Issuu on Google+

   

 

November 2009 

 

Connecting the Public Sector  ‐ Safeguarding citizen data in an unsafe world   

Published by LGITU magazine, with support   from www.UKauthorITy.com, Tomorrow’s   Town Hall and Government Connect.  © Informed Publications Ltd, November 2009 


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

Index      Section  

Page 

Introduction ‐ Data Security, Frontline Services and Secure Communications 

 3 

Executive Summary 

2.1    What is the corporate attitude to sharing citizen data? 

2.2    Is there truly a need to share sensitive citizen data? 

2.3    So who shares with whom? 

2.4    And how is this shared? 

Methodology  3.1    Response: Quick Poll (total: 105) 

10 

3.2    Response: In‐Depth Survey (total: 103) 

11 

Results ‐ Quick Survey 

12 

4.1    Do you share sensitive information about citizens with other public sector organisations? 

12 

4.2    Do you ever share this data by post/paper/solid media? 

12 

4.3    Do you ever share this data by secure network communications? 

13 

4.4    Are all staff regularly trained regarding the sensitivity of citizen information and the importance of  adhering to correct procedures for its handling? 

13 

4.5    Is there a need to share sensitive citizen data in order to improve the quality and efficiency of public  service delivery?  

14 

4.6    Would accessing databases in other public sector organisations improve/help the way services are  delivered? 

15 

4.7    Would trusted and secure data sharing be essential in order to deliver 'Total Place' public services? 

16 

Results ‐ In‐Depth Survey  5.1    Does the organisation's work involve collecting, using or storing information about citizens? 

17  17 

5.2    Does the organisation's work involve sharing this information? 

17 

5.3    How sensitive is the most sensitive information shared? 

17 

5.4    Handling information about the citizen 

18 

5.5    How do organisations share sensitive citizen data with the others? 

20 

5.6    Which policy agendas or initiatives impact the handling of sensitive citizen data? 

21 

5.7    Which legal requirements affect the way your organisation handles sensitive citizen data within its  daily work? 

22 

5.8    Does your organisation share sensitive citizen data with other organisations? 

23 

5.9    Which databases would help your council to deliver services if they were accessible electronically  from your local authority offices? 

24 

5.10  Additional comments on the issue of secure handling/sharing of sensitive citizen data  6 

10 

GC Communicate – 2009 highlights 

25  27 

6.1  Opportunities for improving service delivery using GCSX 

27 

6.2  The Public Sector Network –Partnership and Innovation 

27 

6.3  Aggregated Connection to GCSX Saves Kent £1m 

28 

6.4  In and Out of Work over GCSX 

29 

   

   

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 1


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

    Section (Cont’d) 

  Page 

6.5  Tower Hamlets join the GCSX network and adopts In and Out of Work 

29 

6.6  Caerphilly County Borough and Gwent Police work together over GCSX 

30 

6.7  Preston looks forward to fast, secure data exchange 

30 

6.8  South Hams gets secure access to DWP systems 

31 

6.9  How secure is LA Remote Access? 

31 

6.10  Libra ‐ available soon over the GCSX 

32 

GCSX and Central Government 

33 

Government Connect Benefits Realisation Fund – Local Authority Pilots 

35 

8.1  Bristol City Council ‐ Trading standards and intelligence sharing in the South West (SWERCOTS) 

35 

8.2  Conwy County Borough Council ‐ Joint Asset Recovery Database (JARD) 

35 

8.3  Dartford Borough Council ‐ Kent Connects Kudos – tackling crime and antisocial behaviour  

35 

8.4  Devon County Council, on behalf of the Devon ePartnership ‐ Flexible Working 

35 

8.5  Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council ‐ Business Crime Partnership 

36 

8.6  Great Manchester Public Protection Partnership (GMPP) ‐ Business Compliance – Regulatory Services 

35 

8.7  Halton Borough Council ‐ ‘Place shaping’ through GIS data sharing 

36 

8.8  Hampshire County Council on behalf of the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Partnership ‐ Exploring a  regional approach to employee authentication  8.9  Lancashire Council (Lancashire Constabulary & Police) ‐ Antisocial behaviour data sharing in  Lancashire   8.10  Lichfield District Council ‐ Business data sharing in the West Midlands 

36 

37 

8.11  London Borough of Islington ‐ No Recourse to Public Funds 

37 

37 

8.12  London Trading Standards Authority (LOTSA) ‐ Trading Standards and Regional Intelligence in London 

37 

8.13  North Kesteven District Council, on behalf of the Lincolnshire Public Sector Working Group ‐ Customer  Data Hub  8.14  Plymouth City Council on behalf of Devon ePartnership and Isles of Scilly ‐ Civil  Contingencies/Emergency Planning  8.15  Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council ‐ Blue Badge Scheme 

38 

8.16  South Lakeland District Council ‐ Information sharing to facilitate a needs led approach to older  people  8.17  Sunderland City Council ‐ Births ‐ Tell Us Once 

38  39 

8.18  Torbay Council on behalf of Devon ePartnership ‐ Safeguarding Children ‐ GC Mail 

39 

Appendix I ‐ Quick Survey Response 

38  38 

40 

i.  Councils (Quick survey) – Total: 105 frontline organisations 

40 

ii.  Job titles (Quick survey) 

41 

Appendix II  ‐ In‐Depth Survey Response 

42 

i.  Councils (In‐depth questionnaire) – Total: 103 frontline organisations 

42 

ii.  Job titles (In‐depth questionnaire) 

43 

Appendix III  ‐ Questionnaires 

44 

        © Informed Publications Ltd, November 2009  All rights reserved. This survey was researched and written as a snapshot of local government and other frontline public services attitudes towards the  safeguarding of citizen data within the context of transformation of local service delivery. Whilst every care is taken, the publishers and project partners  accept no liability whatsoever for the content or accuracy of this research and the opinions expressed in this report. 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

  Page 2


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

1. Introduction  Data Security, Frontline Services and Secure Communications  Can local government and other frontline services keep citizen data safe in this new era of collaboration and  service transformation?       As the March 2009 deadline for joining up to the government secure extranet, GCSX, loomed, Richard Steel, former president of  Socitm and CIO of Newham ‐ and GC Programme Board member ‐ wrote, “We are learning, through Government Connect, that  central and local government can work well together. OK – mistakes have been made, and lessons have been learned, but in less  than a year, spectacular progress has been made in joining‐up securely and efficiently. Good job too! If ever there was a need for  secure, efficient and joined‐up government, high profile data losses and the credit crunch conspire to tell us it’s now!  “Government Connect lays the foundation for a single pan‐government security infrastructure. It can’t make sense, and is  spectacularly inefficient, for local government to engage separately with each central government department. I’m delighted,  therefore, that the Government Connect team aims to work with the Public Service Network programme, and related  developments to advance the vision, further enhancing our ability to deliver public services securely and efficiently and  demonstrating that Government really can connect!”  Government Connect extended the deadline for many councils to complete their CoCo (code of connection) until the end of  September. Over the summer, LGITU magazine began to ask:   • • • • • • • •

Is there a need to share sensitive citizen data outside the organisation?   Are councils routinely sharing such data with other local authorities or other parts of the wider public sector?   And if so, how are councils sharing this data?   Is the sector implementing the LGA ‘best practice’ Data Handling Guidelines?   Would the process of gaining what is essentially a ‘certificate’ acknowledging high security standards ingrain the  importance of data security across the sector?   Would all councils achieve this high level security assessment by the final deadline?   Can the public sector therefore meet the dual needs of safeguarding sensitive citizen data whilst sharing information to  deliver efficient, improved public services?   Can connection to a secure pan‐public sector communication network bring ongoing benefits? 

LGITU magazine, in partnership with its sister online publications, www.UKauthorITy.com and Tomorrow’s Town Hall,  approached the Government Connect team for support in undertaking this project. Government Connect generously funded the  data collection and research activities, ceding editorial control to the LGITU research team.   The project aimed to gather views and opinions from senior frontline officers – from both the technology and departmental user  perspective. The research was conducted in, and is reported on, an anonymous basis. However, details of councils participating  and the job titles of respondents to the two research tools can be found in Appendices I and II.   The following report, published in November 2009, outlines the key findings in an executive summary, the methodology and  overall response rate to the research project, results, a round‐up of news from the Government Connect team in the run up to  the final deadline and an update on the Government Connect Benefits Realisation Fund activities.     

   

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

 

   

Page 3


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

2. Executive Summary    Connecting the Public Sector  In an era of high profile data loss and data leaks, why do local authorities still put sensitive citizen data in the  post? Helen Olsen, managing editor of Informed Publications, reviews the findings of LGITU magazine’s survey  assessing how sensitive citizen data is shared across frontline services today.   As a citizen it is astonishing to learn from this research that, despite almost two years of media headlines covering the most basic  and unbelievable ‘accidental’ data losses, local authorities up and down the country still consign sensitive citizen data to the  vagaries of Royal Mail ‐ or worse, to unsecured laptops and removable media that then get left lying about.  From the continuing crop of stories on the news pages of national and specialist press, the Information Commissioner is no less  exasperated. A number of councils have had their knuckles rapped in the last couple of months, and a quick look at the excellent  Public Sector Forums’ Public Sector Data Breach Log 2009 lists 23 such incidents occurring in UK local government alone in the  three months prior to his report.   LGITU’s research, conducted over the same time period ‐ late summer 2009 ‐ looked at who was sharing what, and with whom,  across frontline services when it came to citizen data. With support from Government Connect, its sister online news services,  UKauthorITy.com and Tomorrow’s Town Hall, LGITU magazine conducted two surveys:  • •

an in‐depth questionnaire (103 respondents)  a quick poll among those not participating in the in‐depth survey (105  respondents) 

Both surveys had over one hundred respondents from the breadth of local authority  types, from across the country, with a number of police, fire and health organisations  also participating. The response rate for local government was 34.4% ‐ over one third  of all UK authorities. Approximately two thirds of these responses came from  departmental users, one quarter from heads of IT and IT seniors, and the remainder  from chief executive/councillor/senior corporate officers. 

Response 

% of organisation  type 

Police 

7.7% 

Fire 

8.8% 

Health 

4.8% 

Local Authorities 

43.9% 

Unique authorities 

34.4% 

Unsurprisingly, over 98% of respondents dealt with citizen data – those that did not were in GIS, land charges or land & property  gazetteer departments. Arguably, whilst their work would revolve around property‐based data, communication about this data  with the citizen would still necessitate the collection and handling of citizen data.   Across both surveys, almost eight in ten (79%) shared sensitive citizen information with other local authorities or other parts of  the public sector.   2.1  What is the corporate attitude to sharing citizen data?   The LGA published a set of Data Handling Guidelines for Local Government last  November. These were developed in partnership with Socitm, and endorsed by  Solace and the IDeA, in a bid to stem the flow of data loss from the public sector and  foster a culture of data protection.  

YES ‐ we share citizen data with:    (source: indepth survey) Other local authorities Other frontline services

It was surprising therefore to learn that not all councils had an ‘Information Charter’  outlining how citizen data is handled – just 40% said that their council did.  Researchers wondered at first whether this could be simply lack of awareness on the  front line, but 23% were quite sure that there was no charter in place – in direct 

contradiction of the Data Handling Guidelines. The remainder, nearly four in ten,  were unsure.  

90% 82%

Commercial  organisations

78%

The third sector

77%

Central government

69%

 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 4


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

  Reassuringly, over nine in ten (93%) were sure that all personal information was kept within secure ICT  systems – in accordance with the guidelines. 

Training for data 

From the detailed survey, however, a disconnect starts to appear between the central/high‐level view and  that in the technology and user departments. Looking at items from the LGA Data Handling Guidelines,  corporate/chief executive respondents all answered either yes or ‘don’t know’ to questions about ICT  systems being specified in line with government data security minimum standards; their council having a  Corporate Information Risk Policy, and having all the council’s key Information Assets classified and  allocated an ‘owner’. None of this subset answered no to these items. 

at present. GC is  changing this as we  are required to  actively train all staff  accessing IT 

In marked contrast, few of the technology or departmental respondents said ‘yes’ to the above. This group  accounted for 38% of the total sample saying either they did not know or their council definitely did not  specify minimum government data standards in ICT systems’ procurement.   A total of 45%, again all technology or departmental respondents, said ‘no’ or ‘don’t know’ to their council  having a Corporate Information Risk Policy.   Twenty nine percent said that Information Assets were definitely not classified; with a further 42% not  knowing whether or not they were. Thirty four percent said that information assets were not allocated  owners, with a further 36% not knowing whether they were or not. 

handling: “Piecemeal 

systems.” 

        Training for data 

In summary, the chief executive group was saying ‘yes’ to these questions; while the majority of the  technology and user groups were saying either ‘no’ or ‘don’t know’.  The intentions are evidently there, but the practice is not filtering through.   One further question highlighted this disconnect from the centre: Do councils have a Senior Information  Risk Owner (SIRO) owning information risk? Just one chief executive said no. However, two fifths of the  technology group and nearly a third of the departments said no. In total, 30% of the sample said that there  was no SIRO at their council; with a further 32% unsure.   Worryingly, in light of the unending stream of data loss and data breach stories in the media over the last  few years, whilst the majority of corporate/chief executives said that there was a clear incident reporting  mechanism in place for such occurrences, 14% of the sample said that there was not, and 27% did not  know. 

handling: “Policy  exists but formal and  recurring training  does not.” 

       

It is disappointing, to say the least, that so few of those working with sensitive citizen data could answer  ‘yes’ to this question.  

Need to share? 

