Grow from hope to action Inspiring women changing the way we live in South Africa

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Vol.1 Issue 3

07 09 10–11 12

UJ: Reimagining a better, smarter, more prosperous Africa that shares, cares and grows together Standard Bank Top Women Awards 2017 – Winners Announced Sport Bartlett has massive interest in Varsity Football

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August/September 2017 – Y our Trusted Truth Source

For more information visit: www.schoolsthatrock.co.za or contact Les Van Dyk on 083 460 8581


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August/September 2017 – Y our Trusted Truth Source

Editor’s note Miriro Matema

@miriromatema

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ot long ago, a HR Director told me how hard it is to find suitable female candidates. I doubt he is alone. Many companies struggle to select suitable women candidates for high ranking roles. On the other hand, so many women are leading the charge for start-ups across various industries. So as we talk about women, it’s a mixed bag. Take a leap to page 12 to look at women who have gone against the status quo in their fields!

What are your goals after your studies? What change do you aim to make that will transform your community? Let us know!

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Varsity Times #HelpUsGetThere #SupportADream

he Varsity Times has embarked on a journey to support South African students by raising funds towards their tuition and accommodation costs for 2018. If you are reading this, you have just supported a cause that will see one aspiring university student receive a 1 year all expenses paid bursary, another placed in student accommodation closer to their place of studies once a month including start–up funding for one promising entrepreneur in 2018. As a young team, the Varsity Times understands the financial challenges the youth of South Africa currently faces. As a publication dedicated to reporting on these challenges we are now focused on addressing some of these by playing an active role in assisting and overcoming these challenges one student at a time. The Varsity Times team would like to thank you for your support and for assisting us in as far as instilling hope in the young South African’s who are faced with financial difficulties.

This funding will be allocated to: • • • •

Tuition Fees Payments towards student loans 1 year student accommodation 1 Entrepreneur will receive start-up funding Quote: South Africa is blessed to have women and men like yourselves who have little to give but give what you have with open hands and open hearts. ~ Mangosuthu Buthelezi This edition will see 100 000 copies distributed in 9 provinces in, and around universities and major intersections in major metro’s. This will see 25 000 copies printed and distributed weekly. To see how the #HelpUsGetThere #SupportADream unfolds we encourage you, our readers and supporters to follow us on twitter: @VTimessa and Facebook: @VTimessa to witness the progress a small contribution will make to assisting South African students achieve their dreams. For further details email us on: Mikhail.oliphant@intshamedia.com.

Publisher – Mikhail Oliphant Mikhail.oliphant@intshamedia.com Find us on Twitter: @Vtimessa Facebook: @Vtimessa Website:www.vtimessa.co.za

A world of opportunities Discover a world of opportunities at the University of the Free State. We are here to serve you to become the leader, the critical thinker, the rain maker – the best you! Give your dreams wings and apply now and get it all at Kovsies. Remember you don’t pay an application fee.

T: 051 401 3000 | E: ufsmarketing@ufs.ac.za | www.ufs.ac.za

Inspiring excellence. Transforming lives.

WHY Kovsies? - We recognize and offer you the best academic training in your field - We encourage the development of leadership skills that will differentiate you from the rest of society - We take pride in providing you with skills and knowledge to enable you to work anywhere in the world - We provide you the best technology and networks to connect you with knowledge - We celebrate an openness for new ideas, debate and critical thinking - We value and live a culture of respect and kindness - We work hard to have you to enjoy a balanced student life - But most of all – WE VALUE YOU AND YOUR FUTURE!


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Above: DUT’s Shakeel Ori Appointed As The New Member of WACE Executive Committee Left: Thato Pooe, a success story out of Mr Ori’s department. The 25-year-old final year Computer Systems Engineering student who is in Thailand doing his Work Integrated Learning (WIL) at the Thailand branch of the Western Digital Corporation. Photos: Supplied

Ori is at the forefront of Work Integrated Learning (WIL) at DUT

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he Director of the Durban University’s Co-Operative Education Department, Shakeel Ori, is no stranger to receiving accolades. He has been recently appointed as the newest member of the WACE Executive Committee. The World Association for Cooperative Education (WACE) was founded in 1983 to foster co-operative education and other work integrated learning programmes worldwide. Its main goals are to build a membership of educators and employers from around the world, produce biennial world conferences on co-operative education and develop a newsletter, with worldwide distribution, devoted to issues involved in work integrated learning and co-operative education. Ori works passionately in forging close working relationships between students and industry and the dynamic and hardworking director has now been given the ‘world’ opportunity to join 14 other highly respected colleagues, who will meet once a year, to set up policy and plans for the

global organisation as well as to collaborate with programme committees to make sure that WACE events (research symposiums and world conferences) have a strong research stream. Speaking on his achievement on being selected to represent DUT at the WACE executive committee, Ori said he is excited to be part of the Executive of such a world body. Speaking on his achievement on being selected to represent DUT at the WACE executive committee, Ori said he is excited to be part of the Executive of such a world body. “I have been on the WACE Board of Directors for seven years and we have participated in their world events, including hosting the WACE World Conference here in Durban. And given that there has been a lot of focus on the change of the WIL body, it was decided that I will be a suitable candidate for the WACE executive committee. The other reason that I am happy to be on board is that there are many more countries that are

adopting WIL for their national strategy for employability and that is something I am keen to help promote,” he said excitedly. Speaking more about the Co-op department, Ori added that the unit’s objective is to facilitate cooperation between DUT, external stakeholders, community and governmental departments. The department has two main divisions, one being for experiential learning placements (WIL) and the other for graduate placement. Through Ori’s successful networking and through his role as a South African Business Events ambassador, pastpresident of SASCE as well as Director of the World Association for Co-operative Education, he has been at the forefront of engagement with many industries which he persuades to take on DUT students in the work industry or community for experimental learning. One of the outcomes of this unit is that it has brought funding for research students and bursaries just by linking up with the right people and SETAs Vice-Chancellor and Principal of DUT,

Thandwa Mthembu congratulated Ori on his achievement on the world stage. “As fellow DUT staff members, we could only bask in your glory with great pride. Thanks a lot for the opportunity,” he said proudly. Ori said his success, as well as that of his unit, is as a result of “good relationships that we build and nurture with external organisations and companies as well as people across the University” who have supported the work of his department. “Going forward, we need to prepare students to be work ready. That is, they must have work ethics and realise that the world of work is different from an academic classroom. Lecturers should also play a more active role in preparing the students for the workplace in the future. Education is a partnership, which, through Co-operative and Work-integrated Education, allows the development of graduate attributes, employability (including self-employability and entrepreneurship) and improved academic performance – it’s not just giving out academic certificates,” he said.

News Bites Students with disabilities disadvantaged at higher education level It has been widely reported that at school level, children with disabilities face serious barriers to accessing education. But at tertiary level the picture isn’t much better, with 80% of potential students with disabilities not attending a tertiary institution. It may be time to get a lot more creative in promoting inclusivity.

Cash Strapped Zimbabwe plans $1 Billion Robert Mugabe University The Robert Gabriel Mugabe University is set to focus on science and technology and have an institute focusing on research and “transformative and revolutionary leadership.”

UJ’s mining faculty gets R15 million investment from Sibanye Sibanye partnered with the University of Johannesburg (UJ) to integrate mining education with the Fourth Industrial revolution and will be injecting R15 million into the University’s mining engineering faculty over the next three years, which will be R5 million each year from 2017 - 2019.

UKZN ranked third top university in SA “As a research-led university, UKZN is proud of this achievement, more especially as it is the only university in South Africa to have maintained its position in the world rankings and also improved on its scoring since last year.” Deputy Vice-Chancellor of Research, Professor Deresh Ramjugernath


August/September 2017 – Y our Trusted Truth Source

Celebrating the great women of UWC The University of the Western Cape is home to many inspiring women – who are making their mark at the University and far beyond. Here are just a few.

Dr Fanelwa Ngece-Ajayi Dr Ngece-Ajayi is a senior lecturer in Physical Chemistry at UWC, and a research leader in the field of drug metabolism nanobiosensors for antiretrovirals and Tuberculosis treatment drugs. Apart from her role at the University, Dr Ngece-Ajayi also leads a non-profit organisation called AmaQawe ngeMfundo, which she founded along with five other academics. Together, they aim to change the negative stereotypes about townships and instil confidence among pupils living there to study maths and science.

fishgate.co.za_UW7891

Through their efforts, they have empowered more than 60 pupils from different schools in Khayelitsha using motivational seminars, workshops and talks. These events are also tailored to provide pupils with information pertaining to bursary and scholarship applications, apart from assisting them with placement at institutions of higher learning.

Dr Imogen Wright

Dr Mmaki Jantjies

Dr Wright, a scientist and researcher at UWC’s South African Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI), was instrumental in the development of a software solution called Exatype, which enables health workers to determine a patient’s responsiveness to antiretroviral drugs.

Dr Jantjies is one of the first black women to obtain a Ph.D. in Computer Science, and has greatly contributed to research on mobile learning technology development for mathematics and science in South African schools, with a focus on multilingual content presentation.

Through a simple report, Exatype detects drug resistance in patients – highlighting the need to avoid certain drugs to ensure successful treatment. The software has the potential to contribute towards effectively managing HIV/AIDS in Africa, and also holds promise in helping detect drug resistance for other disease burdens such as Tuberculosis, Malaria and antimicrobial resistance.

She is currently the head of the Information Systems Department at UWC, and also coordinator of the Mozilla and UN Women technology clubs for girls. These clubs are focused on teaching basic technology skills to young girls in disadvantaged communities, with the aim of introducing the technology industry as a viable career option.

This noteworthy work, done in conjunction with UWC spin-off company, Hyrax Biosciences, earned Dr Wright a second place at the 2016 Innovation Prize for Africa (IPA) Awards.

Dr Jantjies’ passion for ICT development earned her a spot on the 2017 Mail & Guardian Young 200 Top Achievers’ list, as well as a place on the list of South Africa’s top 50 inspiring women in technology.

For more inspiring stories, visit www.uwc.ac.za

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All South African schools to be online by 2018

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eputy Minister of Basic Education, Enver Surty, says every South African school will be digitally connected by 2018.

