United Maverick - Flights Of Fancy

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KICK THE TYRES AND LIGHT THE FIRES

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Office 9, First floor, Main Terminal Building. Lanseria International Airport. 24/7: +27 83 270 8886

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The difference is... We are

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Let’s Get Lost p.43 In Search of Happiness; Urban Adventures in Mzansi

p.177 The Himalayan High Life

Destination Aviation p.107 Trading Up; The Impact of Covid-19 on Charter Travel

Getting Down To Business

Magical Musicians

p.35

Loving Lana; An Interview with

Culture for Sale

Lana Scolaro

p.77

p.187 The Global Investment Landscape; Where to From Here?

p.211 African Business; The Post-Covid Quest for Ingenuity

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CONTENTS | 04

Luxury Lifestyle p.97

p.133

Penny Lane

The Land of Magic Silk Making

p.232

Fabulous Fashion

Stock Still

p.11 Fire; Q&A with Adèle Dejak

p.25 Water

p.33 Hometalk with Paul Leisegang

p.55 Market Day

p.63

p.121 Shipwrecked

p.171 Foundry

p.217 Africa Rising – The Modern Warrior Woman

p.225 Haven

p.233 One Night in Naples

Big City Night

p.71 Neon Nights

p.83 Creativity, Colabs & Couture

Fantasy & Fables p.117 Mermaids, Myths & Maelstrom

p.151 Magical Zander

For The Love Of Food p.143 Swinging from the Vine

p.165 Africa on the Menu

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Magnificent Motors p.193

p.201

Keeping Pace

A Matter of Pride

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CELEBRATING

YEARS ANNIVERSARY

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Welcome to Flights of Fancy ... And so it is that sometimes things are so good you can’t do just one, eat one, read one, which is the case with this edition of United Maverick! Welcome to what we are sure is the biggest aviation book produced anywhere in the world. And not only is it big, beautiful, and made with huge enthusiasm but it’s also packed full of the quality content you have come to know and love in United Maverick. In this second book of the 4th Edition you will find wonderful things can and do happen when one relaxes in the luxury of a United Charter flight. We go on adventures to Italy, interview jewellery designer and artist Adèle Dejak, wrap ourselves in silks from Ethiopia, talk musical inspiration with international DJ Lana Scolaro, lose ourselves in fantasy and fairy tales with Mermaids, Myth & Maelstrom, and take a moment to remember why silence is still important. Thank you for reading our treasured production, we hope you love this book as much as we loved producing it.

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by Philippa Rose-Tite

Entrepreneur, designer, philanthropist, jeweller, creative director, Adèle Dejak has worn so many hats, you have to be surprised she still has any space remaining on the no-doubt elegantly appointed hat-rack at her door. But despite a punishing schedule - she’s currently in full swing with the launch of her new line - traffic conspiring to make one or both of us miss interview times, and dodgy internet connectivity making communication difficult - we managed to catch up with her for a United Maverick-style Q&A.

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A

dèle, you studied law and then typographic design in England and then went adventuring through Italy, arguably two of the centres of fashion and design, and you were born in

Nigeria. So Kenya doesn’t feel like an automatic next stop on your road to world domination. Why then did you choose to base your operations in Nairobi? Well, having been educated in England at boarding school, and then moving on to my law degree at university, I had a

What do you think is the next big shift in African

lot of friends from Kenya who had gone to school with me

fashion and design?

in the UK, so I have been a little in love with the country

[laughs] I do love this question, even if it’s impossible to

since those days. Later on I had a large number of Kenyan

answer. In the last few years we saw the release of the

friends, and so when my husband was offered a position

Black Panther movie, and without doubt it was a global

here [Kenya] I was really excited. It’s since proved to be one

phenomenon. The design, the costumes, the sets, it all felt

of the best moves I could have made. I not only employ a

African even if it wasn’t actually, and I thought to myself,

large number of people (around 20), but we have incredible

this is it. This is Africa’s time. It is now; it is the future, and

artisans in Kenya who are able to freelance with me on

we are getting our moment. But it hasn’t translated into the

various collections – great for tax purposes as well as for

seismic shift the world was expecting. Who knows what

investment in skills development.

will bring the next big change? Anyway, we are certainly seeing a more embracing and welcoming environment for African ideas and that’s not to be ignored. Starting a new range is obviously a massive undertaking. Where do you even begin? My starting point is always Africa. I usually begin with a specific tribe and start my designs based on concepts and ideas stemming from that identity. So much of my inspiration comes from the Masai and the Karamojong in Uganda, both of whom have very heavy styles. I like to strip it down to its absolute minimalist point, leaving it outstandingly complex but paradoxically simple. I am generally unapologetically bold, and I believe that we need to embrace who we are. My latest collection ‘Love’ was inspired by the team who worked on the African Fashion International shoots at Hell’s Gate featured in this United Maverick [‘Foundry, Fire, Water’]. We were up so early each day, driving nearly 65km to the park, and on my way out the door at the crack of dawn one morning, I impulsively grabbed a decor piece off my wall. It’s a gorgeous ‘love’ sign that I picked up in Paris, done in metal. The stories we were shooting were about finding your future, while exploring your history, as a people and an individual. The way in which people responded to the ‘love’ sign was just magical, and I realised that this symbolism is such a huge part of the human condition that we have to explore this in the designs. It’s all about love, isn’t it? Loving what we do, who we are with, where we are. It’s all love, it’s a powerful emotion.

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“My starting point is always Africa. I usually begin with a specific tribe and start my designs based on concepts and ideas stemming from that identity. So much of my inspiration comes from the Masai and the Karamojong in Uganda.”

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“The stories we were shooting were about finding your future, while exploring your history, as a people and an individual.”

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FABULOUS FASHION | 24

I do what I can, and I think I am more sensitive to this than a man would traditionally be in Africa. In Rwanda there was a woman who started a basket business and hired other women almost exclusively. They went to the business owner one day to thank her for the work, because now that they were bringing in an income, their husbands had stopped beating them, not because of their intrinsic value as human beings, but because of their What’s been the biggest creative challenge in

economic contribution. Women need to rely on themselves

your career?

and each other to break these binds. Additionally, our

Well, I am not a skilled draughtsperson, I am a visionary,

cultures are being diluted. Between post-colonialism and

and as such my biggest challenge is to express my

the Americanisation of our cultures, we are starting to

creative ideas to my artisans. I get around it by talking

lose ourselves more and more. I want us to embrace our

to them, and then using cardboard to illustrate my ideas.

Africanism, our traditions, our tribes. I want us to integrate

From there I move onto plasticine mouldings, which

our tribes into our daily lives and promote our identities.

are a much better (if not perfect) way to communicate.

It was one of the reasons I adored Black Panther, which

Articulating my vision so the artisans can understand

encouraged embracing identity.

what I am looking for is probably my biggest challenge. If you could talk to 20-year-old Adèle, what would What tools, books, and websites help you find

you say?

inspiration on a day-to-day basis?

I would probably say ‘Don’t be so effing naïve! You live

I do a lot of research on African ceremonies, as well as

in a dream-world. Wake up! Don’t trust as many people.

on the various tribes in Africa. I use Google, but also a lot

Don’t believe everything people say, and try to be more

of books. For example, I have the entire collection from

prudent. Verify! Verify everything!’

Angela Fisher and Carol Beckwith. I look at customs, traditions, and body adornment. The pieces are always

If you were president for a day, what would you change

bold, so I take the inspiration and go from there.

for the creative industry? I love the question. But it’s so tough. In Africa, because of

You use really interesting materials, not those typical

the health infrastructure, there is not a lot of assistance for

of jewellery designers. Tell us more about the choices of

handicapped people to get involved in the creative arts.

brass, cow horn, and other African materials.

I strongly feel that they should be given more facilities and

Growing up in Nigeria the artisans used cow horn a lot,

assistance to improve their lives. Research has shown time

but it wasn’t of this quality. In East Africa the horn quality

and again that if you create cultural centres and art centres,

is amazing! When I lived in Uganda for three-and-a-half

it promotes community building and improved societal

years, I came across this amazing material. There they have

care. We need to get people off the streets so I would create

a specific cow which has these huge horns, the Ankole cow,

sports and arts centres in every disadvantaged area. Let’s

and so often the horns were discarded as a by-product of

get them off the streets and teach people the skills to make

the beef industry. The quality is remarkable, and it’s vital

a living on their own.

to me to use an eco-friendly material, so I was naturally drawn to this product. Giving purpose to this thrown-away material is important to me. Even with our brass, we use reclaimed items like fridge parts and doorknobs. In Kenya the focus is on the environment and my brand is absolutely committed to being environmentally friendly. Has being a woman, and specifically an African woman, affected the way in which you have approached your business? I really hate saying this, but too many of our countries

You can follow Adèle’s journey on www.adeledejak.com or on Instagram at @adeledejak.

on this continent are misogynist, and women are still considered second-rate. It is changing, but too slowly, and so I have aimed at empowering as many women as I can. Having a salary and being independent makes an enormous and tangible difference to people’s lives, so

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Team Africa Fashion International at Naivasha Hell’s Gate National Park. At the heart of our campaign was the idea of creation and of life. There are two elements we associate with this and that’s fire and water. Both elements are potent but they could not be more opposed. Fire is intense and instantaneous, while water, though it can be as tempestuous as fire, is more willful, methodical and unhurried. The Hell’s Gate gorge, for example, was carved and sculpted by water over years while pieces from the Precious Collection were created and shaped in almost volcanic temperatures. This contrast was important.

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“We see water not just as the originator of life but as the key ingredient in the survival of man. Water has a spiritual essence. It is used to cleanse and clarify but it also connects people. For centuries, people have constructed myths and rituals around water. Whole tribes and cultural practices have emerged out of this mystical yet physical phenomenon. It’s pure… it’s the common denominator for life.” ADÉLE DEJAK

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K L A T E M Paul

uitendach by Jo B Talk

to

Leisegang

for

20 minutes and you will feel

HO

better about yourself and the world.

The CEO of creative communications

agency, The Showroom, describes himself as an

African communications specialist, humanist, and father. It is clear though, that whatever role he’s occupying,

it’s permeated with positivity, even during a pandemic. We

sat down with this business maverick, known for his work with the Miss South Africa brand and African Fashion International, to

of who we are. Tell us about your work with African Fashion International (AFI). My AFI work was part of a portfolio I ran while working with the Motsepe family. The portfolio was reputation work, focused on communicating what the family does and how they do it. Football was one part of it, so we brought Manchester United and Barcelona football clubs to play here. Times are tough for so many in South Africa, but on the weekend, you can rest a bit, forget your big problems, and throw yourself into your passions and what you love, which could be football.

hear more.

Fashion was a natural extension of this as, like football, it’s all about How would you describe what you do?

lifestyle and bringing joy to people. The idea was that fashion has the

Communication. The client comes to me with a broad brief, often around,

potential to employ many more people, and so if we can help our designers

for example, social development in a community in which he or she operates

have a good quality product and tell a different story, and if we can give them

or trades in. My team and I then propose what that communication should be;

an opportunity to showcase annually in South Africa and overseas, then maybe

sometimes it’s an event, sometimes it’s a film, sometimes it’s a fashion show.

we are making a good contribution towards clothing and textiles. So, it came

Often it becomes some sort of big national or international campaign. Essentially,

from a motivation to make a difference. We started with an African Fashion

it’s communicating some sort of message from Africa to the world. It’s important

Week which we did in the middle of the 2010 World Cup. It was incredible as

that the African story is told with pride and dignity and with a strong future in

it brought a lifestyle element to the football. And I guess it has just grown and

mind. Communication is one of the most important tasks we have in this country.

grown. In 2019 we took South African brand MaXhosa and Mozambican Eliana

We must convince ourselves and our people that we can do better and that every

Murargy to New York Fashion Week and did an incredible show. Of course, we

time we do something it must be of a world-class standard. This starts with the

would like to continue that, but Covid-19 has affected plans for now.

language we use from our leaders, our businesspeople, and our media. What do you think makes you an African maverick? Tell us more about the work you’ve done with the Miss South Africa brand?

anything is impossible even when people tell them they are dreaming. My

It came from a feeling that the world was ready for a different kind of Miss Universe. My motivation was that my daughter must look at what beauty is and see herself in that, and change was needed. I actively approached the Miss South Africa brand and said, “I think I can help you guys; I think we can do this big; we can do this properly and we can make a statement to the world that times have changed”. We then raised money and did a fantastically elaborate event which ended up with a viewership of more than five million and the winner, Zozibini Tunzi, went on to win Miss Universe. Again, it comes from a place of wanting to communicate something to the world about Africa, about our people, the heart

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Most maverick, entrepreneurial types are similar in that they don’t believe work comes from a place of believing that nothing is impossible, and we can achieve incredible things, it’s only our imagination that limits us. The impossible comes naturally to me. It’s important to have a vision and the courage to share that vision, the ability to sell it to people and then a great team to deliver it. And this combination of things is not one person, you normally have a thinker, a doer, and a reporter. I was born in a shanty town and lived there until I was about eight. Growing up I never thought we were poor, but rather temporarily inconvenienced. Poverty makes you incredibly creative and resilient and it’s those qualities I want to show the

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FABULOUS FASHION | 34

world

Africa

has in abundance. I believe South Africa and South Africans are as good as everyone else in the world. And that a local agency can be just as good as a New York or Japanese agency. And of course, the real driver is then bringing Africa to the table of humanity on an equal footing because we have the capability to make a solid contribution. We have so much within ourselves, our people don’t need handouts, they need

is some sort of education and then a job to get yourself experience, and then you venture out, either into a career or your own thing. I still think this is the best path. But I also think young people need to become experts in something and the most important thing to become an expert in is themselves. No-one must believe in yourself more than you. You will have a hundred people tell you why something won’t succeed, and no-one except yourself to tell you why it will

hand-ups. We must believe in ourselves.

succeed. So, you must know who you are and believe in yourself. So what is next on your agenda? All my efforts, education and experience have led me to where I am now.

What are you most proud of?

My dream is to stage the greatest migration of indigenous people back

My relationship with my daughter. She is 17 and having a daughter made

to the Cradle of Humankind, with a culture, music and wellness gathering

me realise how hard it is to live in this world, especially in the fashion

named ‘The Call’. The aim is to show the world that it’s possible as modern

industry, and especially if you are a woman. We really need to rethink how

humans to live as equals with indigenous peoples and that there is a lot we

we treat, speak to, and consider women.

can learn from them. You read about how indigenous people are struggling to hold on to their

Which African designers do you have your eye on?

land and their way of life, but I have a different view. These people know so

I have so many, but you must ask yourself, who are the designers that are

much, and they have refused to live the way we do, away from nature, because

successful beyond their PR. I have worked with designers from Cairo to Cape

they know it’s not the right way. Stress and modern life are killing us and

Town and I think success is about four things; how unique is the design, how

there is so much we can learn from indigenous peoples in terms of how to

reliable is the brand at getting the product to the client, how interesting is the

heal ourselves, the use of natural medicines and even cosmetics. We need to

business model, and has the business survived over time. Taking these four factors into account I would say that in South Africa the MaXhosa business is

highlight our common humanity. And so, this migration to the Cradle is something that has been burning inside me for the past 10 years. The Cradle of Humankind is so important,

really working, a Senegalese brand called Tongoro is great, and Maison ARTC from Morocco, who is more of an artist than a designer.

a place where we should start our conversation about humanity, the place we should gather is the place where we all left millions of years ago. We are expecting 600 artists, singers, shamans, cultural leaders, and elders, coming to show the world we can gather, and we can find

What keeps you up at night? Our responsibility as creatives, marketing professionals and media and the mental wellbeing of humanity.

each other. Plus, the pure spectacle of all these indigenous people from all over the world makes a real statement. I have travelled around the world and seen so many amazing things, but it’s

Three words to describe yourself? Brave, kind and difficult.

brought me back here to the Cradle of Humankind, the most important place for humanity. What advice would you give to youngsters coming up in the business world? As a younger person there are steps. Your first step

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FOR SALE by Jeremy Gordin

MONETISING AFRICA’S CULTURE

country, then a city, then a suburb, and then one house – complete with all the details you could ever hope to see! The ‘coastline paradox’ also applies to the question: ‘How is African culture being turned into money?’ By ‘culture,’ we mean creations, goods and services that encompass everything from bric-a-brac on the side of the road to art pieces commissioned by international art that if you measure a coastline with a centimetre-rule, you get a longer length than if you measured it with a metre-rule – likewise, that if you measured it with a

collectors, as well as the work of fashion designers, musicians, film makers, writers and the travel industry. Needless to say, the detail involved in examining the different

metre-rule, you’d find it was longer than if you used a kilometre-rule?

sectors is immense. And if we step back to our satellite (and in

It’s called the ‘coastline paradox’ and was written about by Benoit

time) for the broader view, we realise that African ‘culture’ has been

Mandelbrot, the geometer who coined the word ‘fractal’.

monetised for a long time. Think of the majestic pyramids in Egypt,

Similarly, the closer you get to most things, the more detailed they turn out to be. Think of those movies that begin up in the heavens,

the city of Alexandria, Timbuktu and its famed manuscripts, the Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania, Mount Kilimanjaro, the ruins of Great

with the Earth looking no larger than a green, brown and blue beach ball with dabs of white at the top and bottom – but no real detail. Then, pretending the viewer is looking through the lens of one of those fancy spy satellites, the camera zooms into a particular continent, then a

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GETTING DOWN TO BUSINESS | 36

Zimbabwe, the Victoria Falls, the Okavango Delta, and – much closer to home – the awe felt by tourists about the world’s deepest gold mines, not to mention the Big Hole of Kimberley (and let’s not forget the actual wealth emanating from these). But, as far as South Africa is concerned, the earning power of mining relative to the overall economy has markedly diminished in recent decades – and, with our transition to democracy in the early 1990s (we are zooming in a little closer now), the aspects of ‘culture’ that started generating interest and money stemmed mainly from the international community’s interest in the ‘rainbow nation’ and our own ‘new’ pride. So tourism to our cultural sites – the Kruger National Park, the private game reserves, the Cradle of Humankind, the Cape winelands, as well as places representative of the Struggle such as Robben Island and Johannesburg’s Apartheid Museum – became a new crux of monetisation. These were joined, so to speak, by other expressions of our culture. Think about the rise of local musicians and their music. Just last year, when Sho Madjozi – actually 26-year-old Maya Wegerif, who raps in her native tongue Tsonga and also in Swahili – was asked to jump onto the stage at a club in New York City. She is said to have been so impressive that she ‘completely shut the place down’ not in the traditional sense of course! She had the crowds hopping, bopping and applauding till the wee hours. Or consider the rise of local artists whose work has tightly gripped the imagination and taste of international markets, William Kentridge being a prime example. Goodman Gallery’s Liza Essers says ‘there’s a remarkable and obvious intangible gain from our local work becoming internationally recognised,’ and, what’s more, flowing from this recognition, one finds that major museums overseas will suddenly have, for example, an ‘Africa Acquisitions Committee’. What this means, in turn, is that overseas collectors also want to lay their hands on African art.

