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COMFORT AND SAFETY

OUR GUIDE TO ESSENTIAL CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES


WHAT TYPE OF CYCLIST ARE YOU? > SOCIAL

TO FIND YOUR IDEAL BIKE, FIRST DETERMINE YOUR RIDER PROFILE:

YOU LIKE A LEISURELY PEDAL WITH FAMILY OR FRIENDS ONCE IN A WHILE.

> RECREATIONAL

YOU LIKE TO RIDE ON WEEKENDS WHEN THE WEATHER IS PLEASANT. WINNING IS NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU.

> SPORTY

YOU LIKE TO TAKE PART IN AN EVENT ONCE IN A WHILE AND FINISH WITH A SMILE, OR YOU RIDE TO MANAGE YOUR WEIGHT AND STAY FIT.

> SERIOUS

YOU TRAIN TO DO AS WELL AS POSSIBLE IN A FEW RACES A YEAR OR YOU RIDE AT LEAST THREE TIMES A WEEK.

> COMPETITIVE BEING FIT, FAST AND ABLE TO RACE WITH

CONFIDENCE IS IMPORTANT TO YOU.

> FANATICAL YOU RIDE AT ANY CHANCE YOU GET AND MAKE LIFE

DECISIONS BASED AROUND YOUR CYCLING SCHEDULE. WHAT’S YOUR COLOUR? NAVIGATE THE WAY TO YOUR IDEAL BIKE WITH THESE COLOUR GUIDES: BLUE – BEGINNER/ENTRY-LEVEL GREEN – INTERMEDIATE/MID-RANGE ORANGE – ADVANCED/TOP-END

OUR SIMPLE GUIDE TO ESSENTIAL CLOTHING AND ACCESSORIES

MOUNTAIN ROAD


HEADGEAR

HELMETS NOT ONLY IS IT LAW TO WEAR A HELMET WHEN CYCLING IN SOUTH AFRICA; IT’S ALSO COMMON SENSE. GLOBAL STATISTICS REPEATEDLY CONFIRM THAT WEARING A HELMET WHEN CYCLING SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCES THE RISK OF BOTH MINOR AND SERIOUS HEAD INJURIES IN THE CASE OF A FALL.

HOW TO CHOOSE THE RIGHT HELMET FIT: The fit is the most important

PRICE: How much do you value your

factor when choosing a helmet. If the helmet is too large, it will move around on your head and won’t protect you as it’s designed to; it may even obscure your vision, which is dangerous. > There’s an adjustable cranium cradle inside most helmets, which is designed to cradle your head firmly and comfortably. > Your helmet should sit level on your head with the front covering most of your forehead. When pushing it back or sideways on your head, it should not move more than 2.5cm. > Adjust the straps so that when fastened, they sit snug beneath your chin. You should be able to just squeeze one finger between your chin and the strap. Adjust the side straps so that the V starts just below your ears.

life? It’s a tough question, but one you should ask when buying such an important item. More expensive helmets are lighter and more comfortable.

WEIGHT: A lighter helmet will put less strain on your neck muscles over time but is usually more costly.

STYLE: Road cycling helmets are more sleek, while mountain biking helmets offer more protection behind the head and usually also have a peak. Helmets for more risky Enduro-style riding have even greater rear head protection, while hardcore downhill riding and racing requires a full-face helmet.

CHILDREN: Proportionately, children’s heads are larger than adults, which makes them top heavy and more likely to experience head impact when they fall. Children’s helmets come in smaller size options and are usually brightly coloured or themed to encourage children to wear them. Fit is most important. A securely fitted helmet on your child’s head will give him/her optimal protection.

WHY BUY A MORE EXPENSIVE HELMET? As with any sports equipment, more expensive helmets fulfil a similar basic function to less expensive ones. However, with a more expensive helmet you get: > In-mould construction, which means the entire helmet is one piece, whereas cheaper helmets have a plastic cover glued to the compressed polystyrene inner shell. > A wider range of size options. > Less weight. A lighter helmet puts less pressure on your neck muscles which minimises fatigue.

> Better ventilation, which helps keep you cooler and more comfortable. The construction costs of achieving more vents without compromising helmet strength and head protection translate into the retail price. > A more precise strap fastening and retention system that allows you to loosen or tighten the fit of the helmet - even while riding. > More style and colour options. This is aesthetic, but important to many.

