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INK InkSpot 4 Fakir Musafar 6 Corey Lolley Maya Jewelry

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Positive Spin 26 Miss IVI 42 John Maxx 50 Dani La’Bella

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Walter Sausage Frank

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Whiskey Dick 92 Inside the Lens of Jim Louvau

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Diabolik 85258 136 The Overflowing Mind

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Get InkSpired 152 Model of the Month

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COVER CREDITS: Model: Tenra Mihelerakis & WhiskeyDick, Photography: Sean Hartgrove Issue #19

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Editor-in-Chief - Candies Deezy Liu Creative Director - Sean Hartgrove Art Director - David Rossa Website Manager - Cameron Cowan Staff Photographers - Sean Hartgrove, Radek Photography Video Services - James Coulter of Moo Dog Productions, LTD.

Piercing Column

Interview

Managing Editor: Sean Dowdell Fakir Musafar Interview by: Sean Dowdell Photo Credits: Charles Gatewood and from the archive of Fakir Musafar Corey Lolley Interview by: Sean Dowdell Photo credits: Product and Model: Autumn Swisher Editorial: Sequoia Emmanuelle

Dani La’Bella Interview by: Candies Deezy Liu Photos by: Sean Hartgrove Make-up: Nicole Brown Style Diabolik 85258 Words: Candies Deezy Liu Tattoo Feature

Music WhiskeyDick Words by: Candies Deezy Liu Photos by: Sean Hartgrove Model: Tenra Mihelarakis Special thanks to: Dusty Ullerich and Kool Kats Tattoo Fritz’s Sunglasses provided by: Très Noir Handmade Optics Art The Overflowing Mind of Joshua Finley Words by: Siara Gray Photos by: Radek Photography European Section Managing Editor: Ákos Bánfalvi Model: Miss IVI Interview by: Ákos Bánfalvi Photos by: Ernst Alexander Tattoo Artist: John Maxx Interview by: Ákos Bánfalvi

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Walter “Sausage” Frank Words: Candies Deezy Liu Photography Feature Inside the Lens of Jim Louvau Photos by: Louvau Photography Roo Ashley Ellis Words: Candies Deezy Liu Photos by: Sean Hartgrove Make-up: Michelle Rockwell Location: 3 Kings Tavern InkSpired Model of the Month Model: Emily Marie www.Facebook.com/EmilyMarieaz IG: @emilymarieaz Photo by: Ryan Guzzetta with Axium Photography


LETTER FROM

THE EDITOR

Issue No. 19 heats up with a WhiskeyDick style barbeque and photo shoot by Sean Hartgrove, taking us right into the warmth of summertime. Ink Master Season 4 contestant, Walter “Sausage” Frank gives us an inside look of his tattooing. Sean Dowdell’s piercing section includes interviews with legend, Fakir Musafar and Corey Lolley of Maya Jewelry. Siara Gray accompanied by Radek Photography delve inside the mind of Joshua Finley to find out what makes him and his art tick. Dani La’Bella, a modified bombshell reveals what her body modifications are all about. Ákos Bánfalvi interviews Miss Ivi, an alternative model and piercing extraordinaire as well as tattoo artist, John Maxx who has done several of the most popular pieces seen on the web. Diabolik 85258 graces our style section - an alternative jewelry made for the alternative culture. We take a peek into Jim Louvau’s camera lens to see the latest and greatest in the music world and a veteran turned model shares her journey of switching career paths as well as helping a community that she is passionate about. The 19th issue of InkSpired Magazine is an eclectic combination of talent, energy, and art. Our words of wisdom this month are bittersweet: “Whiskey dick - it happens.” Stay InkSpired folks, Your Chief Editor - Candies Deezy Liu

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INKSPOT “Traveling two days and four countries to spend three days getting inked by one of the most humble souls I’ve met - Domantas Parvainis only to take home some great art and a small piece of his soul.” - Wade Ross “Art elevates and brightens our moods. Great art is timeless and never goes out of style. Our tattoos are a representation of who we are and what we love. Tattoos are an art. Just like my house is filled with beautiful art from local artists to enhance the beauty of my home, my body is covered with beautiful art from fabulous local artists. With the help of some gifted artists, my tattoos tell MY story.” - Natalie Culbert “All of mine mean something so dear to me. Almost all of my tattoos are done in the American traditional style. My father was a sailor on a nuclear submarine, I am a military widow, and my husband, Joshua Gargalione (who did most of my tattoos) is a former sailor. They reflect my love for my family and my country. They also reflect my life, my loss, and my memories.” - Devotchka DeLarge “Literally...the words freedom, love and faith are tattooed on me for my children - Freedom Ray, Elijah Faith and Tiki Love.” -Dale Tolmich “My family for their best attributes and talents in life.” - Amanda Nicole McGuire

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FAKIR MUSAFAR Interview: Sean Dowdell

Photography: Sean Hartgrove, Charles Gatewood, Fakir Musafar rituals of other cultures.” EPILOGUE, Body Play: My Journey - Fakir Musafar SD: Let’s start with your age, where you were born, and the city you live in now. FM: I am presently 83, born in 1930 in Aberdeen, South Dakota (which was then on the Sissiton Sioux Indian reservation). I have lived in the San Francisco Bay Area since 1955.

“Why was I obsessed to modify my body? Why would I abandon the comfort of the status quo for the unknowns of body modification and ritual? I did it primarily because I was curious and bored with the status quo. In retrospect, probably for the same reasons early explorers risked the hazards of sailing uncharted seas. And like explorers of the past, present and future seeking rewards of some kind: treasure or knowledge. In my journey I sought to explore the seas of consciousness, my own inner self. The most personal and accessible vehicle was my own body. During my 50 plus years of sailing via body ritual, I have found some of the same reasons I set sail in the body