“The intention is that, by the end of next year, every single school must be connected. As we speak, 98% of schools are connected for purposes of administration,” he said. Surty made the statement during his keynote address at the second Education Conversations event of 2017, held at the University of Johannesburg (UJ) Soweto Campus, on 25 July. He acknowledged that many young people use a tablet, an iPhone or an iPad, and so the country has to digitise its learning content. According to him, over 300 textbooks have already been digitised, with over 124 of these in the science and technology fields. “We cannot teach without integrating Information and communication technology (ICT) into the school curriculum. It has become a core element in terms of the process of learning.” Education Conversations are organised by the Kagiso Trust, a leading development agency working for freedom from poverty, in partnership with the University of Johannesburg’s Faculty of Education. Its interactive sessions create platforms for key education stakeholders, students and society at large to engage on matters that affect and impact South Africa’s education system, with a view to propose practical solutions to the sector’s challenges. “We cannot say there is a qualitative improvement in the school system unless we are able to assess it,” continued Surty. “ICT is our opportunity to do this. It allows us to disseminate data banks for tests and assessments and to manage and oversee complex systems. We believe that, soon enough, we will be able to use

ICT in such a purposeful and meaningful way that we could change the face of education in South Africa.” There are currently 147 District Teacher Development Centres (DTDCs) in the country, which provide spaces designed to train teachers on how to integrate ICT into classrooms. These DTDCs are equipped with interactive boards, laptops, desktops, servers, data projectors, routers and printers. “The view, the dream and the hope are that having passed the 65% mark in terms of the digitalisation of textbooks, by the end of 2018, every single textbook, for every grade in every subject, will be digitised and made available to every single learner,” Surty concluded. Under the theme: ‘Our vision for South African education’, the even saw numerous students from UJ’s Faculty of Education in attendance, several of whom have had their contributions on the topic published in the Education Conversations’ Occassional Publications Series. Many posed difficult questions to the panel, which apart from the Deputy Minister, also included founder and executive director of Oratile Early Childhood Development Centre, Abram Kgari, and Koketso Nthimbane, an education honours student at UJ. Further insights into the education sector were provided by UJ Professor, Caroline Long, who spoke about the merits of agency in effective teaching in South Africa. The event was facilitated by radio and TV broadcaster Masechaba Ndlovu, who fielded questions from the audience through social networking site Twitter. The next Education Conversations event takes place on 5 September 2017. More details can be found on Kagiso Trust’s

Photo: Jack Once Productions

Profile

Veronica Modieleng — Entrepreneur & Public Speaker Introduction

My name is Veronica. I was born in 1990-04-18 in Bloemfontein. I am an Entrepreneur developer and corporate event host. I am a member of the Youth Chamber of commerce and Industry. In 2016 I became Managing Director at Entrepreneurship Custodians and also Project Manager at National Financial Literacy Association. In 2017 March I Opened my solo Company called Veromo Enterprise which specializes in PR, marketing and Events Management. I am very outgoing, vivacious and confident person and am very passionate about SMME development and Financial Literacy based on the love of wanting to develop SMME I have made platforms for SMME to engage and network with Big business and relevant stakeholders. I have been contacting Business seminars for more than 5 years in partnership with different stakeholders. I speak 3 languages English, Xhosa and Setswana, and also speak a little bit of Afrikaans. I am currently learning Tshivenda. In May 2014 I had an opportunity to explore a new professional role when I was appointed as the Programme Director for the Open Arms Wide Visual Arts Exhibition in Alexandra, Johannesburg. The experience unleashed to me how working and performing in an artsoriented environment brings out the very best in me. I was widely complimented for my role, and have been invited back for the next event. On Women’s Day in August 2014, I hosted my first event in Botshabelo, Free State and i realised that event management is an area I want to develop my professional personality on. I fell in love with events from this event and I never looked back. In the same year 2014, I was appointed the National Coordinator of the Entrepreneurs Networking South Africa till 2015 June, I coordinated the launch and the year plan breakfast of ENSA and other events, and did public speaking in most of the events. In 2015 I was

Intsha Media will be launching the National Financial Literacy Initiative during the month of September 2017. A series of seminars across the country will be hosted to assist in educating young entrepreneurs on how to manage their finances to ensure its sustainability. With thought leaders, motivators, investors and industry leaders sharing their knowledge and experience with the future business leaders of South Africa.

For further information visit: www.intshamedia.com Or contact Mikhail Oliphant: Mikhail.oliphant@intshamedia.com

one of the guest speakers at the Arts conference in Qwa Qwa speaking to the youth about how to value life and make the most of it. In July 2015 I started working with the Free State Chamber of Commerce and Industry as a Project coordinator of the Youth entrepreneurship Awards that was on 20th November 2015. Due to my passion for growth and networking, working with people of different skills and personalities always fascinate me. I got to love working with people that I end up having a passion for coordinating Business Seminars (High impact seminars) which focuses on the opportunities that SMME can tap into. I have dedicated most of my time in creating a platforms where ideas and opportunities can be shared. Working with people is what I love most. While employed at Telkom as a Technical support Agent in 2013, I learned and put into practice good communications skills. This period of formal employment taught me I that I am a good time manager, vibrant and able to work under pressure. I get on well with colleagues and client and believe that my strength lies in working very well within the team and also individually. In this post I acquired administrative and data capturing knowledge and I am computer literate across a range of programmes and this fits in very well with my event management passion as i have to work with stage consultants as well. But more significant for my own development as a professional person, I have also developed considerable experience of customer service and relations. I believe that the types of inter-personal skills that I developed continuously equip me to deliver beyond expectations in the events I manage. In 2016/2017 I was given an opportunity by Jozi Media to be the Project Manager of the 1st Annual South African Politicians Awards which took place on 8th February 2017 in Cape Town. And it was a great success, with this event I got to find out how strong and courageous I am.


August/September 2017 – Y our Trusted Truth Source

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Wits University women developing South African education through research in their fields

Dr Nicole De Wet – researching threats to adolescent survival

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r Nicole De Wet is a senior lecturer in demography and population studies at Wits University. She is a CARTA Fellow and a 2016 Woman in Science runner-up. CARTA is the Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa. CARTA funds and supports doctoral training programmes in public health and population studies to advance research and researchers in Africa. De Wet’s research focuses on adolescent health outcomes in South Africa. There is limited research in this country on 10-19 year olds specifically. This age group is fragmented and usually incorporated into adult or child health studies. However, the needs of this age group are specific and distinct from that of children and adults. In the course of her research De Wet has established that diseases pose a higher risk of death for females, while accidents and homicide present higher risks of death for males. Furthermore, place of residence is also a factor and 15-19 years old adolescents are at a higher risk of premature death than are 10-14-year olds. Since attaining her PhD, De Wet has researched adolescent health behaviours that either promote or prohibit successful transition to adulthood. He research identifies risky sexual behaviours and illicit drug use, which puts the health of adolescents at risk. This research aligns with the Policy Guidelines for Youth and Adolescent Health in South Africa. This policy aims to strengthen young people’s capacity to take charge of their own well-being, and promote safe and supportive environments for adolescents. These include relationships with families, social norms and cultural practices.

Dr Thandiswa Ngcungcu – helped solve a 20-year old genetic mystery

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r Thandiswa Ngcungcu is a lecturer in the Division of Human Genetics at Wits. She is a Wits alumna whose undergraduate BSc majors were Genetics, Developmental Biology, Microbiology, and Biotechnology. She was awarded the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship, which honed her postgraduate research interest in non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and the genetics of obesity in the black South Africans. She joined the Wits Non Communicable Disease Research Leadership Training Programme in 2011, earning her MSc. In 2012 Ngcungcu chose keratolytic winter erythema (KWE) as her project for the Next Generation Scientist Programme and later pursued the topic as PhD project. KWE or ‘Oudtshoorn skin’ in Afrikaners, so named for the Western Cape town where it occurred in large families, causes a redness of the palms and soles with consecutive peeling of large sections of thick skin. Afrikaners have a high risk for several genetic disorders, because of ‘founder mutations’ brought to South Africa by immigrants who settled in the Cape. Ngcungcu’s research involved large-scale DNA sequencing during an internship on the Next Generation Scientist Programme in Switzerland. The mutation could not be detected by conventional data analysis, so large regions of the genome that are duplicated or deleted were investigated. Ngcungcu and peers then discovered a duplication of a region between genes, called an enhancer (which ‘switches on’ the target gene) was present in all South African KWE-affected individuals studied. In May 2017, Ngcungcu and peers published these findings in a high impact international journal.

Dr Peace Kiguwa – disrupting heteronormative practice in teaching

Dr Nicky Falkof – interrogating race and anxiety in the media

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r Nicky Falkof is an Associate Professor and the Head of Department for Media Studies at Wits. Her PhD was concerned with crises in white identity during the late apartheid period, read symptomatically through media reporting on the Satanism scare and socalled epidemic of Afrikaans family murder. She published this research as an academic monograph in 2015 and in a revised paperback edition for the trade market in 2016. Falkof was a 2017 Friedel Sellschop Early Career Research Award recipient, which recognises and encourages young academics. Her research primarily interrogates the way in which popular media and culture intersect with identity and ideology. She is interested in issues to do with race (particularly whiteness) and gender (particularly masculinity), as well as with fear, affect, narrative and the urban. Her work is multidisciplinary in nature, drawing on cultural studies, media studies, psychoanalysis, anthropology, and sociology. Falkof’s current research considers risk, anxiety and moral panic in the global south. Interrogating ideas about the culture of fear, she explores issues including Satanist murders of young women, urban legends in Johannesburg townships and the use of social media spaces to advance claims of white ‘victimhood’. In studying space and identity intersections in contemporary global south cities, she has published on the shift from maids’ rooms to garden cottages in Johannesburg and is working on a comparative project around tourist narratives in Cape Town and Santiago, Chile. Her research aims to show the way in which collective anxieties, often centred on race, shape lived experience in the urban global south.