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THINK OF THE MAJESTIC PYRAMIDS IN EGYPT, THE CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, TIMBUKTU AND ITS FAMED MANUSCRIPTS, THE OLDUVAI GORGE IN TANZANIA, MOUNT KILIMANJARO, THE RUINS OF GREAT ZIMBABWE..

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Rooibos is a remarkable beverage – a tasty, aromatic one. But, besides its great flavour, the claimed medicinal values of rooibos are pretty impressive. It’s a source of antioxidants. Thus, researchers tell us, rooibos can help prevent cancer, protect the liver, boost the immune system, and relieve allergies. Moreover, antioxidants have anti-inflammatory properties. Rooibos is also said to have a hypoglycaemic effect, helping to balance blood sugar and improve insulin resistance, which might help combat the development of type 2 diabetes. Alpha hydroxy and zinc, which rooibos contains, are both skin nutrients; Or what about Ndebele murals, Dr Esther Mahlangu being

zinc heals wounds, protects against UV rays and its anti-

the acknowledged queen of this genre, so much so that she was

inflammatory properties can help with acne. And rooibos

commissioned to paint the BMW Art Car (the first non-Western and

also fights irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and can help

female to do so)? Then there’s the remarkable beadwork and the

with asthma because it’s a bronchodilator.

previously mentioned bric-a-brac that can be purchased on the side of many roads, ranging from windmills to wooden carvings. One of our latest favourites is of course the ‘Arch for Arch’ project.

From its origins in the Western Cape’s Cederberg region, the rooibos industry has shown excellent growth. A century-and-a-bit back migrants and settlers

It’s an architectural tribute to Archbishop Desmond ‘the Arch’ Tutu

in the area found that the fine, needle-like leaves of the

constructed in the City of Cape Town last year. Commissioned by

Aspalathus linearis plant made a fine-tasting tea. In 1904,

Design Indaba and financed by Liberty Holdings, the #ArchForArch

Benjamin Ginsberg, a Russian immigrant and pioneer

project celebrates its namesake by being a physical representation

in the Cederberg, whose family had been in the tea

of his strength and resilient humanity; the structure consists of

industry in Europe for centuries, became interested in

14 individual arched beams of wood, together forming a dome.

rooibos and got busy marketing the new ‘mountain tea’.

The wooden arches were bent by Croatian boat builder Dario Farcic

By 1993, the Rooibos Tea Control Board was converted

in Johannesburg and a prototype was unveiled at the finale of

into the privatised Rooibos Limited. In 2009, A Touch of

Design Indaba Conference 2017.

Rooibos was launched: to show its versatility in cooking,

It was Ravi Naidoo of Design Indaba who commissioned the project.

14 of the country’s top chefs contributed recipes

Naidoo is a recognised ‘thinker’ in the field of creativity and design

in which rooibos was used an ingredient. By 2011,

throughout Africa and believes the design and the creative industries

Rooibos Ltd was distributing rooibos to 50 countries

could replace the mining industry as South Africa’s driver of growth.

worldwide. By 2017, the amount of countries buying

‘We’re now pegged as a global hotbed for design, but are also known

rooibos had grown to more than 60 and the industry was

for reframing the discourse around design, and its purpose. ...In this

conservatively estimated to be worth R600-million. Talk

arena, we punch far beyond our weight, after having identified design

about monetisation!

as a critical area for creating a competitive advantage for business, for society, and for every facet of life. We’re betting the farm on South Africa’s creative futures,’ he said. Zooming in even closer, the recent decade has witnessed the burgeoning in Africa of culturally based cuisine and indigenous kings and queens of the kitchen (see Africa on the Menu: The Rise of the African Chefs). Additionally, the work of African fashion designers has taken off. Think of 43-year-old South African David Tlale whose work has been showcased at New York and Paris fashion weeks and Gavin Rajah who is a regular at Paris Fashion Week. Or the plethora of Nigerian designers, including Deola Sagoe and Soares Anthony, both taking Africa to the world. But maybe because some would say it’s not as ‘sexy’ as fashion, food, music or the Big Five, there is one area of our culture and its monetisation that has escaped your notice – our flora.

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GETTING DOWN TO BUSINESS | 40

Rooibos is a remarkable beverage – a tasty, aromatic one. But, besides its great flavour, the claimed medicinal values of rooibos are pretty impressive. It’s a source of antioxidants. Thus, researchers tell us, rooibos can help prevent cancer, protect the liver, boost the immune system, and relieve allergies. Moreover, antioxidants have anti-inflammatory properties. Rooibos is also said to have a hypoglycaemic effect, helping to balance blood sugar and improve insulin resistance, which might help combat the development of type 2 diabetes. Alpha hydroxy and zinc, which rooibos contains, are both skin nutrients; Or what about Ndebele murals, Dr Esther Mahlangu being

zinc heals wounds, protects against UV rays and its anti-

the acknowledged queen of this genre, so much so that she was

inflammatory properties can help with acne. And rooibos

commissioned to paint the BMW Art Car (the first non-Western and

also fights irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and can help

female to do so)? Then there’s the remarkable beadwork and the

with asthma because it’s a bronchodilator.

previously mentioned bric-a-brac that can be purchased on the side of many roads, ranging from windmills to wooden carvings. One of our latest favourites is of course the ‘Arch for Arch’ project.

From its origins in the Western Cape’s Cederberg region, the rooibos industry has shown excellent growth. A century-and-a-bit back migrants and settlers

It’s an architectural tribute to Archbishop Desmond ‘the Arch’ Tutu

in the area found that the fine, needle-like leaves of the

constructed in the City of Cape Town last year. Commissioned by

Aspalathus linearis plant made a fine-tasting tea. In 1904,

Design Indaba and financed by Liberty Holdings, the #ArchForArch

Benjamin Ginsberg, a Russian immigrant and pioneer

project celebrates its namesake by being a physical representation

in the Cederberg, whose family had been in the tea

of his strength and resilient humanity; the structure consists of

industry in Europe for centuries, became interested in

14 individual arched beams of wood, together forming a dome.

rooibos and got busy marketing the new ‘mountain tea’.

The wooden arches were bent by Croatian boat builder Dario Farcic

By 1993, the Rooibos Tea Control Board was converted

in Johannesburg and a prototype was unveiled at the finale of

into the privatised Rooibos Limited. In 2009, A Touch of

Design Indaba Conference 2017.

Rooibos was launched: to show its versatility in cooking,

It was Ravi Naidoo of Design Indaba who commissioned the project.

14 of the country’s top chefs contributed recipes in

Naidoo is a recognised ‘thinker’ in the field of creativity and design

which rooibos was used as an ingredient. By 2011,

throughout Africa and believes the design and the creative industries

Rooibos Ltd was distributing rooibos to 50 countries

could replace the mining industry as South Africa’s driver of growth.

worldwide. By 2017, the amount of countries buying

‘We’re now pegged as a global hotbed for design, but are also known

rooibos had grown to more than 60 and the industry was

for reframing the discourse around design, and its purpose. ...In this

conservatively estimated to be worth R600-million. Talk

arena, we punch far beyond our weight, after having identified design

about monetisation!

as a critical area for creating a competitive advantage for business, for society, and for every facet of life. We’re betting the farm on South Africa’s creative futures,’ he said. Zooming in even closer, the recent decade has witnessed the burgeoning in Africa of culturally based cuisine and indigenous kings and queens of the kitchen (see Africa on the Menu: The Rise of the African Chefs). Additionally, the work of African fashion designers has taken off. Think of 43-year-old South African David Tlale whose work has been showcased at New York and Paris fashion weeks and Gavin Rajah who is a regular at Paris Fashion Week. Or the plethora of Nigerian designers, including Deola Sagoe and Soares Anthony, both taking Africa to the world. But maybe because some would say it’s not as ‘sexy’ as fashion, food, music or the Big Five, there is one area of our culture and its monetisation that has escaped your notice – our flora.

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WE’RE NOW PEGGED AS A GLOBAL HOTBED FOR DESIGN, BUT ARE ALSO KNOWN FOR REFRAMING THE DISCOURSE AROUND DESIGN, AND ITS PURPOSE..

We’ve all partaken of this, mostly when quaffing Amarula liqueur. However, locals and others were sampling the distilled marula beverage a long time ago: many of writer Herman Charles Bosman’s characters have a zest for good ol’ maroela-mampoer. Once the tree’s yellow fruit is ripe – for roughly two to three months every year – and the elephants have had their fill, local folk collect the fallen fruit and sell the pulp, pips, kernels and kernel oil to the nearest processing plants. The sunripened yellow fruit is collected, de-stoned, crushed and fermented. After fermentation, the marula liquid is distilled and aged in French oak barrels for at least two years. Dairy cream is added to provide a rich, velvety texture. Amarula is then shipped off to 103 countries around the world. This has been happening since 1983. In its Integrated Annual (Financial) Report 2017, Distell, the multinational SA-based company that produces, markets and sells Amarula, noted an annual turnover of R22.3-billion and that its operations ‘provide financial benefit’ to 60 000 people annually. One doesn’t know what Amarula’s share is of those billions; but we do know that a bottle of Amarula graces the report’s front cover; that it is listed as number two of the company’s top 15 brands; and that in 201617 it achieved ‘double-digit growth’ in the US, the world’s largest cream liqueur market.

But now, zooming in even more closely, a monetisation of our botanicals that is really burgeoning are the ‘new’ locally distilled gins flowing in the local market and set to take overseas by storm. The point about most, if not all, of the local gins is that they’re infused with botanicals ranging from juniper, wild anise flowers, cardamom, citrus, elderflowers, sweet thorn flowers, rose petals, orange peel, cinnamon, honey, ground almond, angelica, orris root, coriander, naartjie, pomegranate and even the Kalahari truffle. Finally, for those interested in recent legal occurrences, there’s a craft gin on the market called Monk’s Mary Jane: Hemp Infused Gin. Now, that’s monetising our local ‘culture’...

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IN SEARCH OF HAPPINESS:

URBAN

AD VEN TU RES IN MZANSI

by Erika Kle ine

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In those moments where work, tasks and responsibilities are allconsuming,

the vision of what awaits us during our down-time can provide a dose of motivation to help

complete our efforts and achieve our goals. Studies show that the anticipation and planning of a trip, vacation or recreational activity can boost one’s happiness significantly - sometimes even surpassing the enjoyment of the event itself. Add to this that most people derive pleasure from experiencing new things and welcome a detour from the everyday humdrum. If the formula for delight and wellbeing is having a variety of enticing leisure possibilities, combined with the lure of doing something different from your usual routine, then being a tourist in South Africa ticks all the boxes. Travellers are spoilt for choice in this unique country that boasts astounding natural beauty, worldclass cuisine, rich history and vibrant culture. If it’s a luxury urban experience you’re after, Mzansi’s major cities offer worthy options sure to raise your happiness quotient exponentially. To help you visualise a well-deserved period of rest and recreation, here is a compilation of the most highly recommended attractions of Mzansi’s biggest cities.

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A

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ALL THAT GLITTERS IN THE CITY OF GOLD - EGOLI’S SPIRIT SHINES According to a recent Mastercard Global Cities Index,

An insomniac city, Jo’burg’s restaurant and nightlife

Johannesburg was Africa’s most popular tourist city

scene will have you partying until dawn. If at sunrise on a

for the fifth year in a row. This dynamic metropolis and

Saturday you’re near trendy Newtown Cultural Precinct

economic powerhouse may not be the most obvious choice

with its theatres and art galleries, then breakfast at the

as a holiday destination. But this home to about 8 million

Market Theatre Flea Market will provide an energy boost.

fortune seekers holds a magnetic allure for those pursuing the rewards of an edgy cosmopolitan destination. Jo’burgers work and play hard. Perhaps the mines

History and world affairs your thing? Then the Apartheid Museum and Constitutional Hill are requisite stop-off points on your Jo’burg journey. The anti-

underfoot cause the energy and buzz in the air, making

apartheid Struggle is strongly represented in Nelson

for a fast-paced lifestyle that requires leisure activities of

Mandela’s palpable legacy: Mandela House Museum

a similar frequency. Expect to encounter a sophisticated

in Orlando West, Soweto; the Nelson Mandela Bridge

blend of food, fashion, shopping, entertainment and

towering over the fast-gentrifying downtown (check out

culture, combined with a healthy dose of history,

Maboneng); and in the fi nancial heart of the city, Nelson

architecture and design.

Mandela Square - a luxury shopper and food-lover’s dream, and fashionista’s fantasy. While you’re in the Sandton neighbourhood, cruise over to the Inanda Club - exclusive preserve of the ‘Gentleman’s Sport’- and catch a polo match. Or after taking a township tour through Soweto, elevate your spirits further with a 100 metre bungee jump off the Orlando cooling towers. Alternatively, a more serene bird’s eye view is available at the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site: hop in a hot air balloon and greet the sunrise over the highveld.

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THE MOTHER OF ALL PHOTO OPPORTUNITIES IN THE TAVERN OF THE SEAS The runner up in the 2017 Global Cities Index after Johannesburg, a more sedate way of life characterises Cape Town’s ambience, reminiscent of a Mediterranean lifestyle. Of Cape Town’s many names, probably the most familiar is the ‘Mother City’. Other epithets reference the stunning natural beauty of this traveller’s utopia home to almost 4 million people. Breathtakingly picturesque, this ‘Place of Sweet Waters’ offers infinite visual opportunities ideally suited to photographic safaris. Communing with nature, partaking in unforgettable feasts, and enjoying the fruit of the vine are staple experiences for visitors to these shores. A foodie’s paradise, Cape Town is home to some of the world’s top restaurants and wineries. For something a little different, imbibe cultivars grown on and around the slopes of the iconic Table Mountain, or sample artisanal botanical-infused gins and spirits at an inner-city distillery. Otherwise discover the city’s bounty at one of its many markets ultimate hipster hangouts! As a maritime centre, Cape Town’s marine opportunities are numerous, with options including scuba and sailing, or for a more relaxed outing, sun worshipping on any of its 30+ beaches. For other tranquil pursuits, golf courses abound, and spa resorts are aplenty. If planes, trains and automobiles appeal, choose from exhilarating scenic helicopter trips over the peninsula, book a trip on the opulent Blue Train that departs from Cape Town, or ogle the sleek classic vehicles at the Franschoek Motor Museum. Art and design your preferred indulgence? Then the awe-inspiring Zeitz MOCAA (Museum of Contemporary Art Africa) is a must. And for history buffs interested in apartheid, the District Six Museum, or tours of the city’s numerous townships and the famous Robben Island are de rigueur.