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SD: Can you tell us where you came up with the name, “Fakir Musafar” and why? FM: In 1977, Doug Malloy and then icons in the tattoo industry (like Ed Hardy and Sailor Jerry) decided to hold the FIRST international tattoo convention in Reno, Nevada. There was no piercing industry then as such, only Jim Ward and me. We were invited to participate and bring a spectacular show for the closing event. Doug asked me to do all the practices I had adopted from other cultures: bed of nails, bed of swords, etc. for the show. But he felt my regular given name was not memorable enough for the event. Not good for publicity. So he asked me if I had a special pet name I could use. I respected and honored a 12th century Sufi called Fakir Musafar who said to get close to the divine, you should pierce yourself. I adopted that name for the show; after the event the name was remembered and stuck. SD: Fakir, you are known to a lot of us fellow body piercers as the Father of the Industry, what are your thoughts regarding that statement? FM: Jim Ward is actually the Father of the Modern Piercing Industry (he commercialized it) and Doug Malloy is the Grandfather (he championed it). My job has been to educate. I am widely

known as the “Father of the Modern Primitive Movement”. Piercing and a whole lot more, espousing a whole different attitude about “body”. SD: How do you feel about the fact that many people think of you as a role model or icon? FM: Because I was a pioneer and brought something new into our Western Culture, I became an icon. I was #1 in this regard and my teaching was by example not proselytizing. I was driven by an urge to share, not ego driven. SD: What specifically in other cultures prompted you to want to learn more about your body and at what age did you start the exploration? FM: I grew up surrounded by Native American culture, friends, customs and vibes. This was more comfortable for me than Western Christian Culture of the white settlers in South Dakota where I lived. Later, I found that Lakota Sioux and Mandan customs and beliefs were much the same as Hindu and Sufi customs and beliefs. My early explorations began at age 12. See attached my story from “Bodies Under Siege”. I had my first out-of-body experience at age 17 trying the bondage trancing ritual of Eskimo shaman. See BODY OF GOD: www.hulu.com/watch/531912


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SD: When or how did you discover that through pain, one can connect with inner self and conscience? FM: At age 12 to 16 by trying some of the practices like Sun Dance of the Lakota and Ball Dance of Hindu devotees. Later in life when I visited other cultures, especially Hindu culture in Malaysia, and tried their body rituals with hook pulls, Kavadi and suspensions. However, PAIN is NOT my God! The notion of “pain” only exists in Western Culture. SD: Who specifically would you consider to have had a large influence on your life direction in regards to body enhancement and manipulation and why? FM: My own inner self, then by examples of other seekers via body ritual, the inner understandings of other cultures. SD: I read in another interview with you in which was mentioned that “you had befriended some of your local Indian tribesmen and started to learn about them as people and their culture.” What was it that prompted you to participate in your first ceremony with them, and what was it? FM: I was bored and wanted to experience something outside the limited dimensions of the culture I was living in. I did my first permanent body piercing at age 14, my first mini Sun Dance ritual and out-of-body experience at age 17, my first tattoo at age 19 (self-made). SD: Were you accepted entirely by the Indians that you were around or were there some that didn’t want the outside influence from you? FM: Yes, I have always been understood and accepted by the Native American tribes where I lived. Later by other Native Americans and Tamil Hindus in Malaysia and some Sufis. I connect with them all on an energetic level. They can usually “read” energy. SD: How would you describe pain? How are you able to overcome it so easily? FM: Again, PAIN is NOT my God. The idea and emotions behind the word “pain” are strictly a Western, Christian and modern notion. Pain is merely intense physical sensation. Proper mindset and training, as in some other cultures, allows one to accept ever increasing sensation and convert it into an ecstatic state. There are physical changes, like release of endorphins, followed by trance and freedom of consciousness from the material world. What is called “pain” can open doors to “bliss”. One can only learn this through personal experiences. In my case, body rituals including those of body piercing, tattooing, suspensions and pulls. 8

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SD: Do you wrestle with the fact that most people want their piercings for simply aesthetic reasons and miss some of the important ritualistic meanings in them? FM: Yes, I have a problem with this. These people lack the education, training and guidance to understand tattoos as “magic marks”, piercings as movers of energy and body rituals involving intense physical sensation as doorways to spirit. SD: When, why and how did you decide to start your piercing school? FM: After we launched the modern body piercing movement in the 1970’s, the sexual and spiritual aspects stayed pretty much intact until the mid l980’s. Then body piercing became popularized, commercial, and mainstream. By 1990, the beauty and intent of the practices got somewhat lost, as well as the skills and practical knowledge to do safe and reasonable piercing. I started Fakir Intensives in 1991 as an educational enterprise to counter this trend. SD: Were there many obstacles to overcome in doing so? If so, what were they? FM: Everyone who could get a clamp and needle thought they were a piercer. Many mistakes were being made with BAD outcomes. The energy movement and spiritual aspects of body piercing

were being mostly ignored. Out of conscience, I felt I had to do something to counteract the mad rush to “mutilate” and “decorate”. SD: What piercers are you most proud of teaching and seeing their success? FM: At Fakir Intensives, we have trained and educated some 1200 piercers since l991. Many of them are now captains of the industry with some of the the best long term successes in the industry. Fakir trained piercers are in studios all over the U.S. and the world. We set the standards which others try to match. I am especially proud to have been a part of the establishment of the APP and of the Fakir Intensives instructors who are now on the APP Board of Directors. SD: Is the piercing school successful? FM: Of course. We have become a de facto standard in the industry. SD: Are you surprised at the immense popularity of piercing today? FM: Yes, never thought contemporary culture was ready for it. But a bit disappointed by some of the results.

SD: What advice would you say to someone who wants to get into piercing but isn’t quite sure how? FM: Get educated on the skills, health, safety, energy movement and spirit of the craft. Yes, it is a craft with a little bit of magic thrown in. SD: What are your thoughts on some of the heavy body modification that is going on today? FM: Yuck! Much of it was misappropriated from other cultures and has gone “off the rails”. Respect for the originators and Mother Nature is very much needed or there will be a lot of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual damage. SD: What are your ideas for your future in the next 5-10 years; what would you like to be doing or accomplishing? FM: I only hope I have been a positive influence on something newly brought in contemporary culture. SD: Is there anything that you would like readers to know about you that isn’t common knowledge? FM: I am an ordinary man who simply heard the sound of a different drummer.