CHILDREN’S HELMET

BASIC, LOW-COST HELMET

ENDURO HELMET

ROAD CYCLING HELMET

MOUNTAIN BIKING HELMET

DOWNHILL HELMET

VENTILATION: Most of your body temperature regulation takes place through your head, making helmet ventilation important.

WHAT PRICE DO YOU PLACE ON YOUR HEAD?


EYEWEAR

EYEWEAR PROTECTIVE EYEWEAR ISN’T A NICE-TO-HAVE PIECE OF CYCLING GEAR; IT’S A MUST-HAVE ITEM. BESIDES PROTECTING YOUR EYES WITH A PHYSICAL BARRIER FROM WIND, INSECTS, GRAVEL, MUD AND TREE BRANCHES, IT ALSO OFFERS APPROPRIATE UVA AND UVB PROTECTION AND ENSURES VISIBILITY AT ALL TIMES.

HOW TO CHOOSE THE RIGHT EYEWEAR PRICE: More expensive eyewear is lighter and can be more comfortable. But ultimately, your budget will determine your options. FIT: > Your helmet is more important than your eyewear so make sure these don’t compromise your helmet fit. With some helmets, it’s better to have your eyewear inside the helmet straps, while with others, it’s better to have the eyewear arms outside the straps. > Your eyewear should sit firmly on your nose with your eyes looking through the centre of the lenses. Adjustable or different size nosepieces can improve vertical alignment. Nosepieces should be made from a rubber-like material for comfort and non-slip. > The arms of your eyewear should sit behind your ears against your head, but shouldn’t be too tight (discomfort) or too loose (unnecessary movement). Most come with rubber-like ‘socks’ to help secure the eyewear, even when you sweat.

LENS: > The lens needs to be made of a plastic-based material so that it can absorb impact without shattering. > It should be curved around your face and optically correct so that distortion is eliminated. > There’s a range of tints from dark to light, with some even enhancing detail. It’s useful to have more than one lens to suit different light conditions. > Photochromic: This technology enables the lens to change tint according to light conditions. This is very useful for mountain biking in particular, where light conditions can change often in the same ride. > Avoid Polarised lenses for mountain biking as they don’t define small detail well in low light.

IT’S MORE THAN JUST LOOKING COOL

WHY BUY MORE EXPENSIVE EYEWEAR? Eyewear is available in a wide range of prices. With more expensive, cycling-specific brands or styles, you get: > Lighter weight, which ensures you hardly feel them on your head - great for those long rides. >

More fit options for various face shapes. Better fit means you can focus on the road or trail ahead without the distraction of repositioning eyewear from time to time.

> Curved lens optical correctness, which eliminates the distortion that’s prevalent with curved lenses used in low-priced eyewear. > 100% UV ray protection, which reduces or eliminates eyestrain and possible subsequent neck tension and headaches. Lower-priced models usually offer only partial UV ray protection.

> More colour choice – aesthetic, yes, but it means you aren’t limited to only one or two basic colour options. Some brands even enable you to customise your colours. > Cycling-specific models – because of your largely crouched position on a bicycle, your most common head positions require eyewear that’s appropriately designed to offer unhindered vision. > Prescription lens compatibility – If you need to wear spectacles for daily activities, the more expensive eyewear brands offer prescription lens integration or an appropriate insert.

EYEWEAR WITH AUTOMATIC TINT ADJUSTMENT

EYEWEAR WITH PRESCRIPTION LENS INSERT

EYEWEAR WITH ADJUSTABLE NOSEPIECE


BODY

CLOTHES - BASE LAYER SPORTS BRAS

UNDERSHIRTS ADD TO YOUR COMFORT. IN COOL TEMPERATURES THEY OFFER AN ADDITIONAL LAYER TO PROTECT AGAINST WIND CHILL. IN HOT TEMPERATURES, THEY WICK AWAY SWEAT FROM YOUR SKIN, KEEPING YOU DRIER. IN THE UNFORTUNATE EVENT OF A CRASH, THEY ALSO PROVIDE AN ADDITIONAL LAYER OF PROTECTION.