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A LUSH, EXOTIC BLEND OF SURF AND SUN: DURBAN SPEAKS TO THE SOUL

A

top predator from a shark diving cage. Continuing the aquatic theme, a perfect family outing would be a day spent observing the water life at uShaka Marine World. For an adrenaline rush, the Moses Mabhida Stadium swing is the biggest - and the only of its kind - of any in

A review of South Africa’s megalopolises would be

the world. Or if you prefer

incomplete without at least a succinct mention of the lush

more laid-back activity, the

port city, Durban. Sometimes perceived as the country

verdant greens of various

cousin of SA’s two predominant cities, eThekwini (as

golf clubs beckon. As for

it’s known in Zulu), might be considered something of a

greenery, Durban has

sleeper hit. As minor megacities go, it certainly punches

more than its fair share on

above its weight.

display in parks such as the

According to those in the know, ‘Durbs’ - as it’s fondly

Botanic Gardens. For other

referred to by locals - is an up-and-coming commercial

soul satisfying pursuits,

force, taking sixth place in the 2017 Global Cities Index.

a visit to the stunningly

The general appeal of this coastal oasis of about 3.5

ornate Hare Krishna

million people lies in its rich blend of cultures: exotic

Temple is prescribed.

African authenticity mixed with colonial charm, and a strong flavour of India. The city’s beach life is an obvious drawcard. With the

Travel Urban Adventures Mzansi.indd 12

is standard fare, such as a chance to greet the ocean’s

Whichever Mzansi

WITH THE NICKNAME ‘SURF CITY’, SETTING OFF TO ‘HANG TEN’ COULD BE SEEN AS OBLIGATORY.

city itinerary piques your interest, imagining the possibilities is hopefully your

nickname ‘Surf City’, setting off to ‘hang ten’ could be

fi rst step towards increased levels of happiness. Pleasant

seen as obligatory. Underwater and nautical recreation

journey - both imaginary and real!

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“I go early to hear the citrus tales of pomelos and satsumas in January, discuss the snap with favas in May, have a word with a merchant without saying anything, hold a coin bag in one hand and with the other chat with an unsuspecting tomato.” Claudia Castro Luna

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“City of feverish dreams, city that is being besieged by all the demons of darkness, city of innumerable shadowy vaults and towers, city where passion flowers desperately and treachery ends in death the strong: City of night, wrap me in your folds of shadow.” John Gould Fletcher

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“...a city that was to live by night after the wilderness had passed. A city that was to forge out of steel and blood-red neon its own peculiar wilderness.” Nelson Algren

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LOVING

by Philippa Rose-Tite

December 2020 was a lockdown month for many, but a lucky few in Cape Town got to experience international DJ, producer, songwriter, jewellery designer, and woman-abouttown, Lana Scolaro, who jetted in for a few short days to share her talent, bask in the brilliant sunshine, and fall in love with Africa.

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hile United Maverick creative director Ingrid Irsigler was able to conceptualise and execute an entire shoot with Lana, being a typical writer, I was a tad less organised, but luckily managed to catch up with Lana while she was working with her label in Dubai. The spirited young artist has a schedule that would make your eyes water, but graciously managed to squeeze us in despite time differences, a vet appointment that ran longer that it was supposed to do (for my apparently obese rescue Rottweiler, Roxy, who has cholesterol issues, 10kgs to lose, and an increasingly waning sense of humour), and lunch with a label (clearly on Lana’s side, Roxy isn’t allowed lunch anymore). Despite the chaos we were able to grab a few minutes with Lana and got to know the artist behind the famous single Charlie just that little bit better.

The best feeling in the world is the kick you get when an audience responds to what you’re doing and just goes mad. What would you primarily describe yourself as; a DJ, music producer, or a rapper, a songwriter…? Oh, a thousand percent a DJ. It’s my focus! The best feeling in the world is the kick you get when an audience responds to what you’re doing and just goes mad. I love it. You used to play guitar and cello. Tell us more about how you started, and have you managed to keep that up? I wish I had kept playing! But you know what it’s like when you’re a kid! You don’t know where life’s going to take you, so you stop doing stuff when you don’t have to anymore, or other interests start taking more of your time. When I was younger, we had to take an after-school activity, so I chose cello. I was bullied all the time, because I’d lug this huge instrument around and it was bigger than I was, I was only like 11 or 12 at the time. I took it so seriously though.

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You’ve had exposure to such great DJs and artists. Which names stand out for you as truly inspirational? Growing up in Ibiza meant I really did have amazing access to just some of the best DJs. I think one of the artists that really stands out for me would be Avicii. I was lucky enough to meet him a few times and he was just such an awesome talent and an amazingly generous human. Another positive soul with great energy and a huge help and inspiration for me personally, was Erick Morillo. He motivated me immensely to just start creating the music and gave me some great tips on the actual process of creating. One of the artists who’s also helped me profoundly with my sound is Alesso. I was struggling with using male vocals, I didn’t want to confuse people with who I was and what I was creating, and his guidance really helped me make a decision that was quite hard initially. So, who’s on your ‘wish list’ for collaborations?

Now that I’ve built my reputation and people know my style the trust is there, and I love mixing it up a little by playing dance classics at the end of a set.

Ok, this is a hard question! There are so many amazing artists I want to work with! I’m really excited about the idea of mixing genres so I would love to

If you could change one thing about your

work with amazing hip hop artists like 50 Cent and

industry what would it be? I think I would open

Drake. Like a real blend of dance music, EDM, and hip hop

up the industry. It’s really hard to get access to tracks that

would be amazing!

you want to work with as an artist. Rights to samples and that kind of thing are very tricky and awfully expensive.

What’s been your favourite performance to

It makes it difficult for people to get started building their

date? I think one of the festivals I played. I wasn’t meant

portfolio and showing what they can do with tracks the

to play at all, I was there to support my friend Chanel West

audiences recognise.

Coast. But then I guess one of the acts didn’t arrive and the organisers asked me to fill in. I had just lost a close friend, so

What’s the best industry advice you’ve been

I was really sad at the time, and I obviously hadn’t planned

given? At the beginning of your career, it’s super

a set list, but I had some music with me, and when I saw the

important to stick to the same style of music. Don’t confuse

crowd responding it became such a healing process. It ended

your audience by playing random mixes, especially as you

up being such a great night, an amazing crowd and just an

try to cement your reputation, and they get to know you.

overall incredible experience.

Now that I’ve built my reputation and people know my style the trust is there, and I love mixing it up a little by playing

Ok, so the converse of that night… what was

dance classics at the end of a set.

your worst performance experience and what did you learn from it? I think it was early in my career.

If you weren’t a DJ now, what would you be

I was supporting a well-known artist and it was a huge deal

doing? Painting! I love art, I loved making short movies

for me. I was obviously nervous, and I hadn’t quite defined

when I was at Parsons (New School for Design in New York),

my style yet. I had prepped, but I hadn’t realised they

so I’d be focussing on creating beautiful works of art.

were looking for something specific. It was a confidence crushing moment, but you get those, and you grow from

What’s your most useless talent? Being on time.

them. I always prep my sets. I make sure I open with an

It’s just so important to me!

absolute banger, and I make sure everything is properly and professionally planned before I go on stage.

What are your thoughts on doing collaborations with artists from Africa? I’m definitely coming back to Africa when things settle down a little. I was meant to play Zanzibar in 2020, but with Covid and everything it just didn’t feel right. But I’ve loved my time in South Africa and I want to explore more so I will definitely come back, and I would love to work with local artists when I do.

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COUTURE by Jo Buitendach

CO

C

I V T A ITY, E R

A L

N A D S B

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WAKANDA – A POWERFUL AFRICAN NATION KNOWN FOR THE RARE METAL VIBRANIUM.

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racking your brain for its location? It’s in East Africa, isn’t it? Did we study it at school? Don’t worry – your map skills aren’t totally shoddy. It is, in fact, an entirely mythical kingdom. It’s also the setting of the iconic Black Panther comic – it’s a made-up country that has recently helped put Africa on the map creatively. The film version of the comic was an instant hit when it was released in 2018, but its sartorial stylings are what got many talking. Conceived by celebrated costume designer Ruth Carter, who won an Academy Award for her efforts, the Afro-futuristic world of the film was created by sourcing countless authentic pieces of jewellery and fabric from many cultures across the continent. This included patterned blankets from Lesotho, stacked Ndebele neck rings from South Africa, and intricate Masai headdresses from Kenya. This amalgam of African design instantly got the rest of the world’s attention. Hollywood isn’t alone in identifying Africa’s creative potential. In 2020, iconic Italian fashion house Gucci teamed up with Manju Journal, a global art and culture platform dedicated to showcasing contemporary African fashion, music, and photographic talent. Along with creative agency A Vibe Called Tech, they manifested a visual campaign titled ‘We Are All They’. Focused on the relaunch of Gucci’s iconic 1961 Jackie bag, the collaboration also aimed to explore gender fluidity in Ghana.

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“The single African story creates stereotypes and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story.”

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Utilising Ghanaian stylists, photographers, art direction and models and set in numerous locations throughout the capital city of Accra, this Italian/Ghanaian partnership is a colourful celebration of high-end fashion and African production design and ingenuity. Of course, this international attention is fantastic but

South Africa by former models, Botswanan Tebo

it’s putting the spotlight on something that has long been

Bakwena and Democratic Republic of Congo native

known on the African continent. We have an astounding

Serge Kabisoso. Established in 2014, the aim of FWB is

store of creative talent, be it in fashion, photography,

to showcase, uplift and foster the talent of African

architecture, or visual arts.

designers and models across the continent and often

The reality, however, is that Africa is – more often than not – viewed through a negative lens and mostly

from disadvantaged backgrounds. Kabisoso says that there is so much passion and talent in

the story told about the continent is one of poverty,

Africa but very little support, financial or otherwise, and

colonisation, and struggle. And yet while to some degree

so FWB aims to give a platform and exposure to designers

this may be true, it is not the only story worth telling.

who may not have the opportunity otherwise. Participants

Acclaimed Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

have the chance to build and exhibit collections as well

said, when looking at the often-negative narrative around

as do an internship with a major retail brand. From South

the continent: “The single story creates stereotypes and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story.” Africa’s positive story of independence, inventiveness and determination needs to be told. And what better way than through the design talent of those who call the continent home It’s a more nuanced topic than many realise. Africa’s creative community is culturally and stylistically diverse – unsurprising given that there are 54 countries across the vast geographic area. Despite this there’s a definite sense of unity and Pan-Africanism. From Durban to Dar es Salaam there’s certainly a cross-border diffusion and openness to wearing each other’s fabrics and designs, and a global view of how fashion can be both personal and eclectic. A trip to downtown Johannesburg, a historically migrant city, will see you purchasing Ethiopian Netela cloth and colourful handwoven

Africa the movement then spread to Botswana and

Kente fabric from Ghana, both found right

despite the difficulties of Covid-19 in 2020, a digital

alongside intricately patterned native South African

showcase was held for the work of Zimbabwean

Shweshwe material.

and Nigerian designers. FWB has also identified the

This Pan-African attitude is nowhere more apparent

importance of the African market and how designers

than in the work of Fashion Without Borders (FWB),

taking part in the movement need to export their work

a fashion and lifestyle movement that was started in

across the continent and not just internationally. This goes beyond a movie, beyond Hollywood fantasy and the borders of made-up countries. Our continent is celebrating its creativity and natural talent with everything from huge international collaborations to grassroots initiatives. Clearly the only way is up.

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HERE ARE SOME OF OUR FAVOURITE CREATIVES AND PLATFORMS MAKING WAVES IN AFRICA RIGHT NOW: LAGOS FASHION WEEK - The multiple day event takes place in the powerhouse city every year and aims to drive both the Nigerian and African fashion industry. Started in 2011, it brings together buyers, consumers and the press and includes runway shows, talent discovery and industry events. lagosfashionweek.ng New York-based online store THE FOLKLORE caters to both American and international clientele, and offers a space to shop exclusive and sustainable clothing, jewellery and accessories from numerous African countries including South Africa, Ghana, Morocco and Cote D’Ivoire. thefolklore.com As the first African winner of the prestigious LVMH prize, designer THEBE MAGUGU exhibited at Paris Fashion Week at the beginning of 2020. The South African’s luxury fashion brand is sleek and forward-thinking but draws inspiration from the continent’s past as well as Magugu’s small town background. Our must-have item: the Basotho Poncho. thebemagugu.com Nigeria’s KENNETH IZE is able to merge the traditional craft of his homeland with a new design aesthetic while supporting artisans, design groups and a community of weavers. Spring 2021 will see the designer collaborate with the Karl Lagerfeld label on an exciting limited-edition capsule collection. kennethize.net MARGAUX WONG is the brainchild of Guyanese/Burundian jewellery designer Margaux Rusita. Based in Bujumbura, Burundi, the brand is all about opulence and luxury. Each hand-polished piece is seen as wearable art and created using sustainable, locally sourced materials such as cow horn and brass. margauxwong.com INDUSTRIE AFRICA is a platform for African fashion. Created as a digital portal to showcase the continent’s most exceptional designer talent through content, features and interviews, the website has now added a curated online retail space offering Africa’s most coveted brands, delivered directly to your door. industrieafrica.com

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“Penny Lane is in my ears and in my eyes There beneath the blue suburban skies I sit and meanwhile back Penny Lane is in my ears and in my eyes There beneath the blue suburban skies Penny Lane” The Beatles

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“Of all the forces, love is the strongest...Love can make a woman pick up a bus, or it can crush a man under the weight of a feather. Or it just lets everything go on as it was yesterday and will be tomorrow. That’s the kind of force love is.” Martin Amis

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“Underneath the poet tree, come and rest awhile with me. And watch the way the word web weaves, between the shady story leaves. The branches of the poet tree reach from the mountains to the sea. So come and sit... and dream... and climb — just don’t get hit by falling rhymes.” Shel Silverstein

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She had a gypsy soul and a warrior spirit. She made no apologies for her wild heart. She left normal and regular to explore the outskirts of magical and extraordinary. And she was glorious.

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TRADING UP

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g n i d a Tr

by Rob Rose

THE IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON CHARTER TRAVEL

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SOMEWHERE IN JAPAN SHORTLY BEFORE CHRISTMAS, A LOW-COST AIRLINE, PEACH AVIATION, LAUNCHED SOMETHING OF A FIRST.

Like all commercial airlines, Peach’s passenger numbers had been

world, began operating charter flights to deliver doses of the Pfizer

decimated by Covid-19. But it decided to do something it had never

vaccine around the US. It’s a story that reveals so much: first, how

done before: take customised requests. Or, as Japanese headlines put it,

commercial air travel was broken by the pandemic, and the wave of

Peach hit on a plan to launch “personalised charter flights”. Its first trip

lockdowns that followed it; but also, how Covid-19 has been a boon for

was a two-and-a-half-hour flight over the Seto Inland Sea for the Kansai

charter companies and those willing to think a little bit differently.