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COREY LOLLEY MAYA JEWELRY Interview by: Sean Dowdell Photo credits: Product & Model: Autumn Swisher Editorial: Sequoia Emmanuelle Name: Corey Lolley                                                        SD: How much time goes into creating new Company:  Maya Jewelry                          items for your line? Year company started: 2006 CL: It always surprises me how much, actually. City/State: San Francisco, CA Because everything that I do is handmade and I am the creative director, there is a lot of back SD: How many people do you employ? and forth between the artists and myself throughCL: Including my team in Bali, there are about 50 out the process. All of my metal designs are creof us. Steph Bee, who manages in-house sales, ated by hand, using lost wax casting. It is really a client relations, and a million other things, along beautiful ancient art and incredibly laborious. For with Kyle Petersen, my primary road sales repre- me, the result is worth the patience and reflects in sentative here on the U.S. side are my backbone. the designs. I love how much handwork goes into I would not be where I am as a designer without each piece. Each design goes through several them and their endless support and enthusiasm. generations before I call it ready for production. I have worked on some designs for 3 years before SD: What made you want to start making body I felt they were ready for my clients but most take jewelry? about 6 to 9 months. CL: I worked as a body piercer for 13 years. There has always been two things about our industry SD: What other companies do you look up to that has kept me engaged: the people behind it or try to emulate with your company and why and the jewelry. When I was ready to do my own (they don’t have to be in your industry)? thing, I recognized there was an unmet demand CL: I am a huge fan of Rick Owens and Michele for more ornate, high-end, high-quality jewelry Lamy. I am inspired by how Rick pushes the that pushed current fashion trends. I also felt that boundaries of fashion with his against the trendour clients deserved faster turn around times for stream approach, keeps it black, punk and bold. their orders. I set out to create all of these. This is my fashion palette. Michele Lamy, in my

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eyes, is the definition of muse; they are a truly inspirational couple. I have mad respect for all female designers who take risks and own their vision. In our industry, I love those innovators with high quality; my favorites are Reign, BVLA, Anatometal and Quetzalli. SD: What materials do you use in your products and how are they harvested and collected? CL: Although Maya started out as an organic jewelry company, for the past few years my focus has been on the metal mediums, this is where my heart shines and my roots stem. I work with 925 silver, as well as yellow and rose gold plating. I also love to play with raw copper, brass, and white brass. All of our materials are sourced as sustainably as possible.


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SD: Can you tell us about one or more of the pieces that you have created with your company? CL: I think my favorite pieces are the raw copper and brass designs as well as the weights. I like the idea of my jewelry looking like it was dug up at an archeological site and dusted off to become a modern tribal heirloom. I also love the concept of turning sculpture into wearable art that you find in many of the weights. In the upcoming 2014 collection, I started playing with a lot of new textures and movement in metal. Stay tuned for the full collection release in June.

SD: What keeps you motivated to keep creating jewelry? CL: The piercers and studios that carry Maya and endorse it with such loyalty and passion. I feel like the relationships I have with the studios is symbiotic. When I continue to create designs that people love, then we all succeed and we help people feel empowered along the way. As a former piercer, it is my intention to ensure that the industry not only continues to flourish, but that we push the boundaries of embellishment and self-realization. I am endlessly inspired to do this. It is what I was born to do. SD: What is your favorite piece of jewelry that you make or have made in the past? CL: This is like asking me who my favorite friend is. SD: How do you handle it when another company takes an idea that you have created and manufactures something similar? CL: This is a very complicated question. I prefer to take the continued emulation of my brand as gracefully as possible. I will say that based on how much this happens, I know I must be doing something right. SD: Do you have a favorite piercer or studio in this industry and why? CL: This would be a long list. I am so grateful to all of my resellers and the phenomenal piercers who support the Maya Jewelry vision. Without the support and backing of the piercing community, I would not be where I am today. I am so proud of our industry and how we have collectively driven what some called a trend to not only a lucrative business where punks and metal heads like myself could excel, but an industry that has become acceptable and desired by mainstream society. We have turned opposition into desire. Well-played, team. Also, those studios who are putting so much creativity into their jewelry displays and social media presence. These people have proven to be my biggest clients, the payoff is worth the effort. SD: What do you think is something positive that comes from the piercing industry, if anything? CL: There are so many admirable things about our industry. I think that people find empowerment here; I know that I did as a young person and still do. Within our community, it is not just okay to be yourself, whoever you are, but encouraged and supported. There are not many other industries as beautifully unique as ours. SD: Where would you like to be in 5-10 years with your company? CL: My vision is to continue to grow the company along with the piercing and tattoo communities. As my expression as a designer matures, I would hope to think that I can continue to create unique designs that push the boundaries of how we have chosen to adorn ourselves. I want to amplify my collection of jewelry for non-stretched ears as I feel Maya should be attainable by all those lovers of jewelry out there. I wish to empower and inspire people through my art. I see the potential of our communities as limitless.

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SD: What do you like to do in your spare time when you are not running your company? CL: I am a gypsy at heart; I love to travel internationally to obscure destinations that still embody a rich, ancient culture. Although I currently dwell in San Francisco, I try to get out and spend as much time in nature as possible. My dream is to have a little cute farm in the forest one day with miniature animals. I’m really into self-care, eating well and honoring my body, mind, and spirit. I am sober and have been for years now, the clarity and presence this brings is my foundation. My favorite times are definitely with my pup, my man, and close friends. I surround myself with healthy people who are doing amazing things to brighten our world. I love my crew. SD: What was the single greatest moment in your career and what was the worst? CL: The single greatest moment was when I sold my first pair of jewelry. The second greatest was when British Vogue called me 7 years later and asked if they could do a feature on Maya. I literally thought it was a practical joke. SD: What would you like others in the piercing industry to know that they might not know about you? CL: I’m not sure what people know about me but I hope they know that my roots and my blood are forever in this industry; I’m what we call a lifer. I started piercing when I was 20 up until I was 33. I also used to curate the ONE Project, a 5 day ceremony held in the mountains for our community. For the first few years of Maya Jewelry, I ran the business by myself and lived on the road in my Westfalia with my dog Apache, peddling my wares. Maya was built on a great deal of sacrifice and years of not taking days off. I guess it’s still kind of like that, I work a lot but it is worth it as this work is my passion. www.MayaJewelry.com