SPORTS BRA There’s a wide range of cycling specific sports bras that are highly recommended for comfort. They offer a high level of support and are usually made from fabrics that don’t absorb sweat. They also don’t look like underwear so you can confidently unzip your jersey if necessary on hot days.

JERSEY Cycling shirts are called jerseys, even the short-sleeved ones. It’s a French thing. There are also sleeveless jerseys for women. Here are some variations:

TIGHT FIT: Keeps the garment from flapping around and best for road cycling and competitive mountain biking.

LOOSE FIT: Ideal for those not keen on snug clothing, and the more relaxed trail or gravity mountain biker.

ZIP LENGTH: Jerseys are available in full, three-quarter or short zips. The longer the zip, the more you can open your jersey on hot rides.

POCKETS: Most jerseys will have pockets on the lower back. These are useful for storing spares, car-keys, phone etc. Some jerseys, usually the

baggy ones, don’t have many pockets and are designed to be used with a hydration pack, which has its own storage capacity.

FABRIC: Jersey fabrics will vary

WEATHER LAYER

from brand to brand, but they’re essentially chosen to keep you cool and comfortable in varying conditions. Winter-specific jerseys are the exception and usually include synthetic wool or fleece.

WEATHER LAYER An outer layer or weather layer is essential if you are riding in cold or wet conditions.

COLD CONDITIONS: Your forward motion increases the severity of the wind-chill factor. This makes a jacket or “gillet” (sleeveless windbreaker) essential to preserve a comfortable body temperature.

WET CONDITIONS: A water resistant jacket will help keep you dry, within reason. Some rain jackets are waterproof, which keep you dry but results in minimal airflow to your skin, causing increased sweating. Others are water resistant, keeping you dry for a while, but with good breathability.

DRESS FOR THE OCCASION AND BEAT THE ELEMENTS

JERSEY

BASE LAYER


BODY

CLOTHES - SHORTS SHORTS WITH MOST OF YOUR BODYWEIGHT ON YOUR SADDLE, YOU NEED SHORTS THAT PROVIDE OPTIMAL COMFORT. WITHOUT A DECENT PAIR OF CYCLING-SPECIFIC SHORTS, YOU’LL EXPERIENCE CHAFFING AND DISCOMFORT THAT MAY LAST LONG AFTER YOUR RIDE. CYCLING-SPECIFIC SHORTS OFFER A LAYER OF CUSHIONING BETWEEN YOUR BACKSIDE AND SADDLE, WITH A FIRM FIT TO ENSURE THEY DON’T SHIFT AROUND AND CAUSE FRICTION. THEY ARE ALSO DESIGNED TO BE WORN WITHOUT UNDERWEAR. UNDERWEAR CREATES ANOTHER LAYER OF FABRIC, WHICH CAUSES FRICTION AND CHAFFING. THERE ARE THREE MAIN STYLES OF SHORTS:

BAGGY SHORTS Mostly worn by men, baggy shorts allow you to look fairly casual when riding your bike. Wear either regular, bib shorts or the padded inner liner beneath these to ensure saddle comfort. Baggy shorts usually have pockets to store your valuables.

THE PADDING Padding is something you will get to appreciate quickly. The foam density, seam placement and shape determine how comfortable you will be. The longer your rides, the more important the padding details are. More expensive shorts usually have higher-tech padding. Padding in women’s shorts differs from that in men’s.

REGULAR SHORTS Made of Lycra or a similar lightweight, form-fitting fabric. Regular shorts are pulled up to your waist with the leg cuffs extending down to just above your knee.

MEN’S PADDING

WOMEN-SPECIFIC SHORTS

BIB SHORTS Also made of a lightweight, form-fitting fabric, bib-shorts secure over your shoulders and not around your waist. The main benefit is that these shorts are held very firmly in place with little or no chance of friction.

THE LONG AND SHORT OF SHORTS

These shorts are designed to suit the female form, from the length of the legs, to the height of the waist, to the shape and seam placement of the pad. There are also womenspecific bib-shorts, which hold their position really well and are comfortable.