Skyfriend Association, described by the Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Charter companies with established businesses were well positioned

as “40 aviation enthusiasts from local elementary, middle and high

for what may well be a permanent shift in consumer habits. “Soaring

schools”. It was a smart move and captured a major air travel option for

numbers of wealthy flyers are switching to private jets to reduce

an industry seemingly hamstrung by the pandemic.

the risk of catching coronavirus from other passengers on regular

Other commercial airlines saw the gap. According to the Wall Street Journal, United Airlines, one of the oldest commercial airlines in the

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commercial flights,” reported the Financial Times in October. And the numbers attest to this. The commercial sector is bleeding badly. On

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January 1 2020, there were about 110 000 commercial air flights per day, but by mid-April this had plunged to about 30 000 flights per day. As lockdowns lifted, volumes recovered marginally. But by mid-August there were only about 70 000 flights in the air every day. The charter industry, however, didn’t even stutter. In August 2020, for example, the number of private chartered flights was actually up compared to the same month in 2019, according to aviation consultancy WingX. And this was during a pandemic, with many businesses at half-throttle. As Oliver Stone, the MD of broker Colibri Aircraft told the FT: “The crisis has helped raise the profile and benefits of flying privately among those who can afford to do it.” This has also been reflected in customer numbers. Patrick Gallagher, president of the world’s largest private jet operator NetJets, told the New York Times that May 2020 was likely “the best month of new customer relationships that we’ve seen in the past 10 years”. This is the critical point; the rush to charter flights wasn’t just from those who’d flown private before and had run out of options during Covid – many customers were entirely new to it. For example, another charter company, Sentient Jet, reported that in June 2020, the number of new customers was 127% higher than the year before. Now, you might be thinking that it’s just that crises are inherently

“We are seeing record interest from those completely new to travel by private jet, from all corners of the globe and from all areas such as businesses, private people, and governments that previously haven’t gone the private route.” good for the private aviation industry – but actually, it’s the other way around. As Jonathan Wolpe, CEO of United Aviation Group, has pointed out, during past economic downturns spending on charter flights was usually one of the first expenses to be cut. “It’s been different this time however, as there is inherent safety provided to passengers when flying private in a Covid-19 world,” he said. “We are seeing record interest from those completely new to travel by private jet, from all corners of the globe and from all areas such as businesses, private people, and governments that previously haven’t gone the private route.” Globetrender, a UK travel trend forecasting agency, said there are a number of factors fuelling this surge in private jet travel. First, as the views of those running charter companies illustrate, there is an unprecedented number of first-time flyers chartering flights now, compared to pre-pandemic days. Before the pandemic, consultancy McKinsey said that just 10% of those who could afford to charter planes were exercising this option; now, this number has risen sharply. The second factor is the industry’s response, which has been smart and quick, emphasising how much more hygienic and safer it is to charter a flight. “Most operators have applied special anti-bacterial

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treatments to aircraft interiors. There is extra intensive cleaning before and after flights … a study by one operator showed potential exposure to Covid-19 is 30 times lower when flying privately,” said Globetrender. And this actually seems a conservative estimate. European private charter company Globe Air AG estimated that during conventional airline travel, a passenger would have 270 person-to-person interactions. But on private flights, it said, this plunges to less than 20. Third, there’s a lower cost of entry for private jet companies today, and fourth, more companies are turning to charter flights in part because commercial airlines are now operating at skeleton levels, making it harder to get anywhere on schedule and without a headache. For many wealthier, and usually older, people, going commercial at this point just isn’t worth it. “Whether it’s children with asthma, taking the kids to see grandparents, or having a high-risk loved one at home, flying privately will be priceless for those who don’t want to risk infecting those dear to them,” Globetrender said. But is it a permanent shift? Many of these trends, you’ll notice, are linked to Covid-19. Which raises a critical question: will these new customers continue with chartered flying after the virus is thwarted? That depends, in part, on what happens with under-strain commercial airlines. “If airlines, already under huge financial pressure, decide to use the crisis to prune routes and frequencies, further reduce in-flight services for the long term, keep lounges closed and can’t keep their planes clean, new private flyers will likely be inclined to stay away,” said Globetrender. This seems more likely than ever. A report from the multinational body the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) concluded: “In the longer run, changes in consumer behaviour may result in structural changes in air transport demand.” One such structural change may just be a permanent rise in customers flying privately. Many in the industry believe this is exactly what will happen. Florida-based Monarch Air Travel reckons the charter industry has demonstrated its worth during the pandemic, which bodes well for the industry once the virus is under control. “Private aviation will have a higher and more diverse demand than before the outbreak,” it said. This will be fuelled by “new clients that have recognised that flexibility, safety, dependability, and superior customer service doesn’t necessarily mean a higher price”. Of course, charter flights are significantly more expensive than commercial air travel. This has never been in dispute. What has changed the equation, however, is that for those who can afford it, the advantages (including safety) are now heavily tipped in favour of the charter industry. But in any event, perhaps this debate is premature. Sure, we’d all like to envision a world in which Covid has vanished, but this is more wishful thinking than anything else at this point. “I don’t think we understand what ‘after Covid’ is,” said Paul Class, from US charter management company, Solairus Aviation, in an interview with Business Jet Traveller. He’s not wrong. With the need for booster shots, virus variants popping up repeatedly, and little sense of how even children will react to a vaccine, there’s far more runway for the charter industry still. And, most charter firms will confidently bet, once you’ve flown private, you’ll never want to go back. It’d be like handing back your iPhone for a circa-1992 Nokia.

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by Suzanne Jefferies

The 15th century’s ‘Voyages of Discovery’ intrigued the adventurers: a far-off land ripe for discovery, the thirst for the new, for fame and riches, the promise of warmer paradises with intoxicating spices, precious jewels and abundant fuel. Bigger, better, more technically advanced ships trawled It was a dark and stormy night. A cliché, yes, but true

through the oceans on the race to find faster ways to the

nonetheless. Lightning threaded through the sky, as the

East, so as to secure the most advantageous trading routes.

nimble-footed crew slipped and slid over the ship’s deck.

What they didn’t expect was a coastline at the southern tip

Gunfire-rain battered their sunken cheeks. Their eyes

of Africa that was a place of violent storms and tumultuous

stung with salt. Their voices drowned. The sailing vessel

weather. In 1488, Portuguese explorer Bartolomeu Dias

lurched from side to side, a drunken fool tossed by the raging

named it the ‘Cape of Storms’ and many ships sunk off the

waters. Land lay so close, a jagged slither of hope on the

coast, creating an underwater graveyard.

darkened horizon. All they had to do was dig in, stand firm,

But the Cape of Storms is nothing compared to the

and steer their course. They’d survive. The Cape of Storms

Skeleton Coast on the west coast of Southern Africa. Thick

would not claim another victim in its watery grave. Not this

fog, coupled with rocky waters and choppy surf, have led to

time. The angry ocean slapped the ship, a marvel of human

a desolate and eerie landscape referred to as ‘The Gates of

engineering, and the best of its kind.

Hell’ and ‘The Land God Made Angry’. On this bleak and

But then a sickening crunch. Rocks. The hull cracked

unforgiving coast, more than a thousand ships rot. A link

open, its entrails spilling out. The crew scrabbled overboard

between the past and the present, perpetual reminders of

too late. The splintered remains pulled downwards into the

the lives lost to the sea.

dark water, dragging the men under, their cries silenced.

Even for those sailors who made it to shore, unrelenting

Within seconds, the vessel vanished, leaving only ripples and

desert dunes often extinguished any hope of survival. For

waves where once men and life fought to prevail.

the crew and passengers of the Dunedin Star, it was three

For all the successful voyages along Africa’s vast

months of surviving on the harsh coastline with no shelter,

coastline, it’s the ones that were doomed that grip our imagination; a ship claimed by the rocks, its festering skeleton left behind to tell the tale.

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no fresh water and limited supplies, before they were successfully rescued. Others were not as lucky. In 1860, an unnamed vessel succumbed to the harsh coastline. In the 1940s, 12 headless skeletons were found, along with a slate buried in the sand. ‘I am proceeding to a river 60 miles north, and should anyone find this and

appears in fierce storms around the Cape of Good Hope, a

follow me, God will help him.’ The writer’s remains have

portent of bad luck. It is said that anyone who catches sight

never been found.

of this doomed ship will die a gruesome death.

Sometimes, the wreck’s ghost still haunts sailors, an omen

Legends, like that of the ghost ship, abound wherever the

of the tempest to come. In 1641, the Flying Dutchman was

ocean kisses the land. What lies beneath the ocean’s surface

heading back to Europe, heavily laden with treasure from

is hidden, a mystery waiting to be solved. For those who’ve

Indonesia. Determined to round Cape Point, despite the

sought their fortune on the seven seas, tales of what lurked

heavy storm that battered it from all sides, the ship was soon

beneath slowly rose to the surface. For some it was the squid-

in distress. Captain Hendrick van der Decken, however,

like Kraken that wrapped its arms round ships, capsizing it,

pushed forward. The crew mutinied, and the captain killed

leaving the crew to drown or be eaten. Off the African coast,

the rebel leader. Legend has it that a voice spoke to the

the monsters were more human, but still terrifying.

captain dooming him to sail the oceans forever with a crew of dead men, never to make port again or know peace. Ever since that day, sailors have told of a ghost ship that

Yemaya is the Yorùbá Orisha or Goddess of the Living Ocean, considered the mother of all. Often depicted as a mermaid, she is said to be the keeper of deep secrets, easy to anger and quick to dish out retribution to those who have ruffled her waters. There were murmurs of a halfwoman, half-fish with eyes redder than blood who preyed on humans and the Mami Wata said to lure sailors with their sweet singing voices. Africa’s mermaids are pale, with long black hair and fish tails, and seldom benevolent. They possess a penchant for pulling bathers into the depths towards their death. Sometimes it’s the coast itself that’s believed to have dealt the final blow. It’s been whispered that the treacherous Cape of Storms is the creation of an angry giant. Qamata, the Xhosa god, was in the process of creating land when Inkanyamba, a sea serpent, tried to stop him. An intense battle ensued during which the Earth goddess, Qamata’s mother, created four giants to protect the four corners of the world. Once the battle ended, the giants turned to stone to continue their watch forever. The southernmost giant, who also happened to be the biggest and strongest, was given the name Umlindi Wemingizimu (Watcher of the South), or as it’s known today, Table Mountain. Stories say that for those first voyagers hoping to pass through the Cape, the angry beast had to be tamed first – a task requiring a number of sacrifices.

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But for those who uncover wrecks lying at 10 000 leagues under the sea, it’s “finders-keepers”. Still, regardless of the obvious benefits, undertaking Angry beasts or not, shipwrecks are often the result of

such bounty-hunting missions is fraught with challenges.

human error. Arniston was on a return voyage from Ceylon

Unlike the adventure movies, finding wrecks is time-

when it struck the Waenhuiskrans Reef off Cape Agulhas.

consuming and exceptionally challenging as ocean

Three hundred and seventy-two lives were lost. Instead of

currents make this an ever-changing seascape, and then of

being equipped with a marine chronometer, the captain

course there is the complication of retrieving anything of

relied on his own experience. This caused him to believe the

value from deep and buried wreckage. Maybe it’s wise to

ship had rounded Cape Point, when in fact it hadn’t. Bodies

leave such adventures to Indiana Jones.

continued to wash up on the shore for more than a month

As for salvaging those wrecks that are on the seabed –

after the tragedy. This particular wreck was the focus of a

we’ve barely begun to scratch the ocean’s vast underworld: a

dive and salvage operation in the early 1980s. One man’s

reminder that we may well have mapped the territory when

mistake can be another man’s potential fortune, and what a

it comes to land, but the ocean is far more elusive.

fortune was found – rupees, jewellery, and star pagodas, gold coins issued by the East India Company. For the more intrepid, tales of treasure-laden ships, heavy

Every year, thousands of visitors flock to the coast’s various shipwreck museums, and to the wrecks washed up on sandy shores or stranded on sandbanks; monuments

with riches, are lying in wait. A number of ships met their

to man’s ongoing tussle with nature. What people find are

watery end on their return voyages from the East, laden

more questions, not answers: shadowy reminders of a wild

with gold, coins, jewels, even fine porcelain. It’s said that

coast that takes no prisoners, and scatters the bones of its

the ship of legendary pirate Captain Kidd has been found

sacrifices as a warning. Our response though is still the same:

off Madagascar, sunk by the silver he had on board. The

challenge accepted.

Namibian government earned more than $13-million worth of gold coins from a 500-year-old wreck, because this wreck was found on the beach rather than out at sea. Other cargo included tin, ivory tusks and 44 000 pounds of copper ingots.

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WE WERE AMAZONS ONCE, AND THEY KNEW OUR NAMES. HIPPOLYTA, ANTIOPE, THESSALIA, AND OUR QUEEN, PENTHESILEA. NOMADIC WARRIOR WOMEN WHO USED OUR BOWS AND OUR WITS TO EQUAL EFFECT, SHOOTING FROM HORSEBACK, CROSSING SEAS TO CONQUER NEW LANDS AND LIVING AND LOVING WHOMEVER WE CHOSE UNCONFINED BY RULES NOT MADE BY US.

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Our story, like so many others, has become murky with time, retold and refashioned according to the cultures and norms of those doing the telling and in so doing our glory, our dedication to equality between the sexes, our fighting spirit and passionate natures became something to fear or to scorn.

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Elizabeth Edwards

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But slowly we rise again. We lift our voices once more and reclaim ourselves as Amazons, as those that forge their own paths and shake off the chains bound to spirit or body. We rise again, we rise.

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The land of magic

by Philippa Rose-Tite

making… “And then I became aware of all the magnificent silk wrapped around my body, and had the feeling I might drown in beauty. At that moment, beauty itself struck me as a kind of painful melancholy.” Arthur Golden

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One would have thought that the land conditions wouldn’t be conducive to cotton production, and yet for centuries (since roughly 1AD) cotton has grown on the lower elevations in the country and has played a role in the history of the nation, in supporting families, and even in delineating cultural boundaries. In its first iteration the cotton was hand-woven into Shamma (the classic white, gauzy cloth often associated with the traditional wraps of Ethiopian dress), which were worn by noblemen, scholars, and priests of the upper classes. The cloths themselves were woven by nomadic Muslims and Falashas, or Beta Israel (Ethiopian Jewish tribes), who would wander from area to area and would set up their intricate hand looms and weave the cloth on the verandas of those who wished to purchase. As Islam and Christianity spread and the need to cover oneself modestly became more important, the coverings became more popular and soon handloom weaving was pursued in many households. Cotton became not only the covering of everyday wear; better woven or more elaborately patterned designs were worn for ceremonial events as well. The entire process of production didn’t fall entirely on the women of the local villages, who were responsible for spinning the cotton onto spindles (a craft passed from mother to daughter) and would finish the cloths with fringes and any sewing or decoration. The actual weaving itself was a venerable practice learned by the men of the village and passed down from father to son. The Ethiopian looms, many of which are still used today, are called Pit Looms, and bear a striking resemblance to the Indian looms of old – a testament to just how much movement and trade was going on in ancient times. In fact, the looms weren’t the only thing traded from that region. ou would be hard pressed to find a country more abundant in mysterious myth than Ethiopia. Legend has it that this is the home of the Ark of the Covenant and the Queen of Sheba – she of the cloven hooves, unmatched beauty, and (if my mother is to be believed) an overwrought sense of self-importance. It is also the source of the Blue Nile, the obelisks of Axum, and a history as rich and abundant as the jewels King Solomon was said to have been given from the region after he met Sheba for the first time. This is a country of many fables, in which it is hard to separate fact from fiction, and this can even be said of the history of textile production in the region, something one would have thought would not need embellishment. There has never been an African country that has stood out as a competitor to the low-cost textile production hubs found on other continents, until recently. With government policies that welcome foreign investment, massive infrastructure support in the form of industrial parks (for example, the Hawassa Industrial Park which at full capacity will employ up to 60 000 people and generate export revenue of up to US $1-billion), and a minimal trade union presence, the environment in Ethiopia is particularly attractive to low-cost clothing retailers like H&M which has had offices in Addis Ababa since 2012. But what happens when industrialisation and mass production meet a culture where the production of quality textiles is part of the fabric of society? In Ethiopia that question has been answered by a resurgence of the old ways of producing cotton and other textiles.

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Silk became a commonly traded commodity from Arabia and

As the world moves faster, and everything becomes about profit

China, a practice which continued until the Ethiopian government

margins, production yields and more bang for your buck, it’s easy to see

implemented a silk development programme in about 2005.

how practices that involve a lot of time, physical energy, and patience

The history of silk in the region is colourful; there exists a story that

could get lost in the shuffle. But there are pockets of resistance that

silk was stored in massive caves in the highlands of Ethiopia and the

are focussed on ensuring the old ways are preserved and the historical

hereditary title of the governor of the Shoa province, who looked after

skills not forgotten. Conversely too, the very things that make Ethiopia

the region, was known as ‘Keeper of the Silk Caves’. The Ethiopian

so attractive to foreign garment makers (such as the low union

emperors would commission local weavers to make some magic with

representation and the seemingly endless supply of cheap labour)

the silk and then present beautifully spun gifts of silk to the churches.

means that the workforce is disenchanted to say the least – with some

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“OF ALL THE EXOTIC AROMAS AND EXPERIENCES FROM MY SOJOURN IN ETHIOPIA, IT’S THE FRANKINCENSE I MISS MOST.” CATHLEEN FALSANI factories having up to 100% employee turnover in just a few months.

material they use – Sabahar has its own silkworms as well as a silk

Many of those disenchanted workers are finding their way back to

cultivation training programme which trains farmers around the

the old ways and using the skills they have learned in the formal

country on how to cultivate silk and then Sabahar buys their stock.

sector to make a living.

Sabahar is currently supporting over 50 rural farmers including the

We visited Sabahar, an Ethiopian Fair-Trade company which uses

biggest mulberry silk producing farm in Ethiopia. Sabahar is one of

locally produced natural fibres to make its products using the old

the few organisations in the area with Fair-Trade certification, and

techniques, with the idea of sustainability at the heart of its business.

it places enormous emphasis on ensuring that every aspect of the

Sabahar uses locally sourced cotton which is hand-spun by the women

business is consistent with ethical practice, from human relations and

from various collectives, villages, and even in the full-time employ of

green practices to water conservation, and this is certainly paying off.

the organisation. Hand-spun cotton is much softer than machine spun and so gives each item its individual character.