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POSITIVE SPIN ROO PHORIA Story: Candies Deezy Liu Photography: Sean Hartgrove After traveling all over the world and serving in the United States Army for nine years, Roo Ashley Ellis, also known as Roo Phoria, decided to pursue a career in the alternative modeling world. The Ohio native has only been modeling for three years but has shot with numerous well known photographers such as Robert Alvarado and Andy Hartmark, as well as published in several magazines. She is also the founder of the Ohio Altered Beauties, a non-profit organization dedicated to defeating stereotypes that women often face as modified individuals. A pursuer of passions, Roo describes herself as a risk taker. She lives by her mantra, “you only live once, so make yourself known and live your life to the fullest”. Roo joined the military in February of 2002, serving in Afghanistan from 2005-2006. She withdrew from the college she was attending after September 11th to join the army. During her last four years in the military, she was a recruiter, going to various high schools and talking to students about joining the army. Her tattoos served as an icebreaker and provided a way for the students to connect with her. She ended up recruiting 86 people into the military in four years. The veteran’s tattoos play a significant role, symbolizing pivotal points in her life. Her chest piece is one of the most monumental tattoos on her body, done by her husband, a tattooer of 19 years. After a near death experience, she knew it was time to get her chest tattooed. Roo was cruising down the highway on her way to work one day when she was still in the army as a recruiter. The tow bar on the back of a truck fell off and crashed on top of her sunroof, shattering all the glass. The police officer told her that if she hit the brakes a second slower or faster, the tow bar would have gone through her windshield and smashed her in the face or head. Luckily, it landed right where the sunroof met the glass so she escaped with no cuts or scrapes. That night, she asked her husband to tattoo a coffin on her chest. The experience made her feel like she was reborn and reminded her of how delicate life could be. In an effort to demolish the negative stereotypes that modified females often get, Roo founded the Ohio Altered Beauties at the end of last year. They are a statewide group of women who volunteer and do charity work at women’s shelters, animal rescue groups, and the Red Cross. They also organize fundraisers and generate awareness for various charities. She was formerly the president of Ohio Modified Dolls but split off to start the Ohio Altered Beauties to focus more on local charities in her home state. Her husband often donates tattoo gift certificates in support Roo’s auction events. www.Roophoria.com www.Facebook.com/OhioAlteredBeauties

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MISS IVI Story: Ákos Bánfalvi

Photography: Ernst Alexander The small Ivonne Körner AKA Miss Ivi grew up in beautiful Thuringia. After her apprenticeship, she moved to Frankfurt am Main in Hessen, Germany. She was there for several years as an assistant and also met her husband there. After they agreed to turn to another country, they hatched their plan to move to Switzerland. They worked for some time as freelancers in a tattoo studio and Ivonne in a bar until she completed her training as a piercer at Wildcat Düsseldorf. In 2008, they opened their own shop called, “The Flying Dutchman Tattoo and Piercing Co.”. Their new future was built, the store was running perfectly, but Miss Ivi wanted more. Her first modeling experience did not turn out as well as she’d hoped. For Christmas that year, her husband gifted her a professional photo shoot with Michael Zargarinejad who has worked previously with Nina Hagen, Unter Ulmen, Stefanie Heinzmann, DJ Otzi, and several other well known European celebrities. The shoot turned out to be a success as she used the photos as submissions for various tattoo magazines. Her first cover in January 2009 came quickly and so did her second and third covers. She now has 27 international and national covers as well as her own Miss Ivi Pin-up Collection.

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ago and it’s still here and part of my life… What about the tattoos you’re currently wearing? Where did they come from, what’s their significance, et cetera? They usually represent events, stories, and other things that have happened in my life, or things I like or wish for. It’s like I have my personal diary on my skin. Amongst all of your tattoos, which one do you prefer and why? I don’t have a personal favorite, I love all of them because they are all important to me. Do you have a favorite tattoo artist? Yes, besides my husband, it’s Jack Mosher, Patrick Sans, Shige, Amanda Toy, and so on. There are so many great tattoo artists out there! Have you personally met any famous tattoo artists? I don’t care if somebody is famous or not; as long as they are doing great art and good work. People are people and I love all kinds of them as long as they know what they are doing. But sure, I know some popular artists.

Besides modeling, what do you do for a living? My husband and I have owned a tattoo piercing shop in the beautiful mountains of Switzerland since 2008. I’m also the shop manager and I do the piercings as well as laser tattoo removal.

Do you like to stick to one artist or try a number of different ones? I mostly prefer to get tattooed by my husband, but we are always so busy that I have and want to try different ones as well.

What is your favorite or the most exciting aspect about your modeling job? I love working with talented people, and traveling and seeing the world. Makeup and dresses are a huge part of my life so I am always feeling like a princess when I get prepared for a shoot. I also enjoy doing crazy stuff with extreme makeup and doing crazy and extravagant shoots. I love standing in front of the camera and playing with it.

How often do you go on tattoo conventions and which one left the most memorable impression? I go to conventions 6-10 times a year, if I have time. The most memorable convention was the one in St. Gallen, Switzerland in 2008. I got one of the last anchors from my friend Herbert Hoffmann there. That was one of the best memories of my life until now.

When did your interest in tattoos begin? And how long was it from then until you got your first one? I saw a lot of tattooed people and I loved them, so I also decided to get tattoos. I started getting into the scene when I was 14 years old and got my first tattoo 2 years later. It was a long, long time

What kind of music are you listening to these days? Rock ’n’ roll, rock, and punk rock.

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Over the last year or so, I’ve been seeing more and more “kids” under 18 with tattoos. What do you think about this?

That’s terrible. I don’t think that they can make a decision this big at that age. I don’t like it. Honestly, it’s a big hype and I think a lot of them will end up removing some of those tattoos. At our shop, we only tattoo people if they are 18 or older and are 100 percent sure with it. Just because people pay, doesn’t mean we will just tattoo anyone. If we feel like they are unsure of what they want, we don’t tattoo them. The decision is ultimately up to us, to only tattoo those who are ready for it. Because of this, the quality of the tattoos we are producing has definitely gotten better. What was the most shocking tattoo you’ve ever seen? The face tattoo on the young girl from Russia, I think. She didn’t have any tattoos on her body but because of her boyfriend, she tattooed her entire face. In your opinion, how has the tattooing industry changed since shows like LA, NY, Miami, and London Ink have been broadcasted to the nation? I think that these shows have given the broad audience a little better look into the tattoo world but they have also started a big hype around some artists, which I think is a little bit over the top. Have you noticed any changes in the tattoo industry since you started? In my opinion, the artistic level keeps on rising each year. The materials for tattooing have also become much better. On the downside, it’s hard to tell these days who’s the customer and who’s the artist…haha. Which tattoo style is the most popular in Switzerland right now? A lot of the customers want to have the names of their children…that’s a big hype around here nowadays. www.tfd-tattoos.com www.MissIvi.com www.Facebook.com/pages/MissIVI/136707146404825


“IT’S LIKE I HAVE MY PERSONAL DIARY ON MY SKIN.”