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r Peace Kiguwa lectures in Social Psychology and Gender Studies in the Department of Psychology at Wits University. She works as an independent reseacher on the Ford Foundation on Young Women’s Leadership in Higher Education project, and the Destabilising Heteronormative Practice within Higher Education project, funded by Aid International. She is a research consultant for the Poetso Music Project, an NGO-based venture that focuses on the rehabilitation of male prisoners through music. Kiguwa earned her PhD in 2014 for her thesis, A Study of Racialized Subjectivity in the Post-Graduate Academy, and she won the Vice-Chancellor’s Individual Teaching and Learning Award in December 2016. The citation in motivation of her nomination for this prestigious award describes Kiguwa as “a deeply thoughtful scholar who offers nuanced, fresh ideas that are deeply rooted in a constant rethinking of what the social and psychosocial may means”. In applying her mind to teaching Psychology, Kiguwa displays an intimate understanding of the intersection between teaching and learning, research and community engagement intersect. In addition, she ensures a relevant, ethical and critical consciousness among many of her students by using innovative teaching methodologies in the classroom. What makes Kiguwa’s work significant is that she draws on globally significant debates about teaching difference to understand African and South African transformation realities. This combined teaching and learning and research excellence is crucial, and Kiguwa is a scholar who finds ways to teach creatively while incorporating solid theoretical bases that demonstrably contribute to critical and transformative thinking in higher education.


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Above: Dr Xolani Mkhawanazi & Professor Gordon Zide Above right: Chancellor Professor Gordon Zide Right: Newly appointed Vice Chancellor Xolani Mkhawanazi. Photos: Alechea van As — VUT Multimedia

Ushering in a new era at Vaal University of Technology

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he Vaal University of Technology (VUT) celebrated change and welcomed in a new era of leadership with the inauguration of the newly appointed Chancellor, Dr Xolani Mkhwanazi and Vice-Chancellor and Principal, Professor Gordon Zide on 12 August. On this day at the Vanderbijlpark Campus, a new moment was recorded in the history books of the university, witnessed by leaders, staff, students and the community. “It’s a privilege and honour to walk this journey for the next five years,” said Dr Mkhwanazi. Dr Mkhwanazi is a scientist and an internationally experienced senior business leader, serving as a Director with several reputable companies. He is also the former Executive Chairman of BHP Billiton Southern Africa. He holds a BSc in Maths and Physics from the University of Botswana and Swaziland and completed

an MSc and PhD in Applied Physics at the University of Lancaster, in the United Kingdom. In his role as the Chancellor, he said he wishes to see the university reach extraordinary heights. His vision is to see VUT competing as a world-class institution for higher education. He also wants to spearhead the training of more youth in the fields of science and technology. In his inaugural address, titled: “The role of ethics in service excellence: a management challenge for the current and future leaders in the 21st century”, ViceChancellor and Principal, Prof Zide, focused on his strategic vision for the university. To the obvious pleasure of his audience, he emphasised the importance of leading with dignity and complete transparency. He added that during his tenure he will annually hold a public budget speech and a State of the University address as he feels it is important that a culture of accountability and transparency is perpetuated. He further

said he wants VUT to produce many PhDs which may ultimately assist in decolonising education. Minister of Water and Environmental Affairs, Dr Edna Molewa congratulated Dr Mkhwanazi and Prof Zide and wished them well in taking up the mammoth task of leadership in these uncertain times. “Nothing prepares today’s ViceChancellors for what awaits them. They may think they are always better prepared but institutions are changing at a phenomenal pace,” she said. Touching on the university space and its dynamics, the Minister said that Vice-Chancellors often need to brace themselves for the impact that information technology introduces. “Knowledge is accessible and ubiquitous. So the authority shifts from the lecturer to the internet,” she said. “Universities must compete for students

and funding. Unfortunately, the competition is not a level playing field. We know that historically disadvantaged universities such as VUT are still hamstrung by poor facilities and as such have to find innovative ways to ‘catch up’. Your appointment coincides with an economically constrained environment. Within this context, the demands are often unrealistic against diminishing resources. So, navigating through this space is a managerial challenge that must be overcome,” she said. She further noted that neither Dr Mkhwanazi nor Prof Zide were obligated to take up these leadership positions. Instead, they were chosen and accepted the roles. In doing so, they have infused everyone in the university environment with a sense of optimism and resolve to work harder to make VUT a premier centre of learning for the country and for the continent.

Bursaries answer the #feesmustfall national crisis #FeesMustFall protests may be less visible, but that does not mean that the movement has lost momentum. The legacy of suppression leaves in its wake a pool of youth, desperate for education, but unable to fund their needs. While the movement is demanding free education, the viability of this as a solution has been drawn into question. As an alternative solution, bursaries are promoted. While these programmes may not provide a solution for the masses, they do provide relief for some – and the more bursary programmes that exist, the more people will be given the opportunity to build their skills and develop a sustainable career path. One such programme is The Finance and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority’s (Fasset) Bursary Scheme.

This scheme comprises 10 programmes, funding 1 041 students, with a total fund of R196 511 670.20. The scheme entails securing the services of one or more suitably qualified Bursary Management Agents from Public Universities and Universities of Technology (as listed by the Department of Higher Education and Training - DHET), Private Bursary Management Agencies and/ or Professional Bodies to manage the bursary fund on Fasset’s behalf. Amos Nokoane, Acting Projects Manager at Fasset, confirms that the scheme was founded to give candidates a helping hand in achieving their learning and development goals. “The bursary is aimed at: African Black candidates in all provinces; Coloured candidates in the Western and Northern Cape; and learners with disabilities of any race, who qualify. These bursaries are offered with respect to qualifications which fall into one of the top ten identified scarce skills, as identified in

Fasset’s Sector Skills Plan (SSP).” With a noted under-representation of African Black and Coloured people, particularly in the Western and Northern Cape provinces, Fasset has honed in on these areas for additional support. This means that Coloured learners in the Western and Northern Cape provinces can now access Fasset’s bursary schemes, can enter into learnerships and internships, and can also benefit in the learner lifelong learning interventions. Resultantly, Western Cape employers also benefit, as they can now fully utilise the grants available to them. “This scheme was established in order to assist the ‘missing middle’ LSM students, who come from a family earning a combined household salary of between R123 000 and R350 000 per annum.” With the aim to address the national crisis highlighted by the #FeesMustFall movement this Bursary Scheme, was launched in 2017 and is cur-

rently in its first year of implementation. This project has been implemented at the University of Pretoria, University of Free State, University of Cape Town, and University of Johannesburg developing a national footprint. Although it is in its initial phases, great successes have already been witnessed with a large number of otherwise unfunded learners receiving funding. Considering the level of funding offered, candidates must show their eligibility to meet the criteria. “Candidates must show the required potential to succeed, while meeting the pre-set minimum academic criteria, as well as the coming from the ‘missing middle’ income group,” concludes Nokoane. “Candidates must also progress from one academic year to another, or complete their qualification. The ultimate goal is to see candidates receiving their qualifications, with an 80 percent pass rate, and going on to build successful, fruitful careers.”


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Access To Success 2017: Helping O Aidan van den Heever & Nicklaus Kruger

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t’s a neat little problem: A good education - and especially a good tertiary education - can make dreams come true, especially for those from disadvantaged backgrounds or with limited means. But to successfully attain that education requires transport, textbooks, fees, food security - which can be difficult for those of limited means. To solve that problem, the University of the Western Cape’s Access To Success 2017 campaign is raising funds for deserving students. Students like Amanda Kiva, who will be able to realise her dream of graduating with her BCom Industrial Psychology degree thanks to the campaign’s efforts. Amanda was born in the Eastern Cape, but moved to Cape Town after her grandmother died. She attended Sinenjongo High School in Joe Slovo Park in Milnerton, Cape Town. After high school the way forward was clear.

Dr Funelwa Ngece-Ajayi at work in her laboratory at the University of the Western Cape. Her passion for science doesn’t end here. During school holidays she heads off to Khayelitsha to encourage learners to follow a career in science. Photo: Harriet Box

UWC academic changes community through Science

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Harriet Box

t is admirable when someone attains success and yet remains humble. And it’s even more admirable when one’s circumstances growing up were humble, but one remains proud of one’s background and commits to making a positive change in the community one came from. For Dr Fanelwa Ngece-Ajayi, a senior lecturer in Physical Chemistry at the University of the Western Cape (UWC), and research leader in the field of drug metabolism nanobiosensors for antiretrovirals and Tuberculosis treatment drugs, understands that applying to a university to further your education is not a given for people living in township communities like Khayelitsha in Cape Town, where she comes from. Today, Ngece-Ajayi established and leads a non-profit organisation, AmaQawe ngeMfundo, which she started a few months ago on 8 February 2017, along with five other academics. Together, they want to change the negative stereotypes about townships, and they decided to start their work in schools, instilling confidence among pupils to study maths and science. The academic with her bubbly personality and personable nature is enthusiastic about her work when she explains what she and her collaborators aim to achieve. “I’m happy to be leading this group of academics. We all have a heart for the communities we come from and we want to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) among pupils in townships and rural schools, and to encourage these pupils to pursue careers in these areas. “We visit schools with our makeshift mobile laboratory and give learners access to interactive demonstrations and experiments to help make learning more practical. Then there are times we take them on outings - to the Science Centre, for instance. One of the learners inspired by that trip would like to become a forensic biologist,” she says, pleased with the result. “We are limited to Khayelitsha at this point because of inadequate resources and funding, but we would like to see this project expanding nationally.” She appeals to both the private and public sector to support this cause through any form of donations and sponsorships. “In future, I’m excited about seeing these youngsters interested in solving the current water crisis, as well as finding solutions to the health issues in South Africa. I’d want them to see that it is possible to be part of this country’s teams leading projects of this magnitude. “Lecturing at UWC showed me that students from the townships and rural-based schools struggle financially, and sometimes quit their

studies due to a lack of proper foundation in science and a lack of exposure in the field, and I’d like to change that,” she says. “So far we’re proud of what we’ve achieved. Through our efforts we’ve empowered more than 60 pupils from different schools in Khayelitsha through the motivational seminars, workshops and talks we offer. These events are also tailored to provide these pupils with information pertaining to bursary and scholarship applications, apart from assisting them with placement at institutions of higher learning. “It is rewarding to see the positive effect the seminars have on them and how they influence pupils to eventually choose science as a future career. I’d like to see more scientists, engineers and doctors – these are exactly the kinds of skills that this country needs,” says Ngece-Ajayi. She is clearly passionate about education. “I like the whole idea of breaking the cycle of poverty by means of education. It’s what motivated me. My mother, who worked as a domestic worker, pushed education and hard work, simply because she never had the opportunity.” They had no support from her father, but her mom managed to pay for her schooling and that of her other three siblings - a brother now aged 30, a sister currently in matric, and another sister who completed matric a few years ago. They all relied and survived on only her mother’s salary as they were growing up. “I would contribute financially by braiding hair over weekends as well as helping my mom work as a domestic worker also over weekends - until I eventually obtained a government bursary during my honours year. That’s when I was able to stop working and concentrate on my studies. “To me the most disheartening thing is to see bright kids from my area pass matric and sit at home aimlessly. It makes a difference, going out to communities which don’t have wifi access, and teaching them how to go about doing an online application. When you’re right there in the community, it makes it easier for learners to run back home quickly to get the necessary documents, instead of travelling back and forth. I’m basically doing what I would’ve liked done for me when I used to be in the same situation,” she says. Dr Ngece-Ajayi, a mother of three, aged nine, five and three, says she hopes to inspire learners to achieve greater things. “With enough will-power any child can succeed, no matter their living conditions and background. These factors never define you, or are deciding factors when it comes to a child’s potential. My advice is to build hope and to have a plan.” For media enquiries contact Harriet Box on 021 959 9566 or 072 266 4760 or hbox@uwc.ac.za