More worryingly, just two thirds (66%) said that staff were regularly trained regarding the sensitivity of  citizen information and the importance of adhering to the correct procedures for its handling. 

need, as all headline  cases of child abuse  could have been  prevented if agencies  communicated with 

The answer, of course, should have been 100% ‘yes’ in both the above instances.  Indeed, not one chief executive respondent said that their council did not have such a policy or training  mechanism in place. Which, of course, would be the correct answer: all should have both policy and  training.  Results from the quick poll verified this finding: 63.8% answered yes to the same question. But that leaves  nearly four in ten either not sure or, worse, definitely sure that their council did not have regular training  on how to handle sensitive data. 

“There is clearly a 

each other.” 

 

One said that training was “piecemeal at present. GC is changing this as we are required to actively train all  staff accessing IT systems.” Another, very honestly, replied: “Policy exists but formal and recurring training  does not.” 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 5


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

  These results contrast starkly with the finding that 96% of respondents felt that the legal requirements of the  Data Protection Act impacted they way in which they handle citizen data. Nearly eight in ten (79%) felt that  the Human Rights Act, and 94% the Freedom of information Act, had an impact on the way their council  handled sensitive citizen data.  It is clear that the importance of keeping citizen data safe has permeated throughout local authorities. But  the practicalities of ensuring that this be so – for example by implementing the LGA Data Handling Guidelines  throughout the authority – are not filtering down to the troops. 

2.2  Is there truly a need to share sensitive citizen data?  Well, 77.1% of the quick poll said that in order to improve the quality and efficiency of public service  delivery, yes, there was: “Immensely so – for place shaping, service take up, increased customer insight,  offering of value added services and, most importantly, preventative services,” said one.  Added another: “There is clearly a need, as all headline cases of child abuse could have been prevented if  agencies communicated with each other.”  In the long survey we explored the drivers for secure data sharing. Shared services would obviously require  secure exchange of information according to 82% of respondents. Mobile and flexible working also required  this capability in the minds of 81%. For 67% ‘Tell Us Once’ and for 61% MAPPA (Multi‐Agency Public  Protection Arrangements) required secure exchange.  One senior IT officer noted: “(The) personalisation agenda requires secure data sharing. Partnership activity  also, he said, “appears to focus on protocols and high level contact. More detailed work is needed to make  the partnerships more effective at a data sharing level. 

Need to share? 

“(The)  personalisation  agenda requires  secure data  sharing.” 

    Need to share? 

“Immensely so – for  place shaping,  service take up,  increased customer  insight, offering of  value added services  and, most  importantly,  preventative  services.” 

“It would help if e‐GIF were treated seriously – local authorities actively rather than passively ‘encouraged’ to  share information, and application suppliers forced to invest in integration and data exchange as a basic part  of their packages not as expensive, bespoke add‐ons.” 

 

Interestingly, in the long survey, just 13% felt that the new Total Place proposition would require secure  sharing, with almost three quarters (73%) not sure. When the quick poll was conducted approximately six  weeks later, however, the situation was reversed – perhaps more was by then known about this new  approach – with 76.2% saying that, yes, trusted and secure data sharing would be essential in order to  deliver ‘Total Place’ public services. 

Total Place: “Unless 

Stated one respondent: “Total Place looks at how a whole area approach to public services can lead to better  services. In order to achieve this it requires data analysis across the whole area. This data will come from a  range of service providers on a range of different criteria, ie information on crime and anti‐social behaviour.  “Unless this data is shared an informed and holistic view cannot be taken on issues such as where services  need to be better targeted. The approach must be evidenced based and cannot be delivered by a single  agency or group. 

 

this data is shared  an informed and  holistic view cannot  be taken on issues  such as where  services need to be  better targeted.” 

   

“It needs a consistent and collaborative approach which eliminates duplication and joins up activity.”  It is hard to see how this can be achieved without a secure information sharing platform. GCSX will inevitably  play a key role ‐ how else can you uniformly and securely share necessary information or enable secure joint  working across the police, NHS, local authority and central government within an area?  

 

The common denominator, the secure government infrastructure, will, by 2012, become the next generation  Public Service Network. It is hard to see how the public sector could justify missing the opportunity this  presents in tough economic times.   

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 6


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

  However, coming back to the drivers and the LGA Data Handling Guidelines, it is worth noting that just 58%  of respondents said that the guidelines would require secure data sharing. Which, feel the researchers,  rather misses the point.   Indeed, whilst the value of information was recognised, researchers detected confusion as to what these  guidelines were and how they should be implemented – how information security could be aligned with the  business process.  Said one departmental respondent: “Information security is not just about confidentiality. It is also about  data quality and availability, which is the real key to cost‐effective frontline service provision. 

Information Security:

“...is not just about  confidentiality. It is  also about data  quality and  availability, which is  the real key to cost‐ effective frontline  service provision.” 

“Information security also needs to be aligned to the strategy of the organisation and built into its business  process.” 

 

But, he added, “Please give clear guidance on how to allocate a SIRO.” 

 

2.3  So who shares with whom? 

 

Data was currently shared by 78% of the sample with other local authorities, by 74% with the police, 71%  with DWP, 64% with the Audit Commission, 59% with HMRC, 56% with HM Courts Service, 56% with health  organisations, 51% with schools, 47% with CLG, 42% with DCSF, and 47% the Ministry of Justice. 

Service 

The organisations’ databases that most would find helpful to have electronic access to in their own office  were: National Fraud Initiative (62%), National Blue Badge Register (60%), DVLA (59%), National Pupil  Database (54%), Joint Asset Recovery Database (53%), Hospital Leavers & Admissions Database (52%),  Persistent Offenders Register (50%), Electronic Patient Care Records (50%). Interestingly, only just under  half, 48%, thought that access to ContactPoint would help.  Indeed, the potential for service improvements was not lost on respondents: “If we are to improve health  and social care as a whole there will be a need to share data across several organisations.”  One fire authority said that sharing information with PCTs “will help us to identify vulnerable people... and  enable us to target them with community safety initiatives to help drive down the incidence of accidental  dwelling fire.”  There is a definite opportunity for innovation in the use of data to improve services. Take the DWP’s CIS ‐  finding and fighting fraud is the obvious use, but what about using CIS data to inform a proactive  concessionary parking service? It could check the status of invalidity benefit and DLA and simply issue a  continuation of a blue badge, rather than making the resident go through the whole application – and proof  of eligibility – process again. 

3.4  And how is this shared?  Whilst it was encouraging to see that, where appropriate, information was being shared, in many cases it  was disappointing to see that not all use secure communication routes to share this data.   A frankly astonishing 45.7% in the quick poll shared sensitive citizen data by post/paper or removable  storage media.   In the long survey, 44% regularly used paper/post/courier and 22% USB/CD/post/courier combinations to  send sensitive citizen data to other local authorities. Almost three in ten (28%) and 12% respectively used  these methods when sending data to central government. 

improvement: “If we  are to improve health  and social care as a  whole there will be a  need to share data  across several  organisations.” 

      Service  improvement: “(it)  will help us to identify  vulnerable people...  and enable us to  target them with  community safety  initiatives.” 

     

In light of the constant haemorrhage of data loss suffered by the public sector in recent years this can be  described, at best, as unfortunate. 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 7


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

  Apart from the risk of loss or theft there is also the unreliability of the post to consider ‐ CRB checks stuck in  postal strikes will hold people up from starting jobs. Ongoing industrial action by the Communication  Workers Union (CWU) in the second half of 2009 only increases the risk – with reports that much of the post  held up in London industrial action late summer may never be delivered.   The internet goes down, yes, but not as often as the post these days. In addition, the GSCX has back up and  business resilience built in to its contracts. There is no reserve postal service waiting in the wings.  On a more positive note, however, 54% of councils now use the secure government network (GCSX) and 15%  a secure point to point connection when sending information to central government. And 41% used the GCSX  to share sensitive data with other authorities.  In the quick poll 61.9% said that they used the GCSX to share data. Indeed, from the comments relating to  this section it would appear that the programme has gained significant traction in recent months. Many  indicated that they would be using the infrastructure more often once everyone was connected at the end of  September:  “Not yet,” said one, “But we will begin to as we have just had our GCSX connection approved.” Another said  that the network was “currently being rolled out throughout this authority”. 

Awareness:

“Government  Connect has helped  raise some  awareness, but many  councils (connected  and unconnected)  remain in an  immature IS‐capable  state.” 

       

The lack of uniform approach across the sector was recognised by one respondent, who suggested that base  security levels would need to be mandated to see progress: “Until all councils have mandatory and auditable  board‐level ownership of information security risk, the situation will remain unsatisfactory.   “Government Connect has helped raise some awareness, but many councils (connected and unconnected)  remain in an immature IS‐capable state.”  This view was echoed by a departmental user: “There is still a perception among many people and  organisations (not specifically local government) that ordinary email is a secure system.”  Indeed there was, said one user, a need for a national forum: “There are so many agencies involved and with  an interest. We need to get together to discuss best practice.”  Organisations that should be around the table in such a form, suggested the user, include ALGIS (within the  Local Authority Research and Intelligence Association), the National Association of Data Protection Officers,  National Association of Information Management, Chartered Institute of Library and Information  Professionals, Records Management Society, Socitm, and the Society of Archivists.  However, from the end of September, when all local authorities are required to connect up to the secure  government communications infrastructure, there should be no excuse for entrusting sensitive data to the  post or courier either on paper or removable storage media.  Indeed, speaking as a citizen, for all citizen data the preferred option should be a secure communication  channel. How many parents wait nervously for the day those ‘lost’ child benefit disks turn up in a pub car  park?  For local‐to‐local or local‐to‐central/other frontline services, the secure routes provided by GCSX and the  wider secure government network should be the first option considered.  

Awareness: “There   is still a perception  among many... that  ordinary email is a  secure system.”          Awareness: “There  are so many agencies  involved and with an  interest. We need to  get together to  discuss best  practice.” 

   

Apart from the security, just think of the time and cost savings. Add in the carbon reduction element and,  again, from a citizen point of view, it’s a winner.  However, whilst many respondents had interesting views on the challenges around data security and  frontline service delivery, the greatest was identified as “human behaviour (compliance)”. Although this was  “partially mitigable by technological advances”.  

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 8


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

  Data sharing was expected: “Citizens only want to tell us things once. The organisational and departmental  divides within the public sector are not understood by the citizen when they are accessing services. However,  this does place a very high profile on data integrity, security and methods of data sharing.   “There have been too many highly publicised data breaches for the general population to have full  confidence in public sector data handling. However, whereas technical solutions can be introduced and  improved the biggest challenge, from my perspective, is the education of data handlers.”  Whilst there is no doubt that understanding of the importance of safeguarding sensitive citizen data has  permeated to the highest level, and that the technology infrastructure is now in place, our research finds that  the cultural change needed to underpin data security is lagging behind the ‘logical move’ to secure electronic  communications.   To fulfil the vision of data security that both the citizen can have faith in and that the organisation can trust  to underpin efficient citizen‐centric service delivery, the message of just how important citizen data is must  be communicated to every public service worker – from top to bottom. Citizen data is not just sensitive to  the citizen whose data is lost, it is also one of the public sector’s greatest assets – capable of informing and  transforming service delivery. As such it should be safeguarded and nurtured by all those involved in public  services.   As this report is published, in November 2009, all councils are connected to GCSX. 

Cultural change:

“There have been too  many highly  publicised data  breaches for the  general population to  have full confidence  in public sector data  handling. However,  whereas technical  solutions can be  introduced and  improved, the biggest  challenge, from my  perspective, is the  education of data  handlers.” 

 

It will be interesting to see how this new capability to communicate securely between frontline services and  across the wider public sector can help improve public service delivery over the coming year. With GCSX in  place the barriers to close working between organisations are no longer technical or cost. Culture, as ever,  may be the biggest barrier facing joint working teams or shared services initiatives as the sector faces  perhaps its most difficult times.   The perfect storm of spiralling demand for services in the face of inevitable budget cuts will prove one of  frontline services greatest challenges. Will the sector look to existing infrastructure to make the most of  available resources?  

 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

 

Page 9


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

3. Methodology    ‘Connecting the Public Sector’ aimed to explore how  frontline public service organisations currently handled  and shared sensitive citizen data.  

Response

No. of orgs  surveyed 

Total response  to both surveys 

% of organisation  type 

52 

7.7% 

Fire 

57 

8.8% 

Health 

189 

4.8% 

Local Authorities 

433 

190 

43.9% 

Unique authorities 

433 

149 

34.4% 

Police 

Over the summer of 2009 two research exercises were  run: an initial in‐depth questionnaire, followed up by a  quick survey aimed at those who did not complete the  main questionnaire.  

The surveys were targeted at three distinct groups: chief executive/corporate; head of IT/IT senior; and senior departmental  officers. Individuals from each authority in each of these groups were invited to participate in the research by email. In the case  of the in‐depth survey participation was by online survey; in that of the quick poll respondents were asked to reply to an email  with a limited number of questions on it.   A total of 103 frontline service officers answered the in‐depth questionnaire, with a further 105 answering the quick survey.   Responses came from the breadth and depth of the country, across frontline services. The greatest response rate came from  local government – with 190 individuals from 149 authorities answering. This represents a response rate of 34.4% of unique  authorities answering.  A number of authorities submitted more than one response from different survey groups – thus the total response was 190,  offering an ‘illustrative’ response rate of 43.9%.   Response rates from the Police (7.7%), Fire & Rescue Services (8.8%) and Health organisations (4.8%) surveyed was significantly  lower. Although the response from these groups was not statistically robust the answers were of interest to researchers.  