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JOHN MAXX Interview: รkos Bรกnfalvi

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“When I create a design, I like to communicate with the customer. I start from his idea and build it up using artistic elements…I try to make a unique design for each customer.” - John Maxx John Maxx (real name Ionut Maxineanu) is a 34 year old tattoo artist from Bucharest, Romania who has been tattooing for 12 years. Before John started tattooing, he was studying Management at a university; he never thought that his passion for drawing could also be his job. “In my second year of studying in college, I entered a tattoo studio for the first time and it was amazing. I started talking with the owner and he offered to teach me how to tattoo if I would draw for all the shop walls. It was a great opportunity for me to learn new things, so I accepted. As soon as I grabbed the first tattoo machine and started to learn, I knew that this is what I wanted to do for the rest of my life,” Josh recalls. What did your family and friends think about you getting into the business? In the beginning, my family agreed and was happy for me because I could support myself through college and thought it was something temporary but soon they realized how much I love tattooing and they were very happy and supported me in all ways. What was the first tattoo you ever did? My first tattoo was a cover-up, a small one, of course. The guy had a very small moon and I covered it up with an old school panther head. It healed fine, but a little bit lighter than normal, which I think happened because I was too afraid to push the needle into the skin too much. Tell us about your shop Radical Ink Tattoo, please! My shop in Romania is in Bucharest, in the center part of the city. It’s a small shop where I work with another artist named, Zaed; he is a very good, young artist. The shop doesn’t have any signs outside and I work with appointments made by email, phone, or via social networks. Lately, I have been traveling a lot so I haven’t been spending too much time in the shop. Describe how you go about creating a tattoo from concept to finished design. Also describe how you try to put your own unique touch on your tattoos. When I create a design, I like to communicate with the customer. I start from his idea and build it up using artistic elements. I never use the same photo twice; I try to make a unique design for each customer. Being a realistic artist, most of the time I use Photoshop to create the design using photos that can tell my customer’s story and at the same time be very pleasant for the eyes. I often like to use hard contrast photos combined with soft backgrounds. I love doing human nature pieces like faces, hands, eyes, skulls, bones…

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everything involving the human body and I try putting my style in through composition and technique. How would you describe your style and which tattoo style do you like best? My favorite styles are the styles I tattoo, such as realistic, surrealistic, and black and grey. I love to do my own projects created from the clients’ idea with my own composition. Describe how your role models and any other sources of inspiration have affected your tattoo style? In the beginning of my career, I was amazed by some artists like Robert Hernandez, Victor Portugal, Boris, and I have followed them ever since. As years have passed by, I met other great artists that have also influenced me a lot like my friend, James from the Hungarian Celtic Moon Tattoo Studio, Proki, George Mavridis and many more who have taught me a lot and I am very grateful every day for them. I think my style is a combination of all the artists that inspired me throughout my career. What do you think a client should expect from you as a tattoo artist and what do you on the other hand expect from a client to create a successful tattoo as well as a good collaboration? I love to create the designs with the customer’s idea. I love to use his input in the composition elements but I like to have the freedom of creation also so we can create a beautiful and meaningful project. I always create new projects for every client, offering them originality. I never do copies of other tattoos and never do the same design twice. What criteria do you think a tattoo convention should have to be really successful, both for you as a tattoo artist, as well as the visitors? Can you give some examples of conventions that meet these criteria really well? From my point of view, a good convention should be at least 3 days long, should have as many great artists as they can invite, 12 hours per day open to customers and artists, and a good entertaining show for the attendants. And for me personally, the most important is being surrounded by my friends. There is no such thing as a perfect convention because you can’t satisfy everybody, but I have been to a few very good conventions like Warsaw, Poland 2013, Zwickaw, Germany 2014, Amsterdam, Netherlands 2013, and Athens, Greece 2013. How would you describe the current status of tattoos by the general public in your country? The tattoo scene in Romania is in a very fast growing state and growing every year. The artist level has grown a lot in the last years because they started to travel to conventions where they

can meet with many great artists and learn from them. The public requests are also more complex and they are now more informed about tattoos, so the tattoo market is getting better and better every year for artists as well as customers. Tattoos in TV shows, the internet, and especially social networks like Facebook and Twitter have become an extremely widely spread phenomenon recent years. What positive and negative impacts do you think it has for the future development of the tattoo industry? I think all of the social networks like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, et cetera have had a huge influence on the tattoo industry. They’re helping all of the artists around the world promote their work better, giving customers from all over the globe access to artists’ portfolios, providing them contact to discuss projects, and more. I think all in all, it helps increase the general quality of all tattoos and the tattoo industry around the world by easing the access to information. Radicalink.ro www.facebook.com/Radicalink www.facebook.com/JohnMaxxTattoo


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DANI LA’BELLA Story: Story: Candies Deezy Liu Photography: Sean Hartgrove InkSpired Magazine: What do you do for a living? Dani La’Bella: I’m an artist and the assistant warehouse manager and head of quality control at Steadfast Brand. InkSpired Magazine: Can you list all of the different body modifications you have? Dani La’Bella: I am a modification but I’ll give you a brief summary - I have a full back piece of scarification, transdermal horn implants in my head, breast augmentation, 1 1/2” stretched lobes, and a few micro dermals bedazzled around. I also have a black stripe tattooed down the center of my tongue to hold me over until I split it, I keep my teeth in check, my legs are almost fully sleeved down to my toes, a handful of other metal scattered here, there, everywhere, two birds and some roses tattooed on my shoulders, ornamental stonework tat58

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tooed on the back of my neck, my stomach is fully tattooed, and my hair is fuchsia! InkSpired Magazine: What inspired them? Dani La’Bella: Colors, shiny, pain, pleasure, fun...I can’t focus on anything so I take in everything mentally. InkSpired Magazine: Can you describe the scarification on your back? Dani La’Bella: It’s all ornamental. Growing up, my mother was obsessed with detail, antiques, and paintings with huge ornamental frames. My house was set up like it was from the Victorian Era, so that played a huge part in the designs for my back.


