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EDITORIAL

Leapfrog: The way ahead t the outset, here is wishing all our stakeholders a Great New ‘Leap’ Year ahead! As the domestic market matures, spanning the entire value chain, with expanding ecosystem of start-ups, and rising demand from the emerging sectors, one can fairly look forward to the way ahead in which India can potentially become the fastest-growing economy on earth. Simply speaking, this promises to present unparallelled opportunities to transform the lives of millions, and thereby attain an inclusive growth.

A

In retrospect, the year 2011 was quite eventful for the Indian plastics sector and the country, in general. Amid sweeping mega global trends – from the Jasmine Revolution to the unprecedented stress on the Euro Zone and their rising ricochets across the globe – India stood out as one of the few key growth markets, albeit with tapered rate of economic ascent. More importantly, there was a striking shift in the global focus on the sub-continent – not as a mere vendor but as a strategic partner. This signifies India’s advantage not only in terms of better cost proposition, but also lean and efficient business model as well as faster time-to-market capability. Given this scenario, it will be interesting to see if the industry can adopt the approach to leapfrog rather than merely catch up in the race ahead to offer greater precision, productivity, energy efficiency and flexibility by virtue of next-gen products and processes. That said, it is imperative to rapidly ramp up the much-needed infrastructure, especially power and land; access to capital & technology; skilled human resources as well as put into action a conducive policy environment for the Indian industry.

Editorial Advisory Board A E Ladhabhoy Plastics Technologist

Dr Sushil K Verma Former Director General, CIPET

Dr Swapan K Dhara Regional Technical Head, Basell Polyolefins India Pvt Ltd

Scheduled at this juncture, Plastindia 2012 is all set to showcase some of the latest innovations in products & technology, chart strategic growth plans and boost the overall business prospects. This Special Edition of ‘Modern Plastics & Polymers’ reflects all the above and more, with a focussed mix of the past, present and future. All these should lead to smarter technology, precise pricing, superior customer service and proficient performance for the plastics & polymer industries. Believe, you will value this edition as much as we enjoyed putting it together. And, we will be glad to hear your opinions, observations, etc on this and beyond. Our co-ordinates at Plastindia 2012 are Hall: ODP1B & Stall: 11. Look forward to see you there!

Mohan K Jain MD, Indoplast & Past President, AIPMA

P P Kharas Chairman, Ecoplast

Raman M Patel Chairman, Industrial Products Mfg Co

Manas R Bastia manas@infomedia18.in

Vijay Merchant President, Polycraft

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

13


CONTENT S

155

173 Automotive plastics ............................. 174

Extrusion techniques .....156

FRP in automotives ........................ 178

Special Focus

Interface - Aschak Damani............. 184 Extrusion challenges......160

Roundtable ...................................... 188 PVDF fluoropolymer process aids .. 190

Interface - Sunil Jain.....166

Injection moulding .......................... 194

Insight & Outlook PVC pipes .....................168

Designing playground equipment ... 198 Six Sigma methodology .................. 204

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 155

24

Newsmakers of 2011

47

Event Focus: Plastindia 2012

48 50 56 60 62 64 70

Event Preview Interface: Ashok Goel, President, Plastindia Foundation Interface: Daniel Kueng, CEO, Osec Interface: Liao Zhengpin, Honorary Chairman, CPPIA Interface: Chao Yuen-Chuan, CEO and President, TAITRA Industry Insights: Indian plastics market

80

Processing Machinery

88

Research & Development

98

Quality Assurance

106 117 132 136 142

Raw Materials

Sustainability Product Showcase: Germany-Austria-Switzerland China Taiwan India

In Conversation With

152

K M Shah, Managing Director, NU-VU Conair Pvt Ltd

Automation Trends

208

Injection moulding machinery: Optimising equipment efficiency

Energy Management

210

Motor efficiency: Getting to heart of the matter

212

Reducing carbon footprint: A business imperative

214

Biodegradable plastics: Integrating business with environment

216

Injection moulding process: Key advantages in niche applications

222 224 226

Automotive Plastics India - 2011: Time to leapfrog into the future Engineering Expo Pune 2011: Synergising the manufacturing prowess Engineering Expo Chennai 2011: Capturing the southern stronghold

Policies & Regulations Strategy Tips & Tricks Event Report

Highlights of Next Edition

Facility Visit

170

Polymechplast Machines Ltd Scaling new heights of quality

REGU L AR SEC T I ON S Editorial ............................... 13 Book Review ...................... 228

Details on pg no. 220,235

Special Focus: Packaging Insight & Outlook: Polymer Compounding

Cover design: Sharad Bharekar Note: ` stands for Indian rupee, $ stands for US dollar and ÂŁ stands for UK pound, unless mentioned otherwise

News, Views & Analysis ...... 32 Products.............................. 229 Technology & Innovation .... 42 List of Products.................. 250 Event List........................... 220 List of Advertisers .............. 258

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

FOUNDER & EDITOR, NETWORK 18 Raghav Bahl PRESIDENT & EDITORIAL DIRECTOR, TV 18 Senthil Chengalvarayan SENIOR EDITOR Manas R Bastia EDITORIAL TEAM Annabel Dsouza, Swati Sharma, Lionel Alva, Michael Anthony, Abha Mishra, Paskaline Sebastian, Anwesh Koley (Delhi), Avani Jain (Ahmedabad) ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR Varuna Naik DESIGN Sharad Bharekar CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER Mexy Xavier PHOTOGRAPHY Neha Mithbawkar, Joshua Navalkar BUSINESS CONTROLLERS Pukha Dhawan, Lovey Fernandes, Akshata Rane, Deepak Bhatia, Shwetha ME, Jayashree N, Sugandha Kulkarni, Shefali Mahant

PRINTING

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Ananth R Iyer ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGER - PPC Shekhar Khot

PRODUCTION TEAM Dnyaneshwar Goythale, Surekha Karmarkar, Ravikumar Potdar, Ravi Salian, Sanjay Shelar

OVERSEAS CONTACT

CHINA 1001 Tower 3, Donghai Plaza, 1486 Nanjing Road, West, Shanghai 200040, China Tel: +86-21 6289 – 5533 Ext. 368, Fax: +86-21 6247 – 4855 (Craig Shibinsky) Email: craig@ringier.com.hk Ringier Trade Media Ltd HONG KONG 9/F, Cheong Sun Tower, 118 Wing Lok Street, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong Tel: +852 2369 – 8788 Ext. 21, Fax: +852 2869 – 5919 (Octavia Au-Yeung) Email: octavia@ringier.com.hk Ringier Trade Media Ltd TAIWAN Room 3, Fl. 12, No. 303, Chung Ming S. Rd., Taichung, Taiwan Tel: +886-4 2329 – 7318 Ext. 16, Fax: +886-4 2310 – 7167 (Sydney La) Email: sydneylai@ringier.com.hk Ringier Trade Media Ltd GERMANY, AUSTRIA, SWITZERLAND Tel: +41-44 734 0472, Fax: +41 44 734 0680 Email: info@islerannoncen.ch USA Tel: (513) 527-8800 Fax: (513) 527-8801 Email: dhight@gardnerweb.com USA Alfredo Domador, 6505 Blue Lagoon Drive, Suite 430 Miami, FL. 33126, USA Tel: (305) 448-6875, Fax: (305) 448-9942 Ringier Trade Media Ltd

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Printed by Mohan Gajria and published by Lakshmi Narasimhan on behalf of Infomedia 18 Ltd. Senior Editor: Manas R Bastia Printed at Infomedia 18 Ltd, Plot no.3, Sector 7, off Sion-Panvel Road, Nerul, Navi Mumbai 400 706, and published at Infomedia 18 Ltd, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai - 400 028. Modern Plastics & Polymers is registered with the Registrar of Newspapers of India under No. MAHENG / 2008 / 25265. Infomedia 18 Ltd does not take any responsibility for loss or damage incurred or suffered by any subscriber of this magazine as a result of his/her accepting any invitation/offer published in this edition.

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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NEWSMAKERS OF 201 1

Accolade Borealis receives Frost & Sullivan Award

EconCore NV wins Bioplastics Award 2010

( January) Borealis has received the Frost & Sullivan 2010 Global New Product Innovation Award in the category ‘Automotive under the Hood Plastics’. The award recognises the unique capabilities of Borealis Xmod™ GB306SAF polypropylene compounds, which significantly lower system and production costs for automotive system suppliers & manufacturers.

( January) Bioplastics Award 2010 was conferred for the first time during the European Bioplastics Conference in Düsseldorf, Germany. The prestigious award was given to EconCore NV, which offers innovative and cost-efficient honeycomb sandwich structures. The honeycomb cores and skin layers are made from PLA. This considerably reduces weight and materials needed in construction.

Emmbi Polyarns bags SME Excellence Award

Borouge wins Ringier Technology Innovation Award 2011 (October) Borouge received Ringier Technology Innovation Award 2011 for the plastics industry, in Shenzhen, China. It is one of the most influential industrial awards in China. Borouge attributes the award to its latest product RG468MO, a polypropylene random copolymer that offers up to 20 per cent productivity for rigid packaging converting industry.

(November) Emmbi Polyarns Ltd, an established player in the field of woven polyethylene and polypropylene product manufacturing industry, recently bagged the SME Excellence Award at India SME Leadership Summit. The Summit was held on August 26 in Mumbai, organised by SME Chamber of India, and supported by Government of India.

German Diversity award for BASF

Asahi Kasei Plastics gets SPE Innovation Award

(December) BASF received German Diversity Award as ‘Germany’s Most Diverse Employer’ in the category of largescale enterprise. The award was given out by Henkel, business consultancy firm McKinsey and the German business magazine Wirtschaftswoche. It honours employers, individuals and innovative projects that are committed to establishing a working culture of diversity.

(December) Asahi Kasei Plastics North America and Penda Corp shared the stage in Livonia, Michigan, at the Society of Plastics Engineers (SPE) Automotive Innovation Awards Gala with Chrysler Group LLC, winning the ‘Most Innovative Use of Plastics’ award in the Body Exterior category. SPE Automotive Innovation Awards Competition & Gala is the largest and oldest recognition event in the automotive & plastics industries.

Acquisition Rhodia acquires PI Industries’ engineering plastics

Indorama to buy Trevira’s fibre business

(February) Rhodia signed a binding agreement to acquire the engineering plastics business of the Indian company PI Industries Ltd. This transaction supports the group’s aim to increase its share in the Indian polyamide compound market to over 15 per cent by 2015. The transaction includes all assets used and held by PI Polymer; an industrial facility, with R&D capabilities, customer base and logistics network in India.

(March) Thailand’s Indorama Ventures Public Co Ltd (IVL) acquired Trevira GmbH’s polyester staple fibre business. IVL has signed a definitive agreement to seize 75 per cent stake in the company, which operates in Germany and Poland. The remaining 25 per cent would be held by Italy’s privately owned Sinterama SpA, which would be a partner in a joint venture company also to be formed in the second quarter.

Appointment Wilder to run polymers business of Reliance

Marketing Company of Borouge gets new CEO

(April) Indian conglomerate Reliance Industries Ltd has hired veteran petrochemicals executive Warren Wilder to run its polymers business, including its massive polypropylene operations. Wilder, 53, was Managing Director at Malaysian petrochemicals maker Titan Chemical Corp. Wilder’s appointment coincides with Reliance executive Kamal Nanavaty assuming corporate responsibilities in the firm’s petrochemicals business.

(August) Borouge has appointed Wim Roels to lead its Marketing Company (Borouge Pte) based in Singapore. Roels replaces William Yau, who will move to Borealis as Senior Vice President for Commercial Excellence. Roels has extensive experience in production, innovation and business management, to drive growth of Borouge along with Abdulaziz Alhajri, CEO of Abu Dhabi Polymers-Borouge.