WOMEN’S PADDING


FOOTWEAR

SHOES UPGRADING TO CYCLING SHOES AND PEDALS IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT INVESTMENTS YOU CAN MAKE. Cycling-specific shoes are breathable, stiff-soled, and fasten via a cleat, to a clipless pedal. Sure, you can ride a bike with flat pedals and takkies, but you’ll miss out on the efficiency and security that cycling shoes offer. Shoes usually fasten with two or three broad Velcro straps, with

the more refined designs offering a ratchet-strap at the top of the shoe for better security and micro-adjustability. You’ll find that on longer, hotter rides, your feet swell a little, so being able to loosen your shoes is important to maintain comfort. There are numerous cleat designs to match the various clipless pedal systems. Most shoes can accommodate all cleat designs.

ROAD BIKE SHOES AS YOU DON’T HAVE TO PORTAGE A ROAD BIKE DURING A RIDE OR RACE, THERE IS NO ADDITIONAL GRIP ON THE SOLE OF THE SHOES. THIS MAKES THEM SLEEK AND SIMPLE, BUT BE CAREFUL WHEN WALKING ON SMOOTH SURFACES.

FIT: Unlike running shoes, which need a bit of toe movement room, cycling shoes need to fit snug. The less room for foot movement inside the shoe, the better. You can adjust shoe tightness with the Velcro and ratchet-straps.

INSOLE: Lower-priced shoes come with a generic insole, while more expensive shoes have insoles offering the appropriate support or ‘give’ in required areas (arch, heel and midsole). Some high-end shoes have an insole that you can heat up and mould to your foot. It’s also possible to buy separate insoles

should you find you need specific foot support.

SOLE: The stiffer the sole, the more efficient the shoe in terms of transferring all your power into forward motion. Slightly flexible soles offer less efficiency, but a little more comfort. The stiffest soles incorporate some carbon fibre, which is light and strong, but also increases the price.

MOUNTAIN BIKE SHOES MOUNTAIN BIKE SHOES TAKE QUITE A BATTERING COMPARED TO ROAD SHOES AND ARE GENERALLY MORE ROBUST IN CONSTRUCTION. THEY INCLUDE SOME FORM OF NYLON OR RUBBER-LIKE GRIP ON THE SOLE, ALLOWING YOU TO PORTAGE WITHOUT SLIPPING. THEY ALSO HAVE MORE PROTECTION AROUND THE TOES.

SOLE: The stiffer the sole, the more efficient

FIT: The less foot movement inside the shoe,

UPPER: Cycling shoe uppers are made from a combination of materials including nylon, leather and ‘synthetic leather’. They’re designed to hold your foot firm whilst also encouraging airflow to keep your feet cool.

the better. You may want to have a tiny bit of room in the front of the toes to allow for comfort while portaging.

INSOLE: Lower-priced shoes come with a generic insole, while more expensive shoes have insoles offering the appropriate support or ‘give’ in required areas (arch, heel and midsole). Some high-end shoes have an insole that you can heat up and mould to your foot. It’s also possible to buy separate insoles should you find you need specific foot support.

the shoe in terms of transferring all your power into forward motion. Skilled riders can get away with stiffer soles because they do minimal portaging, whereas beginners and intermediate level riders should opt for a sole that offers some compliance to make portaging more efficient and comfortable.

HEEL CUP: In mountain biking, you need to pull up really hard during your pedal stroke to conquer steep climbs. This can lead to your foot pulling partially out of the shoe. This is why mountain bike shoes have firmer, deeper heel cups than road shoes. Some of the more expensive shoes have adjustable heel cups.

UPPER: Cycling shoe uppers are made from a combination of materials including nylon, leather and ‘synthetic leather’. They’re designed to hold your foot firm whilst also encouraging airflow to keep your feet cool.

AN ESSENTIAL CONNECTION BETWEEN MAN AND MACHINE

ROAD BIKE SHOE

MOUNTAIN BIKE SHOE


If you are not ready to commit to cycling shoes, the hybrid style shoe offers a good compromise. They have a moderately compliant sole with a lot of under-sole grip, enabling you to walk normally. They also have a stiffer area around the cleat/ mid-foot area to give you a fairly firm platform on which to pedal. Hybrid shoes are a bit heavier than cycling specific shoes. Most who start with a pair of hybrid shoes end up gaining

confidence and then upgrading to a proper road or MTB shoe to experience the increased efficiency benefits.