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InkSpired Magazine: What was the process like? Dani La’Bella: It was extremely painful, but I did enjoy it. It was a unique experience and my endorphins definitely kicked in for a few days. InkSpired Magazine: How many times did it take and how long? Dani La’Bella: It took about a year and a half going in once a month. Each session was several hours long. I had the process redone a few times throughout the year to build up the scars and have a more intense effect. InkSpired Magazine: What is your favorite body modification? Dani La’Bella: As far as my own modifications go, I’d say my back. I really love my back piece. For modifications in general, I’d definitely say tongue splitting.

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InkSpired Magazine: What future modifications do you plan on getting done? Dani La’Bella: I want a full bodysuit, my tongue split, and I’m sure more piercings will come and go. InkSpired Magazine: What role do tattoos, piercings, and other forms of body modification play in your life? Dani La’Bella: It is my life and I’m an extremely creative person so it only makes sense to start with myself.

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InkSpired Magazine: Can you describe the feeling(s) you get when you get a new modification? Dani La’Bella: I love it! It’s the perfect balance of pain, pleasure, and beauty. InkSpired Magazine: What are people’s general reactions to your modifications? Dani La’Bella: Curiosity for the most part. It seems like most people want to be educated and understand the things that I have done to myself. It shocks me every time how many older women or men explain that they aren’t into tattoos or piercings, but admire how beautiful my back is. It’s way more extreme than the other two, but it’s somehow the most visually pleasing to them. InkSpired Magazine: Who are some of your favorite tattoo and modification artists? Dani La’Bella: Alex Strangler, Bob Tyrrell, Scott Lukacs, Teresa Sharpe, Russ Abbott, Chelsea Rhea, Stefano Alcantara, Jime Litwalk, Mike Cole, and Cory Ferguson, to name a few. InkSpired Magazine: Is there anyone that you hope to get work done by in the future? Dani La’Bella: I would really love a collaboration piece by Bob Tyrrell and Russ Abbott. I know, it sounds like an oxymoron...but I’d like them to finish out my other leg sleeve. Something about their work together makes sense in my head and I think it would be truly amazing! InkSpired Magazine: Describe your modeling career. Dani La’Bella: It wasn’t something I had planned. I look at it as more of a visual documentation of my work and modifications. I model for the love and art of it. It’s not my main focus, but it’s definitely been something I’ve enjoyed since I first fell into it. InkSpired Magazine: How and when did you start modeling? Dani La’Bella: I started modeling right after high school. I attended a tattoo convention in California and met the owners of Steadfast Brand. They saw something in me and offered me an opportunity to start out doing promotions for the company. Less than a year later, I did my first professional shoot with them and I was absolutely terrified, haha! But it turned out well and it opened the door for more modeling opportunities. InkSpired Magazine: Who are some people that you look up to in the tattoo and body modification world? Dani La’Bella: Honestly, any artist in the industry that genuinely loves what they do and has a passion for it is someone I look up to. I’m an extremely positive person and feel a connection with this industry. I admire all those in our community doing what they love. I’ve lived in many different, diverse places, traveled a lot, and met a lot of artists and people in the industry. When I come across amazing, well-known artists who are negative and don’t share the same passion and viewpoints as I do, I will never stop respecting them as an artist, but I will never look up to them. Issue #19

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InkSpired Magazine: What is an interesting fact about yourself that most people don’t know? Dani La’Bella: National Geographic is my mamma-jamma! Before I was an artist, I wanted to be an archaeologist and a scientist. If you know me well, it’s apparent how much that all ties into the things I surround myself with and my modifications.

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WALTER SAUSAGE FRANK Story: Candies Deezy Liu

Tattooing in a high volume studio, famously known as Club Tattoo has prepared Walter “Sausage” Frank for Season 4 of the Ink Master odyssey. His journey on Ink Master reflects just how well Walter performs under pressure and how far he’ll go to prove himself, constantly delivering compelling, concise, and competitive tattoos, despite the various hurdles that were thrown his way. Humble, easygoing, but a fierce competitor, Walter sets out to prove that a nice guy has a fighting chance to win too. The obstacles that he endured on the show has pushed his craft to new limits, mentally, physically, and artistically. Inspired by people with great work, he is constantly seeking ways to improve his art, indefinitely refining his skills to become a well-rounded artist that specializes in a wide array of genres and styles. “Sausage” came as a moniker in 1994 from a co-worker and quickly became a memorable identity that resonates throughout the tattoo industry. Much like his unforgettable nickname, Sausage’s tattoos are dynamic and outstanding with a remarkable attention to detail. Clients travel from all over the world to find themselves at the mercy of his tattoo machine, where they will get exactly what they’re looking for combined with Sausage’s artistic genius. He views himself as a craftsman, finding passion in designing art specific to those in his chair. An artist at heart, he’s always had a knack for creating customized designs for his clients. Driven by drawing and art his entire life, tattooing found its way into Sausage’s life from a fellow artist and friend in 1999 when he was doing t-shirt designs in Anchorage, Alaska. “In high school, I was always told that I should get into tattooing, I just didn’t know how,” Sausage recalls. When Larry Allen from Anchorage Tattoo Studios saw Sausage’s work, he asked him if he would be interested in learning how to tattoo. Intrigued, Sausage visited Larry’s studio one night after work. From the moment he walked in, he was sold. Shortly thereafter, he began his yearlong traditional apprenticeship with Larry, spending the first six months cleaning the bathrooms and tubes, dusting the floors, wondering what any of this had to do with tattooing. “I felt a lot like the Karate Kid,” he laughs. After Sausage proved his dedication and determination, Larry taught him how to build his own machines, make needles, and draw flash. His mentor sparked his interest and introduced him to the craft but it was Sausage’s drive that led him to become the artist he is today. In 2001, he moved to Tempe, Arizona, where he tattooed at the Apache Club Tattoo location. Several years later, Sausage moved to the Club Tattoo in Las Vegas, where he currently tattoos. www.Facebook.com/SausageKingTattoos Twitter: @Sausagekingtat Instagram: @sausagekingtattoos