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


NEWSMAKERS OF 201 1

Collaboration Kemrock Ind, DSM Composite form JV

Anand Automotive JV plant to manufacture plastic parts

(April) Reinforced polymer composites manufacturer Kemrock Industries and Exports has announced a JV with Netherlands-based DSM Composite Resins. With a plant in Pune, the JV – DSM Kemrock India – targets $ 50-million revenue from the Indian market by 2015. DSM will supply innovative specialised composite resin solutions, and Kemrock will produce high-end composite parts at its Pune plant.

(October) Anand Automotive Systems Ltd started production of plastic components for car OEMs at its JV plant in Chennai. Anand has also set up two JV plants in Chennai and Neemrana with Japan’s Takata Corp to manufacture safety systems, eg, seatbelts, airbags, steering wheels, etc. The Neemrana plant started production in late 2010 and serves Indian automakers. The Chennai plant started operation in 2009.

Expansion Moulder PTI Engineered Plastics starts design unit

L&T Plastics expanding capacity

(March) Injection moulder PTI Engineered Plastics Inc will add to its expertise in product development a stand-alone industrial design firm, PTI Design. Michigan-based PTI, has prototyping, tool production and moulding and is specialised in working with companies on creating & refining new parts. John Budreau is Executive Director of a team of industrial designers at PTI Design.

(April) Indian injection press maker L&T Plastics Machinery Ltd will invest `100 million in its factory to double the capacity. The company is in talks with an Italian machinery maker for jointly manufacturing moulding machines. The Chennai-based company, one of India’s largest plastics equipment makers and a former JV partner of Sumitomo Demag Plastics Machinery GmbH, said its growth has buoyed by the surging demand in India.

SABIC expands polycarbonate capacity in Asia

Cap maker Bericap forays into Indian beer market

( July) The Innovative Plastics strategic business unit of SABIC is adding new production lines of the company’s Lexan* polycarbonate resins and films in Shanghai and Nansha, China. These additions are part of the company’s strategy to support the dynamic growth of key plastics sectors in this region, particularly consumer electronics, electrical, solar, security and automotive industries.

( July) As PET bottle packaging becomes more popular around the world, Bericap is rolling out PET bottle closures into India’s impressive beverage packaging market. To secure the high quality of beer in PET bottles during the shelf-life, Bericap has equipped the closure with an oxygen scavenger absorbing the oxygen in the headspace of the beer bottle.

Dow boosts additive capacity at Grangemouth

GW Plastics to expand silicones division

(September) Dow Plastics Additives (DPA), a business unit of Dow Chemical, is constructing an additional plant to make Methyl Methacrylate-Butadiene-Styrene (MBS)-based additives at its facility in Grangemouth, Scotland. With this expansion, Dow is increasing not only the total capacity, but also technical capabilities of the plant to produce the most sophisticated MBS products in the world.

(November) GW Plastics is expanding its Silicones Division in Royalton, Vermont, to support the increasing demand. The expansion will create an additional 15,000 sq ft, scalable up to 25,000 sq ft, including a new ISO Class 8 clean room for silicone moulding and assembly. The initial expansion will support up to 18 machines. GW expects the expansion to add 25-50 jobs over the next 3-5 years.

Inauguration Norner opens its first subsidiary in India (December) Norner AS, a Norway-based specialised, independent innovation and technology partner for plastics companies, has opened its fist overseas subsidiary in India. Based at New Delhi, Norner Mimir India Pvt Ltd will cater to the fast growing Indian market. The Indian subsidiary was inaugurated at Royal Norwegian Embassy amid prominent personalities from Indian petrochemical & plastics fraternity.

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Bayer MaterialScience inaugurates new polyisocyanates unit in India (April) Bayer MaterialScience inaugurated a manufacturing facility for polyisocyanates at Ankleshwar, Gujarat. The plant will produce Desmodur® N grades based on aliphatic hexamethylene di-isocyanate. These raw materials are used for automotive, industrial and plastics coatings. Desmodur® L grades will be made from aromatic toluene di-isocyanate.


NEWSMAKERS OF 201 1

Investment Borealis invests 17 million for PE in Finland (February) European polyolefin producer Borealis may spend 17 million to upgrade its PE2 Polyethylene (PE) production capacity at Porvoo, Finland. The upgrade includes a new ethylene compressor and monomer purification line. This upgradation is expected to yield a 15 kilo tonne per year increase from the current total 2,40,000 tpa PE production capacity.

BASF to invest in SAP plants in Brazil, China and Malaysia (November) BASF SE, the German-based polymer manufacturing company, plans to build Super-Absorbent Polymer (SAP) plants in Brazil and China, and is considering the possibility of setting up a similar plant in Malaysia. The facility in Camaçari, Brazil, will have an annual capacity of 60,000 tpa, and production will likely begin in late 2014.

Solvay to invest in fluorinated polymers plant in China

Adani Group plans plastics processing park at Mundra

(August) Solvay will invest about € 120 million in a plant to produce Solef Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF), Tecnoflon, Fluoroelastomers and their monomer VF2 in China. The plant, to be located at Changshu in Jiangsu province, will be operational in early 2014. The Changshu plant is expected to transform the site into a strong industrial base for fluorinated polymers and their essential strategic feedstock in China.

(August) The Adani Group’s Mundra Port and Special Economic Zone Ltd (MPSEZ) is planning a 200-acre plastic processing park that will seek to attract investment of about ` 4,000 crore. The proposed park aims to attract plastics manufacturers to form a cluste. It will house injection & blow moulding, extrusion, etc to manufacture plastic furniture, PVC pipes and packaging material among other plastic products.

New Facility Carclo to expand its medical market in India

Tredegar opens film plant in India

( January) Carclo Technical Plastics Ltd opened its new manufacturing facility in India. Adjacent to its current facility in Doddaballapur, Bengaluru, the new facility is designed around the global Carclo model of manufacturing. It houses two discrete assembly areas and two fully equipped moulding areas. The facility is spread over an area of 1,000 sq m, with a possibility to expand by 50 per cent.

(May) US-based company Tredegar Corporation announced that its subsidiary, Tredegar Film Products, has formally opened its new manufacturing plant near Pune. The plant will initially specialise in films for the hygiene market, and expand as demand increases. Tredegar has been ranked 17th in Plastics News’ recent survey of North American film and sheet manufacturers, with $ 455 million in relevant sales.

Finolex to start PVC plant at Vadodara

Manjushree to set up two PET container plants

(May) Pune-based PVC pipe maker, Finolex Industries will start production at its new facility near Vadodara, Gujarat. Finolex has an outlay of ` 100 crore for the plant, which will be able to produce 50,000 tpa of PVC pipes and fittings. Finolex has two PVC pipe making units in Ratnagiri and Pune, with a combined production capacity of 140,000 tpa.

(December) Manjushree Tehnopack is setting up two new manufacturing facilities in Bidadi and Harohalli industrial area on the outskirts of Bengaluru, India. The new facilities will concentrate on the food & beverage customers, and liquor and pharma sectors. The proposed Bidadi unit will be close to a major beverage customer, thus reducing logistics costs.

New Material Reinste unveils industrial and research grade carbon nanotubes in India ( July) Reinste has become the authorised carbon nanotube distributor in India. It supplies functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes that can be used for numerous industrial applications. These nanotubes have performance properties like ultra-high tensile strength, high electrical and thermal conductivity, minimum thermal expansion coefficient, etc.

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Dow introduces innovative film resins in India (February) Dow Chemical International Pvt Ltd (Dow India) has launched a range of innovative film resins for use in food packaging, industrial & consumer packaging, and health & hygiene applications. It will meet demands of film converters for new materials, offering better optics, improved toughness and faster processing opportunities.


NEWSMAKERS OF 201 1

Regulation Eastman 168™ gets additional US FDA food contact clearance ( June) Eastman Chemical Company announced US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) expanded food contact clearance for its Eastman 168™ non-phthalate plasticiser. Food Contact Notification (FCN) 1056 permits use of Eastman 168 in contact with all food types at levels up to 55 per cent by weight of finished PVC formulations for repeated-use articles.

EU-wide ban on sales of BPA-based baby bottle (August) A European Union-wide ban on the sales of baby bottles containing additive Bisphenol A (BPA) has been enforced. It follows a European Union (EU) ban on manufacturing baby bottles using polycarbonate plastics that incorporate BPA. EU has acted after inconclusive advice from European Food Safety Authority over the potential of BPA to harm infants, should the chemical leach into infant formula.

Research & Development Star Thermoplastic opens TPR lab

Arkema, INES set up research laboratory for photovoltaics

(December) A division of Star Thermoplastic Alloys & Rubbers Inc has opened a Thermoplastic Rubber (TPR) rheology/ analytical laboratory at the company’s Broadview headquarters. The company has invested in the fully equipped, multifunctional laboratory to further increase its level of customer focus, satisfaction and applications support. The company has a production line for producing and testing samples & finished goods.

(March) Arkema and CEA teams from Institut National de l’Energie Solaire have joined forces to create the first private/public mixed research laboratory for developing polymer materials for photovoltaic module technologies. Arkema will provide expertise in polymers, polymer films and nanomaterials, with the expertise of INES CEA teams for innovative photovoltaic modules, silicon & thin layers.

Sustainability Volvic’s sugar-based PET bottle hits the UK

PE bags have low carbon footprint

(February) Danone-owned water brand Volvic has launched its ‘greener bottle’, made with 25 per cent recycled plastics and 20 per cent plant material. The plant material, BioPET, is made from PET produced using feedstocks manufactured from fermented and dehydrated sugarcane waste. The resulting bottle is 100 per cent recyclable. The biomaterial is made in India, using sugarcane molasses.

(April) British Environment Agency has reported that singleuse polyethylene grocery bags have lower carbon footprint than paper or reusable bags. The report concluded that lightweight high-density PE bags have a lower impact on global warming than alternative bags unless the alternatives are reused multiple times.

StyroChem® launches new EPS

Sustainable solutions for high-barrier films

( July) StyroChem®, manufacturer of Expandable Polystyrene (EPS), has introduced its new EVRgreen™ product line. The first EPS resin with EcoPure® technology, EVRgreen™ is an exciting new environmentally minded product. Microorganisms in active landfills with discarded plastics are the key to biodegradation of EVRgreen™ EPS resin. The microorganisms break down polystyrene at the molecular level.

(September) Mehta Flex Pvt Ltd has developed a multilayer highbarrier film. The Zero Leak™ film is a 100 per cent recyclable food packaging flexi-film. This film is thinner by 50 per cent, lowering consumption of polymers, transportation cost, roll changeovers, labour costs while enhancing strength & gas barrier properties of the film. Edible oil companies prefer this ‘zero leak’ film, as it helps reduce the green footprint and is economical.

Miscellaneous CSIR Technofest 2010 unveils technology to produce petrol from plastics

Messe Düsseldorf Group expands its trade fair portfolio in Southeast Asia

(February) Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehradun, presented a technology at CSIR Technofest to produce petrol, diesel and LPG from plastics. The technology is successful on the semipilot level and a small laboratory plant of 5-kg capacity is working on the campus of the institute. It was presented in the energy technical session organised by CSIR Technofest.

(April) Following the growing market demands of plastics, packaging and printing industries in Indonesia, Messe Düsseldorf Group of Companies is involved in INDOPLAS, INDOPACK and INDOPRINT starting in 2012. Messe Düsseldorf Asia and its local partner PT Wahana Kemalaniaga will organise the exhibitions from April 11-14, 2012, at Jakarta International Expo.