3.1 Response: Quick Poll (total: 105)  The quick poll elicited 105 responses from officers ranging from chief  executives (and councillors) to heads of IT/IT seniors and senior user  department representatives.  Response broken down by group/seniority: 

Chief executives/  councillors

7% 25%

Respondents in London, the south east and east midlands were more  enthusiastic, with markedly less response from councils in the south east. More  districts than unitaries/boroughs/counties replied, but as a proportion of type  the larger authorities were more keen to participate.   Response broken down by region:    

  

London

 

18%

South East

13%

East Midlands

12.5%

North West

10.5%

Yorkshire & Humberside

10.5%

West Midlands

9.5%

East

8.5%

South West

5.5%

Scotland

5%

Wales

5%

North East

2% 0%

10%

20%

Heads of IT and IT  seniors Departments

68%

      Response broken down by organisation type: 

29%

English District English Unitary London Borough English County Metrpolitan District Scottish Unitary PCT Fire Police Welsh Unitary Local Health Board Drug Action Team

16% 16% 9% 9% 5% 4% 4% 3% 2% 2% 1% 0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

    © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 10


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

  3.2 Response: In‐Depth Survey (total: 103)  The in‐depth survey elicited 103 responses – with the profile of respondents by seniority  closely matching that of the quick poll exercise. Response broken down by  group/seniority: 

South East East    North West London Yorkshire & Humberside South West East Midlands West Midlands Wales  North East Scotland Unknown LA

 

 

 

18%

66%

English Districts

30% 23%

Metropolitan Districts

18.5%

London Borough

11.5%

English Counties

6%

Welsth Unitary

3%

Scottish Unitary

5% 4% 4% 3% 2%

3%

Unknown LA

10%

15%

   

English Unitaries

8% 8%

5%

Departments

       Response broken down by organisation type:  

14.5% 11.5% 11.5% 10.5%

0%

Heads of IT and IT  seniors

26%

Response by organisation type and region varied slightly but were on the whole in line  with the quick poll. Again the English districts and unitaries topped the list in terms of  response.   Response broken down by region: 

Chief executives/  councillors

8%

2%

Fire

1%

Local Health Board

1%

Police

1% 0%

20%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

   This report purports to be no more than a snapshot in time as to the attitudes and practice towards sharing and handling  sensitive citizen data within frontline public services. It was conducted predominantly among local government due to the news  worthiness at the time of survey (summer 2009) of the roll out of the Government Connect Secure eXtranet – GCSX.  

                        

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

 

Page 11


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

4. Results ‐ Quick Survey 

 

 

4.1  Do you share sensitive information about citizens with other public sector organisations? (eg local  authorities, health, fire, police, central government)  Yes No Don't Know No Answer

1% 4% 16%

Almost eight in ten (79%) of the sample said that they shared sensitive  information about citizens with other public sector organisations.   Just five percent said that they did not, or did not answer the question.   Sixteen percent were confident that they did not share sensitive citizen  information about citizens with other organisations.   A number of respondents made comments in relation to this question  suggesting that understanding of the sensitivity of handling such data and  related security concerns were high. A representative selection of these is in  the table below.  

79%

Comments: Do you share sensitive information about citizens with other public sector organisations?   “Information is shared with other authorities in line with joint working protocols. Through our various partnerships, we share  information to provide improved services to our residents. Our data sharing is covered by protocols setting out what is being shared, why  it is being shared, and how the data are kept secure.”  “We currently share sensitive data with the local authorities, Health Service, Police at multi agency meetings. Some information that is  sent out has the names and ages of victims redacted.”  “The trust shares information with many bodies where patient care requires this. Great care is taken that sharing takes place only in  conformity with the Data Protection Act, national requirements and guidelines or with specific consent.”  “Yes, but only for operational coordination on an individual.”  “But only within the NHS, not external organizations.”  “Yes, for example, with CAB through a 'trusted partner' secure network.”  “Local authorities at present but plans are in place to expand this over time.”  “With consent if possible but it can be shared if there is a concern about safety.”  “Only where legislation permits.”   

4.2  Do you ever share this data by post/paper/solid media? 

3%

Yes No Don't Know No Answer

8%

47% 42%

Almost half of the respondents said that they did share this data by  post/paper/solid storage media with other public sector organisations.   Just over four in ten (42%) said that they did not. The remainder of the sample  either did not know (3%) or did not answer the question (8%).   A number of comments were made relating to this question. A representative  sample of these can be seen in the table below. However, comments suggest  that postal and courier delivery of sensitive data is no longer a desired  solution – with many commenting how this ‘used’ to be an option and how  officers had been ‘told not to’ do this anymore.  

Comments: Do you ever share this data by post/paper/solid media?   “We share data by paper. When we send information by post steps are taken to ensure that it is secured in line with Government  guidance. Printed personalised data for specific meetings is governed by a strict protocol within our Regional Information Sharing  Protocol. Any electronic information sent by post would be encrypted and sent through a bonded courier.”  “Encrypted solid media; paper; email by a secure web service. Will continue to use to send secure email to individuals and organisations  not on secure email.”  “FOI information sent in the post, by email and solid media. Data files are sent via email and solid media.”  “Especially if this is the most secure method for the type of data.”  “Sometimes when no secure network communications option is available.”  “Yes, but have told everyone not to do this.”  “We used to, but not anymore.” 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 12


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

  4.3.  Do you ever share this data by secure network communications? (eg GCSX)  Yes No Don't Know No Answer

12% 3%

Over six in ten of the sample (62%) sometimes used secure network  communications to share this data with other organisations.   Less than a quarter (23%) never used secure communications such as GCSX.  More than one in ten (15%) however either did not know the answer, or did  not answer, this question.  

23%

A number of comments were made relating to this question. As can be seen  from the representative sample in the table below, many of the respondents  were starting, or planning to start, using the government secure network  infrastructure via the GCSX once they had their connection live.  

62%

Comments: Do you ever share this data by secure network communications? (eg GCSX)  “Yes. Our internal communications are secure. In line with GovConnect, our secure GCSX CoCo will go live at the end of September.”  “Currently not GC.”  “In the pipeline.”  “Not yet but will begin to as we have just had our GCSX connection approved.”  “Not yet, but planning to.”  “We do not currently have a secure network communication in place.”  “A set of secure email addresses has been set using GCSX.”  “Exclusively.”   “Starting to replace the preceding with GCSX”  “Via encrypted e‐communication only.”  “We have implemented GC Connect.”  “Data is shared in a variety of ways, both via secure network and via email/fax/post.”  “This is being developed and will go live this month.”  “This network is currently being rolled out throughout this authority.”   

 

4.4  Are all staff regularly trained regarding the sensitivity of citizen information and the importance of  adhering to correct procedures for its handling?  Yes No Don't Know No Answer

16% 4%

16% 64%

In light of the LGA Data Handling Guidelines, researchers had expected the  answer to this question to be emphatically ‘Yes’. However, just over six in ten  (64%) were able to say that all staff were trained regarding the sensitivity of  citizen information and the importance of adhering to correct procedures for  its handling.   Sixteen percent were clear that regular training did not happen in their  organisation. Almost two in ten (20%) were either unsure or did not answer  this question. A number of respondents made additional comments, a  representative sample of which are in the table below. However researchers  were interested to note the extremes: from admission that whilst such policy  would be preferred, practice was less than perfect through to solid  explanations of robust organisational policy and practice.  

Comments: Are all staff regularly trained regarding the sensitivity of citizen information and the importance of adhering to correct  procedures for its handling?   “As a newly established unitary authority we are assessing our position as staff will have had training and awareness within their  previous authorities. An appropriate programme will be developed to meet needs.”  “Organisation‐wide e‐learning in place and regular communications about information security, plus additional training for staff  handling sensitive data regularly.” 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 13


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

  “A programme of staff training is being established and managers receive regular updates.”  “At induction and followed up by mandatory training in addition to service‐specific requirements.”  “Integral part of induction process and is mandatory training module for all staff annually.”  “Online IDeA training currently being rolled out and class room training provided to council members.”  “We deliver mandatory Information Governance awareness training and all our staff are expected to attend refresher training  periodically.”  “Training is provided to some staff with specific responsibilities for handling sensitive information, such as those dealing with benefits,  but for the remainder the council relies on policy and communication.”  “Daily signup to adherence to the security policies.”  “I wouldn't describe it as regular training ‐ more likely to be included as a staff briefing item.”  “Induction training but no regular training after that.”  “Piecemeal at present. GC is changing this as we are required to actively train all staff accessing IT systems.”  “Policy exists but formal and recurring training does not.”  “We aspire to but not as regularly as we should.”     

4.5  Do you feel there is a need to share sensitive citizen data in order to improve the quality and efficiency  of public service delivery?  

10%

Yes No Don't Know No Answer Sometimes

5%

2% 6%

77%

Nearly eight in ten (78%) felt that yes, there was a need to share sensitive  citizen data in order to improve the quality and efficiency of public service  delivery.   Just six percent said no. The remainder, either did not know (2%), did not  answer, or thought that yes, sometimes, this was necessary (5%).   A number of comments were made. Again, these tended to polarise, however  this was between an emphatic recognition of the need to share – and the  benefits thereof ‐ and of the need to share this data in a safe and appropriate  manner.  

  Comments: Do you feel there is a need to share sensitive citizen data in order to improve the quality and efficiency of public service  delivery?   “Immensely so ‐ for place shaping, service take‐up, increased customer insight, offering of value added services and most importantly,  preventative services.”  “Absolutely.”  “The need to share sensitive citizen data within and between public sector agencies is an essential requirement of effective and efficient  service delivery. This must take place within statutory, ethical and procedural frameworks.”  “But not globally, only to selective agencies.”  “However there are challenges here regarding the Data Protection Act; does place limits on the use that can be made of personal  information. Information Governance becomes an issue. Caldicott requirements need to be considered.”  “In terms of delivering the best healthcare for patients/clients.”  “It is essential for efficient and effective delivery.”  “Particularly within social care (both adults and children).”  “Systems and data sharing protocols need to be developed if service improvements, particularly for more vulnerable people, are to be  achieved.”  “Not at this stage but possibly in the future through the development of the esd toolkit and through our Customer Insight project.”  “In theory yes. However, how it is put into practice could have the opposite effect.”  “There is clearly a need as all cases of headline cases of child abuse could have been prevented if agencies communicated with each  other. This will continue and it will be the same story. It only takes a phone call to discuss a case, however it often gets missed. Cases of  domestic abuse may be more detected earlier allowing intervention and help to be offered to the victim and children.” 

 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 14


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

4.6  Do you feel that accessing databases in other public sector organisations would improve/help the way  you deliver services?  (eg local authorities, health, fire, police, central government)  Yes No Don't Know No Answer Sometimes

1% 12% 2%

Three quarters (75%) of the sample felt that being able to access databases  from other public sector organisations would help improve the delivery of  services.   Ten percent said that accessing such databases would not help with improving  service delivery. The remainder did not know (12%) or did not answer (2%).  One percent said ‘sometimes’.  

10%

Researchers were particularly interested in those that said ‘no’ and why. Of  these there were no real patterns in area of service or seniority. However,  three were senior officers: a director of children's social care, a head of  environmental health services and assistant director of strategy &  performance. Interestingly, one was a Government Connect Lead, who said, “The case is not proven. There is already controlled  access to information.”  75%

From reading the remainder of the comments researchers surmised that whilst the benefits of accessing information from other  organisations was deemed beneficial great concern remained as to how this could be proven and securely enacted. A sample of  comments relating to this question can be found in the table below.     Comment: Do you feel that accessing databases in other public sector organisations would improve/help the way you deliver  services?   “We think that the sharing of information with agencies such as PCT’s will help us to identify vulnerable people within our community  and enable us to target them with Community Safety initiatives to help drive down the incidence of accidental dwelling fire.”  “Shared information with shared databases would probably help and certainly allow a more joined up approach to dealing with sensitive  issues. Too often staff, possibly through lack of training or uncertainty, will not pass on information.”  “Absolutely.”  “Accessing databases ‐ No. Having some of the relevant information available from these databases ‐ Yes.”  “But only if the data is presented in existing systems so that systems update each other ‐ adding another separate system into the  equation means that it simply won't be used.”  “If we are to improve health and social care as a whole there will be a need to share data across several organisations.”  “Joined up working and shared services/information is the way forward.” “Particularly in Children & Young People's services where multi‐agency working is not always supported by information sharing  facilities.”  “Databases don't record data retrievable in a useful way (except by host); the RELEVANT info needs to be extracted for sharing.” “The case is not proven. There is already controlled access to information.” “We work on the premise that you have a central information / intelligence hub with links to partner databases (where relevant) and  that you input once and use many times.”  “In theory yes. However, how it is put into practice could have the opposite effect.” “It would improve service to citizens and allow joined up view of service provision.” “Not at a cost of privacy.”  “We do not share access to databases. If such an arrangement was needed, data would be shared within a secure space and this would  only occur within statutory and ethical frameworks.”  “There are pro and cons in sharing data bases within the Public Sector and presently this is not encouraged for obvious reasons. Also  there are serious issues and concerns with regards to accessing databases in terms of the Data Protection Act and other Parliamentary  legislation that all need to be considered. Guidance will need to be sorted from the Information Commissioners Office (ICO) and the  National Information Governance Board (NIGB) including independent Information Security Risks Assessments and Audits based on  ISO27001 and BSI 10012 (Data Protection) and BS 25999 (Business Continuity).”  “We do to some extent now but not to the extent where we can log in to each other's databases on a daily basis.”  “Whilst access to partners' information is very useful and important, better would be single shared records.” 