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WHISKEY DICK Story: Candies Deezy Liu

Photography: Sean Hartgrove If you put whiskey, ZZ Top, Johnny Cash, Pantera, Willie Nelson, and Allan Wolf into a blender, you get WhiskeyDick, a blues, country, metal, punk rock duo with a huge metal influence. Whiskey and tattoos flow freely in their music, paired with acoustic southern groove and heavy metal pedal riffs. The WhiskeyDick duo consists of Reverend Johnson and Fritz, two guys who have created more than enough “yeehaw” shenanigans for metal heads and country fans alike. Started in 2005, the country metal dichotomy set out on their own beaten path to play for anyone that wants to hear their music. Their southern roots are humble, their vision is simple - to spread the good word of their uniquely harmonious music. “Who gives a crap for being signed? If your music is good enough, people will talk about it,” Reverend says. And talk about it, they do. WhiskeyDick’s fans are evangelistic and to them, their fans are friends and family. They have the same profound respect for fellow bands and musicians. “To me, you’re nothing without your fans and peers,” Reverend says. The high demand for their music and their beaten path has led them on a tour across the nation and in August of this year, to Europe, where they will be playing in Germany, Netherlands, France, and Belgium. For six years, they played in their hometown, Fort Worth, Texas. In 2011, WhiskeyDick booked their first tour on a whim, with only their passion and drive feeding them. Though both were self-taught musicians since they were young, it took a tragedy for Reverend to pick up the guitar again. It was a catalyst for WhiskeyDick to be where they are today, creating music that is fast and original with life experiences as inspiration. With a nostalgic smile on his face, Fritz recalls a time when they used to practice in tattoo studios. “I’ve always been a fan of tattoo culture, being an artist as well, it connects me to the art.” Their tattoos reflect their loves - southern roots, culture, history, tributes, music, and hotrods. Sponsored by Black Market and Lowbrow Art Company, WhiskeyDick proudly walks the metal walk and talks the hillbilly talk in style. The Texas natives have released several albums since 2006, the first one called “Rebel Flags and Whiskey”. “First Class White Trash” (2009), “Drunk As Hell” (2010), “The Wicked Roots” (2012), and a double album, “100% Drunk Live and WhiskeyDick It Happens” EP followed in the short years after the release of their first album. The hardworking WhiskeyDick duo plans on releasing five albums this year, anxious to give their fans all the country metal badassery they desire. The acoustic twosome wants nothing more than to replicate the ol’ times where people sit on their porch and jam. In their case, the stage is their porch. www.WhiskeyDickBand.com www.YeehawStore.com www.Facebook.com/WhiskeyDickBand www.YouTube.com/HellYeehaw

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INSIDE THE LENS OF JIM LOUVAU Story: Candies Deezy Liu

Photography: Louvau Photography A jack of all trades, master of almost everything he touches, Jim Louvau’s passion and talent is uncanny. His photography is just one of his many hobbies turned careers. It started after he discovered his love for music. “It was a natural thing for me to shoot musicians because I have the mindset,” Jim says. Though he was a musician first, Louvau believes that music and photography go hand in hand. He recalls a time when he would go to concerts, showing up hours before they started in hopes of getting a good spot. He saw photographers getting there minutes before the band started playing and getting a better spot than him. Moments like these fueled his interest in the pursuit of photography.

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Ruggiero as bassist, Jared Bakin as guitarist, and Kanses Farver as drummer. Their music spans opposite ends of the musical spectrum and various genres, giving them a unique sound. Though they are still a fairly new band, they have shared the stage with Mindless Self Indulgence, Buckcherry, Crossfade, Dog Fashion Disco, Authority Zero, 18 Visions, and Flyleaf. “I’m one of those people who wakes up one day and decides to do something completely different…if I could pay for more time, I would,” he says before he starts talking about his newly launched radio show, The Louvau Show on 93.9 FM KWSS and KWSS.org.

In 2005, with a little point and shoot camera, Jim went to Ozzfest and started the era of Louvau Photography. It was love at first shot, and he began shooting bands everyday, building a portfolio. With no job and determination to find an avenue to pursue something he enjoyed, he started a job selling newspapers where he got in contact with the photo editor who initially blew him off. His hard work and persistence eventually paid off, landing him his first photo assignment shooting Mötley Crüe and Aerosmith. He continued to build relationships with bands, shooting their live performances, and playing music, learning along the way how to make each career benefit the other.

Louvau’s photography is dynamic; he can shoot in any location, scenario, and subject matter. “I shot music for so long where I didn’t have control of the light. I’ve learned to work with that,” he explains. His portfolio contains a wide array of photography styles, including sports, editorial, weddings, and more. Besides a commercial photography class he took a few years ago to refine his technical skills, Louvau is a self-taught photographer. “Creativity and passion cannot be taught. When you can find someone who has the eye and creativity that learns the technical skills, that’s a good photographer,” he believes. Eloquent, and a bit of a workaholic, he’s passionate about any form of self-expression he can take on.

As a man of many talents, Louvau is also the vocalist for THE ATTITUDE. The band was founded in May of 2005 by him and Anthony Kirksey. With no musical limitations of the founders’ differing backgrounds, they added Nick

www.Facebook.com/LouvauPhotography www.Facebook.com/TheLouvauShow Twitter: @louvauphoto Instagram: @jimlouvau

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DanceFuckSuicide

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Eliza Winn Boykin

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Alice Cooper

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DIABOLIK 85258 Story: Candies Deezy Liu

