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[Ebook pdf] The Resistance

The Resistance Gemma Malley *Download PDF | ePub | DOC | audiobook | ebooks

#1504456 in Books 2010-02-02 2010-02-02Original language:EnglishPDF # 1 7.53 x 22.86 x 5.76l, .55 #File Name: 1599904594336 pages | File size: 55.Mb Gemma Malley : The Resistance before purchasing it in order to gage whether or not it would be worth my time, and all praised The Resistance: 0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. I felt like the writer wrapped up the story with this book ...By D PriceAfter escaping from Grange Hall and earning their freedom from the Authorities, Peter and Anna are trying hard to assimilate into life on the outside. While still working covertly for the Underground, Peter agrees to take a job working for his grandfather at Pincent Pharma. The horrors they faced at Gange Hall are nothing compared to what's


going on behind the doors of Pincent Pharma and Peter and the Underground enlist the help of a new ally to take down this organization once and for all.This book focuses mainly on Peter and his struggles with the Declaration, life after Grange Hall and his relationships with Anna and his family. Once again, I felt like the writer wrapped up the story with this book but I can't wait to see what issues Anna and Peter face in the next book0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. Better than the firstBy Rachel FisherTitle: The Resistance (The Declaration Trilogy)Author: Gemma MalleyRating: 4 StarsMy ReviewI stand corrected. I "resisted" reading the rest of this trilogy despite enjoying the first book (The Declaration) and I'm not sure why. I guess I wasn't entranced enough to put it higher on my TBR list. However, it floated to the top eventually and I finished it off with satisfaction and chagrin that I waited so long. I liked it better than the first.The fact that the cover was a man's face should have told me that it would focus heavily on Peter's perspective, rather than Anna's, but I still found this a surprise. At first, I was annoyed because I'd enjoyed Anna's perspective, but as the story progressed I realized why it had to focus so heavily on Peter.I also was unsold on Jude, to start with. His character was a little grating, but given his life circumstances, you could see how he might turn out that way.Without giving any spoilers, I can say that the fact that Malley held back the actual words of the Declaration until this book was a good move. Very calculated in its build-up. You've heard so much about it and when it finally appears, it's as disgusting as you had imagined, and more so. Let's just say that it will be familiar, and that is what is so twisted...that's all I'm gonna say.I think that the increased understanding of Longevity and what it takes society to support it is well-done. I do like the science-y aspects of books (as you know), and this book had more of that aspect. I also think the world-building was better in this one, seeing as the first spent the majority of its time within the confines of Grange Hall. This time, you get a sense of all the cogs in the machine...how this dystopia developed. I always like that. Even in The Hunger Games, I was kind of annoyed that Collins never explained what had caused society's downfall in the first place (though I overlooked it bc the rest of it was so good).I do think that the villains are a little one-dimensional, with the exception of Dr. Edwards. I liked the development of his character and the story behind it. It gave me more of that sense of, "How did we get here?"I resonate with the questions being asked in this series and really want to see where she goes with it from here. I think it was mostly very well-paced and kept me wanting to learn more (although the biggest plot twist I saw coming a mile away, I have to say). I also liked the way that it got steadily more horrifying, deepening my investment in the heros.I am now looking forward to the third book and will definitely give it a higher priority on my TBR. I can't wait too long to see how it all plays out! (On a side note, it feels very British at times, which makes sense bc Malley is British. That being said, I wondered if she would cringe to hear her beloved characters speaking inside my head with American accents! LOL.)0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. One of the best trilogies ever!!!!By IntelGalOne of the best trilogies ever. Couldn't put down all 3 books - hooked immediately and so vivid you can picture every character. I have even re-read the entire trilogy again over the years. Why is this trilogy and author not better known?? Why aren't there more reviews?? The year is 2140. Peter and Anna are living freely on the Outside, trying hard to lead normal lives, but unable to leave the terror of the Declaration--and their experiences as surpluses--completely behind them. Peter is determined to infiltrate Pharma Corporation, which claims to have a new drug in the works; "Longevity +" will not just stop the ravages of old age, it might just reverse the aging process. But what Peter and Anna discover behind the walls of Pharma is so nightmarish it makes the prison of their childhood seem like a sanctuary: for it seems the only way to regain youth is to harvest the young. From School Library JournalGrade 7 UpIn this gripping, stand-alone sequel to The Declaration (Bloomsbury, 2007), teenagers Anna and Peter have escaped Grange Hall, a prisonlike dormitory for Surpluseschildren living in the United Kingdom in 2140 where childbirth is illegal and longevity drugs allow people to live forever. Anna's parents were overjoyed to have her back but were forced to commit suicide ("a life for a life") in order to give Anna and her baby brother a chance to become Legals. Her boyfriend, Peter, accepts a job working at Pincent Pharma, the Longevity drug company owned by his wicked grandfather, in order to help the Underground (a resistance group) destroy it. His unexpected ally is his Legal teenage half brother Jude, a talented computer hacker. The author addresses the moral and ethical implications of immortality in this dystopian novel, making it a great choice for group discussions. The writing style is not particularly lyrical but the fast pace and exciting plot make it a page-turner that will appeal to graduates of Margaret Peterson Haddix's "Shadow Children" series (S S).Sharon Rawlins, New Jersey State Library, Trenton Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.From BooklistWith the advent of a drug called Longevity, people have achieved the impossible: eternal life. But when people live forever, there is no room for new life, so those who take Longevity relinquish reproductiona life for a life. Those who dont are arrested, their children taken to Surplus halls, where they atone for their parents by becoming Useful. In The Declaration (2007), Surplus Peter and Surplus Anna escaped from one of these halls, but their problems were only beginning. Now Legal, they work for the Underground, and at their request, Peter joins Pincent Pharma under his hated grandfather, the developer of Longevity. Pressured to take the drug and confronted with challenging arguments, Peters finds that his mission is becoming a minefield of temptation and self-doubtand then he learns the horrifying


truth about new and improved Longevity. While the pure evil of Peters grandfatherundercuts Malleys otherwise nuanced presentation, she explores the far-reaching effects of Longevity with harrowing accuracy. Peter and Anna, both fighting for their right to be alive, are sympathetic focal points from which to tell this compelling story. Grades 912. --Krista Hutley Well-written dystopian thriller . . . dramatic and heartfelt * Sunday Times * Well written and thought-provoking * School Librarian *

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