Harriet Box & Nicklaus Kruger

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t’s been my dream to study at the University of the Western Cape because of the high quality of education offered here,” says B.Ed student Nokwanda Linki Tengeni. And thanks to UWC’s Access To Success 2017 campaign, financial issues won’t turn that dream into a nightmare. “One of my favourite moments at UWC was the Prof O’Connell’s welcome to the first-year students in 2013,” says Nokwanda. “At that stage I was still in shock and didn’t believe that I had made it into UWC. It was from that moment on that the reality of this new experience started sinking in.” Further study wasn’t a guarantee for the lifelong Khayelitsha, Cape Town resident - she comes from a large family of five (all of whom went to Vuzamanzi Primary School, then to Intlanganis Senior Secondary). Providing for fees, textbooks, transport and so on was a bit of a challenge. And being a parent while studying, Nokwanda faced other difficulties as well. “Raising kids while studying was my biggest challenge,” she says. “You can’t really concentrate with kids around who constantly want your atten-

“I decided to apply to the University of the Western Cape to further my studies, as this is one of the best universities in the country,” Amanda says. “I was the first member of my family to study here.” Amanda is grateful for the opportunity to achieve her dreams. “I wish to thank all the donors for making the dreams come true for not only myself but for many other students - I am very grateful for the Access to Success campaign.” After she completes her degree next year - thanks to Access to Success - she intends to start a small enterprise with the hopes of bettering the lives of her family and friends. “My mother is my role model,” Amanda says. “She raised three children on her own, with good values and the drive to succeed.” Whatever she does, she’ll take the lessons and values she learned at UWC with her. “Even though I have been through many challenges,” she says, “I hope to to make my University proud.” tion, but I’ve managed throughout with the support I am getting from my mom.” Nokwanda was dealt another blow when she lost a baby at birth. “It was hard for me and it had a devastating impact on my academic life - I failed and had to repeat my second year, which meant I couldn’t get a bursary for further study. So it’s been really difficult to generate money for my studies as well as for my kids to go to school.” “I owe the University a large sum of money and I really don’t have enough words,” says Nokwanda. “But I’ll start by saying, ‘Thank you’, and requesting that they continue doing what they are doing. Knowing that I’m somehow going to be supported by Access to Success is enough to help me concentrate on my studies, rather than on my finances. At least I have one less thing to worry about.” Thanks to Access To Success, Nokwanda is dreaming even bigger than before. “I want to continue my schooling and be in an established career in teaching some day,” she says. “And hopefully I’ll get a chance to open my own NGO and help other kids - not only girls - who are facing the same problems I’ve experienced...and make my mother proud.”

ayson Scott Valentine (21), a second-year Sports Science student from Southfield in Cape Town, knows the importance of determination and persistence to success. After matriculating from Plumstead High School in 2013, he applied to two tertiary institutions: the University of Cape Town (UCT) and University of the Western Cape (UWC) - but he wasn’t accepted by either. He took it well. “Because it is not in my nature to give up,” he says, “I decided to take a gap year, while doing promotional work, and then I tried again.” It’s an attitude he learned from his mother (and role model), Shireen, who he admires because of her positive attitude towards life’s challenges. “Her persistence in overcoming adversity is admirable and I really respect her and admire her for this.” Jayson’s determination paid off: he reapplied to UWC in 2015 - and this time he was accepted. He chose to apply to UWC because he had heard that it has the best biokinetics programme, and he believes that the equipment and training here is better than all the other institutions. Obtaining a degree in sports science is definitely part of his long term plan. “In my honours at UWC I will be doing my internship at UWC’s biokinetics laboratory - and later I’ll further my studies by doing my honours

in biokinetics, also at UWC .” But getting in was just the first step - once at university, he had to cope with financial and logistical challenges. “For me, studying at UWC entails that I use public transport and this generally takes up to two hours per day just getting to campus and another two hours getting back home,” says Jayson. “This definitely has a negative effect on my academic performance,” Luckily, UWC’s Access to Success campaign stepped in to provide funding and support to ease some of his financial burdens, allowing him to concentrate on what really matters. The campaign focuses on providing much-needed funding to students who are performing well academically, but who cannot afford university fees. “It has offered me the help I needed to further my education and made my life a lot easier in the process,” Jayson says about the Access to Success Campaign, “This means I have less debt to pay and far less stress in my life, while studying.” And he’s making the most of it. “I would like to thank the donors of the Access to Success campaign for making a contribution to my university fees. I would also like to thank access to success for giving me this opportunity and for the part they have played in advancing my career,” he says. “After I graduate,I would like to do the same for other students in my position.

The Access to Success campaign, which ran from 7 to 31 August 2017, focused on providing much-needed funding to students who are performing well academically, but who cannot afford university fees.

The Access To Success 2017 campaign includes: • a public media fundraising campaign; • a an alumni phonathon where current students gather testimonies from alumni and request regular, affordable annual donations; and • a a pledge system to allow UWC staff to contribute.

Harriet Box & Nicklaus Kruger

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Others Grow From Hope To Action Harriet Box & Nicklaus Kruger

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or final year BA student Philisa Mzuku, 20, studying Psychology and Language and Communication Studies at the University of the Western Cape (UWC) has been a fascinating experience - and also a challenging one, thanks to financial difficulties. “In my first and second year I didn’t have any funding for my studies. There were times when I didn’t attend class - because I simply didn’t have the money for it. But the Access to Success Campaign has really reduced the burden, and helped me focus on my studies.” The Dunoon, Cape Town resident lives with her family - my mother, my father and my four siblings (she’s the second-born and also the second one to go to university). After matriculating from Inkwenkwezi Secondary School, she decided to study at UWC for two reasons: the swift response to her application, and the fact that her sister was already at the university, studying Nursing. “I could adapt so much better since she was leading me and helped me in every new step on my path as a new student at UWC,” Philisa explains. But having a sibling as a fellow student didn’t help with one important aspect: the significant challenges she faced on on the financial front. “We struggled a lot because I am not the only one who had to make use of transport when attending school every day, and I also didn’t have assistance when it came to food,” she says. “My dad was the only one working and the money meant for food was mostly spent on buying textbooks and course readers - and we both have other siblings who need money and make demand around some of their own needs.” The distance Philisa had to travel from home to school via taxi and train made it hard for her. At home she didn’t have a laptop or phone to work on my studies, or a space to study, and the environment wasn’t exactly ideal for studying. She

would have to wake up early to get to campus to get all her work done, and get home safely. “Gangsterism is all around where I live, and therefore it is wise to go home early, even though I do not always have a chance to complete my assignment on time. Philisa was selected by the University and received an email from Financial Aid saying that she was awarded a bursary. I had R50 000 in student debt. Access to Success helped me, offering R15 000 to reduce my debt. “I thank the donors for their assistance,” she says. “This has motivated me to focus on my studies more than I did before.” Philisa plans to continue her studies next year by enrolling for Honours in the Institute for Social Development - a Research Institute with a long-standing and successful postgraduate programme in Development Studies. “If I don’t qualify I want to do an internship or start working in the language communication studies field, media or journalism - something that has to do with communication. And after that? “I want to get a job that will satisfy my needs - and I want to travel the world, conducting research. In 10 years I see myself as someone successful and a motivator or a role model to many. I dream to help or assist other kids who never get a chance to have access to education. Philisa has joined a community non-profit organisation that assists high school students with moving into university or other tertiary education programmes. Philisa wants to acknowledge the role models in her life - especially her mother. “She made me believe in myself and keeps on encouraging me to always fear to be average and to strive for the best in each and every opportunity I encounter,” she says. “She is not highly educated, but she always tells me to put education first - and I think she is the reason all of her children are studying now.”

hulukazi Ralase, 50, considers herself a late bloomer: after matriculating from St Francis Adult Centre in Langa Township, she was only afforded the opportunity to start studying at the age of 46. But she’s made the most of it, despite a few challenges along the way. When her twin sister, Ncikazi, fell pregnant in the year they were supposed to start attending university, Khulukazi decided she was willing to put her plans to further her education on hold and look after her sister’s baby, until her sister finishes her degree. Her desire to study further continued to grow as she saw her twin sister progress in her studies - and especially when she realised that there were opportunities in the form of the Recognition of Prior Learning programme at UWC. “This programme paved the way for me and now I am ready to make a difference in my community.” Today, Khulukazi is studying towards an LLB. It is a five-year course and she is in her third year of study. After having to complete a bridging course in 2013, she was only able to apply successfully in 2014. But there are still challenges to overcome. Unreliable public transport is one of them, as is the general financial struggle of fees, textbooks and the like - and a home environment where she doesn’t have her own study space. “I have to wait for everyone to go to sleep,” she says. “That’s the only time I have to study, and sometimes my studies give me uphill too, and I struggle with a few modules - but I’m learning to keep pushing through.” That’s why Khulukazi is a worthy recipient of funds from UWC’s #AccessToSuccess campaign, which focuses on providing much-needed funding to students who are performing well academically,

but who cannot afford university fees. “Access to Success has offered me a lot of help, and it came at the right time in my life as a full-time student. I have no other means, except NSFAS. It is a huge relief for me and I am grateful. It means I need to work harder and succeed to be able to pay it forward and help others who are in the same position.” In the future Khulukazi wants to pursue her dream of officially launching a programme called Keep Them Safe, aimed at preventing children from committing crimes. “I already started it unofficially, and it focuses on youth development,” she explains. “I want to open spaces to children in my community where they can be free from the dangers modern society poses for them.” Khulukazi has a long-term dream that supports this venture: “I am hoping to travel the world engaging with other youth developers and working with them in trying to tackle important issues such as child safety. I see myself advocating on behalf of women and children who struggle with the same needs.” She is supported by her role model - her mother, Nandipha - who she describes as someone who is tough and who is able to work her way through challenges. Another inspirational figure is Judge Thokozile Mapisa, who studied law at the age of forty. “The Access to Success initiative will definitely impact positively on the lives of students who are in need, motivating them to work harder and achieve more. This idea is good and it has given me food for thought,” says Khulukazi. “I would like say to my funders - there is a saying in isiXhoso, “umntu ngumntu ngabantu”, meaning,’I am because you are’. I am so grateful. It feels like a dream I do not wish to wake up from.”

