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(Pdf free) The Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963

The Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963 Christopher Paul Curtis ePub | *DOC | audiobook | ebooks | Download PDF

#4201 in Books Laurel Leaf 2000-12-12 2000-12-12Original language:EnglishPDF # 1 6.88 x .61 x 4.20l, .26 Binding: Mass Market Paperback224 pagesThe Watsons Go to Birmingham 1963 | File size: 62.Mb Christopher Paul Curtis : The Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963 before purchasing it in order to gage whether or not it would be worth my time, and all praised The Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963: 2 of 2 people found the following review helpful. Great story, great book!By Kindle CustomerI met Christopher Paul


Curtis in 1998 at the International Reading Association Convention. I bought a hardback of this book and got a picture of Curtis and me. I then had him sign my book. He was very nice, and I told him that I couldn't wait to read his book, because I had heard so many wonderful things about it. Fast forward 17 years, and I have just now gotten a chance to read it because I am teaching 6th grade. Overall, it was a really good book. I loved all the family stories and mischief the boys got into. Only thing I was disappointed in was that I had thought there was going to be more in it about what was going on in history during that time period, but there wasn't anything until the very end. There was so much great story telling in the first 3/4 of the book, and then the last fourth of the book seemed rushed and not fully "fleshed out". I was surprised to hear that my students felt the same way about this. But, nonetheless, it was a really good book, and I can't wait to watch the movie of it (which I don't think will be much like the book).1 of 1 people found the following review helpful. Discrimination is still eminent in our society today but I feel it has gotten a bit better since the time frame in which this stBy LindaWhen I first chose this book to read, I only went by the brief description that told what the book was about. Little did I know that when I began to read the book, I would feel as if I, myself was living through the Watsons. They had normal family drama, sibling rivalry, behavioral issues (that now a days, we would put our child on medication for) There are high points in the book as well as low points. But the family pulls together to get through the tough times. Although the book takes place in the 1960's, it seems to encompass some modern day problems in our society. Discrimination is still eminent in our society today but I feel it has gotten a bit better since the time frame in which this story took place. Through Kenny's eyes we are able to uncover what his feelings and fears are towards every day life, his brother and the incidents in Birmingham, Alabama. It is how this family comes through that has drawn me deeper into this book. The audience that I would gear this towards would be grades 5 - 7 because I feel at this age, they are most impressionable and would really allow the Watsons into their learning environment and minds.1 of 1 people found the following review helpful. One of the best children's novels writtenBy Cathy EstesA funny book with lively characters that teaches about an important event in US history. I've been teaching my class with this novel for many years, always get the same reaction from my students, they love it. The Newbery and Coretta Scott King Honoree about the Weird Watsons of Flint, Michiganfrom Christopher Paul Curtis, author of Bud, Not Buddy, a Newbery Medal and Coretta Scott Award Winner.Enter the hilarious world of tenyear-old Kenny and his family, the Weird Watsons of Flint, Michigan. There's Momma, Dad, little sister Joetta, and brother Byron, who's thirteen and an "official juvenile delinquent."When Byron gets to be too much trouble, they head South to Birmingham to visit Grandma, the one person who can shape him up. And they happen to be in Birmingham when Grandma's church is blown up.AN ALA TOP TEN BEST BOOKAN ALA NOTABLE CHILDREN'S BOOKAN IRA YOUNG ADULT'S CHOICEA NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW BEST BOOKNAMED TO MULTIPLE STATE AWARD LISTS"Every so often a book becomes a modern classic almost as soon as it arrives on bookshelves. That happened in the mid-'90s when Christopher Paul Curtis released his first book, The Watsons Go to Birmingham 1963." NPRFrom the Hardcover edition. .com The year is 1963, and self-important Byron Watson is the bane of his younger brother Kenny's existence. Constantly in trouble for one thing or another, from straightening his hair into a "conk" to lighting fires to freezing his lips to the mirror of the new family car, Byron finally pushes his family too far. Before this "official juvenile delinquent" can cut school or steal change one more time, Momma and Dad finally make good on their threat to send him to the deep south to spend the summer with his tiny, strict grandmother. Soon the whole family is packed up, ready to make the drive from Flint, Michigan, straight into one of the most chilling moments in America's history: the burning of the Sixteenth Avenue Baptist Church with four little girls inside. Christopher Paul Curtis's alternately hilarious and deeply moving novel, winner of the Newbery Honor and the Coretta Scott King Honor, blends the fictional account of an African American family with the factual events of the violent summer of 1963. Fourth grader Kenny is an innocent and sincere narrator; his ingenuousness lends authenticity to the story and invites readers of all ages into his world, even as it changes before his eyes. Curtis is also the acclaimed author of Bud, Not Buddy, winner of the Newbery Medal. (Ages 9 to 12) --Emilie CoulterFrom School Library JournalGrade 5-8-In the only Newbery Honor book to make my list, the weighty issues and historical perspectives don't get in the way of a very funny family. Byron plays some awful tricks on his younger brother Kenny, but readers can't help but laugh at some of his less harmful teasing. He tells a convincing story to little sister Joey about how garbage trucks scoop up frozen Southern folks who don't dress warmly enough, and half-fools Kenny with his tall tale. While the boys supply many of the laughs, it's clear that they get their sense of humor from their dad. His gentle teasing and tongue-in-cheek exaggerations can be hilarious. Laughter and Tears Award: More than any other book on my list, the humor in The Watsons shifts to near tragedy and many thought-provoking developments. The serious stuff succeeds in part because readers grow so close to this family through the humor that comes earlier in the book. Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.From BooklistGr. 4^-8. In a voice that's both smart and naive, strong and scared, fourth-grader Kenny Watson tells about his African American family in Flint, Michigan, in 1963. We get to know his strict, loving parents and his tough older brother, who gets into so much trouble his parents decide to take him back "home" to Birmingham,


Alabama, where maybe his strong grandmother will teach him some sense. Several of the family stories are a bit selfconscious (we keep being told we're going to laugh as Dad puts on a show and acts the fool), but the relationships aren't idealized. Racism and the civil rights movement are like a soft rumble in the background, especially as the Watsons drive south. Then Kenny's cute little sister is in a Birmingham church when a bomb goes off. She escapes (Curtis doesn't exploit the horror), but we're with Kenny as he dreads that she's part of the rubble. In this compelling first novel, form and content are one: in the last few chapters, the affectionate situation comedy is suddenly transformed, and we see how racist terror can invade the shelter of home. Hazel Rochman

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