 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 15


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

4.7  Would trusted and secure data sharing be essential in order to deliver 'Total Place' public services?  Just 4% of respondents thought that trusted and secure data sharing would not  be essential in order to deliver ‘Total Place’ services.  

Yes No Don't Know

10%

No Answer

Over three quarters (76%) felt that it would be essential in order to deliver the  ‘whole area approach to public services’ inherent within the Total Place pilots.  

10%

Ten percent did not answer this question, and a further ten percent did not  know whether or not Total Place would impact the need to share sensitive  citizen data.  

4%

The comments (below) to this question were interesting – ranging from  enthusiastic (and informed) explanation as to the Total Place approach to  dismissal of the initiative as a political public relations ‘spin’.  

76%

  Comment: Would trusted and secure data sharing be essential in order to deliver ‘Total Place’ public services?   “’Total Place’ looks at how a whole area approach to public services can lead to better services. In order to achieve this it requires data  analysis across the whole area. This data will come from a range of service providers on a range of different criteria ie information on  crime and anti‐social behaviour. Unless this data is shared an informed and holistic view cannot be taken on issues such as where  services need to be better targeted. The approach must be evidenced based and cannot be delivered by a single agency or group. It  needs a consistent and collaborative approach which eliminates duplication and joins up activity.”  “Developing trusted and secure data sharing is essential to wide roll out of a total place approach to public services. We are a total place  pilot site, and are seeking to share Customer Insight data across providers in order to inform our work: it is vital we do this in a way that  ensures the safety of citizen data.”  “Absolutely, trusted and secure data sharing is the way forward in order to prevent data breaches and restore public confidence.” “No, but there is clearly a need for a more joined up approach to information sharing.” “Information has to be accurately input and fully understood on receipt ‐ fully trusted systems encourage bypassing of key staff who can  interpret data.”  “Not necessary if 'total place' moves forward sensitively.” “Only a good team of spin doctors can deliver Total Place public services.”

 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

 

Page 16


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

5. Results ‐ In‐Depth Survey  5.1 Does your council's work involve collecting, using or storing information about citizens?   100 80 60 40 20 0

63

Yes

Just two percent of the sample said that their work did not  involve collecting, using or storing information about  citizens.  

98

No

26 8

3

The only group not sharing data were a subset of  departmental users that worked in land charges, with land  and property gazetteers or with GIS.      

 

5.2 Does your council's work involve sharing this information with the following?   YES ‐ we share citizen data with:    … Other local authorities

90%

Other frontline services

82%

Commercial organisations

78%

The third sector

77%

Central government

Ninety percent of those participating in the in‐depth survey  said that they shared this sensitive citizen information with  other local authorities.   Nearly seven in ten (69%) shared this data with central  government, 82% with other frontline services and 77% with  the third sector.   Almost eight in ten (78%) shared information with commercial  organisations (such as care providers, outsourcers etc).  

69%

   

 

Local authorities 

Yes 

Technology

Corporate

Users

Frontline 

Total (%)

22

6

62

90

  Other frontline service organisations  

No 

3

2

4

10

Yes 

23

8

51

82

  Third sector organisations 

No 

3

0

14

18

Yes 

30

6

45

 

77

 

No 

5

2

17

 

23

Central government 

Yes 

26

7

31

69

 

No 

0

1

28

31

Commercial organisations  

Yes 

20

4

49

 

78

 

No 

6

4

11

 

22

 

5.3 How sensitive is the most sensitive information that you share with the following types of organisation?   All respondents shared sensitive citizen data with other organisations. Most felt that the most sensitive citizen data they shared  was that with other local authorities; that shared with the third sector was seen by the group as less sensitive.   However, from looking at the breakdown of answers from different groups it is interesting to note that technology respondents  felt that the most sensitive data their organisation shared was that which they shared with central government. Indeed, in  general, technology respondents viewed the sensitivity of the data they were handling as ‘higher’ than other groups.  

   

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 17


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

  Chief executives/councillors, for example, felt  that the data shared with commercial  organisations or other frontline services   was not that sensitive – in marked contrast to  the weightings given to this by other groups.   However, chief executives/councillors  perceived the data shared with other local  authorities to be more sensitive than did  either technology or departmental  respondents.  

Commercial organisations

All

Central government

Other Frontline

Third sector organisations? 

Users

Other frontline service  organisations

Corporate

Other local authorities Technology

 

0

1 2 3 4 0 = not sensitive / 5 = extremely sensitive

5

5.4 Handling information about the citizen  Does your council have an 'Information Charter' outlining how citizen data is handled?   50 40

37

40 26

30 20 10

28

9 11

23

No

10 5

4

Yes

Don't Know

1 3

0 Technology

Corporate

User

Total %

Just four in ten respondents said that  their organisation had an Information  Charter outlining how citizen data is  handled.   More heads of IT/IT seniors said their  council had no charter than said they  did – arguably the group most likely to  be aware of such a charter. 

  Is personal information kept within secure ICT systems?   93

100 80

60

Yes

60 40

No

24

20

6

1 0

2 5

1 3

0 2

Don't Know

0 Technology

Corporate

User

Total %

The vast majority of respondents were  confident that their organisation kept  personal information within secure ICT  systems. Just a handful of chief  executive/councillor and end user  respondents were either unsure or did  not believe that this was so.  

 

Are Government data security minimum standards (eg ISO 27001/CoCo) incorporated within ICT systems' specification/  procurement?  

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

61

36

31

24

17 5 3 Technology

5

0 2

Corporate

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

3 User

Yes No

8

Total %

Don't Know

Just eight percent of respondents said  that their organisation did not  incorporate government data security  minimum standards within ICT systems’  specification/ procurement. Sixty one  percent were confident that they were,  with 31% overall unsure. It is worthy of  note that 5% of the ‘no’ came from IT  heads themselves.  

Page 18


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

Does your council have a Corporate Information Risk Policy?  55

60 50 40

31

20

29

25

30

16

14 7

10

4

No

8

7

Don't Know

2 1 0

0 0

Yes

Just over half of all respondents said that  their organisation had a Corporate  Information Risk Policy. Whilst every  chief executive/corporate said their  council had a policy, 16% in user and  technology groups stated that they did  not. 

0 Technology Corporate

User

Other  Frontline

Nearly three in ten (29%) did not know if  their council did or not have such a  policy.  

Total %

 

Are all the council's key 'Information Assets' classified?  45

50 36

40

26

30 20 10

9

12

12 4

4

0

29 Yes

16

No

3

1 1 1

Don't Know

0 Technology Corporate

User

Other  Frontline

None of the ‘corporate’ group said that  their organisation did not have key  Information Assets classified. However,  overall, 29% were clear that the  organisation did not. A further 45% were  unsure whether this task had been  undertaken.  

Total %

 

  Are the owners of each information asset clearly identified in a corporate document?   50 40

27

20

20 10

34

30

30

39

9

Yes

13

12 4

4

0

No

3

1 1 1

Don't Know

0 Technology Corporate

User

Other  Frontline

Again, none of the corporate group said  no to this question. In marked contrast  to the 34% in technology and user  departments saying no, information  asset owners were not clearly identified  in a corporate document.   Nearly four in ten (39%) did not know  either way.  

Total %

  Does one person (Senior Information Risk Owner ‐ SIRO) 'own' information risk at your council/organisation?  40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Just 38% could say that there was one  person, an SIRO, that ‘owned’  information risk at their organisation.  

38 30 32 22

23 Yes

18 11 10

No 4

Technology

3

1

Don't Know

3

Corporate

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

User

Almost a further third (32%) were  unsure, and three in ten were definite  that there was no SIRO at their  organisation.  

Total %

Page 19


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

  Is there a clear incident reporting mechanism in place for when security may be breached?  70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Nearly six in ten (59%) said that a clear  incident reporting mechanism was in  place for when security may be  breached.  

59 35

Yes

27 19

16 6

4 5

0 1

No

14

9

Technology Corporate

User

However, that left 27% unsure of what  to do in case of a security breach and  14% absolutely sure that there was no  mechanism in place to report a breach.  

Don't Know

1 1 1 Other  Frontline

Total %

 

Are all staff regularly trained about the sensitivity of citizen information and the importance of adhering to correct  procedures for its handling?   80

Two thirds of respondents said that all  staff were regularly trained regarding  the sensitivity of citizen information  and the importance of its correct  handling.  

66

60

43

Yes

40 14

20

9

6

2

20

10 11

0 1

No

14

2 1 0

Don't Know

0 Technology Corporate

User Other Frontline

However, two in ten (20%) – from the  technology and user groups ‐ said that  this did not happen.  

Total %

 

5.5 How does your organisation share sensitive citizen data with the following organisations?   60

% USING TODAY

50

54 44

20

Removable media (USB, CD  etc) courier/ post Internet

41 36

40 30

Paper/ courier/ post

28 22 16

1717

32

32

23 21 16

20 8

10

28

24

11 6

10

7

6 8

1

Point to point connection

22

19

18 7

28

12

Secure government network

11 4

4

8 Other

0 Local Authorities

Health  Organisations

Police

Fire & Rescue

Third sector

Central  government

Commercial  organisations

In light of the continuing stream of data loss incidents covered in the media, and actioned by the Information Commissioner, it  was surprising to find that all organisations continue to share sensitive citizen data with other public sector organisations by post  and courier – in both paper and removable media (USB, CD etc) formats. Paper was more popular than removable media; this  may well be due to recent media tales of usb stick discoveries in inappropriate places. Indeed, apart from when communicating  with central government, where secure government network was used most, paper/post/courier was the most used option  when communicating across frontline services.   Interestingly, not one of the corporate/chief executive group said that their council shared citizen data using removable media  when dealing with other local authorities, health organisations, central government or commercial organisations. They were also  more likely to say that their council used the secure government network to communicate with central government than any  other mode of communication.  

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 20


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

%

5.6 Do you feel that any of the following policy agendas or initiatives impact the handling of sensitive   citizen data?   90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

82

73 59

56

36 15

1413

16

58

51 45 31

28 20

69

67

49 4139

81

48 34

29

18 10

4

4

36

30 16 2

6

13 1

6

No impact Requires secure data sharing Don't Know

The most interesting result from this question was that for ‘Total Place’ – 73% of respondents did not know whether it would  require secure data sharing. However, by the time the quick poll took place six weeks later, 76% answered yes.   There are some obvious initiatives and policies that, in the minds of respondents, require secure data sharing – namely delivery  of shared services and mobile & flexible working initiatives. Nearly seven in ten (69%) felt that this would be imperative in the  MAPPA arrangements.   Researchers were intrigued to find that only 58% of the sample felt that the LGA Data Handling Guidelines would impact the  handling of sensitive citizen data, requiring secure data sharing. Since the launch of the guidelines last November, researchers  had assumed that they were being adopted unilaterally across local government. (See box for details.)  Tell Us Once (67%) and Service Transformation (59%) initiatives would also require secure data sharing according to the majority.   Researchers had anticipated both Local Strategic Partnerships and Operational Efficiency Review initiatives to require the sharing  (securely) of data to inform strategy and efficiency savings. However, less than half (49% and 34% respectively) felt that this  would be necessary.   LGA Data Handling Guidelines for Local Government  

Comments relating to this question:   “(The) personalisation agenda requires secure data sharing.”   “Partnership activity level currently appears to focus on protocols and high  level contact. More detailed work is needed to make the partnerships  effective at a data sharing level. It would help if e‐GIF were treated  seriously, local authorities actively rather than passively 'encouraged' to  share information and application suppliers forced to invest in integration  and data exchange as a basic part of their packages, not an expensive  bespoke add‐on.”   “As a former intelligence officer I am concerned at sharing using BlackBerry  machines which are far from secure and yet may receive email”.   “There needs to be a sea change in the way that case records are handled.  Firstly the ESCR (Electronic Social Care Record) is relatively new. Secondly,  the (welcome) move towards multiagency working, CAF, ContactPoint etc,  within the framework of ICS, envisages a much wider range of information  sharing. Good data sharing protocols with key stakeholders are critical, as is  a technical infrastructure that will support secure data sharing, which is  largely absent at present in Children's Services. This leads either to poor  record keeping or wasteful double entry on incompatible systems.” 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Produced by Socitm, working in partnership with the Local  Government Association and the Welsh Local Government  Association, the LGA Data Handling Guidelines for Local  Government were published in November 2008.   The guidelines show councils the steps they need to be  taking to keep ‘safe and secure’ data collected from  residents, businesses and other parties. According to the  LGA’s website, the guidelines ‘highlight recognised best  practice in secure data handling, and provide local  authorities with a vital aid in discharging their  responsibilities and accountability for secure and effective  handling of personal information.’   ‘The publication sets the standard for local government  moving forward.’  States the LGA: ‘The guidelines provide a key checklist of  actions that set out the fundamental steps that every  council should take to mitigate against the ever present  risk that personal information is lost or that data  protection systems fail. They provide chief executives,  senior managers and elected members with a vital tool for  the secure handling of personal information.’                  www.lga.gov.uk  Page 21


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

  5.7 Do you feel that any of the following legal requirements affect the way your council handles sensitive  citizen data within its daily work?  120 100

96

No

79 %

80

                               

0

0

11

10

2

 

50

36

29

40 4

 

Don't Know

57

60

20

 

Yes

94

 

14

14

Criminal Justice and  Immigration Act

Civil Contingencies Act

4

 

         

Data Protection Act

Human Rights Act

Freedom of Information Act

Unsurprisingly, the vast majority of respondents felt that the legal  requirements of both the Data Protection Act (96%) and the  Freedom of information Act (94%) impacted the way their  organisation handled sensitive citizen data.   The Human Rights Act was also felt to have an impact by almost  eight in ten of the sample (79%). The only respondents saying no to  this question were from the departmental/user subset – the  majority of IT heads and chief executive/corporate respondents felt  that it would impact, with just a few of each saying that they did  not know if it would or not.   Over half (57%) said that the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act  would affect the way they handled sensitive citizen data. However  almost three in ten (29%) did not know whether or not it would.  Just 14% said that it definitely would not.   Half felt that the Civil Contingencies Act would have an effect; again  14% felt that it would not, with the remainder (36%) not knowing.  