Last year the campaign exceeded all expectations, having raised over R1,6 million in pledges in three weeks - the target was R1million in five weeks - and having also brought on board 557 new alumni and staff givers. So far, 93 students have benefited from Access To Success - and students can apply for funding

through UWC’s Financial Aid Office. To make a contribution, whether a monthly debit order or once-off donation, or for more information about the #AccessToSuccess campaign, please contact Ms Somayah Barnes at sbarnes@uwc.ac.za or visit accesstosuccess. uwc.ac.za.

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Celebrating Our Educor Women Ashmika Chottu and Nana Zuke

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ere’s to strong women. May we know them. May we be them. May we raise them” – an apt Maya Angelou quote that set the tone for Educor’s inspiring Women’s Month breakfast. Held at its head office on Friday, 11 August, Educor dedicated the morning to celebrate its powerful and hardworking female employees. Themed, ‘Dress for Success’ the women’s day event was spearheaded by the Educor Group Social Committee. The programme for the day featured inspirational and motivational talks from female staff as well as pamper sessions and a special staff talent show, highlighting the rich multicultural mix of Educor women. Programme director Jessie Naidoo, Group Head of Communications for Educor, kicked off the event with an inspiring women empowerment video, which set a powerful tone for the morning. This was followed by an opening song, ‘You raise me up’, by Group Research Manager Lorraine Rajgopaul. Lorraine captivated the audience with her soulful voice and melodious guitar skills. The ladies joined in clapping and singing. Addressing the women at the function, Lorraine said, “Despite our different skin colours and backgrounds, it is important to support each other. At the end of the day, we all fight the same battles.” The song followed through with a host of staff performances such as traditional dance pieces and a live band item. Executive Assistant at Educor, Cookie Palanivelu who was part of the women’s day event said, “Women face so many challenges but their strength always makes them rise up.” She shared her words of wisdom: “When the storms of life beat at your door, remember that a beautiful rainbow must follow.” Cookie further encouraged the women never to forget that they matter

Educor Holdings hosts a successful breakfast in celebration of Women’s Month and they should always be the best they can be.” The women’s day event was a platform for the Educor women to share their strength, weaknesses, victories as well as share their approaches to overcoming obstacles as they lift each other up. After the fun activities, the ladies indulged in a scrumptious breakfast, and were treated to massages and manicures done by their coworkers. The employees who particpated in the programme each received gifts. The best dressed walked away with a prize to pamper herself. Educor is the largest private education provider with ten brands within its stable, including Damelin, ICESA, CityVarsity, Dermatech, Central Technical College, INTEC College, Damelin Correspondence College, Lyceum, and Damelin Online and CityVarsity Online. Each of these brands also celebrated women in its own special way. For more information on Educor, visit www. educor.co.za or like our Facebook page, @ EducorHoldingsPTY

Lyceum’s Louisa Khalo: Enriching the Lives of Grade R Students in South Africa Ashmika Chottu

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hen you educate a man, you educate an individual. When you educate a woman, you educate a nation.” A quote that aptly describes the influence that female education has on a community. With the rise of gender equality in the twenty-first century, women have empowered themselves to make a difference, juggling many roles from being mothers, teachers, caregivers and most importantly breadwinners, among many others. One such remarkable woman is Louisa Khalo. Louisa is a forty-seven-year-old house mother and Lyceum Grade R student who has dedicated her life to the children of the Dominican School for the Deaf. For the past six years, Louisa has been staying at the school hostel in Hamanskraal to take care of the children’s every need during the course of the week. On the weekends, the children leave to go home to their parents. Often spending her time with the six-year-old children and finding herself intrigued by their development is what sparked Louisa’s first step into realising her dream and true purpose in life – teaching. Louisa has always been passionate about the ability to make a difference in children’s lives and this is what led her to Lyceum. She said, “I love spending time with children and being able to teach them new things. For the many years that I am living at the school, I have always been involved in ensuring the children are well-taken care of. I help them have a bath and get ready for school, make their lunches, help with homework and dedicate time to play with them. Now, however, I would love to be able to teach them more.” Senior Lecturer of the Lyceum Education Faculty, Helen Dempsey who got the privilege to work with the admirable Louisa, said “Louisa does not only care about the children’s safety and well-being, but she respects the uniqueness

of her children and decided to get involved with their learning and development. It is when she took the interest and initiative to start a teaching career with Lyceum College by enrolling for the Grade R Diploma. She wanted to create and develop new learning experiences by engaging, motivating and challenging her grade R learners.” The determined Louisa is currently completing her first year of the Grade R Teaching Diploma and expresses that she has already learnt so much thus far. “I enjoy studying at Lyceum. I have learnt a lot so far and the staff are helpful. It is not easy to work and study but Lyceum makes it easy for those who are working. I fit my study time after the children go to bed and on weekends.” Helen added, “We are a team of academics with both theoretical knowledge and practical experience in the Grade R classroom environment. This enables us to impart these skills to our students. Louisa fits in well at our Lyceum family, together with her humble personality and a good base of knowledge.” The dedicated and hard-working Louisa would love to share a message to motivate working all over “It is never too late to start studying. It is difficult to work and study but you must continue. Never give up on your dreams.” For more information on Lyceum log on to www.lyceum.co.za


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Profiling the women across time who are changing the way we live in South Africa August was Women’s Month and we’ve profiled the women across time who are changing the way we live in South Africa. Whether it is big or small, their contribution to society is life changing! We celebrate these exceptional women! Founder of Africa Matters, Farai Mubaiwa, was chosen out of over 2000 applications across the Commonwealth to receive the prestigious Queen’s Young Leader Award at Buckingham Palace in London. Mubaiwa travelled to the UK to meet the Queen of England and receive her award. “The importance in the award lies in the fact that Africa Matters as an organisation that teaches Africans to break away from Western narratives, received a Western award.” According to Mubaiwa, Africa Matters is a youth led organisation that encourages young people to reject the notion that Africa is poor and corrupt by empowering them to become active citizens. They do motivational speaking on youth empowerment, workshops and storytelling. The organisation has plans to establish hubs in the rest of Africa to allow other young Africans to do what they do. *** Dr. Sithembile Ngidi, became KZN’s first black female Radiation Oncologist and second black female in South Africa. “I decided to go into radiation ­oncology because I discovered that it was an area with very

few specialists, but it was an area that needs more doctors.” From a young age, Ngidi knew she wanted to be a doctor and help people. Her dream came true when she graduated from the Colleges of Medicine South Africa. She is now based at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital. “I want to encourage young woman to aspire to be as great as they can be. Gender should not be an issue when you are choosing your career and when people say you can’t do something, it should make you want to prove them wrong.” *** Meet Samantha Ngcolomba, the lawyer who goes around the country to help abused women. Having qualified as a practicing attorney in both South Africa and Zimbabwe, Samantha opened a Non-Profit Organisation purposed to tackle the social needs of ordinary women across the continent. The mobile legal office called Lady Liberty SA travels throughout various regions providing workshops, consultations and if required, further legal services for women in marginalized communities. The workshops are purposed to provide access to information on one’s human rights. “I focus on African women because of the cultural shadows that burden women with expectations: ever so often she forgets her potential.” These services are however available to men as well, with many in the townships of

Johannesburg and Tshwane taking advantage of the opportunity. Since its inception just over a year ago, Lady Liberty has had a direct impact on over 1300 people, reaching individuals throughout the marginalized communities of Gauteng, South Africa. *** In 2014 two entrepreneurs, Neliswa Fente and Raelene Rorke Clarke launched SpringAge, a youth-led innovation consultancy which helps businesses better serve their markets. In August 2016, they announced that they had just been acquired by one of Africa’s leading professional services firms, Deloitte. SpringAge helps its corporate clients (the likes of Microsoft4Afrika, South African Breweries, Woolworths, Pepsico, and Vodacom) to gain greater insight and to come up with solutions to complex problems using innovative methodologies that they have developed. *** In late August this year, Funeka Montjane, Chief Executive of Personal and Business Banking South Africa at Standard Bank, was awarded Business Woman of the Year in the Corporate Category by the Businesswomen’s Association of South Africa (Bwasa), a prominent association of professional women in South Africa. This accolade came hot on the heels of Funeka earning the 2016 Private Sector CEO of the Year Award by the African Woman Chartered

A bright future in STEM: Girls from various schools attended the Girls in STEM seminar at VUT. Below: Minister Naledi Pandor: Minister of Science and Technology addressed the learners. Photos: Supplied