With only a small retail concern in Addis Ababa itself, Sabahar doesn’t have to worry too much about the often-annoying retail side of

Sabahar’s 85 artisans still use the traditional looms and methods

the business because it exports to wholesale and retail environments

of weaving even though the designs are more complex than in the

outside the country. In a world that is increasingly aware of the ethics

past – fashions being what they are now. But cotton isn’t the only raw

behind the goods it buys, it’s smart business to care.

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SWINGING

“Accept what life offers you and try to drink from every cup. All wines should be tasted;

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FROM THE VINE by Ellen Evans

some should only be sipped, but with others, drink the whole bottle.” Paulo Coelho

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ne Christmas a few years ago my sisterin-law blessed me with the Wine for Dummies guidebook. She’s a sales rep and wine expert who knows the shallows and depths of every South African wine vat or barrel known to womankind, and I’m a wine dummy who’s somehow survived on the blandest adjectives known to me: good, bad, sweet, dry. These are straight up facts. Another fact: I’ve opened that guidebook twice. The first time was a perfunctory glance while spring cleaning my garage. The second was when I released it from the garage bin out of some sort of loyalty to Christmas gifts and lawful sisters. So, what am I doing writing a wine review, you may well ask? Well. If you come at it creatively, I’m a blank canvas. Ready to sample the best berries any cultivated wine shop, farm, or pub owns. Surely, my inexperienced taste buds can blossom into a sophisticated palate able to distinguish a mulberry from a goji, fynbos from cacti, trees from forest. As does wine, I might also mature past un-ripened comments like, “Oh, this tastes kind of…dry,” to more learned pronouncements.

As does wine, I might also mature past un-ripened comments like, “Oh, this tastes kind of…dry,” to more learned pronouncements. But let’s get real.

site-specific, although anyone who enjoys the likes of Cape

The main reason I will be drinking and writing is to meet a

Point Vineyards will be aware of the heights it can reach.”

man. I figure what better way to get on with my love life post

A giddy phone call to a willing friend (she’s slightly allergic

full-on lockdown than attend a wine tasting? Men must be

to the good stuff but was game nonetheless) and we booked

coming out of those woodwork-wine-barrels in droves!

ourselves a tasting on a beautiful spring day. Driving up that

A quick Google check later and I’m presented with a

winding yellow brick road, sun and expectations in tow,

smattering of options around my local area of Noordhoek.

I could almost hear the wedding bells chime (to my credit,

I could do Wine and Swine but let’s face it, the title doesn’t

the wine farm also operates as a wedding venue, so my

quite shout romance. The Foodbarn Deli is a lovely shop

imagination wasn’t too far off).

that I already frequent and can therefore report that its collection of vino is decidedly… good. There is, however, one viable option residing just up

We practically skipped towards the picnic table bedecked with wine glasses, a cheeseboard, and attended by a lovely gentleman named Walter. As he was the only man on board,

the road from my abode. Actually, up the hill: Cape Point

bar some construction workers building a gazebo frame

Vineyards. That majestic stone and glass castle gazing down

nearby, I was going to behave myself. In fact, I soon admitted

upon sweeping rolls and rows of grass and grapevines.

that this was now all about the wine and the scenery.

Maybe it’s just me, but how could anyone resist the subtle aphrodisiacal website invitation, “Sauvignon Blanc is quite

Talking of scenery: hands down this is one of the best views in the Southern Peninsula. Cape Point Vineyards gazes at the sandy grin of Noordhoek beach, and further across to the charming (slightly smaller) smile of Kommetjie beach. As we sipped our samples and downed the cheese,

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“Sauvignon Blanc is quite sitespecific, although anyone who enjoys the likes of Cape Point Vineyards will be aware of the heights it can reach.” Walter spoke of the sensitively selected ecosystem that encourages flourishing wildlife: a bottle-green water reservoir resting at our heels, a haven for king koi fish and a white regal crane quietly meditating on the outskirts, and every now and then cheery birds circling in wobbly knots, looking euphorically tipsy themselves. Before I got too merry, I asked Walter some serious questions without sounding too much like I didn’t know what questions to ask. I began with the Sauvignon. I know enough French to understand that ‘blanc’ means ‘white’ and (wild guess) Sauvignon means the location in France where the grape was birthed. “Yes,” confirmed Walter, “the grapes were originally from there, though in South Africa we make some of the best Sauvignon Blanc in the world. We primarily focus on this type of wine, and used to have Chardonnay, and do have Sémillon grapes on the estate too, but those grapes go into our blend for our flagship wine. We use the Greek method for fermenting wine.” “Ok, gosh, all Greek to me,” I chuckled, trying to keep up. “However, in South Africa, we can claim the Pinotage as our own,” Walter continued. “In 1920, or thereabouts, Professor [Abraham Izak] Perold invented the blend, a hybrid of Cinsaut and Pinot Noir.” A proud moment for all three of us, even though I’m a Brit (the tipsier we became, the more our nationalities just sort of mushed into each other). Walter then obligingly took over the reins and related the details of what we were quietly and progressively getting happier (read plastered) and happier to taste. “So, Cape Town Wine Company is a new range of wine we released just over a year ago. Today you are sampling three of those wines. The first is a Chardonnay – unwooded, but it shows characteristics of a typical Chardonnay – light in acidity, creamier and more buttery on the palate. The next is a Bordeaux, red style blend: a Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, and Merlot. This one has been in a French oak barrel for six months, so it is a light, woody, easy drinking wine. Last is a Sauvignon Blanc. Fruity, almost bubbly, and sparkly. A 2020 vintage and our latest release. This one will only get better as it ages over the next few months; not your typical Sauvignon Blanc as it’s fruitier and more tropical. There’s almost no wood contact in there – which is typical as we are

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more Atlantic Seaboard based, with a cooler climate.” Now, for you folks who are equally adjective-challenged, I can provide this translation: The Chardonnay was exceptionally good. The Bordeaux, lovely and dry – we could even detect the woody undertones Walter spoke of (impressive, I know!). And the Sauvignon Blanc was semi-sweet and indeed probably one of the best in the world (that I have come across, anyway!). Overall, a wonderful tasting adventure at a wonderful venue. As for my taste buds maturing and being able to distinguish one grape from another? I can humbly assert that my wine preferences are uncannily similar to my men preferences: give me any colour, any brand, from anywhere, just make sure that it’s sweet. Bottoms up!

Sound like an expert

Terms you should probably know if you’re going to fake it! WHEN TASTING Acidity: Acidity is all about how ‘sharp’ a white wine is, and it makes it refreshing and crisp (or ‘sour’ if it’s overdone). Lower acidity makes a wine taste ‘fat’. Body: This refers to the perceived ‘weight’ and viscosity of the wine. A full-bodied wine feels thick, coating the sides of the glass as you swirl (these are called legs). A light-bodied wine is almost like water. A mediumbodied wine is in-between. Flavours: This can get very tricky very fast, especially if

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you’re faking it! So, beginners should stick to the basics. Like fruity, earthy, spicy, smoky, or flowery. Sweetness: This is sweet like you’ve always known, and the opposite of this in the wine world is dry! A wine can also be medium-dry or off-dry (i.e., just a hint of sweetness, but almost too faint to move the needle). Tannin: It’s all about the tannins for red wine. High tannin wines are astringent, maybe even bitter and inky. Lower tannin wines are smooth and soft, and depending

on your tastes, more drinkable. With time, tannins die off making wines less harsh. POPULAR WHITES Chardonnay: Fruity, buttery, with a velvety feel that’s atypical of dry white wines. Pinot Grigio: Simple, lightbodied, dry, and crisp. Riesling: Usually extremely sweet, with intense fruit flavours. Much lighter than Chardonnay. Moscato: Fruity, and often sweet. Sauvignon Blanc: Dry, tart, and

acidic, with herbal as well as tropical fruit flavours. POPULAR REDS Cabernet Sauvignon: Fullbodied with herbal notes. Younger Cabernet has rich flavours of currant. Merlot: Fruity, spicy. Exceptionally soft, less tannic than Cabernet Sauvignon. Pinot Noir: Delicate and fresh, soft tannins with fruity aromas. Zinfandel: Typically zesty, ranges from medium- to fullbodied and dry to off-dry.

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magical

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When boredom breathes its restless sigh, and a young man’s imagination flies, It’s a mother’s fantasy, her dreams, her art – that captures his attention and ignites his heart. Pages flutter, stories abound, princesses get rescued and scoundrels flound, A little boy becomes a dragon, a warrior, a pirate, A blue velvet couch is a plane, his mother – the pilot. Over jungles they soar and a giant’s nose they do tweak. In a flushed tropical garden they play hide and seek. There is hopscotch and juice, ballerinas and Hipponax, Even an obliging, if tired, white bear they call Max. At the end of the day, as the sunset did hover, Exhausted and happy on the couch lay the mother. Relieved to have kept the little boy entertained once again, She dressed her hair, made her face and swopped the fantastical for champagne.

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by Erica Kleine

Most who have had the privilege of experiencing Africa would probably possess an abiding sense memory that can be expressed in one evocative word: petrichor. This describes the earthy scent produced when rain falls on dry soil. Africa goes big in all that it does and it speaks to the soul. The storms are moodier, the sky is bluer, the sunsets are brighter, the smells are more fragrant, the greenery is lusher, the air is fresher, and the flavours are earthier. Indeed, if a continent could be an element, Africa would represent earth. Some predict that Africa could become the ‘Food Basket’ frica awakens the senses. It greets

of the world. What better place, then, for an epicurean to

you with a tableau of impressions.

discover previously little-known gifts? And what better

It summons and inspires a new and

time than the present, which allows anyone with access

exotic vocabulary – regular words are

to technology and a passport to easily reach the furthest

not enough to describe its allure. On offer is a buffet of sensory delights. Africa’s smells,

recesses of the globe? Opportunities now abound for connoisseurs of top-class

sights, sounds and flavours are all bigger, and have an

cuisine and beverages to savour Africa’s culinary pleasures.

intensity unmatched anywhere else. This is appropriate

And a new vanguard of foodies is at the forefront of this

since Africa is indeed huge! Three times larger than North

latter-day voyage of discovery.

America, it is in fact, large enough to contain the whole of the USA, all of China, India and Japan, and almost all of Europe too!

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M

ulti-award-winning young chef Chantel Dartnall is one of these talented pioneers. Rated Best Female Chef in the World (out of a field of 18) at

the 2017 international The Best Chef Awards in Warsaw, Poland, and voted South Africa’s Chef of the Year in 2015, Dartnall also placed 32 out of the Top 100 in the 2017 world’s The Best Chef Awards – the sole South African to make it

more open to new dining experiences.’ In the same vein,

onto the list, coming in ahead of big names such as France’s

Ethiopian food is but one of the many African cuisines

Sébastien Bras (at number 35), and celebrity chef Heston

garnering a growing overseas fan base.

Blumenthal (at number 37). Fellow chefs, culinary experts and food writers worldwide

While food in Africa has strong associations with specific cultural and ethnic identities, many newcomers

have praised Dartnall’s novel interpretation of modern

have brought their own backgrounds and skills to African

cooking, featuring her signature botanical accents. Trained

shores. These foreign influences have been embraced,

and mentored by top three-star Michelin chefs, this

adopted and incorporated into the local dishes to create a

inventive chef-patron draws inspiration from fresh, seasonal

fascinating cross-pollination, a fusion combining the thrill

produce and ‘memories, experiences and little moments’

of novelty with a taste of the familiar.

that she translates using her entirely unique style into ‘stories’ – dishes that taste as wonderful as they look. While Dartnall’s accomplishments have no doubt helped

The dishes on offer also mirror the continent’s diversity, with vistas ranging from voluptuous and colourful, to stark and – at first glance – sparse. In Africa, extravagance

elevate South Africa’s status in the international culinary

and luxury exist side-by-side with simplicity and frugality.

scene of late, hers is only one story among those of the many

Cosmopolitan meets township, urban meets rural, à la carte

African chefs on the rise. As the ‘poor stepsister’ of the

meets street, and game meets organically farmed.

culinary world, Africa is not a place usually associated with

bringing a taste of the continent to trendy

F

London foodies. Speaking about the rise of West

the South African food scene. Also Europe-trained, the

fine dining and haute cuisine. But happily, that’s changing.

N

igerian chef Tokunbo Koiki has recently been

emale chef, African food guru, co-ordinator of the annual Mzansi International Culinary Festival and author of Through the Eyes of an African Chef,

Nompumelelo Mqwebu, is another young trendsetter on

African cuisine in Europe, Koiki says: ‘The reason it’s

well-travelled Mqwebu aims to stimulate passion for and

now becoming an emerging trend is because people are

understanding of the bountiful and diverse food heritage of her land and continent, especially African indigenous foods. Her methodology? Finding ‘fresh new ways of practising, preserving and upholding Africa’s finest culinary traditions’. She also aims to rectify lingering disparities in the South African food and hospitality industry, and address the current lack of diversity and dearth of professional training for young black chefs.

T

hese are goals shared with the recently appointed president of the South African Chefs Association, James Khoza, the first South African-born and-

trained chef to lead the association in its 44-year history. Khoza is passionate about the training and development of young African talent rising up through the culinary ranks, and he sees this wave of young blood as an opportunity to unify cooking professionals from all demographic backgrounds.

C

hefs such as Mqwebu and Khoza are among a growing number of home-grown hospitality professionals raising Southern Africa’s profile in

the food industry. As attested to by the plethora of local names now appearing regularly in the region’s food and lifestyle media, there is currently a welcome trend towards recognising and appreciating indigenous culinary talent.

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A

nother South African name frequently mentioned in the food scene buzz, is Wandile Mabaso, chef de cuisine and owner of the unconventionally

conceptualised and appointed SA Culinary Club in Bryanston, Johannesburg. Simply producing a menu is not

home and hospitality that he observed growing up under

on the agenda. He aims instead to take diners on a creative

the tutelage of his mother and grandmother in the family’s

journey via his food fantasies. Trained in Paris, Miami and

farmhouse kitchen. With a keen sense of style and a highly

New York, Mabaso offers his patrons a unique and daring

trained eye for design, Van der Westhuizen’s offering at his

French dining experience ‘designed to evoke emotions and

restaurant JAN in Nice, France, consists of reinterpreting

push boundaries but yet comforting to the body and soul’.

for discerning European culinary audiences some ‘honest’,

S

classic South African favourites inspired by local market

outh Africa’s first Michelin-star chef, wine aficionado,

produce in the south of France. Another driving motivation

published author, artist and passionate photographer,

for this multi-talented entrepreneur is the need for

Jan Hendrik van der Westhuizen has carved out his

sustainability and an awareness of food wastage.

illustrious career on the basis of recreating the comforts of

While many of the well-known chefs like these who interpret Africa’s taste sensations into delectable symphonies hail from South Africa, there are also a number of rising stars who originate from elsewhere on the continent.

South African Culinary Constellation Here is a starter list of South African chefs to watch and follow. (Please note: this is not an exhaustive list, and is not in any particular order of importance. Included here are chefs who have attracted accolades for their work, and whose names frequently appear in glowing reviews.) Bianca Fogwell eu en iffe David Higgs Matthew Foxon Scot Kirton Bertus Basson

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Luke Dale-Roberts Michael Cooke eter empe hoff Gomotsegang Modiselle Vusumuzi Ndlovu

Mark Hoberman Amoré Botha Angelo Scirocco Loyiso Mtoba Kobus van der Merwe

Margot Janse Katlego Mlambo Liam Tomlin Matthew Gordon Chris Erasmus Jackie Cameron

Kate Marek Simone Rossouw Shane Sauvage Veronica CanhaHibbert Jason Whitehead

Michelle Theron Adriaan Maree Peter John Vadas Lucas Ndlovu

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The Chefs in Africa Platform his initiative y chef ieuvei a onga and his industry peers aims to raise the pro e of frican gastronomy and assist ta ented young frican chefs in ‘narrating their culinary journey and philosophy,’ providing an opportunity to boost their careers. The initiative cites the following culinary pioneers in frican gastronomy as inspiration Victoire Gouloubi Mutaro Balde Emilie Kasonga Patrick Mavoungou -hussain ahamoud

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Loïc Dablé Honor Toudissa Mick Élysée e ke Constantijn Leo

Hahndiek e assie tadika ohamed i de kader Chef Rubia ijah moo ddo

Mame Sow r me k da icha d Bénédicte Mendy Christian Yumbi

Pierre Thiam nthony arpong Raphael Ndaiga Simon Wanjau moteda adekomo

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Seven Experience group of restaurants. Describing his offering as an ‘Afro-Mediterranean fusion with a touch of the East’, Jethwa showcases his country’s finest, freshest fare, including an impressive selection of seafood, meat and vegetables. Also a proponent of inventively combining the best of European and African flavours through expertise honed at Le Cordon Bleu Culinary Institute in Paris and Vancouver’s Pacific Institute of Culinary Arts, is the dynamic Nigerian chef Gbubemi ‘Fregz’ Fregene. Fregene prepares Nigerian dishes infused with European accents, aspiring to ‘merge a

Dieuveil Malonga is the embodiment of

creativity that is fresh and unbridled with elements of the budding youth culture… to make every meal a truly unique culinary experience’. His vision is to transform the point

Afro-Fusion. THIS YOUNG CONGOLESE-BORN, GERMANRAISED, FRENCHBASED GOURMET CHEF of view of those African chefs who only serve foreign

cuisine at high-end restaurants, as he believes that African dishes are able to stand against even the most exotic of

is passionate about creating ‘a culinary bridge between

foreign options.