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

Proposed ASTM plastics standard to cover polyurethane gel tests A proposed ASTM standard will provide polyurethane raw material suppliers, customers and developers with a useful practice for setting up gel tests to determine the reactivity of materials. The proposed new standard, ASTM WK34781 Practice for Gel Tests for Polyurethane NonFoam Formulations, is being developed by Subcommittee D20.22 on Cellular Materials – Plastics and Elastomers, part of ASTM International Committee D20 on Plastics. Polyurethanes are used as adhesives and in coatings. David Mullen, Process Chemist, Rubicon LLC, and a D20 member, informed that having some idea of the time taken by adhesives to bond & coatings to set helps determine suitability

Excellence in enterprise

(L-R) Kushal Sampat, Dr H P Kumar, Shikha Sharma, Anil Kabra (Chairman, Synthetic Packers Pvt Ltd) and Lakshman Gugulothu

Dun & Bradstreet, the world’s leading provider of global business information, knowledge and insight; and Axis Bank, the third largest private sector bank in India, have announced the ‘D&B – Axis Bank Business Gaurav SME Awards 2011’. The awards felicitated 34 of India’s leading Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) of India for their significant achievement and contribution over the years. The occasion also marked the launch of Dun & Bradstreet’s and Axis Bank’s premier publication, Leading SMEs of India 2011. The publication was released by Chief Guest, Dr H P Kumar, Chairman & Managing Director, National Small Industries Corporation Ltd. Also present at the event were Rajendra D Adsul, President-SME Business, Axis Bank, M V Subramanian, President-Business

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for different applications. He said that many polyurethane raw material suppliers and customers have their own methods for testing. Mullen said, “Measurement of gel time can give developers, suppliers and customers an idea of the reactivity of different polyurethane raw materials, mainly isocyanates and polyols, for the purposes of identifying various applications and using in quality control.” The task group works with analytical methods that involve wet chemistry, spectroscopic techniques and chromatography. Performance test methods like WK34781 mark a departure for the task group’s development of analytical-only testing, but could open areas for other types of performance test development. Manas R Bastia Banking, Axis Bank, and Lakshman Gugulothu, Chief Executive Officer, BSE SME Exchange. Synthetic Packers Pvt Ltd was honoured with the ‘Best Small Enterprise’, while Emmbi Polyarns was awarded ‘Best Medium Enterprise’ at the D&B Axis Bank Business Gaurav SME Awards 2011. Speaking on the occasion, Shikha Sharma, Managing Director & CEO, Axis Bank, said, “The SME business is the backbone of the Indian economy. At Axis Bank, we believe in partnering in the growth of our SME customers by associating with them right from the initial stage of their business lifecycle. The D&B-Axis Bank Business Gaurav SME Awards is our attempt to recognise and reward the performance of the SMEs.” Speaking at the Awards ceremony, Kaushal Sampat, President & CEOIndia, D&B, said, “Dun & Bradstreet India reinforces its commitment towards the SMEs, through the launch of the D&B –Axis Bank ‘Business Gaurav SME Awards 2011’. These awards have been envisaged as a tribute to the achievements of the leading SMEs, thus acknowledging their valuable contribution in the country’s economic development.” Annabel Dsouza

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Large tonnage injection moulding machine shipped by FMI

Adding impetus to the Indian plastics industry, Ferromatik Milacron India (FMI) has successfully shipped the largest India built injection moulding machine Maxima 2500 f rom its Ahmedabad facility to an international automotive manufacturer based in Pune serving Indian and international customers. The Maxima range of highperformance injection moulding machines are offered from 500 T to 2,500 T. It is the first and largest machine built by any manufacturer in the country. Maxima is a global product of the Milacron product portfolio and manufactured to serve various end application segments. Some of its salient features are energy efficiency, compact footprint, reduced platen deflection, large mould carrying capacity, high speed, precision & reliability, reduced mould wear & enhanced mould life, central uniform locking over mould area, etc. Mahendra Patel, Director, FMI noted, “We are enthralled to ship the largest injection moulding machine Maxima 2500 to our customer, as it helps us to serve on a larger base to the Indian injection moulding industry. It gives us a sense of fulfillment and opportunity to grow along with the Indian plastics industry. Indian moulders need not look at overseas manufacturers for these machines anymore.” Avani Jain


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

Danone bags Bioplastics Award 2011

The sixth Bioplastics Award 2011 for the first time was awarded, exclusively by the unique industry organ bioplastics MAGAZINE, to Danone GmbH . Marianne Schweiger, Senior Packaging Development Engineer of Danone accepted the prestigious award during the sixth European Bioplastics Conference in Berlin. The annual Bioplastics Award was established in 2006 by the English trade publication European Plastics News. It recognises the special role played by a brand owner or single individual and acknowledges the contribution made by companies, products or services to further development of bioplastics by way of specific innovation or imaginative marketing concepts. The five-man panel of judges, from academia, the press and trade associations the world over, selected Danone GmbH. The judges were of the view that Danone, as an international brand owner, has made a significant contribution in moving bioplastics from a niche packaging product to a mass market product with the introduction of Activia and Actimel in bioplastic packaging (Polylactic acid and green high-density polyethylene). This means that no more than half of the Danone products in the German market are packaged in bioplastics. Manas R Bastia

Coca cola eyes development of plant-based plastics Coca-Cola Co has invested in three biobased companies in an effort to accelerate the development of a PlantBottle made entirely from plants. The three companies include Virent Inc, which makes bio-based feedstock, ie, BioForm X for paraxylene; Gevo Inc, which has developed a 100 per cent renewable isobutanol – a building block for paraxylene; and Avantium

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Gneuss to present its Rotary Melt Filtration System at Plastindia The Gneuss Filtration Technology product group will be displaying its Rotary Melt Filtration Systems at Plastindia 2012, with further design enhancements. With the latest generation of RSFgenius Melt Filtration Systems, Gneuss has again extended its technological lead and with regard to back-flushing material waste levels and energy consumption, has set new unparalleled standards. By optimising the melt channel geometry, it was possible to increase the active filtration area of model sizes RSFgenius 75, 90, 150, 175 and 200 by about 30-40 per cent. The increased

filter area has an important advantage in that, given the same throughput rate and filtration fineness, the next smaller model size can be used. This has two advantages: on one hand, the specific investment cost for the filtration system can be reduced, while on the other, space on even the most cramped extrusion lines can easily be found for the already compact design that is one model size smaller. Thus, one need not skip high-quality filtration due to the restrictions of installation. In other cases, advantages to the processor are offered by the ability to use the same model size with finer filtration or with the same filtration and a reduced pressure differential. Lionel Alva

Chevron Philips to expand facilities in Texas Chevron Phillips Chemical Co LP is moving ahead with a massive project to add two Polyethylene (PE) plants with total annual capacity of 2.2 billion pound. The plants will be located either at the firm’s Cedar Bayou complex in Baytown, Texas, or at its Sweeny facility in Old Ocean, Texas. Chevron Phillips is ranked as North America’s largest maker of high-density PE with a marketshare of 20 per cent of the annual capacity. The firm ranks fourth in low-density PE with 8 per cent share and sixth in Linear Low-Density Polyethylene (LDPE) with a 4 per cent share. Final site selection is set for the first quarter of 2012. The total cost of the project is estimated at $ 5 billion. The PE plants are part of a larger project

for installing a new ethylene feedstock cracker in Baytown. This cracker will use natural gas-based ethane, and the annual capacity will be 3.3 billion pound. The project is expected be completed in 2017. Market analyst Phil Karig, Managing Director, Mathelin Bay Associates LLC consulting firm, St Louis, said, “Chevron Phillips appears to be making a reasoned decision, based on what we know today about what the world will probably look like five years down the line.” Anwesh Koley

Research and Technology whose YXY chemical catalytic technology has led to the development of a new bio-based plastics, ie, Poly-Ethylene-Furanoate (PEF) to make 100 per cent bio-based bottles that could be a replacement for today’s Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) bottles. Rick Frazier, Vice PresidentCommercial Product Supply, Coca Cola Co, said, “Moving to a PlantBottle made

entirely of plants is imperative, as the company’s goal is to double the daily serving from Coca Cola beverages to 3 billion by 2020. Further, to double our business in a sustainable way, we must find a new way to do more with less,” he said. With this investment, the company aims to advance the technology to make purified terephthalic acid from nonpetroleum sources. Avani Jain

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


MPP Jan 2012 Ad Name: Alok Pg No. 35


MPP Jan 2012 Ad Name: Alok Pg No. 36


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

Rajoo continues its pioneering efforts in Pakistan

Rubbermaid to invest in Virginia plant

Reinhardt ties up with German firm

Rubbermaid Commercial Products has been in operation in Winchester since 1968, the company now plans to establish a distribution centre in the nearby Frederick County. This significant investment is slated as a logistics strategy that is expected to streamline the manufacture and distribution of the products.

India’s Reinhardt Roto-Machines is expanding operations by setting up a new plant in Vadodara. The new 17,200-sq ft facility will be located next to the company’s existing plant and produce coating & slush moulding lines. Dhanu Patell, Partner, Reinhardt Roto-Machines, said, “The facility will commence production by mid-2012. The new portfolio of equipment will be manufactured with about 40 per cent import content. The software, fabrication, machining, assembly and installation will be done at our plant.” Ernst Reinhardt GmbH and Reinhardt Roto-Machines had signed an agreement recently in Bengaluru to further their cooperation. “Ernst Reinhardt has only one production facility in Germany, and the Indian plant will be its first outside Germany. The advantages of having a factory in India are lower production costs and access to Australia, China, the Middle East and Africa. India is competitive pricewise, as the same line costs 30 per cent less in India than in Europe, and the delivery time to many parts of the world is shorter,” said Patell. The company is a joint venture between Ernst Reinhardt GmbH of Villingen-Schwenningen, Germany; Rijsholt BV of Deventer, Netherlands; and Indian partners Dhanu Patell and Harleen Chawla. Avani Jain

Rajoo Engineering Ltd (REL) has pioneered the supply of a three-layer co-extruded blown film line to Poly Pack Pvt Ltd of Pakistan. Poly Pack Pvt Ltd, Pakistan, was impressed with the tailored solution purchased from Rajoo. Optimised and stable operations in the last few months, with a strong handholding from commissioning to use and reach enhanced performance standards, motivated Poly Pack to further its relationship with Rajoo. With a strong expansion plan, Poly Pack purchased most of its converting equipment from leading European manufacturers but still preferred to buy the Blown Film Lines from Rajoo for their increasing requirement of Polyethylene (PE)-based films. “With Poly Pack being among the largest manufacturers of polypropylene woven sacks and PE bags and films in Lahore, it was important for us to select the right vendor for the expansion activity of Co-Extruded Blown Film Lines. We are happy to choose Rajoo at the first instance and continued with them, “ said Ahmed Iftikhar, Chief Executive Officer, Poly Pack. Lionel Alva

Further, to take advantage of low-cost natural gas supplies, LyondellBasell plans to restart a 780,000 Tonne Per Annum (TPA) methanol plant at Channelview, Texas. The Channelview plant is expected to increase its capability to process lowcost ethane feedstocks by an additional 500 million pound per year. The company is also advancing on a project to build a new metathesis unit at Channelview, which is planned to increase propylene production. Butadiene expansion wil be done at

Wesseling by 40 per cent, through a debottlenecking project. Jim Gallogly, Chief Executive Officer, LyondellBasell Industries NV, said, “The North American projects built upon our asset and technology positions, coupled with cheap and abundant natural gas & natural gas liquids, will offer high returns in a relatively short period. They are also expected to be completed more quickly and inexpensively than Greenfield projects.” Avani Jain

