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March/April 2016

Children’s Books and Authors: Old favorites—and perhaps some new ones!


Ink and Fairydust Managing Editor Courtney Seybold Assistant Editor Sarah Levesque Submissions Editor Elizabeth Troup Graphics Editor Jansina G. Graphics Assistant Courtney Seybold Illustrators Mary MacArthur and Anna MacArthur Authors Avellina Balestri, Donna Ferguson Dudley, Marie Jeanette, Sarah Levesque, I.H. Malmgren, R. Michael, Amanda Pizzolatto, and Courtney Seybold Photographs from www.unsplash.com Questions? Ask@iandfmag.com All articles and artwork belong to their respetive creators and may not be copied without permission.

Contents Editor’s Note

by Courtney Seybold

Jack and the Witch by I.H. Malmgren

1

2-10

Author Interview

12-13

A Friend in Need

14

Review: Of Mice and Imagination

15

with Hannah Heath

by Donna Ferguson Dudley

by R. Michael


March/April 2016

16-17

Review: Tales of Rowan Hood Series by Avellina Balestri

18-23

A Day at Grandma’s

23-25

Prayer Place

28-29

by Courtney Seybold

by Marie Jeanette

Tolkien, Lewis, and the Saints by Amanda Pizzolatto

30-33

Why Read Children’s Books by Sarah Levesque

Ink and Fairydust March/April 2016 Ink and Fairydust is a free e-magazine and blog created by teens and young adults. We seek to inspire with a mix of creativity and faith.

www.iandfmag.com To Subscribe: www.iandfmag.com/subscribe Or Email Subscriptions@iandfmag.com

I&F is a publication of Rivershore Books www.rivershorebooks.com


J.M.J.

Editor’s Note Courtney Seybold

Dear Readers, “No book is really worth reading at the age of ten which is not equally—and often far more—worth reading at the age of fifty and beyond.” –C.S. Lewis My childhood favorites have stuck with me long after they first kept me up too late at night racing through pages until that final cover fell. They’re the books which introduced me to a love of reading, and also to some of the greatest writing and authors that I’ve had the pleasure of knowing. They are also a huge part of why I love to write. Often these days people seem to mistake immorality for great literature. I’ve seen a lot of books on reading lists of supposedly classic literature whose only credentials were the exploration of evil and perverted behavior in pretty words. While children’s literature isn’t completely free of such themes, and adult fiction can be found that doesn’t just rely on shock factor and unique (often used to describe sinful) subject material, I do think that there’s less chance of finding these pretenders at classic literature among children’s books. Children’s literature holds a good deal of those timeless works, appropriate to and enjoyable by almost any age-range. In this issue we celebrate that with our own children’s literature, reviews and articles on pieces by more famous authors, and our usual columns and interview. As always, we hope you enjoy what we have to offer.

Yours Ever,

Courtney Seybold Managing Editor

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Coming May 2016: Nautical Adventures!

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March/April 2016: Children's Books and Authors  

Ink and Fairydust

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