VUT opens doorway of opportunities for girls in STEM

Nontobeko Zondi

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n today’s world, science and technology play a very important role as they have provided advancement in our daily lives and in economic development. Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) subjects allow learners to take advantage of all the opportunities these fields offer. The Vaal University of Technology (VUT) has also taken the initiative to introduce young girls to STEM and to give them a better idea of the opportunities available. On 15 August, VUT hosted a special seminar in this regard at the Desmond Tutu Great Hall. The purpose of this seminar was to invite exceptional women who have excelled in their careers in the STEM fields to interact and serve as role models for young girls in high school and women doing undergraduate studies at VUT. It is hoped that this exposure will encourage female learners to excel in STEM-related

subjects and thus increase their chances of being accepted at tertiary institutions or follow a career in this direction. This year’s seminar was graced by the presence of the Honourable Minister of the Department of Science and Technology, Ms Naledi Pandor, who delivered the keynote address. The newly inaugurated Vice-Chancellor and Principal, Professor Gordon Zide welcomed all guests present to the event and encouraged the young women to take hold of opportunities that have been opened up to them. The Honourable Minister congratulated VUT for organising the seminar. In her address she informed the young women that science, technology and innovation are vitally important for robust and sustainable socio-economic development. She also stated that gender inequality has no place in today’s world: “This gender inequality is unacceptable in modern democracy and is a national

disaster in emerging economies and the developing world. This is because the exclusion of millions of girls and women denies our societies the contribution of half our people,” she said. In her closing, she appealed to young women to follow careers in science, engineering and technology. Other speakers were equally inspiring. Dr Taile Leswifi, a Senior Lecturer: Chemical Engineering in the Faculty of Engineering and Technology at VUT shared her life experiences. She informed the young women to take up the challenges in their journey and said: “Where there is a will, there is a way.” The DVC: Academic and Research, Professor Kuzvinetsa Dzvimbo, acknowledged the guests and encouraged learners to succeed through hard work, thought and focus. The girls received goodie bags with personal care items donated by Thusong Projects, under the Vesco Group, and Lab Coats donated by VUT.

Accountants. Both awards celebrate female leaders who excel in business, yet also strive to uplift their communities. Funeka is known at Standard Bank for encouraging women to give themselves permission to conquer whatever is in their path to success or personal fulfilment. She has compared female empowerment at work to the first person to run a marathon under two hours, saying that all you need is that one person to break the 120-minute mark. When that happens, many others will run it under two hours. Funeka is not just a powerful force in the corporate world, but also a strong advocate for women’s empowerment in greater society. *** You may be living the highlife in London or Perth, earning a fortune with the world at your fingertips, but where do you feel really alive? Angel Jones is CEO and founder of Homecoming Revolution, a company that assists African expats who are planning on returning home. Established in South Africa in 2003, Homecoming Revolution is the “brain gain” Global Headhunting Firm for Africa. We have a database of 37 000 globally experienced African professionals. We also have strong local and international relationships with multinational corporates, professional industry networks, global diaspora groups, Ivy League Universities and university alumni. We travel across the world attending different industry summits and meeting high-calibre candidates. My Life Mission | To bring skilled global Africans back home – inspiring South Africans, Nigerians, Kenyans abroad to return to their home countries.


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Photos: Dee-Ann Kaaijk

UJ: Reimagining a better, smarter, more prosperous Africa that shares, cares and grows together

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he University of Johannesburg (UJ) was established through successful collaboration in 2005, and here we are today, still collaborating to build a better, smarter, prosperous continent that cares, shares and grows together. Today, in its twelfth year of existence, UJ serves approximately 52 000 students across seven faculties and the University of Johannesburg’s College of Business and Economics (CBE), launched on 1 July 2017. CBE is now strategically positioned to act as the centre of regeneration in Africa through socioeconomic transformation and the promotion of Pan-Africanism. UJ continues to play a nurturing but pioneering role in restructuring higher education in Africa. However, as we know, the work of educators is never done. It is incumbent upon UJ to renew, develop and diversify this ancient profession that is so critical to our continent. The university of the future will no doubt look very different due to digital disruption. Some argue that universities will struggle to keep up with the brave new technological world. However, one thing is certain - “learning” will always survive. People will never stop generating innovative ideas and seeking ways to challenge the mind. There will always be a need for some form of university and a place where learning can take place without limiting processes. A place where open innovation and analytical minds can thrive and where the future is shaped. The challenge is to develop and adapt to these new approaches to research, teaching and learning. This can only be achieved through collaborative, forward-thinking and creative academics, tutors and students. Information and knowledge are necessary, but not sufficient. In order to really ‘learn’, students must connect what they are learning to their own personal experiences. They further need to be inspired to delve beneath the surface of information in order to develop wisdom. And wisdom does not come only from lectures, books nor search engines. It comes from ‘thinking out of the box’, from stretching the imagination far beyond what is perceivable and it comes from learning from others and sharing with one another – Ubuntu. UJ continues to ‘rethink’ education and we encourage our students to reinvent themselves. However, we have moved on to the next level. The time is now and clock is ticking! We know what we must do to ensure a bright future for Africa. We are no longer postponing, procrastinating or pondering. We are doing it, and we are doing it now! Our Global Excellence and Stature (GES) flagship programmes reflect our commitment to purposefully and actively ‘reimagining’ where it is needed most:

University of Johannesburg’s Graduate School of Architecture (GSA)

Architecture is to become revolutionary and the University of Johannesburg’s Graduate School of Architecture (GSA) is at the forefront of this drive for a shift in perceptions. Our students continuously open themselves to feel, dream, imagine and then reimagine the future of architecture. We are embracing the age of architecture experimentalism. At GSA we are setting the standard for

need to solve the problems they will face, particularly in global private-law of international trade, with an emphasis on private-international legal issues. Students are required to be creative and innovative, embark on critical thinking and problem solving, communication and collaboration. All these skills are needed to execute as professionals with a South African and African context, and as global citizens.

The Confucius Institute

Prof Rensburg, outgoing VC hands over the reins to Prof Marwala who takes up the VC post officially in January 2018. Photo: Jan Potgieter innovative thinking beyond current trends. Some might feel uncomfortable with the thought of reimagining the future of architecture and would prefer to resist change with all they have. Not UJ’s GSA. We are ready to shake things up. Not because we discard, disrespect or wish to ignore the rich and astonishing history of the discipline, but because we are excited about the future of architecture.

Institute for Pan African Thought and Conversation (IPATC)

We at the University of Johannesburg are reimagining Africa’s future and we are passionate about pan-Africanism. So passionate and committed, that we established the Institute for Pan African Thought and Conversation (IPATC). IPATC is ideally positioned in Johannesburg, South Africa’s economic hub - a true Afropolitan centre, where knowledge and research will be produced, collaborating with key African thought-leaders. The ultimate aim remains the total liberation of the African continent and its people. At UJ, we continue to question everything. We do not accept the status quo and we do not settle for mediocre. We take hands with our fellow Africans and together we map out our destiny by reimagining the future.

Institute for Intelligent Systems (IIS)

The pace of innovation is going to lead us to interesting places, and perhaps sooner than we think - UJ is ready. We know that Africa’s science mission is to create wealth, thereby creating jobs and eradicating poverty. With these hopes and dreams comes obligations to establish leading innovative hubs for learning, collaboration, research and rapid development of new products, technologies, services and solutions. The University of Johannesburg is taking a leading role by partnering with industry, Government and communities to dismantle big data problems for the economic benefit of Africa. Thus, the establishment of the Institute for Intelligent Systems (IIS) at UJ.

Early Childhood Development

The multifaceted nature of early childhood

development has made it an internationally recognised political priority, and the University of Johannesburg’s Department of Childhood Education is at the forefront of changing the educational landscape for the betterment of all the children of Africa. Through key research projects, collaboration on an international scale and ongoing development of ground-breaking innovations, UJ is making a significant impact in the early childhood educational domain. UJ’s positive impact starts with reimaging a brighter future for the children of Africa. We at UJ are reimagining the future by developing building blocks for the future.

Centre of Excellence for Integrated Mineral & Energy Resource Analysis (CIMERA)

Earth’s future is determined by our actions. Our actions start with our thoughts about how we want earth to look like in the year to come. How will we know where we are going to if we do not understand where we are coming from? We should ask questions, explore ideas and continue to question everything. The University of Johannesburg is unique in Southern Africa for its combination of economic geology, hominid dating research and expertise in finding out how old mineral deposits and rocks of any age are. UJ’s Centre of Excellence for Integrated Mineral & Energy Resource Analysis (CIMERA) collaborates with national and international educational institutions to tap into collective expertise in mapping and describing strategic mineral deposits, research towards improving mining exploration and efficiency, and understanding the formation of mineral deposits during ‘early earth’.

International Commercial Law

A large part of the knowledge and skill necessary for dealing with future challenges are not developed through ‘traditional’ learning programmes. In seeking grounding concepts, theory and practical application of the principles of law, one of the University of Johannesburg’s flagship programmes, International Commercial Law, is pursuing and developing the knowledge they will

Thirty years ago, no one in the world imagined that China would be able to grow its GDP at an average of 10% per year, becoming the second largest economy in the world in 2010 and expected to surpass the American economy by 2025. Nobody would believe that China has not only become the “World’s Factory,” but also sent their astronauts into space. China - from a nation that was once colonised, risen to become a superpower. Just like China, South Africa has ambitious, hardworking people, caring for their families and relentlessly pursuing good education and success. The UJ Confucius Institute continues to drive research, science, and technology through solid educational systems through embracing the Confucian ethic of creating dedicated, motivated, responsible and educated individuals with an enhanced sense of commitment, organisational identity and loyalty to institutions that promote progress.