Rubbermaid Commercial Products plans to invest $ 67.3 million in its injection moulding plant in Winchester. The company will retrofit an existing 454,000sq ft building in nearby Frederick County into a distribution centre. The company will invest in energy-efficient injection moulding machinery in Winchester. The project will add 71 jobs at the site. Proximity of the two facilities to the Virginia Inland Port gives the firm direct access to international and domestic customers. The parent company, Newell Rubbermaid Inc of Sandy Springs, plans to close its Rubbermaid Home Products injection moulding plant in Greenville, Texas, and move the warehousing from Wooster, Ohio, to Mogladore, Ohio, as part of a renewal project. The consumer, commercial and industrial products giant is globally realigning its three operating groups into two – Newell Consumer and Newell Professional. Anwesh Koley

LyondellBasell on an expansion drive LyondellBasell Industries NV will spend $ 1.5 billion on new plants and expansions to add about $ 1 billion a year to pretax earnings by 2016. The company will start with ethylene capacity expansion by increasing production at its facility in La Porte, Texas. Subsequently, it will undertake China PO/TBA Plant Study, which is an agreement to conduct a joint feasibility study to construct a world-scale PO/TBA plant in Ningbo, China. 38

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

(L-R) Sunil Jain, President, REL; Amir Iftikhar, Director, Poly Pack, Ahmed Iftikhar, CEO-Poly Pack;


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

LANXESS quarter results exceed expectations LANXESS achieved a record third

quarter in 2011 due to ongoing strong demand, especially for its synthetic rubber and high-tech plastics. The German specialty chemicals company also reiterated its full-year outlook for EBITDA pre-exceptional to grow about 20 per cent year-on-year, and exceed the one billion Euro mark for the first time in the company’s history. In India, LANXESS achieved sales of about € 65 million in the third quarter, registering a growth of 52 per cent year-

Dow, Jilin Connell sign LOI to strengthen Dow polyurethanes business Dow Polyurethanes, a business group of The Dow Chemical Company and a leading producer of Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (MDI), has recently announced signing of a Letter of Intent (LOI) with Jilin Connell Chemical Industry Co Ltd, a subsidiary of Jilin Connell Group, aimed at providing US Gulf Coast aniline supply for growth of their polyurethanes business. Jilin Connell Group, a privately-held company, was formed in 1991. Its subsidiary, Jilin Connell Chemical Company ( Jilin Connell), is the top merchant aniline producer and distributor in China and has announced expansion plans that would position it as the largest in the world.

KHS Corpoplast crosses landmark number in orders placed The success story of the next-generation KHS Corpoplast stretch blow moulders keeps getting better. A special moment

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on-year. India is a key pillar of the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) strategy that LANXESS pursues and has been performing consistently. Venkatesh Sankaran, Executive Director and Chief Financial Officer, LANXESS India Pvt Ltd, said, “Overall, this was our best quarter by far. The performance polymers segment clocked a growth rate of about 155 per cent in India, which is the highest among the three business segments. In this segment, the polybutadiene rubber business unit emerged the strongest.” This is an acknowledgment of the fact that the applications of high-performance rubbers from LANXESS are increasingly finding acceptance in the Indian market. These key markets now represent 25 per cent of the Group’s sales. Manas R Bastia The LOI with Jilin Connell concerns the exploration of opportunities for future technical and commercial collaboration in the industrial production of aniline. Discussions include plant location options such as the possibility of Jilin Connell building a fence line plant at Dow’s site in Freeport. Dow operates the largest single-train crude MDI plant in the world today, and thus competitive US aniline supply is critical to meet customers’ needs in different markets & applications, including energy-efficient rigid & spray foam insulation solutions for appliances, building & construction; lifestyle-enhancing moulded and viscoelastic foams for furniture, bedding and automotive applications. Anwesh Koley for KHS Corpoplast was when a contract was signed for delivery of the 100th InnoPET Blomax Series IV stretch blow moulder. The order was placed by Western Container Corporation, USA. KHS will supply an InnoPET Blomax Series IV with 24 blow stations. The machine has a maximum capacity of 52,800 Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) bottles per hour. Darrel Smith, Corporate Blow Molding Manager, Western Container Corporation, said, “We expect a lot from the new-generation stretch

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

MRS Extruder establishes itself in the market Since K 2007, the Multi Rotation System extruder from Gneuss has been established as a key technology for processing Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) bottle flakes. More than 15 of these special extruders have been sold for film, fibre and repelletising applications worldwide. The major advantage of this extruder is that it permits processing of PET without pre-drying, and by using a simple water ring vacuum system to process PET to a high-quality product. This is achieved by means of its unique and patented processing section. Based on a conventional single-screw extruder, the Multi Rotation Section (MRS) is a drum containing eight satellite single screws, driven by a ring gear and pinion transmission. The barrels cut into the drum are about 30 per cent open and provide optimum exposure of the melt. Due to this design, the devolatilising performance is 50 times greater than that of a conventional single-screw extruder – and this at a vacuum of only 25-40 mbar. By avoiding the need for a high-vacuum system and predrying, the MRS is an economically efficient alternative to conventional technologies. MRS also offers excellent decontamination performance. Even heavily contaminated post-consumer waste can be processed to odourneutral products. Lionel Alva blow moulders. The amount of energy that we will be saving as compared to conventional machines is a positive factor. We are impressed with the fact that the InnoPET Blomax Series IV can produce lighter-weight bottles as compared that possible earlier.” After being unveiled at Drinktec in Munich, the new KHS Corpoplast InnoPET Blomax Series IV generation of stretch blow moulders has attracted huge attention in the industry. Lionel Alva


TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION

New Zetpol® EP polymers New Ultra SideGate hot runner by Husky

Zeon Chemicals has added Zetpol EP to the company’s Hydrogenated Nitrile Rubber (HNBR) product line. Featuring low viscosity and excellent process safety, these new elastomers are designed to dramatically improve and simplify processing in injection moulding applications, reducing operating costs without compromising the performance of finished parts.

Created specifically to aid in injection moulding of complex parts, the new Zetpol EP HNBR family provides substantial improvement in mould flow and a superior safety margin against scorch to help eliminate knit lines and part delamination. Like standard Zetpol grades, Zetpol EP elastomers are proven to achieve an excellent balance of heat and environmental resistance as well as outstanding dynamic properties.

New ultra-high barrier film by Honeywell Husky Injection Molding Systems has introduced new Ultra SideGateTM hot runner technology. It is designed and optimised for deep draw parts, eg, pipettes, syringe barrels and other small parts. It allows customers to direct gate parts that would otherwise require gating with a cold runner, making this new technology particularly valuable in manufacture of parts where quality and gate vestige are critical. Ultra SideGate allows for high-cavitation moulds with a small footprint, while providing outstanding gate quality and offering mould makers add design flexibility. By direct gating parts with Ultra SideGate, moulders can achieve resin savings, faster cycle times and better performance across a wide temperature range. It offers exceptional gate quality leaving virtually no vestige on finished parts (~0.05 mm vestige).

Permanent-magnet servomotors boost efficiency in injection moulding machine By replacing a standard induction or frequency drive motor with a permanentmagnet servo motor, the Maxima Servo injection moulding machine from Milacron Plastics Technologies is said to offer energy efficiency, reliability and part quality, rivaling an all-electric machine, but at a lower price point. 42

The new Aclar UltRx 6000 is effective in protecting moisture-sensitive medicines in all climates, even in the hottest and most humid locations. This allows pharmaceutical companies to standardise their product packaging with a solution that will work in all regions of the world. Aclar films, including Aclar UltRx 6000, help reduce drug package sizes by up to 55 per cent as compared with the alternative, cold-formed foil. Aclar UltRx 6000 can be used in existing equipment, with minor adjustments, which pharmaceutical companies use to thermoform their packages. Also, like all Aclar films, Aclar UltRx 6000 is clear, allowing pharmaceutical companies to differentiate their brand by allowing the pill to be seen through the packaging. Aclar UltRx 6000 is a 6 mil, 152micron thermoformable film that provides an extremely low Water/ Moisture Vapour Transmission Rate (WVTR/MVTR). This property helps

protect drugs, especially in climatic zones 4 and 4B, which includes many parts of South America, Africa, India and Southeast Asia. Aclar films are based on Polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE) fluoropolymer technology. These films facilitate increased patient compliance with doctor prescriptions in terms of see-through, portable and patientfriendly pack presentations.

The two-platen clamp design allows the machine to apply pressure directly to the centre of the mould instead of at corners, promoting better platen parallelism, which can lead to more consistent parts. Maxima’s servomotors vary in speed from 0 to 3,000 RPM in both directions, responding to work load with high resolution, since rotation can be controlled by a fraction of an angle. An internal gear pump replaces an

electro-hydraulic pump, with benefits of running only when needed and requiring less maintenance. By centrally locating tonnage cylinder behind the moving platen, Maxima provides clamping force directly behind the mould, reducing platen deflection and concentrating uniform force across the mould surface. This reduces mould wear and allows superior force distribution across the mould’s parting lines for cleaner parts.

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION

SABIC’s Lexan*EXL copolymer boosts design freedom for miniature photovoltaics

SABIC’s Innovative Plastics has launched a new, high-performance Lexan*EXL copolymer resin that addresses the trend to miniaturisation of Photovoltaic (PV) connectors and junction boxes. The enhanced electrical and flame-retardant performance of new Lexan EXL resin grade enables designers to miniaturise the entire system by creating thin-walled parts, moving conductors closer together and integrating junction box systems – reducing solar energy costs and increase efficiency. New Lexan EXL resin helps customers strengthen their competitive footing by contributing significantly to benefits of PV systems and accelerating the move to solar energy. The flame-retardant material also complies with UL94 V0 standard at 0.8 mm, allowing design of thinner-wall parts. With its processing advantages of easy flow for cost-effective thin-wall designs and high throughput, plus easy release from the mould, Lexan EXL 9330S copolymer can reduce total injection moulding cycle time by 40 per cent.

Masterbatch boosts PLA melt strength Teknor Apex has introduced a new melt-strength enhancer in masterbatch form to increase the pull force that can be applied to Polylactic Acid (PLA) by 300-500 per cent over a wide range of drawdown ratios. Thus, higher throughputs in extrusion and thermoforming become possible, while scrap rates are reduced. 44

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Greener bottle made from 20 per cent sugarcane waste Volvic Natural Mineral Water has launched a new Greener bottle made partially from sugarcane waste. It is a 100 per cent recyclable Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) plastics, which uses renewable plant material. The new Volvic 50-cl Greener bottle contains 20 per cent plant material, reducing the amount of non-renewable material needed to create the bottle. It will have 38 per cent lower packaging carbon footprint and 16 per cent lower total lifecycle footprint.

Bioriented polypropylene laminating films

This reduction is achieved by using 25 per cent recycled plastics from previously used bottles and new plant-based plastics – BioPET. BioPET is created by combining PET with fermented and dehydrated sugarcane waste, a natural and renewable waste product derived from production of sugar from sugarcane.

Soft Touch® metalised provides printed matter with a metalised finish that gives a textured visual effect and even a holographic sensation combined with the smooth and velvety Soft Touch® feel. Its

success lies in the fact that end customers are able to differentiate their products from those of their competitors because they supply graphic supports that are pleasing to touch and visually unique. Anti-Scratch (also BOPP) provides products with effective protection because of its excellent scuff resistance and exceptional Ultraviolet (UV ) ink adhesion and hot stamping properties. Due to the special treatment that it undergoes, the final result can be cold stamped and considered as a valuable alternative to matte acetate. All products are available in an oxobiodegradable version that breaks down within a period of less than 18 months due to the action of the air, temperature and UV light. All products include a version capable of adhering to liquid products or incorporate a thermolamination layer.

Terraloy MB-90001A1 melt strength enhancer broadens the processing window of PLA in cast film and sheet for clear end products like clamshell containers used in product packaging, food service takeout, etc. In thermoforming clamshell containers, some force is needed to force a hot sheet of plastics into a mould, and the deeper the mould cavity and the sharper the corners, the greater will be the force

needed to fully shape the sheet into a finished container.