African flavours and Western cuisine’ through a ‘subtle

The enthusiasm and energy of these enterprising

blend of tradition and modernity’. Malonga’s ambition

young tastemakers provide a thrilling portent of things

is to write a new narrative of gastronomy with its roots

to come out of Africa in future. Just like the handful of

in Africa, thus helping to establish African cuisine as

gastronomic virtuosos profiled here, there are many

gourmet. His desire is to transmit his knowledge far and

more outstanding born and bred African chefs conjuring

wide as a means of spreading Afro-Fusion cuisine globally.

culinary magic at the moment.

Born in Ghana and raised in the United States, Selassie

The only thing to do if you are feeling the urge

Atadika is a staunch advocate of Africa’s profusion of

to become a bon vivant in Africa is to set out on a

cuisines. From her base in the Ghanaian capital, Accra, she

gastronomical adventure throughout the continent, and

passionately pursues her mission of introducing African

discover them for yourself!

offerings to a broader public through her culinary business

Bon appetit!

Midunu – meaning ‘Let us eat’ in the local Ewe vernacular. Emphasising provenance, and referencing the history and complexity of the region’s recipes, she aims to create demand for more locally grown ingredients by adapting traditional recipes. This is her strategy for changing people’s perceptions of African food for the better. A rich multi-cultural heritage is the foundation for Kenyan chef Kiran Jethwa’s colourful cooking style. The son of an English mother and Indian father, this adventurous third generation Kenyan has brought a vibrant amalgamation of tastes to Nairobi at his popular

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“The most powerful weapon on earth is the human soul on fire.” Ferdinand Foch

Cape Town Fashion Week Campaign. Styled by Adèle Dejak, Photography by Ingrid Alice, Photography on location in Nairobi, Kenya.

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by D eb ra B o u wer

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My sister and I are in the heart of Kathmandu, gateway to the Himalayas and the main route to Mount Everest. We arrive at the domestic airport where the mayhem from the streets spills into the departures hall. Bags are strewn everywhere, people yell and dart back and forth like sparrows in the early morning. We soon fi nd ourselves gently nudged towards the departure gates where a women walks back and forth yelling, ‘Yeti 227 to Pokhara,’ ‘Buddha to Nepalgunj,’ and ‘Yeti Mountain Flight’. People rush for the door. It’s not long before we fi nd ourselves on the other side of the gates, being herded onto a rickety old bus and driven to a small 16-seater aircraft at the edge of the runway. We are greeted by a fl ight attendant who marches us onto the plane. She

proceeds to squeeze her way to the front, taking care to step over packets of rice, pockets of potatoes and the odd backpack. Standing in front of her gathered audience on the plane, she says: ‘Buckle up, your safety chart is in front of you and here is some cotton wool for your ears.’ And we are off, trundling down the runway, up and over the dusty city of Kathmandu, away from the noise and clutter, off to experience the Himalayan High Life. Acres of seemingly endless rice fields spread out on the hill slopes beneath us as the drone of the engines rock us steadily forward on the fl ight to Lukla. Wisps of cloud

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float by, and pockets of air bump into the little plane sending our stomachs on a roller-coaster ride. Before long, the towering, jagged peaks of the Himalayan range come into view as cameras frantically click to capture

itself is dangerous because once a pilot has committed

every passing image. Far ahead, the infamous runway of

to landing, there is no chance of a turn-around or an

Lukla spreads out on a nail-bitingly

opportunity to re-take the approach. Not surprisingly a

narrow strip of land.

sign in the old Lukla airport warns: ‘We do not fl y in bad

Designed to accommodate small fi xed-wing planes like a Dornier,

weather because clouds have mountains in them.’ Stepping off the plane we quickly fi nd ourselves

the runway is 460m long and 20m

immersed in a land of incredible peace and tranquillity.

wide, lies at an altitude of 2 800m

The bustling noise of Kathmandu and the endless

and slopes up at a gradient of 12

cacophony of hooters are soon replaced by the calming

degrees to help slow the planes

sounds of yak bells and the gentle chatter of local

down on landing. The runway

village people. About 600 years ago, a small group of people from Kham in Eastern Tibet migrated across the treacherous mountains and settled in this area called the Khumbu. With Mt Everest, which they call Chomolungma (Mother

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of the Universe), watching over them from her/its lofty height, they made the region their home. They are the Sherpa people, sherpa or sherwa deriving from the Sherpa language words Shar (East) and Wa (people), meaning Eastern people. Burgeoning tourism, trekking in the region and the media have resulted in the name Sherpa becoming synonymous with the term, ‘climbing guide’. The Sherpa people are remarkably adept at living at high altitude and surviving in the harshest conditions. This is apparently thanks to a gene inherited from a group of extinct humans called the Denisovan; this genetic mutation enables the Sherpa people to survive on 40% less oxygen than most of the trekkers coming into the region. And yes, they are also well acclimatised, but this does not make their life any easier. They survive through freezing winters, work tirelessly in their fields and walk endless miles across rugged terrain. While the elite climbing Sherpa make about $5 000 during one climbing season of two months, the average porter or farmer will earn only around $1 000 a year. Life is harsh and yet good natures and smiling faces prevail. Our guide is a bundle of happy energy called Nir, a member of the Rai family, and has a constantly happy face and so my sister quickly

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and acceptance. They are hung outside where they, like humans, become subjected to the hardships and joys of life. Over time, the wind frays them, the sun fades them and they gradually fade, fray, and wither away, a representation of the frailty of human life. For the Sherpa people, existence moves at its own natural pace. Mt Everest towers over the surrounding peaks and nature provides the Sherpa with all they need to survive. Harnessing run-off water from the hillsides, they fi ll buckets for washing and cooking. Carving rocks from the earth, they build houses and walls to create fields. In this region, a yak is one of the most prized possessions. Weighing between 220kg and 580kg, these pack animals are found in high altitude regions of Asia. Apart from ferrying loads of supplies and trekking gear, they are a great source of food, providing their owners with milk and its by-products, butter and cheese. Their thick coats are regularly hand-combed and the wool spun to knit garments and carpets to see the Sherpa

nicknames him ‘Smiley’. Over the course of the next 18 days he mesmerises us with stories about the Khumbu and the Himalayan people. We trek through endless small villages and spend the nights in local tourist lodges and sometimes in people’s homes. The attitude of the people, the way in which they unconditionally invite you into their homes and their lives, endears them to you immediately and you can’t but help immersing yourself in their world. Every morning as you wake, you are met by the smells of burning incense and juniper as each household lights fi res in offerings to the gods. They pray for peace, acceptance, blessings and tranquillity against the backdrop of towering snow-capped peaks. Above them, the early morning clouds gather up their prayers and carry them across the Khumbu. Endless carved-out prayer or Mani walls line the routes that connect the small villages. Chortens reach to the sky, prayer wheels ring as locals turn them and multi-coloured prayer flags blow in the wind scattering prayers across the universe. ‘Smiley’ explains the prayer flags to us. Each flag has an array of prayers on them, for blessings, love

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through the bitter winters. Not a thing is discarded in these parts, including animal and human waste. All over, local families, with baskets on their backs, walk the paths surrounding their homes collecting yak dung. The dung is then mixed with a little water and shaped into a ball. These balls of dung are flattened onto rocks, and dried in the sun for about six or seven days, after which time they are stockpiled and used to fuel the fi res that cook the daily meals. And human waste? Many toilets in the region consist of a hole cut out of a wooden floor with a hollowed out area beneath it. At the end of the bathroom visit, some leaves are kicked down the hole. The resultant half-leaf litter is then mixed with some yak dung, and used to fertilise the soil. The result is healthy crops of buckwheat, barley, potato, spinach, carrots and cabbage. On one of our days we walk through a remote area. Mist settles like lace across the paths and endless tundra. We are at 4 800m. As we ascend a rocky area a small boy

comes over the ridge line carrying a basket on his head. Meandering down the paths he slowly comes toward us and stops briefl y to exchange greetings. He is quiet and shy, 12 years old, his clothing worn and tattered and an old pair of obviously oversized sneakers are on his feet. Around his neck nestles a pendant of the Dalai Lama which he clutches protectively in one hand. He tells us that he lives at a village at the bottom of the hill called Phortse, almost 1,000m lower in altitude. His daily task is to bring in an income for the family by carrying loads up to the lodges at Gokyo at 5 000m. As he walks away, tears roll down my face and ‘Smiley’ quietly holds my arm and asks: ‘Didi, why are you so sad?’ I can’t answer. How to explain that at home our children have everything they need. They have computers, technology, cellphones. They go to school and spend time playing freely. They have everything they need, yet all too often do not appreciate how easy their lives are. This child has nothing. At 12 years old, he works to support his family. His prized possession is the

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through the bitter winters. Not a thing is discarded in these parts, including animal and human waste. All over, local families, with baskets on their backs, walk the paths surrounding their homes collecting yak dung. The dung is then mixed with a little water and shaped into a ball. These balls of dung are flattened onto rocks, and dried in the sun for about six or seven days, after which time they are stockpiled and used to fuel the fi res that cook the daily meals. And human waste? Many toilets in the region consist of a hole cut out of a wooden floor with a hollowed out area beneath it. At the end of the bathroom visit, some leaves are kicked down the hole. The resultant half-leaf litter is then mixed with some yak dung, and used to fertilise the soil. The result is healthy crops of buckwheat, barley, potato, spinach, carrots and cabbage. On one of our days we walk through a remote area. Mist settles like lace across the paths and endless tundra. We are at 4 800m. As we ascend a rocky area a small boy

comes over the ridge line carrying a basket on his head. Meandering down the paths he slowly comes toward us and stops briefl y to exchange greetings. He is quiet and shy, 12 years old, his clothing worn and tattered and an old pair of obviously oversized sneakers are on his feet. Around his neck nestles a pendant of the Dalai Lama which he clutches protectively in one hand. He tells us that he lives at a village at the bottom of the hill called Phortse, almost 1 000m lower in altitude. His daily task is to bring in an income for the family by carrying loads up to the lodges at Gokyo at 5 000m. As he walks away, tears roll down my face and ‘Smiley’ quietly holds my arm and asks: ‘Didi, why are you so sad?’ I can’t answer. How to explain that at home our children have everything they need. They have computers, technology, cellphones. They go to school and spend time playing freely. They have everything they need, yet all too often do not appreciate how easy their lives are. This child has nothing. At 12 years old, he works to support his family. His prized possession is the

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pendant of the Dalai Lama. Trekking through the region, one thing becomes glaringly apparent. Apart from prayer and water wheels, there are no other wheels in the region. Carrying exceptionally heavy loads on their backs, locals ferry everything, from supplies to building equipment, up the steep paths of the Khumbu. For the Sherpa people, their apparent happiness seems not to come from acquisitions or material comforts. It seems to come from within; and the people with whom they connect every day becomes one of the treasures of life. I remember what the Dalai Lama once said: ‘It is under the greatest adversity that there exists the greatest potential for doing good, both for oneself and others.’

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The global investment landscape:

Where to from here? by Dr Lance Vogel

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clawed back to the February peak. The rally from the March low point had resulted in an index move of nearly 54% - a classic V-shaped market response as investor emotions went from ‘pandemic panic’ to ‘hooked on stimulus’. However, as equity markets rallied, the earnings outlook for 2021 was being lowered aggressively and by the end of August the earnings outlook for 2021 was way below the expectations we saw in early 2020. While equity markets were then up by about 54%, the earnings outlook had been lowered by a staggering 30%, creating a disturbing divergence between market levels and the underlying fundamental driver – future earnings. Shapes are often used to describe the behaviour of market indicators and metrics. The crocodile jaw is common, and we also recently were exposed to the shape of a hippopotamus jaw, but the only shape that accurately depicts this persistent divergence between global equity markets and future earnings is that of a striking green mamba! The valuations of global equity markets are now at extremely expensive levels and are eerily reminiscent of the technology-driven dotcom bubble in the late 1990s that ended in tears for many investors as the bubble burst in 2000 and equity markets collapsed over the following two years. he past two years have

From current levels global equity markets must either tread water

subjected investors to a very bumpy ride in the global equity

until the future earnings outlook has recovered sufficiently to match

markets. These markets tumbled in the final quarter of 2018 and

the lofty valuations or these equity markets must once again fall until

by the third week in December, the global index of listed equities

the levels more accurately reflect the subdued earnings outlook that

had fallen by about 18%. Then, as if activated by the flick of a switch,

is still clouded by the ongoing impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on

these markets turned around and continued to move up right the

global economic activity. With valuations at such elevated levels,

way through 2019 and by the middle of February 2020 the rally

particularly in the US equity markets, forward-looking investors will

from the bottom in December 2018 had produced a total gain of

have to turn their backs on the US where returns have essentially

about 35%. The markets then turned south again with the Covid-19

been ‘stolen’ from the future by the extent of the rally since late

outbreak as the catalyst and by the third week of March 2020, the

March this year. More appealing equity market valuations are evident

extent of the fall in the value of this index was 34%. The fall in the

elsewhere on the globe, more specifically in the UK and in the

global equity markets in the final quarter of 2018 was unexpected,

Eurozone, but structural issues, compounded by the acrimonious

as the underlying fundamentals – expected earnings one year ahead

Brexit negotiations, may still dampen opportunities in those markets

– remained resilient. The subsequent recovery into 2019 was thus

for quite some time.

also expected as the markets realised that the earnings outlook continued to remain positive and that the negative reaction in the final quarter of 2018 was entirely unnecessary, a classic undershoot. In true market fashion, by the time February 2020 had arrived, the equity markets had delivered a classic overshoot and so

THE OUTLOOK FOR GLOBAL INVESTMENT MARKETS IS NOT ONLY CLOUDED BY THE LOFTY VALUATIONS OF EQUITY MARKETS, BUT ALSO BY THE LACK OF YIELD IN TRADITIONAL INTEREST-BEARING MARKETS.

the fall in February and March of this year was not entirely unexpected as the earnings outlook had been moderating since the second half of 2019.

The outlook for global investment markets is not only clouded by the lofty valuations of equity markets, but also by the lack of yield

On the 23rd of March 2020, the global equity markets turned

in traditional interest-bearing markets. Using as an example the

again as governments and central banks responded to the carnage

US Federal Reserve Funds Rate – the rate off which most interest

in certain sectors of the market with monetary and fiscal stimulus

rates are determined – we can go back to the middle of 1981 when

packages aimed at mitigating the destructive impact of hard

this benchmark rate was at 19.1%. A slow and steady decline in this

lockdown policies on consumer and business activity across the

rate then characterised the next 30 years, accelerated to a certain

globe. Trillions of dollars have been showered on economies in

extent by the introduction of ‘quantitative easing’ in the US in late

efforts to prevent ‘lockdown meltdown’. This ‘hope rally’ in global

2008 during the height of the Global Financial Crisis, until the end

equity markets ran out of steam at the end of August 2020 as they

of 2011 by which time the rate was down to 0.07%. The Fed Funds

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On the subject of emerging markets, local South African investors do have some cheer. The FTSE/JSE All Share Index of equities is not valued at the same extreme levels as global equity markets. The price paid currently for future earnings is not at record high levels and is in fact around the average for the past 15 years. Contrast this with prices being paid now for future earnings in global equity markets that are 50% higher than the average

THE CROCODILE JAW IS COMMON, AND WE ALSO RECENTLY WERE EXPOSED TO THE SHAPE OF A HIPPOPOTAMUS JAW, BUT THE ONLY SHAPE THAT ACCURATELY DEPICTS THIS PERSISTENT DIVERGENCE BETWEEN GLOBAL EQUITY MARKETS AND FUTURE EARNINGS IS THAT OF A STRIKING GREEN MAMBA!

paid over the past 20 years. Fixed income markets in South Africa are also a lot more appealing than those of more traditional developed market economies. Lending money to the South African government for 10 years currently offers a yield of about 8.8% and with inflation running much lower at 3.2%, the inflation-beating yield on offer is attractive. These higher yields do reflect the higher risks involved but the global fixed income, interestbearing government bond markets will be faced with elevated risks for a long time to come. It is possible that global investors have arrived at an inflection point as

Rate currently sits at a meagre 0.09%. This has a marked effect on

far as investment strategy is concerned. The strategy that has for

the whole bond market and the US yield curve now offers little to no

decades been anchored by traditional developed market assets of

yield for investors out to at least 10 years. US Treasury Bonds with

equities and government bonds may have run its cyclical course

maturity less than two years currently offer yields as little as 0.10%.

for those wanting to complement local emerging market assets

Lending money to the US government now for 10 years will offer a

with developed market assets. The anchor may have to shift from

yield just less than 1%. With inflation running at about 1.5%, this offers

developed to emerging markets or the anchor may well have to shift

risk-averse investors truly little opportunity to protect their capital

to alternative asset classes in developed markets where valuations

against the effects of inflation in the US.

currently placed on future earnings are much more reasonable.