   

Human Rights Act Personal data must be handled in accordance with the Data  Protection Act (DPA). But the parliamentary Joint Committee On  Human Rights last year (2008) found that breaches in data  protection (aka data loss scandals) contravened the HRA – which  safeguards the right to respect for personal information. ‘The  committee has repeatedly expressed concerns ‐ mostly rejected by  the government ‐ about the adequacy of safeguards on the sharing  of personal information in specific bills....  The committee agrees  with the Information Commissioner that data sharing is not, in  human rights terms, objectionable in itself. But it inevitably raises  human rights concerns. Government must show that any proposal  for data sharing is justifiable and proportionate and that  appropriate safeguards are in place.’   The committee expects the government to take action ‘to foster a  positive culture for the protection of personal data by public sector  bodies’. It also suggests that anyone affected by government data  breaches could use the Committee on Human Rights report to  support legal action brought against the government.                                                 www.parliament.uk

It is worth noting that the chief executive/councillor group said yes  to all these questions.  

Data Protection Act  

Indeed, as can be seen below and in the relevant boxes, all do have  major impacts on how citizen data is handled.  

The requirements of the Data Protection Act 1998 are well known  across frontline public sector organisations. All organisations which  handle personal information are required to comply with a number  of important principles regarding privacy and disclosure. One of the  eight key principles is that data be kept securely.  

 

Civil Contingencies Act      The Civil Contingencies Act 2004 places a statutory duty on certain  organisations to share information in emergencies.  The Act and its associated non‐legislative measures provide a  ‘robust, modern framework for civil protection right across the UK’.  Recovery Guidance on the Cabinet Office website outlines  requirements for data protection and sharing in emergencies. In a  number of emergencies, problems, either perceived or real,  surrounding interpretation of Data Sharing and related Human  Rights legislation have prevented public bodies from carrying out  their duties effectively. The Indian Ocean Tsunami, the Bichard  Inquiry (to the Soham murders) and the Victoria Climbie Inquiry all  

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

The issue of sharing personal information is a key area of data  protection compliance and an issue of much debate. The  Information Commissioner has produced guidance for the public  sector. It should be noted, however, that the ICO also regularly  publishes a set of ‘data protection myths’ suggesting that  ‘unfortunately, some organisations continue to use the Data  Protection Act 1998 as an excuse not to do something, rather than  seeing it as good business sense to treat their customers and their  information with respect’.  Indeed, DPA is often put forward as a reason to block data sharing  in the public sector. However, the Information Commissioner has at  various times stated that he does not want data protection to be  ‘wrongly blamed for preventing sensible information sharing’, for  example in order to detect crime, prevent fraud or protect children  at risk.                                       www.ico.gov.uk 

Page 22


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

Freedom of Information Act  

identified areas of uncertainty in the interpretation and application  of data protection and sharing rights and responsibilities.  

The Freedom of Information Act applies to all public authorities and  companies that are wholly owned by public authorities. Public  authorities are obliged to provide information both through a  publication scheme and in response to requests made under the  general right of access.  

Most recently, as part of the government’s lessons identified  following the 7 July 2005 London bombings, it was found that  limitations on the sharing of data between a number of Category 1  and 2 responders hampered the connection of survivors to  appropriate support services. Subsequent investigation found that  many of these limitations were self‐imposed and resulted from  incorrect application of duties perceived to be imposed on public  organisations by the Data Protection Act and other legislation.  

When responding to requests, there are set procedures that public  authorities need to follow, including the time in responding ad the  fees that can be charged for dealing with requests. Full guidance is on  the Information Commissioner’s website:                   www.ico.gov.uk 

Criminal Justice and Immigration Act   Of most interest to frontline public sector organisations, the Criminal  Justice and Immigration Act 2008 amends the Data Protection Act to  allow the ICO to fine organisations directly for serious breaches of  the DPA principles.  

Data sharing within and between the public and private sectors,  and between Category 1 and 2 responders, cuts across a range of  scenarios and responsibilities – the duty to properly risk assess at  local and regional levels; to construct effective and realistic  emergency plans; during the response to an emergency; and to  recovering from and managing the consequences of emergencies.   www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/ukresilience.aspx 

The provision is not yet in force, but secondary legislation setting out  the level of fines and their application is anticipated shortly. The  Information Commissioner has recommended that the fines are  brought in as soon as possible and that they should be in line with  those imposed by the FSA.                                     www.justice.gov.uk  

 

5.8 Does your organisation share sensitive citizen data with any of the following?  Don't Know

1

Police

9 16

Will do soon No

74 30

1

Fire & Rescue Service

37

32

Yes 14

1

Health Authority / Primary Care Trust

29 34

0

Regional Government Offices

31

78 20 24

Ministry of Justice

0

Department for Communities & Local Government (CLG)

0

24

35 37 22 31

2

Department for Work and Pensions (DWP)

0

59 28

47

14

1

Department for Children Schools and Families (DCSF) 

56

17

0

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC)

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

14

0

HM Courts Service (HMCS)

35

8

0

Other local authorities

56

43 42 8 19 10

20

71 30

40

%

50

60

70

80

90

Page 23

 


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

  As can be seen from the charts on the previous page and below, more than seven in ten councils currently share citizen data with  other local authorities (78%), with the police (74%) and with DWP (71%). More than six in ten (64%) shared data with the Audit  Commission,  59% with HMRC, 56% with HMCS and 51% with schools and other educational institutions.   Almost half (47%) shared data with CLG, 42% with DCSF.   It was interesting to note the ‘no’ responses – not one category gained a negative response from half of the sample. The ‘highest’  negative responses were for data sharing with DCSF (43%) but almost as many again (42%) did share information with the  department ‐ which confirmed researchers’ expectations that many requirements would be departmental/user specific.   Does your council share sensitive citizen data with any of the following organisations? (Cont’d) 

Don't Know 17

1

Schools and other education institutions

31

No

34

0

UK Borders Agency

44

22

39

25 18

0

Audit Commission

18

64 24

1

Driver & Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA)

42

33 27

3

Probation Service

43

27 26

0

Crown Prosecution Service (CPS)

32

42

34

0

HM Prison Service (HMPS)

42

24 0

Yes

36

0

Office of Fair Trading (OFT)

Will do soon

51

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

%

 

  5.9 Which of the following example databases would help your council to deliver services if they were  accessible electronically from your local authority offices?  As can be seen from the chart on the following page, over half of respondents would find electronic access to the following  databases ‘from their desk’ helpful in terms of service delivery: National Fraud Initiative (62%), National Blue Badge Register  (60%), DVLA (59%), National Pupil Database (54%), Joint Asset Recovery Database (53%), Hospital leavers & admissions database  (52%), Electronic patient records (50%) and the Persistent Offenders Register (50%).   Few had access today to any of these databases, the exceptions being the National Fraud Initiative (19%), DVLA (17%) and  ContactPoint (12%).   Whilst access to relevant databases for individual departments will without doubt depend on requirements, researchers  anticipate that once secure access becomes a trusted entity and the benefits to service improvement such access delivers are  demonstrated, demand for access will grow.  

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 24


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

  Which of the following example databases would help your council to deliver services if they were accessible electronically from your   local authority offices? (Cont’d) 

19 19

National Fraud Initiative (Audit Commission)

17

DVLA

Already Accessible 62

No

24

59

Yes

3

NOMS

77

20 2

National Pupil Database

44

54

0

National Resilience Extranet (NRE)

59

41 4

National Blue Badge Register

36

60

2

Persistent Offenders Register

48 50

2

SARS

60

38 2

Moneyweb

72

26 5

Libra

72

23 6

Joint Asset Recovery Database

41

53

3

Electronic patient records

47

4

Hospital leavers & admissions database

44 12

Contactpoint

0

50

10

40

20

30

40 %

52

48 50

60

70

80

 

 

5.10 Additional comments on the issue of secure handling/sharing of sensitive citizen data  Additional comments:  “The greatest challenge is human behaviour (compliance) ‐ though partially mitigable by technological advances ‐ culture shift is still  significant.”   “Too many databases, not enough sharing.”  “Until all councils have mandatory and auditable Board‐level ownership of information security risk, the situation will remain unsatisfactory.  GC has helped raise some awareness, but many councils (connected and unconnected) remain in an immature IS‐capable state.”   “Data sharing is expected ‐ citizens only want to tell us things once. The organisational and departmental divides within public sector are not  understood by the citizen when they are accessing services. However, this does place a very high profile on data integrity, security and  methods of data sharing. There have been too many highly publicised data breaches for the general population to have full confidence in  public sector data handling. However, whereas technical solutions can be introduced and improved, the biggest challenge, from my  perspective, is the education of data handlers.”  

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 25


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

  “There is still a perception among many people and organisations (not specifically local government where I am from) that ordinary email is  a secure system.”  “There needs to be a national forum for this sort of issue. There are so many agencies involved and with an interest and we all need to get  together to discuss best practice. Organisations that should be around the table include ALGIS in LARIA, NADPO (Data Protection Officers),  National Association of Information Management, CILIP, Records Management Society, SOCITM, Society of Archivists. ALGIS in LARIA might  be keen to take on such a role.”   “Data security is important but vague ‐ it is sometimes unclear whether you can share info or not which will adversely impact on the service  you can deliver.”  “Maybe both government and LGAs should be considering the advantages of a VRM based method of citizens asserting a self‐maintained  identity thus removing the onus for the storage of such identities by Local Government in the first place. Our recent custodianship of such  data seems fraught.”   “For Health and Social services to share data effectively requires not only security but confidence and change in culture. Data security is  often used as a power/control mechanism and not in the best interest of the patient/service user.”  “Recent events have rightly focussed everyone on confidentiality, but info security is not just about confidentiality. It is also about data  quality and availability, which are the real key to cost‐effective frontline service provision. Info security also needs to be aligned to the  strategy of the organisation and built into its business processes. Please give clear guidance on how to allocate a SIRO.”   “This whole area is under‐resourced and not understood by strategic management in many LAs children's services departments. The NHS  Connecting for Health Information Governance Toolkit is about to be made statutory for Adults and Children's Social Care. This will greatly  assist in providing an effective driver for pursuing this agenda further.”  

   

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

 

Page 26


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

6.  Edited highlights from GC Communicate newsletter in 2009   

6.1 Opportunities for improving service delivery using GCSX (September 2009)  Now that the GCSX network is live across all English and Welsh local authorities, opportunities for improving the  way in which information is shared between public sector organisations are coming to the fore.   A growing number of secure and efficient services and data transfers are fast becoming reality:   Sharing data with Health: Local authorities with a GCSX connection can now use a GCSX email account to exchange sensitive  data ‐ including patient identifiable data ‐ with health sector staff that have an NHS.net email address (eg PCT staff and GPs).  Connecting to the Police: With both GCSX and the Police National Network (PNN) connected to the wider Government Secure  Intranet (GSi), data can now be safely transferred between council and police using GC Mail. Information relating to crime  statistics, community safety, child protection, youth offending and emergency planning can all be better shared and used to  improve services and joint community initiatives.   Courts Access: The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) is currently piloting secure local authority access to HM Court Records, held on the  Libra case management system, via GCSX.   Youth Offending: The Youth Justice Board (YJB) has implemented a GCSX connection to link up Youth Offending Teams (YOTs)  with the YJB Service to arrange secure accommodation placements for youth offenders. The service uses structured messaging to  transfer data between YJB and YOTs. YJB is also working with Government Connect to enable secure local authority access to  both its main Case Management System and the eAsset database which provides information on youth offender secure  accommodation across the country.  Trading Standards & Asset Recovery: GCSX connectivity enables secure information sharing between local authorities, police  and trading standards providers. Access to both the Joint Asset Recovery Database (JARD) and Money Web will soon be available  to Trading Standards officers from their council desktops ‐ enabling local authorities to participate in the Home Office incentive  scheme and claim their share of the estimated £200m+ of criminal assets documented within these databases.  In and Out of Work: DWP, HMRC and local authorities are implementing new processes that provide a more joined up service to  certain people moving in and out of work. National rollout of the streamlined processes began in autumn 2008 and is scheduled  to complete by early 2010.  eLAID rolls out: Following a successful pilot with 10 local authorities and JobCentre Plus, the eTransfer Project pilot ‐ secure  electronic exchange of Housing Benefit and Council Tax benefit claim data using an electronic Local Authority Input Document  (eLAID) – is set to roll out nationally.   

6.2 The Public Sector Network –Partnership and Innovation (August 2009)  John Stubley, PSN Programme Director   Today we live in an ‘on demand’ world. Video, music, internet, business service access – everyone wants it now. And this need  has to be satisfied, irrespective of time, place or device.  The Public Sector Network (PSN) might not offer such unbridled access, but it aims to enable common business functionality  across the Local Government Sector. It will improve the way we share services and information, bringing the potential for better  efficiency and effectiveness. To put it bluntly, it will allow us do our jobs better.   The PSN is designed to be a single, integrated infrastructure, delivered by multiple service providers ‐ in effect a ‘private network  of networks’ for the public sector, providing voice and data services.  It will allow the same quality of experience to be offered across a range of platforms – desktop, laptop, mobile devices and  telephone.  