Derprosa has developed a complete range of bioriented polypropylene laminating films. Soft Touch® is the first ever Biaxially-Oriented Polypropylene (BOPP) film with tactile properties that endow printed matter with a unique finish and sharper images than ever before.


EVENT FOCUS: Plastindia 201 2

Packing a punch for India Event Preview: Plastindia 2012 .....................................................................................................................................................................48

Interface: Ashok Goel, President, Plastindia Foundation....................................................................................................................50 Daniel Kueng, CEO, Osec...................................................................................................................................................56 Liao Zhengpin, Honorary Chairman, China Plastics Processing Industry Association ...................................................60 Chao Yuen-Chuan, CEO and President, Taiwan External Trade Development Council ...............................................62

Industry Insights: Indian plastics market: Engine of global growth ................................................................................................................64

Raw Materials: New-age polymers: Leveraging the potential for excellence ...............................................................................................70 Innovation index: Invigorating the world of plastics ........................................................................................................... 76

Processing Machinery: Quality drivers: Propelling performance..............................................................................................................................80 Price concerns: Competitive propositions by Indian SMEs ................................................................................................84

Research & Development: Plastics in niche applications: Focus on futuristic solutions ................................................................................................88 Knowledge investment: Progress through people power .....................................................................................................94

Quality Assurance: Food & pharma packaging: Raising the safety bar .............................................................................................................98 Seamless processing: Performance meets profitability....................................................................................................... 102

Sustainability: Production efficiency: Optimum energy utilisation ..........................................................................................................106 Safety standards: A green step forward ............................................................................................................................. 112

Product Showcase: Germany-Austria-Switzerland............................................................................................................................................ 117 China................................................................................................................................................................................... 132 Taiwan.................................................................................................................................................................................136 India .................................................................................................................................................................................... 142

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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EVENT PREVIEW: Plastindia 2012

Endeavouring towards excellence The eighth edition of Plastindia returns with bright promises and brighter opportunities for the Indian plastics fraternity. Upgradation of machinery, sufficient availability of raw materials and the never-say-die attitude of the Indian entrepreneur make India the preferred global source for plastics. Against this background of optimism and exuberance, Modern Plastics & Polymers chronicles the five pillars of growth for the Indian plastics industry. Annabel Dsouza

O

ver the last three years, the Indian economy has conquered the global economic downturn with intelligent regulation and strong fundamentals. The same can be said of India’s manufacturing industry, which is surging ahead at a Compounded Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 5 per cent. In keeping with future projections of exponential growth in domestic consumption and export markets, there could not have been a better time for the Indian plastics industry. The industry is quite promising and creating new employment opportunities for the people here. Apart from the immense opportunities indicated by per capita volume consumption, Plastindia 2012 will highlight the widening application spectrum of plastics and 48

penetration of new-generation polymers in all key sectors of Indian manufacturing. The Government of India is introducing economic reforms to elevate and boost the plastics industry by way of joint ventures; foreign investments and entrepreneurs are trying to provide highquality plastic products. For an industry governed mostly by Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs), this spells immense opportunities. At present, there are 25,000-30,000 plastics processing units in the country. This market potential will surely actuate the entrepreneurs to invest in this industry.

The growth platform The Indian plastics industry owes much of its extraordinary success to outstanding manufacturing and management practices of Indian entrepreneurs as well as globally competitive innovations & technologies. Reckoned among the

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

largest plastics exhibitions in the world, this eighth edition of Plastindia is as much a celebration of success as it is a platform for the global plastics industry to be a part of the India story. The ensuing Plastindia 2012 special section highlights the following five pillars on which the Indian plastics business is building future growth and expansion. Raw materials: As Indian processors welcome the latest innovations in the commodity plastics and engineering polymers, base polymer availability and price volatility are among the core concerns of the industry. Processing machinery: To ensure long-term success and profitability, the focus should be on quality, efficiency and cost-competitiveness of plastics processing machinery. Research & Development (R&D): To stay competitive with global innovations, Indian players need to


Plastindia 2012

Showcasing machinery might

Plastindia 2012 fast facts When: 1-6 February, 2012 Where: Pragati Maidan, New Delhi, India Organisers: Plastindia Foundation Net Exhibition space: 1,00,000 sq m Exhibitors: 1,500 Visitors expected: 1,50,000 Countries to be represented: 40 Concurrent events: Asia Plastic Forum (APF) International Conference Plasticon Awards invest significantly in cutting-edge R&D for existing applications as well as niche demands of the future. Quality assurance: With an expanding export market, Indian processors must meet stringent quality standards, especially for pharma and food packaging industries. Sustainability: Apart from reducing carbon footprint of the plastics processing value chain, the Indian industry needs to improve the ‘green’ quotient of plastics.

with its true potential harnessed, it is all set to reach 12.5 million metric tonne by consumption, making India the third largest consumer of plastics by 2012. With cost-effective manufacturing solutions, India has a good potential in terms of capacity, infrastructure and availability of cheap labour. A shift in the manufacturing base from the West to a region with low labour cost and high knowledge & technology base is expected to further drive plastics consumption. The fundamentals of low consumption base, coupled with lower prices, will accelerate the rate of growth of plastics in India. The export of Indian plastic products is growing steadily at a rate of 15-20 per cent for the last few years. The markets showing good potential for exports are United Arab Emirates (UAE), the US and UK. Exports to the US have been growing at a rate of 33 per cent and are poised to grow further in the future. However, as compared to other fast developing countries, India is lagging behind. However, as barriers to trade are going down, it is expected that Indian industry will be able to have a larger share of export market in the future.

Opportunities unlimited

Future beckons

The Indian plastics industry has an enormous opportunity in satisfying the consumer needs in virtually all applications. It took 30 years for India to consume the first million tonne of plastics. The second million tonne was consumed only in five years. The Indian plastics industry has been growing at a rate of 12 per cent over the years and

The next two decades are expected to offer unprecedented opportunities for the plastics industry in India. According to a Credit Rating and Information Services of India Ltd (CRISIL) report, the world trade in plastics is expected to reach 140 Million Metric Tonne (MMT) in 2012 and thus provides a lucrative opportunity for India. However,

with just 1.5 per cent share in the world export volumes, India is not in a position to seize this opportunity. The Indian plastics industry, going forward, needs to consolidate and enhance capacity, upgrade facilities, improve productivity and increase utilisation of critical plastics applications. The industry has to improve its preparedness to leverage this volume growth by utilising latest technology solutions and embracing innovations. The need of the hour is higher capacity machines that offer profitable margins along with quality output. The industry has to build world-class design capabilities, moulds, tools and dies and technological know-how. Use of intelligent manufacturing to improve productivity and asset utilisation for development of new products & applications must be addressed on a large scale. Effective collaboration between industry, academia and State & Central governments will further add value to plastics processing in India. The plastics industry is currently in a strategic position to enhance capacities, create opportunities and revolutionise manufacturing practices across the nation. The associations need to create a positive policy framework with all statutory entities and increase per capita consumption of plastics, encourage exports, thereby significantly contributing to national growth. Therefore, Plastindia 2012 will serve as a platform for various industry stakeholders to come together and envisage the future of plastics in India. Email: annabel.dsouza@infomedia18.in

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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PLASTINDIA 201 2: Inter face - Ashok Goel

“India is now fully equipped to become the global hub for sourcing processed plastics” …opines Ashok Goel, President, Plastindia Foundation. He gives an overview of the current state of the Indian plastics industry, while also highlighting the immense potential that this industry has to become the global provider of plastics processing machinery as well as finished products, in an exclusive interaction with Annabel Dsouza.

What is the importance of Plastindia 2012 amid the economic downturn in the West? In spite of economic sluggishness in the West, business in plastics is growing at a fast pace. India’s per capita consumption of plastics at 7 kg per annum is much below the world average of 28 kg. Thus, India has a tremendous opportunity for growth. This will prompt foreign exhibitors to tap the future growth potential of the Indian market. For domestic exhibitors, it is an opportunity to show the world that they are now fully equipped to become the global hub for sourcing processed plastics. Plastindia exhibitions are the largest in India and among the top three in the world. Over 1,500 exhibitors from about 40 countries participating in this exhibition will have the opportunity to interact and explore infinite opportunities that exist for their business.

How will existing high interest regime and inflationary pressures impact the plastics industry’s growth in India? The current situation is denting the confidence of the entrepreneur, but the demand is still intact. Hence, we do not foresee any major problem. To reduce the adverse impact of high interest regime, as an association, we have requested the Government to set up technology upgradation funds 50

or changing product design, while maintaining functionality. All these can also give added benefit of reduction in processing cost in the form of rationalisation of manpower and reduced energy.

What is the commercial viability for plastics recycling in India? India recycles 60 per cent of its used plastics, higher than the world average of 22 per cent. There are 2,600 recycling units and 5,100 pelletisers in India. The average turnover of the recycling industry is ` 11,250 crore with a value addition of ` 4,500 crore, establishing its commercial viability. Future trends in the recycling industry in India are in plastic automotive parts and plastic-mixed waste recycling. for interest subsidy scheme for their technological upgradation. A bigger challenge is sourcing latest technology for productivity and cost-efficiency. We believe that Plastindia 2012 can play a big role here.

What are the strategies by plastics processors to offset rising raw material prices and its impact on long-term business of the industry? The challenge for processors is to look for better material or reduce wastage. Waste reduction can happen by adopting modern technology, reengineering the production process

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Latest update on Plastindia’s knowledge centre in Gujarat... Plastindia Academy of Technology and Management is coming up in Vapi, Gujarat, to cater exclusively to the plastics industry’s requirement of both technical and managerial human resource. It will have a design and R&D centre to provide technical assistance to the industry. We also plan to collaborate with overseas universities for student and faculty exchange programmes. We will be signing a memorandum of understanding with two overseas universities during Plastindia 2012. Email: annabel.dsouza@infomedia18.in


MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: Joyti Tab-2, Pg No. 53


MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: Loxim Tab-2, Pg No. 54


PLASTINDIA 201 2: Inter face - Daniel Kueng

“Growth potential exists along the entire value chain”

...affirms Daniel Kueng, CEO of Osec, the official Swiss foreign trade promoter. Founded in 1927 under private law, Osec holds the mandates of export and location promotion as well as the import & investment promotion on behalf of the State Secretariat for Economic Affairs (SECO). In this e-interaction with Manas R Bastia, he fields an array of queries pertaining to the Swiss-Indian bilateral trade, particularly in plastics, and the road ahead. Excerpts… Let’s begin with the production and export performance of the Swiss plastics sector. What are its highlights during the last 2-3 years? The plastics industry is an important pillar of the Swiss economy. The Swiss plastics industry achieved a turnover of 15.8 billion Swiss Franc (CHF) in 2010, an increase of 10 per cent over the previous year. The number of companies grew from 843 in 2009 to 854, and these companies employed 35,101 personnel in 2010, three per cent more than the previous year. Although the industry is still competitive by virtue of innovation and productivity, it now faces great challenges on account of rising CHF against foreign currencies. As a strong CHF makes imports cheaper, it may be positive for 56

some segments of the industry, but there is pressure on the price competitiveness of exports. Due to the emerging pressure on exporting companies, increasing numbers of Swiss firms are exploring various avenues to remain competitive and looking for attractive locations/partners abroad for business collaboration.