YOUR HANDS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR SUPPORTING YOUR BODYWEIGHT, STEERING, GEAR-SHIFTING AND BRAKING. THEY NEED TO BE AS COMFORTABLE AND UNRESTRICTED AS POSSIBLE

WHICH GLOVE ARE BEST Traditionally, cycling gloves are snug-fitting, have some palmregion padding and cut-off fingers. Most find this kind of glove adequate, but there are other options to consider:

SOCKS For cycling, you want socks that offer comfort, which means that shape and fit is essential. Any kind of bunching will lead to discomfort and or a blister. Rather go for a thinner sock as reduced cushioning between your foot and pedal allows for more efficient use of energy. Also, thinner socks dry faster and keep your feet from getting water-laden in damp or wet conditions.

GLOVES

Sock length varies from low-ankle to mid-calf. Mid-calf socks offer a small measure of support in the ankle and lower calf region.

> LONG-FINGERED GLOVES: These offer full-hand/finger protection, but can become a little warm in really hot conditions. They’re ideal for mountain biking because of the higher crash risk as well as the possibility of snagging your fingers on trees or poles in a tight singletrack.

> MINIMAL-PADDING:

SHOE COVERS Because cycling shoes are designed to keep your feet cool on hot days, you need to add a protective cover to keep them dry or warm in wet or cold weather. Shoe covers can be light or robust and range in materials from Lycra to Neoprene. If you intend riding throughout the year or in varying weather conditions, they’re a good investment.

AN ESSENTIAL CONNECTION BETWEEN MAN AND MACHINE

Gloves that offer generous padding may increase your comfort, but they rob you of some control because you have less direct feel for the trail or road. For rides shorter than two hours, opt for reduced or no-padding gloves. Rides longer than two hours require more glove padding.

HANDS

FOOTWEAR

HYBRID SHOES


HYDRATION

HYDRATION PACKS HYDRATION PACKS ALLOW YOU TO CARRY YOUR LIQUID REPLENISHMENT AS WELL AS OTHER ESSENTIALS, INCLUDING SPARES, TOOLS AND WEATHER LAYERS. These packs allow you to drink with minimal fuss, letting you maintain focus on the trail and control of your bike. Another important factor with hydration packs is that your drinking nozzle is chest high, which keeps it far from the mud, dust and grime on the trail, making it a more hygienic. Hydration packs generally come with 2 or 3 litre bladders, which are removable and washable.

Deciding on the best pack for you depends on how much stuff you want to carry. If you’re going on longer rides you will need a large pack. However on a short ride close to home, a compact pack will be just fine.

HYDRATION PACKS

The two things that can count against using a hydration pack is that they can become a bit uncomfortable on very hot days and they place weight high up, sometimes adding 3-4 kilograms. This alters your centre of gravity somewhat which requires adjustment.

BOTTLES & CAGES The use of bottles is dominant in road cycling and shorter forms of mountain bike racing and riding. There are generally two bottle sizes – 500ml and 800ml, which come with a closure system that eliminates leakage. Select bottles that have a well-designed drinking nozzle so that you can easily gulp down fluid while on the move. Bottle cages come in a range of materials; basic aluminium, plastic and carbon fibre. The design of the cage is often more important than the material it’s made from.

You want a cage that holds the bottle firmly so that it doesn’t bounce out over bumpy surfaces, but you also don’t want to struggle to remove it from the cage to drink. Most bottle cages are designed to be fastened to the bicycle frame. With a different clasp they can also be secured to the seatpost, as used largely by triathletes and mountain bikers that do marathons or stage races. These seatpost clasps can be purchased separately, or are available with certain model cages designed specifically for this mounting.

THE BARE NECESSITIES

WATER BOTTLE AND CAGE


ESSENTIALS

RIDING ESSENTIALS

HYDRATION PACKS

WHEN YOU HEAD OFF FOR A RIDE, THE CHANCES OF SOMETHING GOING WRONG WITH YOUR BIKE ARE EVER PRESENT. BUT YOU CAN PREPARE YOURSELF TO DEAL WITH ANY PROBLEM SO THAT YOU CAN MAKE IT BACK HOME. HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED:

> MULTI-TOOL: This should have all the most common tools, including: 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8mm Allenkey; T25 and T30 Torx; Phillips screwdriver; and a chain-breaker.

> TYRE LEVERS: Aluminium levers are stronger and last longer than nylon/plastic levers.

> TUBES: Presta-valve tubes are a better option as the more slender valve fits in all rims.