In a weak economy with rising metal costs and fierce competition, Ira and Jennifer Leibowitz created Diabolik 85258, a high quality yet affordable jewelry brand symbolic of the people wearing it. Unmaterialistic and not just a commodity, their jewelry is meant to be a symbol of their soul. They wanted to capture their audience’s personas, allowing them to make a statement by wearing Diabolik. Their mission was to create an identity and brand with which they can set themselves apart and to have no rivals. 85258 identifies the zip code in which Diabolik was conceived on the 4th of July in 2009. The unique spelling in their name is representative of their vision to create something different and alluring. The Arizona based company distinguishes themselves as alternative jewelry in an alternative metal for an alternative world. As they set out to create a brand that would resonate with their audience, Ira and Jennifer looked towards their American roots of hard work, integrity, quality, and standards. With affordability in mind, they began doing research on various metals. Reminded of early American metalsmiths, they found their solution - pewter in its lead free form. An American heritage metal, pewter is the fourth most valuable metal in general use. Its durability, charming color, nice finish, and affordability convinced Diabolik’s creators that pewter was the metal for them. Ira and Jennifer take pride in being an all American company, never outsourcing their labor to overseas manufacturers, but instead keeping their operations right where they started it. With unmatched style and the attitude of their wearers as inspiration, Diabolik has more than 150 unique designs. Their jewelry can be found adorning celebrities such as David Ellefson of Megadeth and Testament guitarist, Glen Drover. In the name of Diabolik 85258, they are bringing the art back in the form of their jewelry. www.Diabolik85258.com

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THE OVERFLOWING MIND OF JOSHUA FINLEY Story: Siara Gray Photgraphy: Radek Photography Like a constant flow of thoughts in a human mind, Joshua Finley’s artwork is lifelong, steady, and a tumbling flow. It’s rare not to see him working on some sort of project - prints, murals, show posters, commissioned work, anything and everything. The Kansas born artist describes his work as a mash-up between cartoony, realism, and stylized with realistic textures on bubbly cartoons. The subject matter is a juxtaposition between what you would see on a romping LSD trip and the gritty, true parts of both our everyday lives and imagined archetypes. He flirts with a hedonistic edge that’s executed so playfully. However, Joshua is versatile to accommodate commissioned work as well. “I love pushing the bill. I love drawing gnarly shit that’s witty, well constructed and fun! There are times I look at something I just drew and go, “that’s messed up!” I just love how in art, you make the boundaries. In commercial art, concert posters are kind of the last frontier of freedom…anything can go on a show poster. Anything from a sock to a greasy ape riding a cosmic toaster while snorting his own brains out of a coke straw through his skull,” Joshua explains. A multi-faceted and proudly non-politically correct artist, Joshua Finley flexibly appreciates a handful of mediums such as acrylic house paint for large-scale murals, the staple pencil for its versatility, and watercolor for its balance between control and fluidity. His main love is the black ink pen for illustration, demonstrating Finley’s bold style with solid lines that can powerfully portray texture, highlights, and depth with only a few strokes. Today, Joshua Finley works and lives in Denver, Colorado with his fiancé and business partner, Valerie. He has identified himself as an artist since childhood, when he first picked up a pencil and never put it down. He’s not only a full-time, self-taught artist and illustrator, but has been the percussionist of country-surf-punk band, Granny Tweed for the last five years. Joshua says the band is very reflective of his work ethic and artistic style; as well as some of the most offensive posters he’s ever created. As of now, Joshua and Val are making plans to marry in September in a private beach ceremony in Italy while continuing to improve his website and online store in addition to working on some fantastic upcoming projects. Finley will be starting a large mural on Route 66 near Vega, Texas and focusing on his and Val’s educational children’s book character, “Cheeky McNeeky”. As diverse and talented as Joshua Finley is, one golden trait that he lives by is hard work. If you are a Denver resident, it is an exceptionally rare sight to see Finley idle. Each morning, he writes a list of client work for the day, then sketches out roughs for jobs, creates graphic designs and ink illustrations and scans them in for further work, prepares canvases, and then sketches some more. When Joshua goes out at night for concerts or art shows, he continues working at the show, selling illustrations and prints, and preparing work for the next day. “Stay out of trouble for fuck sake. Don’t be a dick. Also believe in what you want to do, think about how to make it a reality. Build little goals to get to the bigger ones. STAY HUMBLE and thoughtful, but use your spikes when necessary. As far as strictly creating art or music, don’t be afraid to create what you may not understand. Just enjoy.” -Joshua Finley www.Joshua-Finley-Art-2.MyShopify.com www.ReverbNation.com/GrannyTweed 146

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GET INKSPIRED Are you InkSpired? Submit your tattoos and stories to: Submissions@InkSpiredMagazine.com.

Want to be InkSpired? All Submissions must be e-mailed to submissions@InkSpiredMagazine.com. If your file size is too large to e-mail, please send us a message stating as such and we will provide you with an alternative solution. Please, DO NOT send us links to online storage or websites to view your files. Also, any photos posted in our various social media sites, while appreciated and possibly shared by us on those sites, will NOT enter you into consideration for publication. Minimum of three (3) HI-RESOLUTION images need to be submitted. Low-res images will automatically be discounted from consideration. Photo credit, including Photographer, Model, Hair Stylist, and Makeup Artist, needs to be included with EACH IMAGE. You also need to state which of these YOU are, so we can provide you with the correct release form for publication.

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before publication, we must receive a release form, signed and dated by yourself and ANY PERSON WHO RETAINS OWNERSHIP of the image. We provide the release forms to you once you have been accepted for publication, but it is your responsibility to return it in a timely fashion.

Social Media

Personal Tattoo Submissions:

InkSpired Online Store

If you are not a model or photographer or another professional in these fields, but you still have an amazing tattoo or two that you would like to submit for our new "Reader's Ink" section, we will be accepting lesser-quality images such as those taken from a cellular phone or personal camera (not professionally taken). The remaining guidelines apply, as well as a notation providing us with the name and location of your tattoo artist. Tattoo Artists: If you are an artist who would like to submit your portfolio or flash material for publication, please send us a message and a sample of your work, and we will get in touch with you about how to move forward as this is treated more as an advertisement than a submission.

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www.InkSpiredMagazine.com/products with the freshest gear and art from InkSpired Magazine, InkAddict, Black Market Art Company, Lowbrow Art Company and more!


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MODEL OF THE MONTH EMILY MARIE

Photography: Ryan Guzzetta with Axium Photography

www.Facebook.com/EmilyMarieaz IG: @emilymarieaz

To submit to the InkSpired Model of the Month contest, visit: www.InkSpiredMagazine.com/submit/inkspired-model-of-the-month

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Issue No. 19