Tell us about the present trade flow between Switzerland and India from the viewpoint of plastics sector. Swiss-Indian bilateral trade grew robustly during the period 2003-08, nearly trebling from CHF 1.24 billion to 3.5 billion in five years. Although in 2009, the growth was impacted due to global economic meltdown, the positive trend was restored in 2010 with Swiss export to India going

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

up by 18.8 per cent, reaching CHF 2.56 billion. Similarly, the Swiss import from India went up by 26.2 per cent, reaching CHF 1.01 billion. The major products that Switzerland exported to India during 2010 included machinery,pharmaceuticals,pearls,jewellery & precious metals, chemical products, precision instruments and watches. On the other hand, the main products imported by Switzerland from India during 2010 were chemicals, textiles, pearls, jewellery & precious metal items, fertilisers, dyes, pigments, etc. The buoyancy in the bilateral trade growth is continuing this year. During the first three quarters of 2011, the Swiss export to India touched CHF 2.2 billion, an increase of 19.4 per cent as compared to that in the same period of 2010.


Daniel Kueng

From the perspective of the plastics sector, the export of machinery for production of plastic products to India plays a major role and reflects the trend in the Indian industry to expand this sector both qualitatively and quantitatively. On the import side, Switzerland is increasingly importing plastic raw materials from India.

What are the potential growth areas in the above bilateral trade and Osec’s role in facilitating investment both ways? Growth potential exists along the entire value chain with technical cooperation, technology transfer and services. Osec is the official Swiss organisation for furtherance of exports, imports as well as for the promotion of Switzerland as a business location. The aim of these mandates is to provide companies in Switzerland and Liechtenstein, as well as companies abroad, with information relating to their international business projects and also offer them advice and support for market entries & sustainable success. The Swiss Business Hubs are the backbone of Osec’s presence abroad and are located in countries, including India, which are of particular importance to the Swiss export industry. The Swiss Business Hub India facilitates investments of Indian companies with international focus by providing tailormade information and dedicated free advisory service to Indian investors who are in the process of considering investments in Europe in general, or Switzerland, in particular.

What are the major challenges affecting growth in this bilateral trade and the actions taken by Osec in addressing the same? High import taxes in India and a strong Swiss Franc are the threats to further success of bilateral trade. Osec provides optimised support and assistance to its clients and members for finding optimised solutions with sustainable effect. Furthermore, Osec shows new business opportunities. Overall, the growth prospects are bright and with the current negotiation of a free trade agreement between the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) and India, both sides can look forward to further expansion of their bilateral trade.

Tell us about the participation of Swiss companies at Plastindia 2012. What are some of the high points and areas of Indo-Swiss collaboration? At Plastindia 2012, Switzerland will present services and products along the entire value chain, from raw materials to recycling of plastics. One hot spot will be the live demonstration of In-Mould Labelling PS-cup (IML PS). In addition, highly specialised mould and dies producers will present their range of applications, along with manufacturers of equipment & machines for the plastics & rubber industry. Most of the exhibiting companies have a local partner for the Indian market. This is still interesting for Swiss companies and offers good business opportunities with high growth rates. Email: manas@infomedia18.in January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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PLASTINDIA 201 2: Inter face - Liao Zhengpin

“Plastics consumption is a key indicator of a country’s development” …avers Liao Zhengpin, Honorary Chairman of China Plastics Processing Industry Association (CPPIA). Founded in 1989, CPPIA is composed of units of the plastics sector and related industries on the basis of its regulation and voluntary application. The association functions as a bridge for more than its 2,000 membership units and the government department of the People’s Republic of China. Excerpts of Zhengpin’s conversation with Ringier Trade Media Ltd… How is the plastics industry faring in China? Plastics consumption is a key indicator to measure a country’s development level. With China’s consumer market demand, its total consumption of plastics has propelled it as the first in the world. According to China Customs, the export value for plastic products between January and October 2011 reached $ 24.989 billion, higher by 15.5 per cent as compared to $ 21.621 billion in 2010. Also, China’s plastics consumption surpassed 65 million tonne in 2010, accounting for over a quarter of the world’s consumption; China’s per capita consumption is about 46 kg, more than the world average of 40 kg.

What are the major challenges before China’s plastic products industry? There is much room for improvement in the overall production and quality of output of China plastics processing industry to meet high global standards. However, as compared to that in developed countries, the quality of 60

plastics processing equipment produced by China is still relatively backward and cannot meet the high-level production volume & special needs, so China still has to import advanced production lines. China’s Research and Development (R&D) capability is undergoing an institutional reform with research work mainly conducted by research institutions of universities and R&D centres of some enterprises engaged in polymer materials. However, advanced moulding process and production of specialty or highperformance products remain weak. The production, variety and quality of synthetic resins have shown tremendous improvement over the years, but are still unable to meet the rapid growth of China’s plastics industry requirements. Domestic production of synthetic resins has been on the rise for the past 10 years, but, currently, it can meet only 56 per cent of domestic demand, with compounds still being imported. In recent years, with increasing uncertainties in the international situation, the Western financial system in developed

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countries faces the challenges of economic downturn; further, changes in oil supply and demand has increased uncertain risks of downstream processing. The increasing pressure on product costs, product homogeneity and repeated investment has led to fierce competition in the market. There is a need to strengthen the regional characteristics and speed up the construction of industrial clusters. It is time to build various local characteristics region and industrial clusters based on the region’s economic development needs, to promote SME cluster and further improve and enter large-scale industrial production.

Your message for Plastindia 2012… I have attended Plastindia trade show several times, and am aware of India’s production capacity as well as the fact that India’s plastics industry is also rapidly developing. CPPIA and All India Plastics Manufacturers Association (AIPMA) have been closely cooperating to develop strong bilateral trade between the two countries. Email: spedit@infomedia18.in


PLASTINDIA 201 2: Inter face - Chao Yuen-Chuan

“Taiwan’s mechanical products have attracted several overseas buyers” …opines Chao Yuen-Chuan, CEO and President of the Taiwan External Trade Development Council (TAITRA). Founded in 1970, TAITRA is the foremost non-profit trade promotion organisation in Taiwan. It assists Taiwan’s businesses and manufacturers by reinforcing their international competitiveness. Excerpts of Yuen-Chuan’s conversation with Ringier Trade Media Ltd… How do Taiwan’s mechanical products fare globally? Taiwan is the world’s fifth largest producer of plastics and rubber processing machinery and the fourth major exporting country. Taiwan’s mechanical products with high quality and cost-competitiveness have attracted many overseas buyers. For example, the last edition of Taipei International Plastics & Rubber Industry Show (Taipei PLAS) drew 18 per cent foreign buyers from emerging markets, eg, mainland China, the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand and India, where rising demand for Taiwan-made

plastics machinery in emerging markets was seen.

How has been the export performance of Taiwan’s machinery and equipment in recent times? Taiwan’s machinery and equipment exports grew rapidly between January and September 2011 with export value at $ 15.89 billion, up 28.3 per cent against that in the same period in 2010. Taiwan’s machinery exports in 2011 reached $ 17.2 billion, growing 51.7 per cent over that in the same period in 2010. Taiwan’s plastics and rubber

Table 1: 1999~2010 production, exports, imports and demand for Taiwan plastics and rubber machinery

Resource: Customs Import and Export Statistics Monthly Taiwan Association of Machinery Industry (TAMI)

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machinery exports increased significantly in 2010, with major products being plastic injection and blow moulding machines and extrusion machines.

Plans to make Taiwan’s machinery industry more competitive globally... The Economic Cooperation Framework Agreement (ECFA) signed between Taiwan and mainland China, effective from January 1, 2011, will benefit Taiwan’s machinery industry with gradual reduction in tariffs for Taiwan’s machinery exports to mainland China. This will make Taiwan’s machinery products more competitive in China. Taiwan’s machinery industry has witnessed vast improvement in terms of global competitiveness. The cross-strait ECFA will help Taiwan’s machinery products penetrate the mainland market, but factors that could affect the industry include appreciation of NT Dollar, the formally implemented European Union Korea Free Trade Agreement (FTA) in July 2011, and the US–Republic of Korea FTA likely to be implemented in January 2012. Machinery exports are estimated to grow by 20-25 per cent, which would increase Taiwan’s annual exports of machinery products to over $ 20 billion. Email: spedit@infomedia18.in


INDUSTRY INSIGHT S: Indian plastics market

Engine of global growth The buoyant domestic demand for plastics is driving the growth of compounders and processors, thus boosting employment prospects. As the Indian plastics industry is growing exponentially, it is well poised to provide a lucrative opportunity to the world, and the still untapped market will provide a platform for investments, both foreign & domestic. Vivek Patel

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he global economy is expected to rebound from the economic slowdown and pick up significantly in 2012-13, especially in developing countries. This will give a fillip to the plastics market worldwide. The developing countries were less affected by the recent global economic downturn because of solid domestic demand from China, India and Taiwan to others, and the growth projected for 2012 is encouraging. In contrast, the US and European countries that were hit particularly hard by the economic slump are still struggling to return to sustained growth as demand remains weak for plastics consumption in the US and European markets. The Indian plastics market is now growing and poised for a rapid expansion into large & sustained markets.

Current industry scenario The Indian plastics industry has experienced extraordinary growth over the last five years and caters to a wide assortment of products and household appliances. The current Indian plastics market is estimated at 8.8 Million Metric Tonne (MMT)/annum by volume, mainly due to the bullish demand for Polypropylene (PP) (2.5 MMT) and followed by Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) (2.1 MMT), while by value the current market would be about ` 80,000 crore. This is up 14.5 per cent over the previous year, and the highest growth since 2000. The market is mainly driven by a tremendous growth in packaging, building & construction, consumer goods and automotive industry. A substantial amount is also exported. The per capita 64

plastics consumption reached 7.4 kg in 2010 from 4.6 kg in 2005. The Indian plastics industry has a fragmented structure, consisting of over 26,000 small, mid-sized and large manufactures or fabricators along with 16 major raw material producers across the country. The installed capacities in most small-scale units are smaller than the heavyweight players. There is a balance in the present plastics development pattern of India; however, Indian plastics production is concentrated in the western regions (about 78 per cent of the total, in Maharashtra and Gujarat). The development of plastics material in India’s western, southern and northern regions will boost plastics production and consumption demand. Plastics’ fast growth in India during 2010-11 is the result of brisk demand in the domestic markets and government projects as well. The economy of India is benefiting from rapidly surging domestic and export demand due to various factors

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such as stable political situation, Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) inflow policy and rich human resource. In order to increase plastics consumption in India, some compounders/fabricators are developing a series of grade with a suitable cost/performance ratio and wide scope of application for high-volume production using low-cost technology.

Burgeoning domestic demand Plastics compete with steel, aluminium, composites, wood and concretes. In the Indian materials market, the amount of plastics usage is more than 50 per cent of total steel, aluminium, composites and concretes consumption. The materials industry shows huge potential for growth in its use of plastics, since plastics usage has increased and is now used in more than 50,000 end-use products. The Indian plastics industry has grown 1.5 times the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth, reflecting the upbeat economy and strong macro-economic


Indian plastics market fundamentals as growth drivers. Being the fastest growing market for plastics, India has registered double-digit growth in the past five years. The Indian plastics industry offers an attractive value proposition based on its low-cost manufacturing base, world-class automated processes coupled with strong design and product development expertise. The Indian economy is expected to grow at 8-9 per cent per annum through 2016. India is now the fourth largest economy behind the US, China and Japan, but is likely to become the world’s third largest economy in 2011 by overtaking Japan in terms of GDP measured according to the domestic purchasing power of the Rupee. Plastics correlate well with economic growth, particularly in construction and infrastructure development. In 2012-13, Indian plastics manufacturers/compounders/fabricators will need to expand into these product segments to continue to satisfy a burgeoning domestic demand. Commodity plastics, including Polyethylene (PE), PP and PVC enjoy 85 per cent marketshare of the total Indian plastics industry, thanks to their features like low cost, high performance, industry acceptability and easy formability. Polyolefins (PP & PE) account for about 61 per cent of the total plastics consumption, followed by PVC at 24 per cent and others by 15 per cent, such as engineering plastics, specialty plastics and thermosetting. In FY-11, among commodity polymers, PP has shown a robust growth rate of 17 per cent, followed by PVC (11 per cent) and Low Linear Density Polyethylene (LLDPE) & High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) (13 per cent each). However, LDPE demand reduced by 10 per cent due to widening price delta.