In other G10 economies the situation is worse. In Germany, for

Private assets, infrastructure assets and the move towards a more

example, the yield curve for government bonds offers negative yields

environmentally sensitive and decarbonised portfolio construction

out to at least 30 years. Lending money to the German government

methodology all have merit in a post-Donald Trump world order.

by buying 10-year bonds will cost the investor about 0.5% per annum.

But one thing is certain. Investors who use their experience of

Although inflation in Germany is now negative at -0.2%, investing

developed market investment returns over the past 10 years as a

in low-risk government bonds will also not protect an investor

benchmark for US dollar denominated investment returns during

against the effects of inflation. Most of the government bonds in G10

the next 10 years are likely to be disappointed.

economies offer little-to-no yield. Looking ahead, yield-seeking low-risk investors in developed markets will have to cast their nets much wider and deeper to find the yields that are necessary for them to meet their investment objectives. Many emerging market economies do offer government bonds with much more appealing yields, but the risks associated with such an investment are significantly higher. Unfortunately, higher yield does mean higher risk for such investors.

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KEEPING by S h a n e O o sth u i zen

A

Five years ago,

A

– A

if you were to have

an unknown in the emerging markets, which won’t see Elon Musk’s

said Jaguar would be

handiwork for a good few years to come.

leading the charge in mainstream electric mobility, it would have

You could then argue that BMW takes the accolade for electric

found many critics. If you were to have told those same critics that

vehicles with the i8 and the i3. Or what of the Prius? Or the Nissan

Jaguar would not only lead the way, but that it would engineer a very

Leaf? We’ll come back to those in a moment.

usable, very handsome, pseudo-SUV as a starting point, you would’ve been labelled a madman, and immediately ejected from the bar. In truth, the I-Pace signals the start of something far greater than

The I-Pace uses two concentric electric motors with one placed on each axle. This gives the electric Jag permanent four-wheel drive and a slew of impressive performance figures: 294kW and 696Nm makes

that. What the arrival of the I-Pace suggests is that mainstream

it good for 0-100kph happening in a sports car-rapid 4.5 seconds,

manufacturers are prepared to invest – to build new, from-the-

despite weighing in at a fairly hefty 2.1 tonnes.

ground-up electric cars you actually want to own. Sure, Tesla has been successfully converting the petrol and diesel brigade to electro-power for a number of years now. But Tesla is still

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A D

The impressive figures don’t stop at performance either. The claim is that a 10-hour charge will give you a 500km range with a 7kW home charger, or will charge to the same level in only 45

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minutes on a 100kW DC supply. In terms of looks, there is no denying that the I-Pace is a belter! This has become something of a trend with electric autos, as designers have more canvas to play with – with no engine up front – allowing the wheels to be pushed right into the corners of the body.

JAGUAR HAS CREATED THE FIRST REAL WORLD RIVAL TO THE TESLA X WITH A CAR THAT NOT ONLY TROUNCES THE COMPETITION, BUT CATAPULTS JAG TO AN

account for a very pleasing silhouette. A classy rear spoiler, vented bonnet and flush door handles provide the detail. Finished in massive

CREDIBILITY IN THE LUXURY ELECTRIC VEHICLE MARKET.

22-inch wheels, the I-Pace really sets the tone in terms of looks.

surface and conditions, but off the tarmac this is no Range Rover Evoque or Jaguar F-Pace. The brakes are of the regeneration variety, as is to be expected on any electric car. This helps to regenerate some lost energy while the top of the pedal travel, before giving the mechanical feedback you expect from a more traditional braking system. It’s noticeable, but not alarming. The interior of the I-Pace is rather familiar. It might not be as futuristic and ‘Apple-esque’

The other benefit to having a motor, or battery housing, placed

as a Tesla, but still features vast surfaces of touchscreens. Switch it on

low down and in the centre of the chassis, is a low centre of gravity.

and it’s not unlike the Range Rover Velar in its operation. Even some

This allows the enthusiastic among us to carve through corners

graphics seem to have slipped across from the Jaguar/Land Rover

with grip and confidence – which is in keeping with Jaguar’s theme

(JLR) parts bin. But on balance, the I-Pace is refreshingly similar to a

of building driver’s cars.

‘normal’ car, with just the right amount of future.

This is reaffirmed with the now standard offering of different driver

As mentioned before, because the wheels have effectively been

modes to suit your mood. ‘Dynamic’ gives you a stiffened-up steering

moved forwards, the I-Pace Jag claims the same interior space as a

and increased throttle response, while ‘Comfort’ and ‘Eco’ modes

Porsche Cayenne. This, as well as a 27-litre cubbyhole where you’d

deliver on their respective promises.

expect the engine to be, means space is plentiful. In fact, the 656-litre

Despite its beefed-up SUV appeal and decent approach/departure angles, the I-Pace isn’t an off-roader. It does feature something called

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motor and brake settings depending on

braking. This results in a mushy feeling at

This also lends itself to an attractive snubbed nose and the high, squared-off rear end, which

Adaptive Surface Response, which adjusts

boot is twice the size of that found in a Volkswagen Golf. It’s a well-packaged, well-built and very spacious car that just

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happens to be electric. Which brings me to the previous mentions of the Toyota Prius and similar vehicles. The direct environmental benefits are obvious. But owning, charging and planning your life around one is a chore we could all do without. And that has always been the issue with the electric car in Southern Africa. It has ultimately become an expensive city car, with its credentials more aligned to its price tag and exclusivity than its purpose. The I-Pace is also not an EV for the masses. It remains a premium vehicle that’s priced accordingly. However, it is an electric car that you do actually want to own, with the added benefit of real-world usability and a 500km range which will comfortably cover the needs of the majority of buyers. The EV transition will be a learning process – both for the big brands and consumers. But what the I-Pace does is make the idea of going green a lot more tolerable. Sure, an electric motor does strip away a lot of the interactions we’ve come to love about driving. But the I-Pace restores some of that with its addictive acceleration and sporty handling. You miss the drama which gives cars their individual characters, like gearboxes and engines. You’ll miss the engine note when straddling the red line. And you’ll miss stopping to fill the tank which, as much of a chore it seems to be now, will become even more of a chore when we’re all needing to be plugged in for 45 minutes. The Jaguar I-Pace won’t be to everyone’s taste. But charge a glass and offer a salute to Jaguar for making a car that steps boldly into the unknown. And pretty much nails it.

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A MATTER OF

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by Sh a n e O o sth u i zen

It’s been 70 years since the first Series 1 Land Rover rolled into the countryside, and the chaps over at JLR have done well to re-introduce the world to the Defender. But can fresh looks, new-age tech and a hefty price tag defend its legendary honour?

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THINK LAND ROVER DEFENDER AND MOST OF US WILL RECALL THE HARROWING CAMEL TROPHY EXPEDITIONS OF OLD. What comes to mind are photos

of canary yellow Land Rovers being ferried across jungle rivers on

makeshift rafts or teetering precariously on the edge of mountain paths. Or, closer to home, who can forget following the many crosscontinental journeys of Kingsley Holgate? His wheels of choice always included a Defender in his calabash-carrying entourage. Regardless of your personal affinity to the brand, Land Rover is to adventure what Mercedes-Benz is to luxury. It’s the name we automatically associate with the rough and tumble world of pioneering off-road travel.

THEN…

In 1945 the Rover Company was caught in the aftermath of World War 2. Europe was in a shambles and demand for almost everything had stuttered to a halt. Rover – desperate to fire up its factories – looked to the Willys Jeep and was inspired to design its own agriculturally focused four-wheel-drive truck. This led to the birth of the first Land Rover in 1948, a boxy aluminium body riding on a steel frame that would come to be well known as the Land Rover Series I. From there, the Land Rover adopted a number of upgrades, but retained its overall styling, until 1971 when Land Rover released the Series III. This saw the headlights move away from the grille out to the fenders, added synchros to the manual transmission and moved the gauges in front of the steering wheel from their former home in the centre of the dash. A V8-powered model was introduced in 1979, which ultimately defined the SUV’s instantly recognisable front end and would continue to do so for the next three decades. The Defender name came about in 1990, when the need arose to distinguish the original workhorse from the newer model, and this remained largely unchanged right until the last Defender rolled off the production line in January of 2016.

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rear window visibility, with the spare wheel mounted on the back door taking up a great deal of rear window real estate. Under the bonnet is your normal slew of JLR power plants, with two petrol engines and two diesels on offer. The 2.0 litre four-pot diesels

AND NO

will be the ones that make the most sense to those who want to use the Defender as a tool, with a choice of 200 hp or 240 hp. A 2.0 litre petrol or 3.0-litre petrol engine make up the difference. However, don’t expect

Four years later, Land Rover has given the Defender a complete,

any sporting credentials here – these are not designed for out-and-out

wheels-up redesign. Dubbed the L663, the new Defender rides

pace. They’ve been specifically geared for low-speed tackling of tricky

on an aluminium-intensive unibody platform, based on the one

terrain rather than flying around country lanes, but will still dispatch

underpinning the Range Rover, Range Rover Sport, and Land Rover

the 0-100 kph sprint in about 9 seconds. Hybrid and V8-powered petrol

Discovery models. It also does away with the traditional live-axle

derivatives are expected in the new year.

suspension in favour of an independent multi-link setup on the front and rear. This means the new Defender drives like an SUV rather than a tank,

Performance and modern powertrains aside, the real departure from the box-like tractor that once was, is in the styling. It’s not that elements of the old Defender are completely gone – it still retains the classic

while maintaining its off-road capabilities. Make no mistake, it’s still

flat back end with spare wheel and side-hinged rear door that opens

no sports car, but it’s happily able to navigate bends at speed now. The

outwards. But elsewhere, it isn’t quite so nostalgic.

inclusion of height-adjustable air suspension on top-end models irons

Up front, new square headlights with roundish daylight running

out most speed bumps and potholes. This, coupled with ultra-light steering, means it’s just as happy on the school run as it is in the bush. The only grievance here are the electrically assisted brakes, which take a little getting used to even for those who know the brand. Adding to these newfound road manners are typical 4x4 fare, such as big door mirrors, a high-up seating position, and large windows with great visibility, making it a doddle to park. The only exception is

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SO, WILL THE NEW DEFENDER RECLAIM THE RUGGED USABILITY OF THE MODEL IT REPLACES? THE QUICK ANSWER IS YES, BASED ON ONE OFTEN OVERLOOKED OINT RELIABILITY. Land Rover Defender.indd 8

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which show a camera feed of the road behind you in the mirrors. This comes in handy when you’re heavily loaded and the rear-view mirror happens to be obstructed. It’s worth noting that the boot is pretty decent too, bigger than you’ll find in comparable Toyota Land Cruiser and Jeep Wrangler models. lights and sloping front grille give the Defender a much more modern

So, will the new Defender reclaim the rugged usability of the model

look. Entry-level cars come with a body-coloured roof, white-painted,

it replaces? The quick answer is yes, based on one often overlooked

18-inch steel wheels and LED headlights, while top-spec cars get big

point – reliability.

alloy wheels and contrasting paintwork.

Previous Land Rovers, particularly Defenders, were plagued with

As per Landies of old, the new Land Rover Defender comes in

reliability issues. While they were nigh indestructible in their earlier

a short-wheelbase 90 model and the 110 long-wheelbase version.

years, recent Defenders appeared less so, often breaking down when

This is the Defender of choice for most, along with no less than 170

the going got tough. The new Defender, however, looks to appeal to an

customisable and optional accessories, from protective body panels to a

entirely different kind of driver. One who will covet the idea of owning

snorkel intake for wading through deep water.

an older Defender, but wants the modern-day luxury, comfort, and

Inside, it’s another mixture of traditional and modern, like a trendy city-centre flat with designer furnishings and exposed brickwork. Soft

maintenance plans of a Discovery or Evoque instead. The real question is; can the new Defender step into the shoes of its

materials sit alongside deliberately exposed screws and rubber floor

predecessor and transport an entirely new generation of overlanders

mats, while a 10-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android

into lands unknown? But most of all – will it inspire an entirely new

Auto dominate the dash.

level of Camel Trophy hunters? Only time will tell.

The very modern infotainment system is familiar territory and powered by new software called Pivi Pro which allows you to connect two smartphones at once and provides for ‘over-the-air’ updates, meaning you don’t have to go into the dealership to get any software upgrades – something other manufacturers should really investigate! Mid-spec SE models or above also get ClearSight rear-view mirrors,

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by Rob Rose

Sub-Saharan Africa might have been spared the most

It was a remarkable choice as you’d probably get long odds

brutal consequences of Covid-19, but you’d be fooling

on most Americans even locating it on a map. Yet Malawi

yourself to imagine the continent’s economies have

– a country of just 19 million people better known for its

somehow been spared the ravages of the pandemic.

monumental lake and for exporting industrial quantities of

And yet, from these ashes, have emerged some of the brightest spots of optimism. In late December, the influential publication The Economist chose as its country of the year not New Zealand (roundly celebrated for its Covid-19 response) or

marijuana and many workers to South Africa – was the only country of 80 tracked by Freedom House, the only place where democracy and freedom rights actually improved during the time of Covid-19. It’s a remarkable turnaround for a country which, in June

Taiwan (just seven virus deaths), but rather opted for the

2020, booted out the incumbent leader Peter Mutharika,

Republic of … Malawi.

who tried to steal the election a few years ago. The re-run

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“Almost every country and region is left with a higher debt ratio. There’s no getting away from this, and we need to think long and hard about what this higher [debt] means for the region’s ability to reignite growth.” election in the same year installed the people’s favourite,

in much of the rest of the world, partly reflecting sub-

Lazarus Chakwera, in his place. “Malawi is still poor, but its

Saharan Africa’s relatively limited policy space within which

people are citizens, not subjects. For reviving democracy in

to sustain a fiscal expansion.”

an authoritarian region, it is our country of the year,” said

The good news is that some exports should do well in 2021, provided there’s a strong global recovery. Sky-high

The Economist. It’s a story to confound the sceptics, who’d earlier in the

palladium prices will benefit South Africa (the world’s

year predicted 10 million dead bodies thanks to Covid-19 —

largest platinum group metal producer), and any recovery

but had been wrong on that count too. The truth, according

in oil (thanks to optimism about the vaccine) will help

to official numbers at least, is that Africa has had far fewer

countries such as Nigeria and Angola. “The outlook for 2021

deaths than most individual European countries. By late

is positive and Africa’s trade is expected to rebound strongly

December, the continent had about 60 000 total deaths,

in 2021 as global economic activity picks up and demand for

out of about 2.5 million total cases. For context, this means

African exports increases,” said Afreximbank, the Cairo-

a continent of 1.2 billion people has had fewer deaths than

based African trade finance bank.

the UK (population: 66 million) and Italy (population:

Africa’s share of exports to Asia, it said, has already risen to

60 million), and less than a fifth of the number of deaths

30.7%, while the European Union’s share has fallen to 24.6%.

suffered by the US (population: 328 million).

The bottom line: for specific African countries, 2021 could

Economically, you’d think that these fewer deaths, and less

be very good indeed. Rwanda’s GDP is expected to rebound 5.7% in 2021; Ghana 4.8%; Kenya 4.7%; Angola 3.2%; South

harsh lockdowns would be good news, right? Well, sort of. The fact is, the continent lost $115bn in

Africa 3%; and Nigeria 1.7%.

output, 40 million more of its people were pushed into

Charles Robertson, the chief economist at Renaissance

poverty and, thanks to the disaster rippling through the

Capital, told the Financial Times in September that if you

developed countries, there are fewer buyers for what

strip out South Africa, Nigeria, Angola and Gabon, “many

Africa does make.

countries in sub-Saharan Africa are going to outperform

“Many African countries, including the largest economies, were struggling to revive growth ahead of the Covid crisis,” said Razia Khan, chief economist for Africa at Standard Chartered Bank, at an Atlantic Council conference in late December (the

the global economy”. The likely best performers in his view: Ghana, Kenya, Rwanda, among others.