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 27


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

  Why Network Procurement Should Change   At the very heart of the PSN is a concept that brings together network services and standards, and most importantly helps to re‐ invent and improve the procurement process.  Currently, procurement lacks centrally managed standards. All public sector bodies run separate procurement competitions to  buy their networks to connect their various departmental locations. This creates an environment which is highly inflexible, built  to different standards, wasteful and costly.  Procurement needs to change.   In a nutshell, the PSN allows users to move away from the ‘kit and bandwidth’ mindset and look at ICT in terms of the services  your organisation needs. 

 

6.3 Aggregated Connection to GCSX Saves Kent £1m (August 2009)  Kent Connects – a partnership of all Kent and Medway authorities – was the first partnership to achieve  aggregate connection to GCSX, saving itself over £1m in the process.   All 12 districts, Medway and Kent County have invested in a shared IT infrastructure, the Kent Public Services Network (KPSN). By  signing up to a standard configuration for aggregate connection to GCSX all the authorities benefited from a simplified, and thus  cheaper, connection process.   As an added bonus the partner councils have achieved better standards of resilience and capacity than any would have achieved  by themselves.   Two 10MB GCSX compliant circuits in separate locations now ensure resilience and business continuity for all councils in the  partnership. Each circuit receives equal volumes of data, has separate firewalls, and supports the other. Partners now benefit  from at least 100MB circuits, with the majority of KPSN running at 1GB. The greater bandwidth increases capacity and provides  the network with flexibility in peak times.  Centralised project management also freed up ICT staff to focus on other work and streamlined discussions with GCSX. As  network services are shared the group’s future costs are reduced ongoing.  Jeff Wallbank, KPSN’s partnership development manager, says that aggregation supports the Digital Britain agenda and has  environmental benefits too: “The number of circuits has been reduced but upgraded, potentially extending high speed access to  the internet for small businesses and residents.”  Jeff believes that aggregation is an option for other authorities: “There are more savings and efficiencies to be had. Bigger  aggregations are possible, and it can only help in the drive for efficiencies and joined‐up public services. However I recommend  getting the partnership governance model right at the outset.”  Meanwhile KPSN partners are developing the use of GCSX and the secure GC mail: sharing information with magistrates’ courts  to streamline council tax and business rate summons, tackling fraud with trading standards and Kent Police, and liaising on social  services cases. 

 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

 

Page 28


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

  6.4 In and Out of Work over GCSX (July 2009)  In and Out of Work (IOW) provides a single point of contact at Jobcentre Plus for customers to access Jobseekers  Allowance and Income Support, HM Revenues and Customs Tax Credits, and local authority administered  Housing and Council Tax benefits.  People whose work status changes thus no longer have to visit multiple government offices but can deal with all relevant  support organisations in one place, in one go. Their financial support also arrives more quickly and is less prone to error as  duplication and rekeying is removed from the process.   E‐Transfers, the system developed in collaboration with the DWP Housing Benefit Information Flows team, enables the  electronic transfer of local authority Input Documents (LAIDs) using the DWP Generic File Transfer Service via GCSX (Government  Connect Secure eXtranet). The IOW project also uses GCSX to provide the links for the secure exchange of customer information.  The E‐Transfer and IOW project teams are working together with Government Connect to align implementation of the two new  processes in order to minimise the impact of these changes. Wherever possible, local authorities will be e‐enabled in advance of  adopting IOW processes.  

 

6.5 Tower Hamlets join the GCSX network and adopts In and Out of Work (June 2009)  Tower Hamlets switched on to the Government Connect Secure eXtranet (GCSX) on 23 February 2009, after  submitting its first assessment return in May last year. The journey has been an instructive and crucial one.  There were a number of drivers behind signing up for the secure network. The Department for Work and Pensions’ (DWP)  intention to switch off access to CIS by 1st April unless routed through a secure network, being one.  However, ensuring that client data be secured to the ‘highest possible standard’ has long been one of Tower Hamlet’s highest  priorities. “We do have a general commitment to ensuring that data is secure” says ICT head, Jim Roberts. “We take the whole  issue of security very seriously indeed. Subscribing to GCSX is a very good indication that we are doing the right thing.  “Improved processes around GCSX should also in future speed up certain business processes, which in turn will hopefully release  savings opportunities.”  Tower Hamlets is looking forward to enjoying such benefits now that it is linked into the network. These will include: an  improved administration and delivery benefits; reduced risk of misplaced sensitive data by having secure email; and a secure ftp  route for data exchange with central government departments.  The council was also one of a number of local authority areas that adopted the new In and Out of Work (IOW) processes in  February – and will be using its GCSX connection to enable this.  Through the GCSX network information can be shared electronically and securely. “We were very excited and keen to get  involved,” says Steve Hill, the council’s benefits service manager. “The idea of just one organisation collecting the evidence so  that customers only have to go to one place, rather than several, is a highly appealing one. This will make a huge difference for  our customers in terms of access to benefits and turnaround.”   

     

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 29


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

6.6 Caerphilly County Borough and Gwent Police work together over GCSX  (April 2009)  Caerphilly County Borough Council (CBC), Gwent Police and other local agencies have signed up to the GCSX  programme, with several departments within the council looking to use the network to securely share  information with trusted partner organisations – including Housing Benefits, Community Safety, Social Services,  Youth Offending Service and HR/payroll.  Head of Caerphilly council, Cllr Lindsay Whittle, said: “This system is excellent in that we are now able to securely transfer  sensitive and confidential data between partner agencies swiftly and accurately. Not only is it of real benefit to us, but it will also  benefit the residents of the Caerphilly county borough. No doubt others will follow suit in the near future to take advantage of  this new secure communication facility.”   Caerphilly’s community safety manager, Howard Rees, agreed: “Residents of the Caerphilly county borough should feel safe in  the knowledge that this technology will now aid us even further in tackling crime and disorder across the area, as it allows us to  communicate with our partners quicker and more accurately than ever before.  “Those responsible for committing crimes and acting anti‐socially will not be tolerated, and this new technology will help  significantly in helping us bring them to justice quickly.”  Detective inspector Huw Watkins of Gwent Police has emphasised the timeliness of the implementation: "We are working  together on a daily basis in the sharing of information for the benefit of the community. As the staff at Caerphilly CBC are  working with us on a variety of themes, it is essential that we are able to communicate securely.  “This approach has allowed us to drive down volume crime, and share information about preventing radicalisation. This is great  news for the people of Caerphilly, who can be sure that those responsible for ensuring their safety are working together to  target those who cause harm.  “One particular incident recently highlights this to very good effect. Following deployment of a 'capture car’ in Blackwood the  footage of the suspected offender was circulated to Caerphilly staff. Almost a month later, police officers saw some men acting  suspiciously in Blackwood and asked the council’s CCTV operator to focus on the person.   “That operator recognised the man as being wanted by the police, was arrested by the officers and the crime cleared up.” 

 

6.7 Preston looks forward to fast, secure data exchange (April 2009)  Preston City Council was connected to the GCSX network on 2nd April 2009, just six months after its original  Code of Connection submission.  “We continually invest in ICT at Preston, move with the times and keep our technology current. From this point of view we had a  very good base to build on and not a huge amount of work to do to become compliant,” asserts Greg Skellorn, Preston City’s ICT  support manager.  “The main challenge for us was ensuring that our processes, policies and procedures included the specific requirements of the  GCSX network. This also gave us the opportunity to ensure that these were generally properly documented and up to date.”   The main motivation to signing up to the Government Connect programme was the DWP Data Access Policy that came into force  on 31st March this year. “Longer term, we hope the facility will help us to streamline services by speeding up secure data  exchange with a range of public bodies. Any services that come online and will help us to do this, we’ll make use of,” says Greg.  

   

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 30


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

6.8 South Hams gets secure access to DWP systems (April 2009)  South Hams District Council went live using GCSX in February ‐ one of the earliest authorities to do so.   “I’m extremely pleased with the dedication of my team here at South Hams. The process has had its challenges but, with the  support of the Government Connect team, we’ve made it,” said Pauleen Blampied, South Hams head of ICT.  “With GCSX in place, we now have a more secure mechanism to access DWP systems and will also be able to take advantage of  the security and efficiencies that GC Mail offers," says Robin Barlow, ICT support manager. 

 

6.9 How secure is LA Remote Access? (March 2009)  Citizens rightly demand that personal data is properly handled and access controlled. Remote access and mobile  media are particular challenges in that they provide a ‘soft underbelly’ for physical and virtual attack on  systems, such as hacking.  Furthermore, we risk losing public confidence when we misplace or mishandle remote devices containing secure data. And yet,  this way of working is fast becoming a necessity within local authorities. Whilst local authorities have been, and are, innovative,  CESG security standards have highlighted weaknesses. Prior to GCSX, councils were not assessed against industry standards for  remote access. A secure system of remote access is part of the CoCo process (although the GCSX network does not technically  impact on remote working).  The vast majority of local authorities are now acting positively to correct these weaknesses.   Networks are assured and risk assessed against confidentiality, integrity and availability. In fact, the government data that is  accessed across GCSX includes Impact Level 3 (IL3) Restricted data, eg DWP’s CIS database.  CoCo compliance also demands dual factor authentication on remote network access, in order to reduce the threat of attacks  against local authorities.   Normally this is a card or token based solution which confirms the user identity ie authenticates. It offers an additional assurance  that users are who they say they are, and not just someone who has gained access to the system and passwords.  When data is accessed by remote systems some of this data may still be cached on the PC. This data is retrievable using specialist  tools that can be deployed by unauthorised as well as authorised persons. Such a PC could cause considerable embarrassment,  as a minimum if it falls into the wrong hands. This is one reason why CESG insists that PCs must be appropriately encrypted and  consideration given to disposal.  Although there are thin client systems that claim not to leave information on PCs there are compliance difficulties if these are  not correctly configured. There is a need for appropriate control at the end points where they sit outside the LA network.  A further risk is that the PC might not be maintained at the right patch level i.e. all operating system updates are applied. This  could include essential security patches which would leave the PC (and hence the network) exposed if not properly controlled.  This is not possible if the PC is owned by the individual rather than the organisation.  Remote working brings inherent risks which can certainly be mitigated through checks and balances, outlined within the CoCo  process. GC presents an immediate opportunity to put those checks into place sooner rather later before it’s too late.  

     

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 31


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

6.10 Libra ‐ available soon over the GCSX (February 2009)  Libra replaces the magistrates’ courts existing information technology systems with one national system  enabling standard national business processes across all courts.   HMCS are also changing the business processes used to manage the criminal, civil, accounting and enforcement workload, these  new processes coupled with the new infrastructure will improve information links between the courts and criminal justice  partners. Local authorities will be able to utilise these enhancements initially through their Youth Offending Teams (YOTs), using  their GCSX connections.  YOTs will be able to streamline work practices and share information more efficiently with these key agencies.  Libra provides electronic interfaces that automatically transfer case information between the courts and partners (such as the  Police, DVLA and the Office for Criminal Justice Reform). Interfaces reduce re‐keying of data and should decrease transcription  errors. GCSX users will be able to access Libra from their own desktops, negating the need to use third party access and will be  able enquire about court cases, view an electronic diary and print court lists and registers. This reduces the time spent dealing  with routine enquiries and printing lists.  Youth offending teams may currently have local agreements to access existing court systems to see court lists and results for  young people that YOTs are managing.  However, when Libra is installed, this will no longer be possible.   Local authority IT networks that are Code of Connection compliant will meet these criteria and will not have to make costly and  timely alternatives to receiving this information.   Phil Sutton, head of ICT Business Change and Benefits for the Wiring Up Youth Justice programme, said: “The Libra Central  Service is a real benefit for YOTs in court areas where Libra has been installed. Early feedback from YOTs using the service has  been extremely positive. They now receive court lists and results automatically, which saves them time.”   

 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

 

Page 32


Connecting the Public Sector   

7.  GCSX, Central and Local Government  

2009 

 

 

 

        www.govconnect.gov.uk 

Developing opportunities for improved information sharing between Central and Local Government    Housing and Council Tax Benefit Administration  GCSX is enabling improved benefits administration via:  • • • • •

Direct secure access to DWP customer information system (CIS).  Secure email of personal sensitive and RESTRICTED data between local authority and DWP staff.  Secure bulk file transfer of case data ‐ eg Local Authority Input Documents (LAIDs) and Local Authority Claim  Information documents (LACIs) ‐ between DWP and local authority systems.  Improved access to DWP fraud related data.  Delivery of the In and Out of Work project which through secure electronic communication between DWP, HMRC and  local authorities is streamlining processes and enabling people moving in and out of work to access benefits  entitlements more effectively.   

Trading Standards  GCSX is enabling secure communication between key delivery partners. This can lead to an improved ability to share regulatory  intelligence within Public Protection Partnerships, improved 5x5x5 reporting between organisations and the ability to securely  access Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) applications such as the Joint Asset Recovery Database (JARD) from a local  authority desktop.   

Youth Justice  By establishing secure connectivity between the Youth Justice Board (YJB), HM Courts Service and local authority based Youth  Offending Teams (YOTs) GCSX enables secure access to key applications such as the HM Courts Libra system, the YJB’s Case  Management and e‐Asset systems and the exchange of secure structured messaging relating to custodial and remand  information.   

Tackling Crime and Improving Community Safety  GCSX enables more secure, reliable and timely exchange of data between the Police and local authorities, improved ability to  share information with key partners in the delivery of Multi‐Agency Public Protection Arrangements and Risk Assessment  Conferences (MAPPA and MARACs) and secure information sharing with Fire & Rescue Services.   