The Johannesburg Institute for Advanced Study (JIAS) The Johannesburg Institute for Advanced Study (JIAS) is a joint initiative of the University of Johannesburg (UJ), and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore, with the purpose to promote advanced research in the humanities and natural sciences, beyond the regular teaching and research activities at institutions of higher learning. At JIAS, we look beyond the present boundaries and frameworks of these disciplines. We look towards the future in order to explore some of the remarkable phenomena that we still do not fully understand. JIAS is generating ground-breaking knowledge right here in Africa through an interdisciplinary intellectual community. Since its establishment in 2005, and under the bold and visionary leadership of Prof Rensburg, the University has had a remarkable journey that has seen it become the national standard bearer for transformation, equity, access, and Pan African and global excellence. As a result, the University has become a leading African university with global stature that is now ranked 7th amongst Africa’s universities, and ranked within the top 2.3% of universities in the world as published in the QS World University Rankings for 2017/2018. This is an exceptional accomplishment, reaffirming the notable headway that UJ has made in attaining Pan African and global academic excellence and world-class status. As we enter the next phase with newly appointed ViceChancellor Designate, Prof Marwala, who will take office on 1 January 2018, we celebrate past successes, look forward to new challenges and possibilities, and continue to reimagine the future. For more information visit www.uj.ac.za


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August/September 2017 – Y our Trusted Truth Source

STANDARD BANK TOP WOMEN

S

A’s women are increasingly been making the

news

in

agriculture,

many

sectors

franchising,

including

science

and

tech. Clearing away the last shards of

the anachronistic ‘glass ceiling’, 17 August’s glittering 14th Standard Bank Top Women Awards honoured accomplished women from across the economy, in the process motivating thousands of entrepreneurial-minded younger women, both in attendance at Emperors Palace and following the ceremony through social media, to pursue their

Captions: Top Women Lifetime Achiever Award - Yvonne Chaka Chaka (Far left); Top Young Achiever of the Year Award – 40 Years _ Younger - Chelina Bodhie – Gautrain Management Agency (Top); Top Female Entrepreneur of 2017 Award - Lynnette Magasa – Boniswa Corporate Solutions (Left)

own BHAG’s (Big Hairy Audacious Goals). Hosted by Topco Media and Standard Bank, some of the awards’ highlights included: • Lynette Magasa, CEO of Boniswa Corporate Solutions, taking the trophy for ‘Top Female Entrepreneur of 2017’. Magasa has launched her fast-growth brand into several African countries. • In property, developer Xoliswa Daku took top spot. She heads up a portfolio worth R600 million.

The judges also honoured organisations that have been increasing opportunities for

• ‘Top Businesswoman of the Year’ went to Dr

women - including Standard Bank’s ‘Gender-empowered Business of the Year’, Microsoft

Nombasa Tsengwa, head of coal operations for Exxaro Resources. Born at the height of apartheid in the rural Eastern Cape, she oversees a concern worth R30 billion+.

SA, which strives to bring more women into the S..T.E.A.M. fields: science, technology,

• The

‘princess

of

Africa’,

Yvonne

engineering, art & design and mathematics (in these fields, women still make up less than 20% of the workforce).

Chaka,

Once again, the closely-watched awards underscored the fact that today, women are

serenaded the audience after receiving her honorary ‘Lifetime Achiever Award’.

key players at the forefront of the economy. Think about that ...and then think about your own personal five-year plan!


August/September 2017 – Y our Trusted Truth Source

AWARDS 2017 TOP GENDER EMPOWERED FEMALE ENTREPRENEUR OF 2017 AWARD SPONSORED BY WDB Investment Holdings & Seed Engine Lynnette Magasa – Boniswa Corporate Solutions Carissa Rapolthy – Urban Striker (Highly Commended) TOP GENDER EMPOWERED SKILLS DEVELOPMENT AWARD SPONSORED BY Elijah Barayi Britehouse SSD TOP GENDER EMPOWERED RETAIL AWARD SPONSORED BY Godrej Kelloggs of South Africa Ford Motor Company (Highly Commended) TOP GENDER EMPOWERED DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE AWARD SPONSORED BY Stanlib Wesbank

Top Businesswoman of the Year Award - Nombasa Tsengwa – Exxaro Resources

Top Male Driving Gender Empowerment Award - Bashier Adam – Nexia SABT

TOP GENDER EMPOWERED FEMALE PUBLIC SECTOR LEADER AWARD (PARASTATALS AND GOVERNMENT) SPONSORED BY Eskom Dr Anneline Chetty – Department of Trade & Industry Zibu Masotobe – Airports Company South Africa (Highly Commended) TOP GENDER EMPOWERED INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AWARD SPONSORED BY Orvall Coporate Design Bigen Africa TOP GENDER EMPOWERED FAST GROWTH WOMEN – OWNED SMME AWARD SPONSORED BY Simply Tech Solutions Kathabo Group

Top Gender Empowered Company Retail Award - Kelloggs of South Africa - Zandie Mposelwa

Standard Bank’s involvement with Feenix.org is part of a multifaceted strategy by the bank to develop meaningful, practical and sustainable ways to help the youth access quality education, by removing some of their financial burden. Ultimately, this contributes to South Africa’s economic growth. Feenix.org’s innovative approach uses crowdfunding as a mechanism to link students with funders (“crowdfunding”: the practice of funding a project or venture by raising money from a large number of people). The power of crowdsourcing as a viable solution to boosting educational funding channels is taking off worldwide and we are excited to be able to take part in this exciting journey in SA. It’s a call to action, for everyone in society who is concerned about the state of education and willing to do something about it. Access to education remains a major challenge for so many people who have the ability but lack the funds. As a proudly digital bank with a history of making a difference, we want to ensure that our expertise is also harnessed here. In Feenix.org’s case, there was a recognition that the support available to students in need was insufficient - and a parallel recognition that ordinary South Africans and business owners wanted to play their part but did not have an avenue to do so. Feenix. org distributes the responsibility for funding as widely as possible, while making the funding process as direct and easy as possible Feenix.org’s simple signup process allows students at any one of the country’s 26 public universities to register their financial needs for the current year. The platform exposes each student’s profile to a variety of funding sources. Ordinary South Africans wishing to fund student’s fees can search for individual students on the platform and pay for all, or a portion of, their fees. To date over R1.4 million has been raised and 29 students have been fully funded. There are, at the time of writing, 759 students who have profiles on the platform, with both students and finding increasing on a daily basis. At Standard Bank, our purpose of driving Africa’s growth is what inspires partnerships with organisations such as Feenix.org - and Top Women. The Standard Bank Top Women Awards allows us to share two messages; the first, with all South African women, to say that we are here to help them move forward. The second message, with the wider economy, is to emphasise that advancing women is good for business, good for society and great for South Africa’s future prospects. Amongst the bright young students and graduates of today, we see the Top Women of tomorrow. Jayshree Naidoo, Head: Standard Bank Incubator and Interim CEO of Feenix Twitter: @jayshnaidoo • For details, visit: www.feenix.org

TOP WOMAN IN PROPERTY SPONSORED BY Dormehl Phalane Property Group Xoliswa Daku – Daku Group of Companies TOP YOUNG ACHIEVER OF THE YEAR AWARD – 40 YEARS AND YOUNGER SPONSORED BY EETC Chelina Bodhie – Gautrain Management Agency Thembelihle Mbatha – Inkomati – Usuthu Catchment Management Agency (Highly Commended) TOP GENDER EMPOWERED ICT AWARD SPONSORED BY ICT Works Dimension Data TOP GENDER EMPOWERED RESOURCES AWARD SPONOSRED BY Anglo Platinum Exxaro Resources TOP WOMAN IN AVIATION AWARD Nokuthula Mcinga – Airports Company of South Africa – King Shaka TOP GENDER EMPOWERED HEALTH & PHARMACUETICAL AWARD Clicks Group TOP WOMAN IN AGRICULTURE AWARD SPONSORED BY Diageo Lesego Serolong – Bokamoso Impact Investments TOP GENDER EMPOWERED TRANSPORT & LOGISTICS AWARD SPONSORED BY Labat Africa Mercury Freight TOP GENDER MUNICIPALITY AWARD SPONOSRED BY PSM Ugu District Municipality TOP WOMAN IN SCIENCE AWARD SPONSORED BY Sanbi Precious Hawadi TOP GENDER EMPOWERED CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP AWARD SPONSORED BY British American Tobacco Suncoast Casino, Hotels and Entertainment TOP WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION SPONSORED BY SHRA Revona Botha – Robus Engineering TOP GENDER EMPOWERED PUBLIC SERVICE AWARD SPONSORED BY Transnet The Cancer Association of South Africa TOP BUSINESSWOMAN OF THE YEAR AWARD SPONSORED BY Standard Bank Nombasa Tsengwa – Exxaro Resources TOP GENDER EMPOWERED RURAL DEVELOPMENT AWARD SPONOSRED BY NW READ Lima Rural Development Foundation TOP MALE DRIVING GENDER EMPOWERMENT AWARD Bashier Adam – Nexia SABT TOP GENDER EMPOWERED ENERGY & UTILITIES AWARD SPONSORED BY Enel Green Power Matleng Energy Solutions TOP GENDER EMPOWERED BUSINESS OF THE YEAR AWARD Sponsored by Standard Bank Microsoft SA

15


16

July 2017 – Y our Trusted Truth Source

YO U R T R U S T E D T R U T H S O U R C E

Interview

Pindai Makhalima

W

For advertising queries: advertising@intshamedia.com For Subscriptions queries: vt.subscriptions@intshamedia.com Editorial queries: editor@intshamedia.com Publisher: Mikhail Oliphant Editor: Miriro Matema

e met with pioneering quantity surveyor and entrepreneur Pindai Makhalima. Often described as a dynamic leader within the built environment, she started her career as one of the few black female quantity surveyors. We pictured health and safety standard boots with a hard hat, she pictures a passionate career in developing Africa. MM: Why did you study QS? PM: Would you like the long answer or the short one? J Well, when I was considering career options for the umpteenth time, my Dad had just met a quantity surveyor at the pub and suggested I look at pursuing a career in quantity surveying. When I did some research, it just made sense. I was such a tomb boy and loved working with numbers so it was a good fit and still is. It also struck me, based on my research at the time, how versatile quantity surveying is in terms of career paths after graduation. MM: Why UCT? PM: I submitted my applications to a number of universities both abroad and on

the continent and UCT was and still is a world class institution. And I’m not just saying that because of my alumni status either J. The built environment degree programme was internationally accredited and with respect to being able to work globally, that was a definite plus. Financially, it made sense to the parents too ;-) MM: Was it difficult to get a job after varsity? PM: Well, I worked every vacation during my degree so I could get some work experience and by the time I graduated, my internship employer had offered me a job. So I wouldn’t say I struggled to find employment. My recommendation to varsity students is that they need to show initiative and work during their vacations. The advantage of this is that once you graduate you have had exposure to the work environment and have relevant work experience which will help with finding employment upon graduation. MM: Was being female an advantage/ disadvantage? PM: I believe there are challenges and benefits in any business environment regard-

less of one’s circumstances. In what used to be a predominantly male environment, one can feel disadvantaged if that’s your focus. Personally, I generally found myself in male dominated environments from an early age, so I wasn’t fazed by any negativity I encountered. When you spend time with boys, you develop thick skin J I also found that there were some people who were impressed at the fact that I chose a career in the construction industry. In business, there were times that I encountered what has traditionally been described as the ‘Old boys club’. My response…shake it off and move onwards and upwards. MM: Advice to young ladies wanting to pursue a career in the built environment? PM: I was raised in a gender neutral home when it came to academics and career pursuits. As a result, I would recommend that young ladies pursue whatever career they have a passion for. Don’t let gender biases determine what you achieve. The important thing is to be intentional about having a good work ethic, conducting yourself with integrity and be willing to learn. Always.