THE DEBT FACTOR

Atlantic Council is an American think tank focusing on international affairs.)

“Almost every country and region is left with a higher debt

This sounds promising –

but the deeper question is, will this growth be enough? The continent now owes a rather stupendous $540bn in debt to all kinds of institutions, and this amount has grown

ratio. There’s no getting away from this, and we need to think

during Covid. This debt is perhaps the biggest factor that

long and hard about what this higher [debt] means for the

could derail the recovery. In some cases, it already has done

region’s ability to reignite growth.”

so, if Zambia is any indication. In November, it became the

In late October, the International Monetary Fund (IMF)

first African country to default on the bond debt it owes,

reckoned that sub-Saharan African will have seen its

during the coronavirus, when it failed to make a $42.5m

overall GDP fall by 3% in 2020 due to the virus, before

Eurobond repayment. It was predictable, but nonetheless

inching back up 3.1% in 2021.

disastrous. Thanks to Covid-19, the price of copper has

It’s a bleak diagnosis: a negligible 0.1% gain between 2019

tanked. This meant that Zambia, as the continent’s second-

and 2021. Or put another way, that’s two wasted years. As the

largest copper producer, owing $12bn in all, had already

IMF pointed out: “This is a smaller expansion than expected

defaulted on repaying the Chinese, who’d lent it billions

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“If I pay [bonds], the moment I pay, the other creditors are going to put dynamite under my legs and blow off my legs. I’m gone. I can’t walk anymore.”

in the past five years. As Zambia’s finance minister told state television after the default: “If I pay [bonds], the moment I pay, the other creditors are going to put dynamite under my legs and blow off my legs. I’m gone. I can’t walk anymore.” Now, it’s true that Covid-19 made matters worse, but you can’t blame the virus entirely for where Edward Lungu’s government found itself. Some awful spending decisions haven’t helped. As the Financial Times put it: “The default also illustrates how high-octane borrowing and misrule combined to scupper one of Africa’s fastest-growing economies.” Still, Zambia is unlikely to be the only country rifling through its pockets and coming up empty in 2021. “Operating conditions across Africa will remain difficult, with economic activity, consumer spending and government finances battered by the consequences of the pandemic,” said rating agency Moody’s in a report in November. This means that the economic recovery “will be slow and uneven”, it said. “The shock will dampen growth for a significant period, resulting in lower income, increased inequality and increased social tensions.” So that’s the overall picture but, as the Malawi example illustrates, there are some pockets of excellence and promise that provide an exception to the rule. Robertson, speaking in December at that Atlantic Council conference, pointed out that Africa was the least hurt by the 2008 global financial crisis. “Again, it’s the continent which will get away the lightest from this crisis. And I think that’s what investors miss. For all this talk of [diversifying] assets, actually the continent does succeed in doing that.”

AN OUTPOST OF REMOTE TECH EXCELLENCE? Where could opportunities come from? Fintech is an

obvious growth point, even if many banks are still struggling to figure out how it can actually make money for them. Another is technology. As Robertson put it, you will be able to use tech to create jobs offshore “but on much less electricity requirement than you’d need for industrialisation, and maybe that can happen. I think there will be countries, like maybe Rwanda, who could But it’ll take some creativity and imagination to get there. As Raymond Gilpin, chief economist at the United Nations Development Programme, said at the African Economic Conference in December: “Covid-19 has given Africa the opportunity to rethink development paradigms, reimagine the future, reposition the private sector and reassess the way we [use] technology.” This cliché of ‘the great reset’ is one we’ve heard at just about every public event since Covid raised its head; the trick will be whether Africa has the imagination to see what this future could be, and the ingenuity and application to get there.

Business The Post-Covid quest for ingenuity v4.indd 6

All figures correct at time of going to press.

show us how that can work.”

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AFRICA

RISING The Modern Warrior Woman, by Adéle Dejak for African Fashion International

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STRONG LINES, BOLD STATEMENT PIECES AND ABSOLUTE GLAMOUR COMBINE IN AN UNAPOLOGETIC ODE TO GEOMETRY AND CONFIDENCE. THIS LINE UNDERSCORES THE SOPHISTICATION, FEMININITY AND POWER OF AFRICA’S MODERN WOMEN. MADE IN AFRICA, INSPIRED BY THE WORLD.

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HAVEN “And there are so many stories to tell, too many, such an excess of intertwined lives events miracles places rumors, so dense a commingling of the improbably and the mundane!” Salman Rushdie

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#iamafrica

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LUXURY LIFESTYLE | 232

by Ellen Evans

STOCK STILL The glass surface of a lake, a cat sleeping, a flower closing

I can confidently say that people take a long time to feel

its petals for the night. These things come to mind when I

safe. If humans are experts at anything, it’s their ability to deny, protect and avoid. The great news about arriving at

think of stillness. What also comes to mind is how difficult it is to feel

that place of stillness though is that you can arrive! A relief

consistently calm in my heart and soul. My heart is hidden

in itself. You may not start out there – you may feel like

beneath tissue and bone, and my soul … well that’s one

pouring yourself a hefty drink as you deal with the myriad

for the gods and the philosophers, is it not? What is true,

issues that arise, but as you slowly start to break them

however, is that I’m not a delicate flower, a serene lake,

down, clean them out and deal with them, a deep calm is

or a master-of-meditation cat. I am a mere human being,

your reward.

one for whom it is far easier to connect with tangible

I’ve looked within sufficiently to know that peaceful

distractions than it is to connect with my inner core, or

‘oneness’ is the way and flow of the universe, and I’ve come to understand that stillness is something I don’t have to

quiet centre of being. And I’m pretty sure I’m not alone. For all of us, the

work at, I need rather to uncover it.

thought of spending a couple of hours, or even minutes, contemplating what’s in our heads or (heaven forbid) our hearts can be terrifying. It’s far easier to reach for the phone and take a scroll through Instagram and see how much better everyone else’s life is, leading, naturally, to more stress, but that’s another conversation altogether! Life is as tough as it is beautiful – speckled with potholes and plot holes, and cultivating inner calm is key to outer peace and real ‘success’.

‘Let the waters settle and you will see the moon and the stars mirrored in your own being.’ Rumi

My saving grace is breath meditation – the inoculation against my anxieties, worries, and fears. Movies,

In this topsy-turvy time of worldwide chaos and

socials, food, and drink, they only go so far in stemming

uncertainty, to recognise I am inherently ‘settled,’ and

angsty undercurrents.

to stay that way when chaos reigns, is crucial. Using

Take the recent worldwide lockdown – good for some, tough for many, excruciating for others – but the forced isolation provided me, along with the rest of the world, the

distractions may make a specific moment easier, but not the rest of them. I don’t know about you, but I need to put aside more

chance to stop and take stock. I was invited to be the main

time and gather my courage to turn off the bright lights

guest in my own company, and, like any thoughtful guest, I

and just be, on a consistent basis. I need to rest in the quiet

had to take care of the environment in which I now found

flames amidst the roaring fires of my life, and try to avoid

myself – my head!

using them just to roast marshmallows!

When given the chance to slow down, it’s impossible to ignore what’s staring you in the face. What was staring me down was a deep sadness. A kind of loneliness. I’m a trained psychotherapist, and it shocked me that after years of therapeutic processing – and meditating – I was still holding deep pain on a tight leash.

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ONE

NIGHT NIG in

NAP LES “Ogni altra cosa, ogni pensier va fore, E sol ivi con voi rimansi amore.” Petrarca

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“I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead; I lift my lids and all is born again. (I think I made you up inside my head.) The stars go waltzing out in blue and red, And arbitrary blackness gallops in: I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead. I dreamed that you bewitched me into bed And sung me moon-struck, kissed me quite insane. (I think I made you up inside my head.) od topp es from the sky, he s res fade Exit seraphim and Satan’s men: I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead. I fancied you’d return the way you said, But I grow old and I forget your name. (I think I made you up inside my head.) I should have loved a thunderbird instead; At least when spring comes they roar back again. I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead. (I think I made you up inside my head.)”

MAD GIRL’S LOVE SONG by Sylvia Plath

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his edition of United Maverick was in development for a little longer than usual and when you hold this edition in your hand you understand, by its heft, why that is so. We would like to thank all of those who have been involved in the production of this spectacular book – whether they are listed or not, each of them has contributed a piece of their creative self and for that we unreservedly thank them. • Ronel van Heerden for her

• Carolyn Davies for her beautiful

contributions to the creative layouts

inspiration and assistance in the

in this edition.

layout of ‘Italy,’ among other pieces.

• Nicole Bruigom for her always beautiful artistic contributions, inspiration and assistance to this edition of United Maverick.

• Arwen Swan for the most beautiful treasure chests for our keys to adventure. • Jeremy and Deborah Gordin,

our proof-reading team, for missing many a Saturday afternoon nap in the pursuit of ‘perfect’ spelling and grammar. • Dieuveil Malonga, Executive Chef, for his immensely beautiful images. The Production team of our Creative Director Ingrid Irsigler and Editor Philippa Rose-Tite would like to thank United Aviation Group for the opportunity to bring this beautiful book once again into existence. Thank you for trusting our vision for this wonderous edition of Maverick, and yes, you’re right. It’s not too big!

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CREDITS 244

COVER

MODELS: Zoe Dolph & Chuma Uphokuhle. PHOTOGRAPHER: Ingrid Alice Photography STYLIST: Ryan Hing CLOTHING: Wanida Boutique, Shana Morland, Stefania Morland, Crystal Birch RETOUCHER: Kay van Niekerk & Alex Sedova HORSE: Patch owned by Maryse Collins PRODUCTION: Purple Raindrop

WATER

MODELS: Jo Kisila, Aliet Sarah, Maury Netheo, Akol Mary, JD Makau PHOTOGRAPHER: Ingrid Alice Photography STYLIST: Adèle Dejak HAIR: Richard Kinyua MAKEUP: Valary Mdeizi JEWELLERY: Adèle Dejak RETOUCHER: Kay van Niekerk & Galina Trush OTHER: Joram Model Management CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Paul Leisegang for African Fashion International

LANA SCOLARO

MODEL: Lana Scolaro PHOTOGRAPHER: Ingrid Alice Photography STYLIST: Ryan Hing HAIR & MAKEUP: Andrew St James RETOUCHER: Galina Trush OTHER: CCPP Group: Technical Supply CARS: Cape Corporate Tours

FIRE

MODELS: Jo Kisila, Aliet Sarah, Maury Netheo, Akol Mary, JD Makau PHOTOGRAPHER: Ingrid Alice Photography STYLIST: Adèle Dejak HAIR: Richard Kinyua MAKEUP: Valary Mdeizi JEWELLERY: Adèle Dejak RETOUCHER: Kay van Niekerk & Galina Trush OTHER: Joram Model Management CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Paul Leisegang for African Fashion International

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URBAN ADVENTURES IN MZANSI

PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jan van Heerden, Mike van Heerden

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MARKET DAY/ BIG CITY NIGHT & NEON NIGHTS

MODELS: Anyon Asola, Roxsanne Smith, Inky Hwang, Graobe Noelle, Sello Hlapo PHOTOGRAPHER: Ingrid Alice Photography STYLIST: Karin Orzol HAIR: Saadique Ryklief MAKEUP: Lesley Whitby CLOTHES: Marianne Fassler, David Tlale, Rich Factory, Bulbulia Threads, Imprint ZA, Maxhosa Africa, Matt Nolan, AFI Prive, Leopard Frock JEWELLERY: E G Jewellery RETOUCHERS: Kay van Niekerk/ Galina Trush CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Paul Leisegang for African Fashion International PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT: Julian van Jaarsveld AFI ASSISTANT: Lindiwe Mlalazi

FASHION WITHOUT BORDERS

TRADING UP

MODELS: Thabi Moleko, Thanolo Keutlwile, Ace Baeti, Marley Pito, Erica Moalosi, Moshanjo Shepherd, Malebogo Salepito PHOTOGRAPHER: Ingrid Alice Photography CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Paul Leisegang PRODUCER: Serge Kabisoso STYLIST: Karin Orzol FASHION ASSISTANTS: Tumelo Nkwe, Ole M HAIR: Saadique Ryklief MAKEUP: Sam Scarborough CLOTHES: Marianne Fassler, Eccentric Style Loft, Wizards Vintage, TheSourceJoburg RETOUCHER: Alex Sedova PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT: Julian van Jaarsveld

MODELS: Zoe Dolph, Ryan Hing, Laura van Wyk, Andrew St James, Michael O'Kennedy PHOTOGRAPHER: Ingrid Alice Photography HAIR: Rachael Darné MAKEUP: Andrew St James RETOUCHER: Studio Rainn PRODUCTION: Purple Raindrop

SHIPWRECK

MODELS: Michelle du Toit, Stacy Malgarte PHOTOGRAPHER: Ingrid Alice Photography STYLIST: Karin Orzol HAIR & MAKEUP: Lindsey Swart RETOUCHER: Galina Trush PRODUCTION: Purple Raindrop OTHER: Adrie Neuper at In Eden Design

PENNY LANE

MODEL: Franchesa Aviva PHOTOGRAPHER: Ingrid Alice Photography STYLIST: Karin Orzol HAIR & MAKEUP: Sam Scarborough RETOUCHER: Galina Trush

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CREDITS 246

AFRICA RISING

MODELS: Jo Kisila, Aliet Sarah PHOTOGRAPHER: Ingrid Alice Photography STYLIST: Adèle Dejak HAIR: Richard Kinyua MAKEUP: Valary Mdeizi JEWELLERY: Adèle Dejak RETOUCHER: Kay van Niekerk OTHER: Joram Model Management CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Paul Leisegang for African Fashion International

MAGICAL ZANDER

MODELS: Laura van Wyk, Zander Schreuders PHOTOGRAPHER: Ingrid Alice Photography STYLIST: Kat Kotze HAIR & MAKEUP: Andrew St James RETOUCHER: Galina Trush ART DEPT: Ryan Hing, David Shaun Lai

SWINGING FROM THE VINE

PHOTOGRAPHER: Ingrid Alice Photography

AFRICA ON THE MENU

HAVEN

MODELS: Matachley Salmon, Franca Le Roy PHOTOGRAPHER: Ingrid Alice Photography STYLIST: Lunar Lifestyle HAIR & MAKEUP: The Little Harlequin CLOTHING: Lunar Lifestyle RETOUCHER: Kay van Niekerk

PHOTOGRAPHER: Dieuveil Malonga

ONE NIGHT IN NAPLES

MODEL: Jade Hill-Nicolopoulos PHOTOGRAPHER: Ingrid Alice Photography STYLIST: Karin Orzol HAIR: Shakeela Dawood MAKEUP: Danit Gordon RETOUCHER: Galina Trush

FOUNDRY

MODELS: Jo Kisila, Aliet Sarah PHOTOGRAPHER: Ingrid Alice Photography STYLIST: Adèle Dejak HAIR: Richard Kinyua MAKEUP: Valary Mdeizi JEWELLERY: Adèle Dejak RETOUCHER: Kay van Niekerk OTHER: Joram Model Management CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Paul Leisegang for African Fashion International

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www.ingridirsigler.com

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Adventures in Dustyland Fairytales with a Travelling Fashion, Portrait & Beauty Photographer – Ingrid Irsigler

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Ingrid Alice is a creative Fashion, Portrait & Beauty Photographer & Creative Director from South Africa. Her expressive use and love of varying palettes has earned her the moniker “Queen of Colour” and has become an identifying feature of her work. Although based in Cape Town, Ingrid works all over the world where what’s needed is that extra dash of creativity and something special. With a client list that runs the gamut of aviation, fashion and celebrities, Ingrid has a flexible approach to every project and brings her years of experience in business, technical ability with lighting and photography to every campaign. Ingrid has achieved a number of career highlights; • Featured in Nikon Top 100 Photographer list for multiple years. • Three projects featured in official Pantone 2020/2021 colour trend book, and inspired a new colour; Afro Black. • Multiple cover features for London’s Hedonist magazine, as well as for FUBIZ, Radio X Track in France. • Chosen by the Secretary-General of the UN to be included in an international campaign to promote equal access to vaccines. • Requested to be part of Saatkultr (German based fund-raising campaign for the fight against international hunger).

www.ingridirsigler.com

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