Better Health and Adult Social Care Integration  GCSX provides a secure email facility that enables local authorities to securely share Patient Identifiable Data with NHSmail users  (PCTs, Acute Trusts, GPs etc) in order to improve existing joint working arrangements in areas such as bed management, hospital  discharge, unscheduled care and hospital at home initiatives. In addition DWP is looking to enable access to N3 applications via  GCSX and remove the current requirement for separate N3 connectivity.   

Better Children’s Services  By enabling secure access to systems such as Contact Point, the Common Assessment Framework (eCAF) and Free School Meals  (FSM) and providing secure email between local authorities and key partners such as the Family Courts, GCSX provides the  potential for local authorities to improve information sharing with key partners in order to safeguard children.   

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 33


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

Improving the Management of Citizen Changes of Circumstance  GCSX will provide the secure channel for local authorities to engage in the Tell Us Once programme, which aims to radically  improve the provision of government services by enabling citizen information to be securely and electronically shared across  government via access to the Tell Use Once ‘hub’ and secure email.   

More Effective Government Estate Management  GCSX is enabling the Office of Government Commerce to share the full dataset contained in its central database of civil estate  properties, land holdings and occupations (e‐PIMS). This will lead to greater cooperation between central and local government  and exploitation of the opportunities for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the wider government estate.   

Supporting Civil Contingencies  GCSX enables organisations to securely communicate electronically via email and by making it possible to browser‐access shared  emergency planning and instant response applications both locally and nationally. One such application is the National Resilience  Extranet (NRE) that will be available to local authorities over GCSX soon.   

Improving Joint Working  The ability to access central government data systems from a local authority building via a GCSX connection will not only enable  local authority staff to access useful and reliable data efficiently and securely but will also enable central government staff to  operate within and deliver services from local authority buildings. This will enable the provision of multiple services to citizens  from a single location – thereby improving the ability to deliver end to end services, tailored to the citizen, from initial point of  contact through to service delivery and facilitating more efficient joint working between government departments and local  authorities.   

Shared Services  A recent Gartner study concluded that GCSX offers good value for money and in certain scenarios may offer the most efficient  option for the provision of shared service infrastructure at both the local and national level. 

   

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

 

Page 34


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

8.  Government Connect Benefits Realisation Fund – Local Authority Pilots  See the I&DeA website for full details: www.idea.gov.uk     Project 

Description  

Bristol City Council 

Without secure email, the trading standards community in the South West can neither  share ‘restricted’ intelligence with enforcement colleagues and law enforcement  partners nor access specialist intelligence databases.  

Trading standards and intelligence  sharing in the South West  (SWERCOTS) 

However, the advent of GCSX secure email dramatically transforms the teams’  dynamics by enabling secure email and providing secure access to specialist databases.  Teams can now target effective enforcement in partnership with other local, regional  and national services and law enforcement agencies.   This new collaborative and intelligence led approach should make the lives of rogue  traders, loan sharks, fraudsters and other criminals targeting the vulnerable much  harder – and the lives of residents much safer.  

Conwy County Borough  Council  Joint Asset Recovery Database (JARD)  

The government’s ‘Taking Profit Out of Crime’ initiative helps councils, the Home Office  and other partners to recover money from crimes covered by the Proceeds of Crime  Act. Data is held centrally in the Joint Asset Recovery Database (JARD).   Conwy County Borough Council has been leading recovery activity in its area –  currently working on behalf of itself, 11 other councils, the DVLA and the Illegal Money  Laundering Unit.   GCSX will facilitate secure remote access to JARD for Conwy’s team ‐ enabling roll out  of more efficient electronic processes and delivering immediate savings from cutting  the need for officers to make frequent trips to London to access information in person  and attend court.  

Dartford Borough Council   Kent Connects Kudos – tackling crime  and antisocial behaviour  

Kent Connects’ KUDOS (Kent Universal Data Output System) project is exploring how  secure data sharing can be enabled in order to streamline joint working between  partners to help tackle crime, antisocial behaviour (ASB) and drug abuse in Kent and  Medway. 

 

The police, fire and rescue authority, local councils, primary care trusts and others  work together in the area through local crime and disorder partnerships (CDRPs). Each  agency has its own IT and data recording systems but has a duty to share its data.  Kudos is using GCSX to enable standardised, secure data sharing and underpin  operational planning. 

Devon County Council, on  behalf of the Devon  ePartnership 

Devon’s councils are working together to pin down an ‘accredited and affordable  model for enabling secure access’ to council systems for Flexible Working initiatives –  which enable normally office based staff in partner councils to work from home or  from a trusted partner site, such as an NHS site. However, ensuring access to a secure  office environment and secure access to GCSX from the many different desktop, laptop  and PDA devices used by staff is proving difficult.  

Flexible Working 

During the CoCo approval processes the partnership encountered a variety of protocols  across government departments for secure access to GCSX. The current project will  analyse, and attempt to synchronise, identified policies in order to develop a standard,  affordable and accredited working solution to enable flexible working for all  partnership councils.  

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 35


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

Dudley Metropolitan  Borough Council  Business Crime Partnership 

Dudley Borough Business Crime Partnership Limited is a private, not‐for‐profit  company set up by the council in a bid to reduce crime, the fear of crime, and  antisocial behaviour in local business centres.  Implementation of a secure GCSX connection will enable the council and partnership to  securely share sensitive information with West Midlands Police and the Crown  Prosecution Service.   It will become possible to send pictures, crime details and criminal backgrounds in real‐ time safely via GCSX so that prolific offenders can be swiftly targeted in the business  centres covered by the partnership.   

Great Manchester Public  Protection Partnership  (GMPP)  Business Compliance – Regulatory  Services   

Ten Greater Manchester authorities and the Fire and Rescue Service have formed the  Greater Manchester Public Protection Partnership (GMPPP) to transform regulatory  services in the region.    The partnership is creating a radical new model to assess business compliance across  all disciplines ‐ Trading Standards, Environmental Health, Licensing and Fire Safety ‐  with a simple e‐enabled assessment tool utilising a harmonised risk assessment  system. The methodology for securely sharing this data across the partnership – and  Greater Manchester Police, the Health & Safety Executive and the Food Standards  Agency ‐ is underpinned by GCSX.   The project aims to deliver efficiency savings and reduce unnecessary inspections; it  will also enable expensive resources to be targeted at high risk and rogue businesses to  deliver higher levels of public protection.  

Halton Borough Council  ‘Place shaping’ through GIS data  sharing   

Halton Borough Council has little information available beyond its own borough  boundary to either help with citizen enquiries or facilitate business planning.   The project aims to rectify that by formulating a means of securely sharing and using  standard geographic information between Liverpool City Region Sustainable  Community Strategy partners. Data will be in a standard format and be capable of  being used directly within each partner’s existing corporate GIS.  This aim is to share socio‐economic, crime, demographic and land use planning  information between partner authorities ‐ Halton, Liverpool, Wirral, Sefton, St Helens  and Knowsley ‐ plus other more general information sets such as environmental  monitoring and property.  

Hampshire County Council on  behalf of the Hampshire and  Isle of Wight Partnership  Exploring a regional approach to  employee authentication  

On behalf of the Hampshire and Isle of Wight IT Managers’ Group, Hampshire County  Council is investigating whether the national Employee Authentication Service (EAS)  can be used as a common ‘strong’ authentication service for national, partnership and  local working. GCSX and its ability to provide secure network links between local  authorities and to EAS is an essential component of the design.   Hampshire believes that it is feasible to develop a standard authentication service  offering capable of being either used directly or replicated as appropriate by any local  authority to strongly authenticate their employees to any EAS service or local partner  network.  Ultimately this should provide a key enabler for service transformation through  breaking down the barriers between partner systems and support flexible working  without compromising security. This will promote the take‐up of shared services by  making them available more efficiently and cost‐effectively. 

    © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 36


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

Lancashire Council  (Lancashire Constabulary &  Police)  Antisocial behaviour data sharing in  Lancashire  

 

A consortium of partners– including Lancashire County Council and Lancashire Police  (project sponsor and lead respectively), London Borough of Barking and Dagenham,  Newcastle City Council, North Lincolnshire Safer Neighbourhoods Partnership, and  Somerset County Council ‐ has started a project to help deal more effectively with  antisocial behaviour (ASB)  The consortium aims to build and test a secure ‘pipe’ (data connection) for data  sharing; gain government approval for switching it on; and then write and test XML  schemas (templates for recording data).  This will join the two main secure environments that police and local authorities use –  the GCSX network and the Police National Network (PNN) – to enable ‘almost life‐time’  swapping of information about ASB. Thus enabling ASB to be identified, tracked and  dealt with far more swiftly than at present. 

Lichfield District Council  Business data sharing in the West  Midlands  

Business Matters aims to demonstrate that by applying data standards to core data  about businesses, data can be shared in ways that will improve efficiency both for  business and the public sector.   Project partners Lichfield (lead authority), Solihull, Dudley and Business Link West  Midlands, believe that sharing accurate, up‐to‐date data will bring major benefits to  many service areas. The GCSX secure network enables the project to move from this  theoretical model of data sharing to actual deployment.  Partners will be able to share a single ‘version of the truth’ about businesses in the  West Midlands, thus facilitating better delivery of business support and regulatory  services. Businesses should get more focused and targeted support, and public sector  partners will be able to work in a joined up and more efficient way. 

London Borough of Islington  No Recourse to Public Funds 

 

Islington aims to develop a database and information sharing process for social services  to inform care provision for people with ‘No Resource to Public Funds’ (NRPF) – for  example, asylum seekers and failed asylum seekers, people who have entered the UK  on visas and, in some cases, European Economic Area nationals who are destitute in  the UK.   This ambitious project aims to address the information gap and revolutionise the way  the NRPF client group is managed by local authorities. It will also develop a national  NRPF database in partnership with the UK Border Agency (UKBA) to record who is  being supported, why, and by which local authority. This will be accessible via GCSX.  A steering group of six authorities (Birmingham, Bradford, Brighton and Hove, Glasgow,  Islington and Manchester) is working with representatives from the UKBA and the  NRPF Network.  

London Trading Standards  Authority (LOTSA)   Trading Standards and Regional  Intelligence in London 

London Trading Standards (LoTSA) has its own regional intelligence unit providing  services to all London boroughs, requiring the sharing and exchange of information.  Information is shared through the filing of ‘5x5x5’ intelligence reports by trading  standards officers within London Boroughs. Access to secure email and a connector  from existing case management systems to a national database will greatly enhance  the service. GCSX now forms a base on which to develop a working connector between  local case management systems and LoTSA, enabling electronic receipt and processing  of 5x5x5 reports.  

      © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 37


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

North Kesteven District  Council, on behalf of the  Lincolnshire Public Sector  Working Group   Customer Data Hub 

Lincolnshire County Council is creating a single, trusted and complete view of the  county’s customers in a new Customer Data Hub (CDH). This central repository of  accurate, up‐to‐date data will be shared with the district councils.  Connected to the national ‘Tell Us Once’ initiative, the project aims to use a common  infrastructure ‐ based on GCSX ‐ across the county to improve information transfer. A  common messaging format will be agreed to notify public sector authorities of  residents’ changes of circumstances, along with data sharing protocols and governance  processes around data management and data quality.   In a future phase of development, CDH will provide Lincolnshire’s ‘change of  circumstance’ service to the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) via GCSX.  

Plymouth City Council on  behalf of Devon ePartnership  and Isles of Scilly  Civil Contingencies/Emergency  Planning 

Rochdale Metropolitan  Borough Council   Blue Badge Scheme  

Recent events in the Devon ePartnership area – including the grounding of the MV  Napoli off the East Devon coast and the flooding in Boscastle and Ottery St Mary –  exposed communication frailties among Devon’s public services and highlighted the  need for a standard, secure approach to both planning and operational contingencies  between organisations.  Building on work by Plymouth and Isles of Scilly civil contingencies teams, the project  encompasses sensitive emergency planning data which can be shared among agencies  via a secure infrastructure ‐ GC Mail over GCSX. It involves all 11 Devon councils, plus  Cornwall Council and the Isles of Scilly, police, ambulance and fire services, as well as  primary care trusts (PCTs) and regional agencies.  The Blue Badge Scheme for disabled parking provides a vital lifeline to disabled people.  A marked increase in Rochdale’s elderly population is reflected in the rise in its Badge  holders from 673,000 in 1987 to over 2.3 million in 2007. Two‐thirds of badge holders  are over the age of 65 and 55% of them do not use public transport.  Rochdale is seizing the opportunity presented in the Department for Transport’s  Reform Strategy to establish a secure data‐sharing system.   With the ultimate vision of creating a national database with local access, Rochdale will  use GCSX to give all Greater Manchester and North West authorities access to vehicle  driver data.   This will not only facilitate the issue of badges but also significantly enhance fraud  enforcement. It will also enable secure data exchange with local authority partners  such as the NHS, police authorities and DWP.  

South Lakeland District  Council  Information sharing to facilitate a  needs led approach to older people 

Starting with service provision for older people, South Lakeland District Council is  piloting a new approach to delivering efficient and effective services – ‘Need‐Led  Service Design’. By understanding customers’ needs, and then designing and wrapping  services around these needs, the council felt its services, and those of its partners,  could be better targeted and more effective.  The pilot will be underpinned by secure data sharing via GCSX across all relevant parts  of the public sector working with the elderly.  Partners, including NHS Cumbria, Cumbria County Council, Cumbria Fire and Rescue,  Cumbria Constabulary and Age Concern, are keen to share information operationally.  This will help them to provide services seamlessly and proactively to older people on a  preventative basis, spotting issues before they become problems and keeping older  people healthier and independent for longer.  

    © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 38


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

Sunderland City Council  Births ‐ Tell Us Once 

Sunderland City Council is exploring how parents’ experience of the public sector on  the birth of a new child can be improved. From supporting new parents by improving  access to child benefit and other child related benefits to developing secure and  appropriate information sharing across the Local Strategic Partnership, Sunderland  believes that more can be done to deliver joined up services for new babies and their  families.  The city is working with HMRC’s Child Benefit Service, South of Tyne and Wear Primary  Care Trust, City Hospitals Sunderland Foundation NHS Trust, Northumbria Police and  Gentoo Housing to explore how a secure infrastructure like GCSX can underpin  improved data capture and data sharing.  The project is linked to both the DWP ‘Tell Us Once’ and DCSF ‘ContactPoint’ projects. 

Torbay Council on behalf of  Devon ePartnership  Safeguarding Children ‐ GC Mail 

The Devon ePartnership surveyed all Devon councils to identify user communities for  secure email, the volume of such mail, and current methods of transfer. The results  clearly demonstrated that secure email was unacceptably being transmitted via  insecure mechanisms, such as the internet. Significant volumes of secure data were  also being shared between Devon councils, government agencies, police, health and  voluntary sector organisations.  Three Devon councils – Torbay, Plymouth and Devon itself – subsequently identified a  requirement for secure email for their Safeguarding Children teams. Torbay Council has  already piloted Government Connect’s GC Mail for its team.  The project aims to document achievements/benefits to date, expand the solution  further into the secure email community for Torbay team, and then roll out the  solution for Plymouth City Council and Devon County Council. 

 

See the I&DeA website for further details: www.idea.gov.uk    

 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 39


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

Appendix I – Response: Quick survey  i.  Councils (Quick survey) – Total: 105 frontline organisations    Aberdeen City Council  Aberdeenshire Council  Ashfield District Council  Basingstoke & Deane Borough Council  Bath & North East Somerset Council  Blaby District Council  Blackburn with Darwen Borough Council  Bolton Council  Bradford City Council  Broxbourne Borough Council  Camden Drug Action Team  Camden London Borough  Carmarthenshire County Council  Cotswold District Council  Craven District Council  Crawley Borough Council  Denbighshire County Council  Derby City Council  Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council (x2)  Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council  Durham County Council  Ealing Council  East Hertfordshire Council  East Renfrewshire Council  East Staffordshire Borough Council  East Sussex County Council  Fareham Borough Council  Fenland District Council  Fife Council  Flintshire Local Health Board  Great Yarmouth Borough Council  Hackney London Borough  Hambleton District Council  Hampshire County Council  Haringey Council (x3)  Havering London Borough  Herefordshire Council  Herefordshire Primary Care Trust  Hertfordshire County Council  High Peak District Council  Hull City Council  Humberside Police Force  Huntingdonshire District Council  Hyndburn Borough Council  Isle of Wight Council  Kettering Borough Council  Kingston Upon Thames Royal Borough Council  Kirklees Council  Lancashire County Council  Leicestershire Fire and Rescue Service 

Lewisham London Borough  Lincolnshire County Council  Lincolnshire Fire and Rescue Service  Liverpool City Council  Malvern Hills District Council  Manchester Primary Care Trust (x2)  Newham London Borough  Newham Primary Care Trust  North Ayrshire Council  Northampton Borough Council  Nottingham City Council  Nottinghamshire County Council  Nuneaton & Bedworth Borough Council (x2)  Portsmouth City Council  Preston District Council  Richmond Upon Thames London Borough  Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council  Rushmoor Borough Council  Rutland County Council  Ryedale Borough Council  Sefton Council  Somerset County Council  South Cambridgeshire District Council  South Gloucestershire Council  South Kesteven District Council  South Oxfordshire District Council  South Wales Police Force  Southampton City Council  Southwark Council  Staffordshire County Council  Suffolk County Council  Surrey County Council  Sutton London Borough  Telford & Wrekin Council  Torbay Council  Torfaen Local Health Board  Tyne and Wear Fire & Rescue Service  Waltham Forest Council  Welwyn Hatfield Borough Council  West Midlands Police Authority  Westminster City Council (x3)  Wiltshire Fire & Rescue Service  Winchester City Council  Wirral Council  Woking Borough Council  Wokingham Borough Council  York (City of) Council (x2) 

   

      © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 40


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

  ii.  Job titles (Quick survey)    Acting Head of Revenues  Application Developer  Assistant Chief Constable   Assistant Customer Services Manager  Assistant Director Commissioning and Performance  Assistant Director of Joint Committee (care and health)  Assistant Director of Strategy & Performance  Assistant Systems Officer  Branch Manager for Corporate Development  Business Development Manager  Business Rates & Revenues Manager  Change Consultant  Chief Executive (x3)  Chief Fire Officer  Chief Information Officer  Chief Revenues and Benefits Officer  Client Services Officer  Commissioning & Performance Manager  Commissioning Manager ‐ Community Care Services  Community Information Unit Manager  Corporate Improvement Adviser  Corporate Strategy Manager  Council Solicitor  County Manager Access and Information  Customer & Information Services Manager  Customer Services Manager (Resources Directorate)  Customer Services Manager (x3)  Data Protection & Information Security Officer  Deputy Chief Fire Officer  Development Plans Manager  Director of Adult & Community Services  Director of Adult Social Service & Housing  Director of Children's Social Care  Director of Corporate Planning  Director of ICT & Business Transformation  Director of Information Communication & Technology  Director of Performance & People  Drugs Team Leader  E Enabler Practitioner Leader (Quality & Performance)  Executive Head of Customer Contact  Financial Adviser  Financial Services & Audit Manager  FOI Administration  GIS Manager  GIS Manager / LLGP Custodian  Government Connect Lead  Head of Billing Services  Head of Customer Services  Head of Environmental Health Services 

 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Head of ICT  Head of Improvement and Inclusions  Head of Income & ICT  Head of IT (x4)  Head of Local Land Charges & LLPG Manager  Head of Performance & Efficiency  Head of Revenues and Benefits  Head of Service ‐ Children & Families  Housing Services Manager (x2)  ICT Applications & Infrastructure Manager  ICT Consultant  ICT Systems Manager (Public Protection)  Information Governance Manager  Information Manager  Information Security Manager  Information Services Officer  Interim Head of Public Protection  IT Project Officer  IT Strategy Manager  Joint Commission Manager for Disability Services  Library Operations Manager  LLPG Custodian  Office Manager ‐ Council Tax & Benefits  Performance & Project Manager  Performance Management Officer  Performance Officer (x2)  Planning Support Services Manager  Principal Benefit Officer  Principal IT Analyst  Principal Officer ‐ Children's Commissioning  Principal Trading Standards Officer  Procurement and Commercial Manager  Project Manager  Project Manager ‐ Executive Leadership Team  Revenues  Revenues & Benefits Manager  Revenues Manager (x2)  Revenues Officer  Scrutiny & Policy Officer (Information Management)  Senior ICT Development Officer  Senior Solicitor, Policy & Advice Team  Service Development Manager  Service Performance Manager  Strategic Performance Manager  Team Leader, Natural Environment  Waste Policy & Amenities Manager 

   

 

Page 41


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

Appendix II – Response: In‐depth questionnaire  i. Councils (In‐depth questionnaire) – Total: 103 frontline organisations     Aintree University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust  Babergh District Council  Barking & Dagenham London Borough (5)  Barnsley Metropolitan Borough Council  Bolton Council  Bournemouth & Poole Teaching Primary Care Trust  Bracknell Forest Borough Council  Brent London Borough  Brighton & Hove City Council  Bromley London Borough  Broxtowe Borough Council  Chelmsford Borough Council (2)  Conwy County Borough Council  Corby Borough Council  Darlington Borough Council  Derby City Council  Derbyshire County Council  Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council  Durham & Darlington Fire & Rescue Service  East Hampshire District Council  East Sussex County Council  Eastbourne Borough Council  Eastleigh Borough Council  Edinburgh (City of) Council  Fenland District Council  Forest of Dean District Council  Greenwich Council  Halton Borough Council  Hammersmith & Fulham London Borough  Havering London Borough  Hertfordshire County Council  King's Lynn & West Norfolk Borough Cncl  Kirklees Council  Leeds City Council (2)  Luton Borough Council  Mansfield District Council  Midlothian Council  Monmouthshire County Council  Newport City Council  North Hertfordshire District Council  North Kesteven District Council  North Norfolk District Council  North Somerset Council (3)  North Tyneside Council  Northamptonshire Police Authority  Norwich City Council (2) 

Nottingham City Council  Oxfordshire County Council  Pendle Borough Council  Poole Borough Council (2)  Reading Borough Council (2)  Renfrewshire Council  Richmondshire District Council  (2)  Sefton Council  Shepway District Council  Solihull Metropolitan Borough Council  South Cambridgeshire District Council  South Gloucestershire Council  South Lakeland District Council  South Norfolk Council  Southend‐on‐Sea Borough Council  Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council (2)  Suffolk County Council  Sunderland City Council  Swansea Local Health Board  Tamworth Borough Council  Test Valley Borough Council  Thanet District Council (2)  Tonbridge & Malling Borough Council  Tower Hamlets Council  Trafford Council (2)  Wakefield City Council (2)  Walsall Council  Wandsworth Borough Council  Warrington Borough Council  Warwick District Council  West Sussex County Council  Wigan Council  Wiltshire Council  Winchester City Council  Windsor & Maidenhead Royal Borough Council (2)  Wirral Council  Wokingham Borough Council  York (City of) Council (3) 

                 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 42


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

ii. Job titles (In‐depth questionnaire) 

 

 

 

 

Application & Information Manager  Assistant Director of Adult Social Services  Assistant Director of Finance & Resources  Assistant Director, Democratic & Customer Services  Benefits Customer Services Manager  Benefits Manager (x4)  Benefits Services Manager, Housing  Benefits Supervisor  Business Analyst  Business Change Group Manager  Business Systems Manager  Call Centre Supervisor  Change Manager  Chief Executive  Chief Officer ‐ Information Services  Community Care Team Manager  Contact Point Implementation Manager  Corporate Director Adults & Community & Deputy Chief Executive  Corporate Information & Complaints Officer  Corporate Information Manager (x2)  Corporate Records Manager  Council Tax Manager (x2)  Councillor  Councillor ‐  Deputy Leader  Councillor ‐ Education, Children & Young People Portfolio  Councillor ‐ Executive Member for Children & Young People's  Services  Customer Access Manager  Customer Relations Officer  Customer Services Manager  Data Protection & Information Security Officer  Data Security  Director of ICT & E‐Government  Divisions Manager for Revenues and Benefits  Environmental Health Principal  Finance, Control & Support Manager  Fire Control Data Manager  Geographical Data Manager  GIS & Mapping Manager & LLPG Custodian  Head of Benefits  Head of Children's Services & Safeguarding  Head of Contracts & Procurement  Head of Customer Contact  Head of Department  Head of ICT 

Head of IT  Head of IT Strategy  Head of Performance & Scrutiny  Head of Revenues & Benefits  Head of Technology Services  ICT Project Manager (x2)  Information Governance Manager (x3)  Information Officer  IT Business Integration Manager  IT Infrastructure Development Manager  IT Systems Administrator  IT Systems Team Leader  Land Charges Manager/Officer (x4)  Management Consultant ‐  E‐Government  Management Information & ICT Systems Manager  Member ‐ Portfolio Holder for Children's Services, Education &  Youth Services  Partnership Coordinator ‐ Unified Assessment Project  Performance Improvement Officer  Performance Review Inspector  Performance Review Officer  Planning Services Development Officer  Policy & Performance Manager  Primary Care Performance Officer  Principal Environmental Health Officer  Principal Housing Benefit officer  Principal IT Officer  Principal Service Development Manager  Principal Trading Standards Officer  Project Coordinator (Customer Services & Partnerships)  Project Manager ‐ Government Connect  Revenue & Benefits Manager (x5)  Senior IT Support Analyst  Senior Planning & Policy Officer  Senior Support Officer  Senior Trading Standards Officer and Chief Inspector of Weights  and Measures (x2)  Service Director ‐ Strategic Procurement & E‐Services  Systems Development Manager  Systems Support Team Leader  Team Manager  Technical Team Leader  Trading Standards Manager (x2) 

 

 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 43


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

Appendix III – The Questionnaires  i. Quick Survey  Q1.   Do you share sensitive information about citizens with other public sector organisations? (eg local authorities, health,  fire, police, central government).     Q2.  Do you ever share this data by post/paper/solid media? 

  

Q3.  Do you ever share this data by secure network communications? (eg GCSX) 

 

Q4.  Are all staff regularly trained regarding the sensitivity of citizen information and the importance of adhering to correct  procedures for its handling?     Q5.  Do you feel there is a need to share sensitive citizen data in order to improve the quality and efficiency of public service  delivery?     Q6.  Do you feel that accessing databases in other public sector organisations would improve/help the way you deliver  services?  (eg local authorities, health, fire, police, central government).     Q7.  Would trusted and secure data sharing be essential in order to deliver 'Total Place' public services?   

ii. In‐Depth Questionnaire 

   

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 44


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

 

   

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 45


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

  (cont’d next page) 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

 

Page 46


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

 

  (cont’d next page) 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

 

Page 47


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

 

  (cont’d next page) 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 48


Connecting the Public Sector   

2009 

 

 

  © Informed Publications Ltd, 2009 

Page 49


Connecting the Public Sector