Market outlook The current Indian engineering/ performance/specialty plastics market is around 225 Kilotonne (kt), consisting of 35 per cent of the import market. The overall market represents 2.6 per cent of the total Indian plastics market. Electrical & electronics has the largest marketshare

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At the industry level, the Indian plastics industry is characterised by: High domestic demand potential, as the Indian plastics market develops and per capita consumption (presently, 7.4 kg capita) levels increases High market penetration in highend applications Higher emphasis on exports (currently, only 1.5 per cent share in world export volumes) due to the burgeoning demand from developing countries Low focus on R&D

of 46 per cent, followed by automotive (24.8 per cent) and consumer goods (23.5 per cent), while industrial segment has a meagre 5.8 per cent. PE is the largest consumed commodity plastics, representing 32 per cent of total Indian plastics market. PE demand in FY-11 was 2.8 MMT, and this grew at an impressive 14 per cent over the previous year. In the next five years, PE demand is expected to grow by about 17 per cent, which will accelerate with great demand from packaging film applications and penetration in injection moulded products. In 2016, total PE demand will reach 7.2 MMT. It is expected that about 2.5 MMT per annum of PE capacity will be added in 2013. In FY-11, PP demand in India was 2.5 MMT, which represents a growth of 15 per cent over that in 2009. The market is driven by a healthy growth in Biaxially Oriented Polypropylene (BOPP) films for flexible packaging, bulk packaging for cement, raffia, automobile and Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG) products. In 2016, total PP demand is estimated to be 6.0 MMT, while double-digit growth in the packaging, automotive and FMCG sector will propel PP demand for the next five years. Non-woven PP is another promising area of growth where the demand will be high. About 1 MMT per annum of PP capacity

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is being added within 2013. The excellent growth in LDPE consumption can be attributed to the steadily increasing demand in packaging film, plasticulture and favourable price differential with LLDPE. Healthy growth in PVC consumption is driven by demand from the building and construction including infrastructure (pipes & fittings), wire & cables and footwear sectors. In FY 2011, India imported about 700 KT of PVC. The demand is expected to grow during the next five years with growth in building & construction, and infrastructure is also expected to rise in the future.

Growth forecast The Indian plastics industry is projected to grow at a Compounded Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 16.4 per cent in the next five years. The bullish domestic demand of plastics is the growth driver for compounders/fabrications, and the number of processing units is expected to increase by 30 per cent to about 34,000, which will increase employment opportunity among the plastics technocrats. The Indian plastics Industry is expected to reach 18.8 MMT in 2016, providing a lucrative opportunity to the world as well as its untapped and fragmented market will provide the platform for foreign and domestic investment. The consumption of plastics will increase about 2.5-fold from 2011 to 2016. The commodity plastics will have the largest share at 88 per cent, while polyolefins will remain at about 61 per cent marketshare of total Indian plastics consumption. In India, extrusion-based methods account for 62 per cent of the total plastics processed, followed by injection moulding at 27 per cent. For the plastics business perspective, Gujarat and Maharashtra appear as attractive destinations owing to availability of raw materials, conducive business environment and policy support for investments. Vivek Patel is a Consultant at PolySol. Email: vivepatel@gmail.com


RAW MATERIALS: New -age polymers

Leveraging the potential for excellence In its journey towards scaling new heights, the plastics industry in India is leveraging on the largescale applications of commodity plastics as well as innovations in engineering polymers. Annabel Dsouza relooks at the ability of these materials to address our day-to-day challenges and offer unique solutions.

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he global plastics industry is marked by dynamic growth in quantity and quality aspects propelled by rapid innovations, sustainability concerns and cost pressures.

Growth dynamics Plastics has played a major role in the lifestyle of the 21st century. At present, the global Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is about $ 32 trillion. The value of chemical output alone contributes about 5 per cent of this. Commodity plastics contributes $ 90 billion, that is 5.6 per cent of the entire chemical output, and polyolefin output is $ 61 billion – 3.8 per cent of the chemical output. This gives us an idea of the size of the plastics industry and the significance that it holds in the global scenario. This becomes even more significant when the global polymer industry is growing by almost twice the rate of global GDP. In India, plastics has scripted a growth story of its own. Nitin Shah, Honorary Secretary, Gujarat State Plastics 70

Manufacturers Association, comments, “India is emerging as a global hub for manufacturing. It is therefore imperative to adopt new products, technologies and better manufacturing practices. Performance plastics are high-value products that exhibit exceptional heat resistance, greater chemical and wear resistance, strength & stiffness and offer dimensional stability among other critical properties.”

Commodity polymers growth Commodity plastics is quite an established market, as it is indispensible in every aspect of contemporary life. At present, there are 25,000-30,000 plastics processing units in the country. The domestic demand for common plastics has been growing at 9 per cent and reached a market size of almost 5 million tonne. The plastics industry has been witnessing tremendous growth due to the widening of its application spectrum and penetration of new-generation polymers in all key sectors of the Indian economy. In spite of these records, in comparison to world standards, the size of the Indian plastics industry is small.

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Shah continues, “The potential of the plastics industry has motivated Indian entrepreneurs to acquire technical expertise, achieve high quality standards and build capacities in various facets of the booming plastics industry. Phenomenal developments in the plastics machinery sector coupled with parallel developments in the petrochemical sector, both of which support the plastics processing sector, have facilitated plastics processors to build capacities to service both domestic and export markets.” Commodity plastics in India account for about 85 per cent of the total consumption of plastics, while engineering


MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: Plast Tab-3, Pg No. 71 MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: Plast Tab-3, Pg No. 71


MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: A & D Tab-3, Pg No. 72 MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: A & D Tab-3, Pg No. 72


New -age polymers

The major challenges that come in the way of boosting demand for performance plastics in India are low awareness level of the industry and lack of processing technology, which are interdependent and need to be addressed together. Nitin Shah Honorary Secretary, Gujarat State Plastics Manufacturers Association

and others account for the remaining. The main application of each major plastics is in industrialised areas. The large tonnage of commodity plastics is mainly used for packaging. Three important plastics, namely, Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC), Polypropylene (PP) and Nylon have the widest balanced range of applications. PP is the most diversified of all commodity plastics, with the fastest growth rates. PVC is mostly used for durable and infrastructure applications in building construction and public works. The fastest growing applications are in packaging and Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) bottles. In building construction, plastics constitute only 1-3 per cent of the total material tonnage, but at least 10 per cent of the total value, mainly in secondary construction. The electrical industry is another major consumer of plastics, which includes cables and wires. Rapid growth in applications is seen in agriculture and consumer goods as well.

Innovations in engineering polymers

The Indian market for performance plastics is still a small percentage of the global market. Lack of product awareness, availability issues, high price, smaller base of enduser industries such as healthcare are some of the factors restricting the growth of this market. Mamta Wadhwa Senior Director, Chemicals, Materials and Food Practice, Frost & Sullivan, South Asia, Middle East and North Africa

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There is considerable growth potential in the engineering plastics industry worldwide since untapped opportunities still exist for metal replacement in cars and trucks, household appliances as well as other applications. Growth in Asia will be driven by increasing usage of engineering plastics in segments like electrical & electronics, construction and automotives. Mamta Wadhwa, Senior Director, Chemicals, Materials and Food Practice, Frost & Sullivan, South Asia, Middle East and North Africa, says, “The global market for specialty plastics has shown considerable growth with continuous product and application development. But, the Indian market for performance plastics is still a small percentage of the global market. Lack of product awareness, availability issues, high price, smaller base of end-user industries such as healthcare are some of the factors restricting the growth of this market. This trend is likely to change with changing consumer needs and an increase in the number of end-user industries, coupled with the functional and regulatory compliance norms that these plastics must meet.”

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Demand for engineering plastics is expected to rise globally, driven by the ongoing replacement of metal parts with high-performance plastics. Engineering plastics in India has grown at a fast pace, although the market size is not as large as some other Asian countries. However, this is likely to change as more Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), particularly in the automotive industry, plan to establish plants in India. With India becoming an automotive hub, and the electrical & electronics market witnessing a boom, the demand for engineering plastics in India is set to grow rapidly. The focus, at present, is on engineering plastics for the development of new chemical materials. Conventional material is no longer considered to be sufficient to cater to demands of current applications. In modern times, engineering plastics are perceived to be essential and these are being widely applied in every sector of the global economy. The global market for engineering plastics is projected to grow at a compounded annual growth rate of 9.5 per cent over the next 10 years. The growth in consumption of engineering plastics on an average annual basis is likely to reach 3 million tonne – 18 per cent of the total demand – in 2013.

Business ahead Anticipating a promising growth for the industry, plastics manufacturers today are placing more emphasis on performance plastics. Most of these plastics offer tremendous value in the automotive, electrical & electronics and healthcare segments. Shah concludes, “Though the initial price is high, performance plastics can help reduce the long-term cost, which includes processing cost of the fabricated product. The major challenges that come in the way of boosting demand for performance plastics in India are low awareness level of the industry and lack of processing technology, which are interdependent and need to be addressed together.” Email: annabel.dsouza@infomedia18.in


RAW MATERIALS: Innovation index

Invigorating the world of plastics With a rapidly booming plastics industry in India, the additives and masterbatches sector carries a veritable influence on the scope of indigenous innovations. Considering their significance in driving growth of specialty and engineering polymers, Lionel Alva assesses some of the changing dynamics of the additives & masterbatches industry.

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dditives and masterbatches constitute a highly successful and an essential segment of the global plastics industry. Global industry analysts predict that the world masterbatch additive market will reach $ 8.25 billion by 2017. The last 15 years have witnessed a constantly increasing impact of additive and masterbatches in applications such as antistatics, foaming agents and flame retardancy. Technology developments that help impart desired colour and property to the polymer and simultaneously reduce its cost will aid in turbo charging the market’s growth in medium to long term, especially given the evolving demand among end-user industries for highperformance and functional products.

Understanding the industry The use of concentrated additive masterbatches and sophisticated material delivery systems gives high confidence in polymer compounding. Other 76

important reasons for choosing additive masterbatches instead of pure additives are the physical form, dosability, ease of handling, homogeneous mixing, safety, additive protection and improvement of performance, influence of carrier system, supplier experience and cost. Porous polyolefin carriers offer masterbatch suppliers an inexpensive and simple way of producing high concentrates without having to use an extruder. Pure additives usually require specific handling. Some additives have to be dispersed like pigments to avoid agglomeration, while some others need to be intensively kneaded. It is difficult to select processing conditions that offer simultaneously an optimum on mixing/dispersing/kneading/ dissolving efficiency as required for processing of additives with different properties. Masterbatches go to some extent to overcome these problems. Nikhil Tibrewala, Director, Avi Additives Pvt Ltd, observes, “The Indian polymers industry is growing year-on-

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year at twice the rate of the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Since the growth in additives and masterbatches industry is directly proportional to that of the polymers sector, the prospects for additives segment in India appear bright. As competition among plastics processors is intensifying, and each one is looking for differentiation, they have to fall back on additives to provide the niche they seek.”

R&D drives industrial growth Some materials that have been sold for over 20 years are regarded today as commodity chemicals, particularly when patents covering their use have expired.