> MINI-PUMP: Aluminium barrel mini-pumps tend to be more durable and reliable than plastic barrel options.

MULTI-TOOL

> CO2 BOMBS AND CONNECTORS: Find the simplest connector you can and always have at least two CO2 bombs with you.

SADDLE BAG

> PLUG KITS: Search on youtube to find out how to use a plug kit.

> QUICK-LINK: One is good, two is better. A broken chain is ride-ending.

QUICK-LINK

> SADDLE BAG: Not everything will fit into a saddle bag, but you can fit most of your spares and tools in one. The rest you can carry in your pockets or hydration pack. MINI-PUMP

AT HOME, YOU SHOULD HAVE: > FLOOR PUMP: For loweffort, high pressure tyre inflation (get one with a pressure gauge).

CO2 BOMBS AND CONNECTOR TYRE LEVERS

> SHOCK PUMP (FOR MOUNTAIN BIKERS): Essential for all bikers with an air shock fork or rear shock (virtually all mountain bikes).

> BIKE STAND: Think of if as a safe, portable parking spot for your bike/s. SHOCK PUMP

FLOOR PUMP

THE BARE NECESSITIES PART TWO

TUBES

PLUG KIT


GADGETS

HYDRATION PACKS

BIO-FEEDBACK GADGETS

AS BICYCLES AND GEAR HAVE BECOME MORE HIGH-TECH, SO TOO HAS THE DESIRE FOR PERFORMANCE MONITORING. THERE ARE A RANGE OF ELECTRONIC AND DIGITAL ‘GADGETS’ AVAILABLE THAT CAN ENHANCE YOUR CYCLING EXPERIENCE, WHETHER YOU’RE A FAIR-WEATHER NOVICE OR A SEASONED PODIUM-CHASER.

BIKE COMPUTERS This is a handlebar-mounted gadget that gives you feedback on a range of factors related to your ride progress. These include current, maximum, average and top speed as well as odometer, ride distance, ride time and actual time. More expensive bike computers with sensor accessories can also read your pedalling cadence.

GPS UNITS GPS units have become very popular among road cyclists and mountain bikers because they combine all the elements of a basic bike computer and a heart rate monitor. They also give geographic and atmospheric condition feedback, including current, minimum, maximum and average temperature as well as altitude; accumulated altitude increase and decrease; route mapping and tracking. These also allow for online sharing.

POWER METERS

HEART RATE MONITORS This gadget, which can be wrist or handlebar-mounted, offers all the basic bike computer information with the addition of heart rate. This allows you to manage or monitor your effort as well as analyse your effort and recovery after the ride. It includes current, maximum and average heart rate as well as estimated calorie consumption. More expensive heart rate monitor models also include GPS and power measurement options.

A GADGET FOR EVERY GEEK

Power meters measure the amount of Watts of force you exert while pedalling. This feedback has been confirmed as being the most accurate in terms of current performance and is used by all serious, competitive racers and cycling coaches. Power is measured by various methods, including through chain tension on the rear hub, speed/gradient calculation and tension on the cranks.


BY NOW YOU’RE PROBABLY CLEAR ON THE PERFECT SPECS FOR YOUR IDEAL BIKE. OR BETTER YET, YOU’VE ALREADY MADE THE MOT SATISFYING INVESTMENT OF YOUR LIFE – CONGRATULATIONS! THESE ASSOCIATED SERVICES WILL HELP YOU GET THE MOST OUT OF EVERY RIDE.

TOYOTA SUPERCYCLING CLUB

South Africa’s largest cycling club that offers support for new and experienced cyclists with organised, safe training rides and loads of member benefits.

FITTRACK

The personalised online coaching system that can help you achieve your goals, taking into account your lifestyle and time-constrained schedule. CYCLE LAB ONLINE When convenience is critical, our online store offers the widest range of bikes, spares and accessories.

PWC BIKE PARK An international-standard trail park graded for beginner, intermediate and advanced mountain bikers - safe for women and children. Sandton, Jhb. CYCLE LAB WORKSHOP We’ve taken South African bike servicing and maintenance to a new level, both in terms of quality and service.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON ALL OF OUR SERVICES, VISIT WWW.CYCLELAB.COM


Clothing, accessories and general cycle safety.