August/September 2017 – Y our Trusted Truth Source

17


18

Sports

August/September 2017 — Your Trusted Truth Source

Above: Karla Mostert addresses the Varsity Netball captains and media at the Varsity Netball #ShowYourColours launch. Right: The 2017 Varsity Netball captains at the #ShowYourColours launch. Varsity Netball takes place from 27 August to 9 October 2017. Photos: Supplied

South African netball star has firm roots in Varsity Netball Karla Mostert wants to see more South African netball players on the world stage

K

arla Mostert started playing netball at the tender age of eight, at Laërskool Hennopspark. Mostert qualified as a dietician at the University of the Free State (Kovsies) but more notable were her achievements on the netball court during her time at the Kovsies. She was in her fourth year, in 2013, when Varsity Netball was launched as part of Varsity Sports. Kovsies would successfully defend their title in 2014, after winning the inaugural Varsity Netball trophy a year prior. Mostert played an integral part during Kovsies’ domination of Varsity Netball and was awarded Player of the Tournament for two consecutive years – in 2014 and 2015. The 27-year-old represented the Bloemfontein tertiary institute for three years. Mostert could no longer participate as a player, according to the age limit rule as set forth by Varsity Sports. She has recently returned from Australia where she had a very successful first season for the Sunshine Coast Lightning. The

Queensland side won the Grand Final in the Australian Super Netball league and Mostert was awarded the MVP (Most Valuable Player) for her performance during the final. “I have always believed in myself,” said Mostert. “At first it was difficult to adjust to hearing people say that I will become a great player. A teacher at Laërskool Hennopspark told me once that I would play for South Africa. I did not think that I would but I always worked hard at being the best I could be.” Mostert had to miss the domestic league due to her being in Australia while the local league was underway. She’s had to juggle and prioritise not only her schedule but also her time spent with loved ones. Having such a busy timetable, Mostert believes in finding and maintaining a balance between her netball and family time. “The fortunate thing for me is that most of my family and friends are in Bloemfontein or Pretoria, so it’s not that I cannot make time to see or spend time with them, but it is very important to grow and nurture these relationships. My fiancé and I often take spontaneous road trips, exploring small towns in and around the Free State. We love learning about the rich history that these towns have and also discovering nice restaurants in these areas.”

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The Proteas player hopes that netball in the country will be able to receive the same attention and resources that the more mainstream sporting codes are enjoying. After spending time in Australia she experienced a level of professionalism and support from the governing bodies that she would like to see materialise within South Africa. “We work just as hard as some of the top sports athletes. We get up early, train hard and sacrifice a lot to be able to compete at an international level. I think that we have the potential to produce many more great players, but the lack of funding for these players makes it difficult for players to play netball fulltime once they have graduated from university.” The two-time Varsity Netball Player of the Tournament affirms that hard work pays off and that believing in yourself is key to a successful career in any sport. Having a solid support structure begins at home and the netball star attributes much of her netball success to the support of her parents. She also believes that Varsity Netball gave her that much-needed platform to take her game to the next level. “Never give up on yourself and always believe in yourself. My parents have been an amazing support throughout my career. They have always supported my decisions. It is very important to surround yourself

For further information on the Varsity Times

with people who believe in you as much as you do. Varsity Netball has opened up more doors for me and also allowed more people the opportunity to see me play, which was a great experience, but more importantly it helped my career.” Varsity Ne tball starts on 27 August 2017 with opening weekend matches in both Bloemfontein and Stellenbosch.

For more Varsity Netball: For all news, fixtures, logs and updates online: www.varsitysportssa.co.za Facebook: facebook.com/VarsitySportsSA Twitter: @VarsitySportsSA Instagram: @VarsitySportsSA YouTube: youtube.com/VarsitySportsSA Official hashtag: #ShowYourColours Varsity Sports App: Google Play Store / App Store

mikhail.oliphant@intshamedia.com C. +27 (0) 74 790 86 17

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19

August/September 2017 – Y our Trusted Truth Source

Bartlett has massive interest in Varsity Football Tuks FC head coach keeping a keen eye on all the action

The Tuks team before the Varsity Football match between Tuks and Wits at the LC de Villiers Stadium in Pretoria. Photo: WE Brown

T

shwane University of Technology (TUT) hosted two-time champions University of Pretoria (UPTuks) in the opening round of Varsity Football on 27 July. The first week was loaded with surprise results, packed stadiums and entertainment for all who had their bums on a stadium seat. Varsity Football is a proudly South African product supported by amazing sponsors including FNB, Samsung and Debonairs Pizza. Former Bafana Bafana striker and current Tuks FC head coach Shaun Bartlett praises the Varsity Football competition and believes that it is the biggest amateur soccer tournament in South Africa. Bartlett attended last week’s Pretoria derby between defending champions TUT and UP-Tuks at the TUT Stadium, on Thursday. “The Varsity Football tournament is great platform for professional coaches to spot and unearth raw talent,” says Bartlett. “Gone are the days where our amateur football was at a decent level and we could promote players to professional teams, but now with Varsity Football coming in, it is a great place for coaches to look at these players. This tournament is a level up from amateur football,” said Bartlett. The 44-year-old retired from professional football in 2005 after represented Bafana Bafana 74 times following his debut in 1995. Bartlett, who was part of the 1996 African Cup of Nations winning side, started coaching in 2012 as an assistant coach at Durban-based Golden Arrows. He joined Tuks FC in 2016. The former Kaizer Chiefs striker scored 28 goals for his country and more than 129 first class goals while playing for clubs including Cape Town Spurs, Charlton Athletic, Kaizer

Chiefs, Bloemfontein Celtic and FC Zürich. Varsity Football has provided a sound platform for players to make the transition to professional football. Top clubs utilize the platform that this inter-university football tournament provides to their advantage, knowing that these players are exposed to a semi-professional environment. Despite it being early days, Bartlett is of the opinion that this year’s edition has the potential to produce great players. “It is very important for us as coaches to recognize talent early on and what I saw on Thursday night gives me hope. Obviously doing one amazing thing in one game doesn’t

Join the online conversation by following the #Iyachesa hashtag and stay up to date with all the latest news and fixtures.

For more Varsity Football: For all news, fixtures, logs and updates online: www.varsitysportssa.co.za Facebook: facebook.com/VarsitySportsSA Twitter: @VarsitySportsSA Instagram: @VarsitySportsSA YouTube: youtube.com/VarsitySportsSA Official hashtag: #IYACHESA #VarsityFootball Varsity Sports App: Google Play Store / App Store

WOMEN’S FOOTBALL

WOMEN’S FOOTBALL

21 SEPT

8 UNIVERSITIES

1 WINNER 21-23 SEPT 2017

FANIE DU TOIT SPORTS GROUNDS @VarsitySportsSA

mean you are an outstanding player, but if you’re doing it on a regular basis then it catches the eye of the clubs.” The former Charlton Athletic striker did not want to disclose which players he thinks have the potential to go all the way and make a name for themselves in professional football. “There are already a few players that have caught my attention, but it is going to be unfair of me to identify or mention their names. But we have already seen players that we are possibly earmarking, if not for the upcoming season, maybe in January, to start engaging with.”

varsitysportsSA.com

DOWNLOAD THE VARSITY SPORTS APP

TV

16:00

UFS

vs

CUT

Fanie du Toit B

16:00

TUT

vs

UCT

Fanie du Toit A

18:15

UJ

vs

UP-TUKS

Fanie du Toit B

18:15

UWC

vs

NWU

Fanie du Toit A

10:00

UCT

vs

CUT

Fanie du Toit B

10:00

NWU

vs

UJ

Fanie du Toit A

11:30

TUT

vs

UFS

Fanie du Toit B

22 SEPT

11:30

UWC

vs

UP-TUKS

Fanie du Toit A

17:00

UWC

vs

UJ

Fanie du Toit B

17:00

UCT

vs

UFS

Fanie du Toit A

18:30

TUT

vs

CUT

Fanie du Toit B

18:30

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vs

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Fanie du Toit A Fanie Du Toit A

23 SEPT 10:00

Group A (4th)

vs

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11:30

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vs

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Fanie Du Toit A

13:00

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vs

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Fanie Du Toit A

14:30

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vs

Group B (2nd)

Fanie Du Toit A

Semi-Final 1 Winner

vs

Semi-Final 2 Winner

rd

28 SEPT 15:30

@VarsitySportsSA

varsitysportsSA.com

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TBC

Live On SuperSport

# IYACHESA


20

August/September 2017 – Y our Trusted Truth Source

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The Varsity Times will officially be distributed nationally across all 9 provinces in South Africa.

Varsity Times in Numbers: 25 000 Copies Printed Weekly 100 000 Copies Monthly 9 Provinces 26 Universities Distributed Over 30 Days 20 Student Bursaries by 2018

As we move towards becoming South Africa’s leading student, university, skills development agency and career guidance print and online platform we are pleased to announce that we will also be launching the #HelpUsGetThere and #SupportADream bursary initiative in a bid to raise funds for students in need of financial aid in 2018. The Varsity Times will be on sale nationally for only R10.00 each day (Street Sales Only). Revenue generated from these sale will be allocated to the #HelpUsGetThere and #SupportADream initiative to assist students in achieving their dreams. For more information contact: Mikhail.oliphant@intshamedia.com @VTimessa —

@VTimessa —

www.varsitytimessa.co.za

Varsity Times  

August Edition 2017 - Celebrating Inspiring Women

Varsity Times  

August Edition 2017 - Celebrating Inspiring Women

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