Innovation index

Additives can not only help plastics retain its performance characteristics in an aggressive environment, but can also add new attributes and functions via advanced light management. Nikhil Tibrewala Director, Avi Additives Pvt Ltd

Others, however, have a shorter life or disappear without a trace, eg, when the production process cannot be made suitably economic, unforeseen toxicity occurs or a new generation of additive renders them technically obsolete. Additives for plastics must be seen in the larger context of specialty chemicals. Thus, this requires considerable innovation and knowledge of technical application. Research and Development (R&D) is essential and global operations are vital in this area. Tibrewala highlights the importance of additives, “Additives can not only help plastics retain its performance characteristics in an aggressive environment, but can also add new attributes and functions via advanced light management. These developments help the processors maximise returns on their investments by eliminating some of the shortcomings inherent in agro-plastics.”

Significant breakthroughs in recent times The past year has been a rather exciting period for the additives and masterbatches industry with several key developments: 1. Developments in antimicrobial masterbatches with silver-based technologies: As a metal, silver 78

is well known for its antimicrobial effects. Silver ions and compounds have a toxic effect on some bacteria, viruses, algae and fungi, typical for heavy metals like lead or mercury, but without the high toxicity to humans normally associated with other metals. There has been a renewed interest in silver as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent. The industry has seen several developments in antimicrobial masterbatches with silver-based technologies to reduce the hazards of Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI). Covering a broad antimicrobial spectrum, including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, this technology is effective against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and VancomycinResistant Enterococcus (VRE). 2. Additive systems improve longterm scratch and mar resistance of plastics automotive products: The luxury impression of an automobile’s interior largely depends on the surface quality of the plastics interior trim parts. In higher level vehicles, this is achieved by covering the plastic surfaces with Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) or Thermoplastic Olefin (TPO) skins, fabrics or paint. However, cost constraints influence the use of unpainted, moulded colour plastic parts in most vehicles. Typical materials currently used for these parts are Polypropylene (PP), talc-filled PP, talc-filled TPO, AcrylonitrileButadiene Styrene (ABS), Polyamide (PA)/ABS and Polycarbonate (PC)/ABS. The essential factors of these plastic part surfaces are low gloss appearance with good scratch and abrasion resistance, which has improved through extensive development efforts over the past several years. 3. Developments in masterbatch technology helps colour-rigid PVC: One of the major problems associated with PVCu processing is its resistance to flow, which is not uniform. When

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

filled with large quantities of pigment, this problem increases significantly and, coupled with its heat sensitivity, it becomes a major hurdle to overcome. With flexible PVC, the incorporation of plasticisers negates this tendency, but for PVCu, other ways are required to overcome these difficulties. The essence of the new technology for producing masterbatches that allow adding colour successfully to PVCu is a combination of two additive systems used in the formulation. 4. Processing aids High-molecular-weight acrylate processing aids are used to help the material flow smoothly. These reduce melt viscosity, overcome melt fracture and reduce shear burning. Selection of these aids can depend on application (eg, when manufacturing tints for crystal compounds as some grades impart a haze or opalescence into PVCu). 5. Lubricants Lubricants fall into two categories – internal and external. Internal lubricants help reduce frictional forces between the polymer molecules and/or pigment. This generally aids dispersion and lubricates the melt flow (increase flowability at lower temperatures). This technology produces masterbatches that work both in rigid and flexible grades without any of the inherent compatibility and homogenisation problems.

Challenges faced by the industry The bottom line on the use of any additive is the desired level of performance. The additive package formulation must achieve cost-effectively the performance required for a given application. In the past, complaints about plastics articles were common. But, use of additives has some potential disadvantages as well. Many people have been influenced by a widespread public suspicion of chemicals in general. Technological actions must be taken within a strict environment, which regulates potential hazards of chemicals in the workplace. Email: lionel.alva@infomedia18.in


PROCESSING MACHINERY: Quality drivers

Propelling performance Plastics processors are continuously involved in making new-generation performance machines with modern technology, productivity and performance levels so as to compete with global players. Avani Jain analyses some of the novel innovations making headway in the plastics processing machinery segment for enhancing quality and efficiency of machines.

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he Indian plastics processing machiner y industr y is incessantly setting up new highs year over year thanks to the increased ability of Indian machinery suppliers to accommodate better technologies available in the world in their machines. Further, the presence of internationally renowned major players in injection moulding, blow moulding and extrusion sectors has bolstered the industry’s growth. In fact, the plastics processing machinery segment in India is growing at a record 15 per cent in the country. In the recent past, the plastics processing industry has witnessed some of the major innovations, which will have a long-term impact on the functioning of machines. With cost reduction, quality improvement and energy efficiency being the major driving forces, the plastics processing industry offers a comprehensive choice of technologies and application techniques. Jaymin 80

Pithwa, Director, Konark Plastomech Pvt Ltd, notes, “Every day, the companies are developing new technologies, which can help minimise mechanical losses, reduce energy consumption of machines and generate maximum output at a lower cost.” Some of the major trends for increasing the operating efficiency in all sectors of plastics processing machinery segment like injection moulding, blow moulding and extrusion include increased usage of servo motors, Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system, Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) system, Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machines, etc.

Technology for energy efficiency Looking at the injection moulding machinery segment, the all-electric injection moulding machines are increasingly becoming popular due to their energy efficiency, greater cleanliness, quick start up, better

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

repeatability and noiseless operations. These help in substantial reduction in maintenance cost as the electric machine eliminates the need for hydraulic oil, obviating the need to store, dispose, maintain and cool the oil. Praveen Sharma, Proprietor, Hind Machineries, avers, “The only disadvantage with these machines at present is their higher cost as compared to conventional hydraulic systems, and that only few companies in India make these machines. These machines cannot go beyond certain tonnage, eg, 100-140 tonne, and thus are not appropriate for large productions. Nevertheless, these


Processing machiner y

Every day, the companies are developing new technologies, which can help minimise mechanical losses, reduce energy consumption of machines and generate maximum output at a lower cost. Jaymin Pithwa Director, Konark Plastomech Pvt Ltd

machines will be the future of the injection moulding machinery segment.” Another technology that has helped the plastic processing machinery segment in reducing the energy consumption is the new servo motor. This motor seems to be the buzzword in the plastic processing machinery segment, as almost every processor is talking about it and think of it as the future of the industry. Sharma notes, “Servo motors help in reducing energy consumption by about 60 per cent. These occupy less space. The existing normal electric/fuel-driven motors transmit power to various points of movements through gears, chains, belts and pulleys, which are heavier & bigger. While in servo motors, all movements in the machine are powered by appropriate size of motors controlled by drives and sensors, which are smaller, lighter & convenient.”

Precise and faster operations

The CNC machines have revolutionised the machining processes as the parts now need not be manufactured manually. This has helped in making highly precise machines and minimise chances of errors. Praveen Sharma Proprietor, Hind Machineries

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Enhancing the quality of the machine means not only reducing energy consumption, but also reducing waste and increasing speed. Pithwa notes, “Today, the motive of every company is to reduce wastage in order to become environment-friendly. Here comes the benefit of SCADA-based system, which refers to centralised systems that monitor and control complex systems spread over large areas. The machines with this system help in achieving zero rejection. It also makes the manufacturer’s work easy as there is no need to set parameters of a repeated process every time because the machine will do that automatically according to the commands given.” With respect to the importance of waste reduction and increasing machine speed of machines to facilitate increasing production, Sharma notes, “The usage of PLC systems and SCADA systems have helped increase the speed of the machine. The PLC systems reduce the scanning time and the process is initiated within few minutes.” At present, plastic processing manufacturing companies use CNC machines for manufacturing of their

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key components. Sharma notes, “The CNC machines have revolutionised the machining processes as the parts now need not be manufactured manually. This has helped in making highly precise machines and minimise chances of errors.”

Efficiency through automation In order to ensure consistent quality and greater production efficiencies to offset high cost of raw materials, customers are moving towards the use of automation and robotics. Thus, automation technologies have gained the due attention from plastic processing machinery companies. Pithwa notes, “Today’s customers want highly automatic and synchronised systems so as to improve their product quality and efficiency. Although priced slightly higher, the highly automatic machines will be the demand of every customer in the future. Further, automation reduces the overhead cost of the companies, as they need not employ a large number of workers.”

Future potential To meet the future growth potential of the plastics industry, the Indian plastic processing segment needs to bring in new technology and scale up the installed capacities to remain competitive in the volatile economic environment. The influence of global brands on the Indian machinery landscape has further raised the quality bar in terms of technology collaborations. Industry experts believe that the phenomenal success of the Indian plastics industry would continue in the coming years due to increased usage of plastics in various sectors like packaging, automotive, electronic, household and medical. In future, the expectation from new machines would be more from less. In the competitive world, machines with higher output and lower power consumption per unit of output will only be the winners. Thus far, the innovations that have made headway in the sector will surely have a long-term impact on the industry and form a basis for future advancements. Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in


PROCESSING MACHINERY: Price concerns

Competitive propositions by Indian SMEs Due to low prices of machines, Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) seem to give significant competition to companies in the organised sector, which include large-scale companies in the country. Avani Jain analyses the reasons behind growth of SMEs in the plastics processing industry in India and strategies adopted by entrepreneurs for attractive pricing.

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he Indian plastics industry has been growing at a rate of 12 per cent over the years. Packaging, electronics, telecommunication, inf rastructure, transportation, healthcare and consumer durables are some of the fast growing sectors of the Indian economy, offering growth for plastics consumption. This has given a boost to the plastics processing machinery segment as well.

Market scenario India’s plastics processing sector is expected to grow from 69,000 machines to 150,000 machines by 2020. This tremendous growth of the plastics processing machinery segment has further boosted the confidence of the plastics processors, especially the Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in the country. Moreover, the upgradation 84

of machinery, more than sufficient availability of raw materials and the ‘never say die’ attitude of the Indian entrepreneur f rom the SMEs have accelerated this growth. Of the total firms in the plastics processing machinery sector, a majority are SMEs, ie, barring 10-15 per cent of the firms, which can be classified as large-scale operations, all units operate on a medium- and small-scale basis. Further, more than 95 per cent of the firms in the industry are partnership, proprietorship or private limited companies. Despite the small size of operations of SMEs, they are able to operate profitably. Uday Shah, Director, Star Technocrates Pvt Ltd, notes, “The market has been good since the last few years. However, the SMEs are witnessing few issues related to dispatches,

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as there is liquidity crunch, but as far as orders are concern, there is continuous demand.” It is observed that the demand for lowcapacity machines in developing countries like India is propelling the growth of Indian SMEs. Shah notes, “There is a trend in India that companies will buy four machines, which are lower in prices as against one machine that is expensive.”

Ensuring price efficiency One of the major reasons that has helped the SMEs to gain a stronghold in the Indian plastics processing machinery market is that the machines made by


Price concerns

Large- versus small-scale industries

As SME owners have begun visiting various exhibitions, they are trying to re-engineer their own machines based on the observations and make similar machines. Thus, the quality of machines offered by them is gradually improving. Uday Shah Director, Star Technocrates Pvt Ltd

them are priced lower than the products offered by large-scale or multinational companies. Shah cites the reason, “First, the SMEs buy raw materials, motors, drives from the local market, which facilitates cost reduction. Second, the manufacturing facilities are smaller in size, so big investments are not needed. Third, most SMEs are familyrun businesses where entrepreneurs work themselves, so they cut down on overheads. Last, they buy raw materials from the vendor on a credit basis and sell it to the customer in cash, which is then used to repay the vendors. Therefore, the SMEs are not investing anything of their own to make the machine. This trend might pose a challenge to large-scale units in future.”

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The market is divided into two segments – one that comprises fairly young companies that are involved in producing lower quantities and the other, which includes companies producing large quantities. The former buys machines from the SMEs and the latter prefers to buy from large-scale companies. Generally, the start-ups buy their machines from the SMEs, but when they reach a certain level and grow, they start exploring machines that require minimum maintenance and form an asset base for the company. Thus, the two – large-scale companies and SMEs – will co-exist as there will always be beginners as well as those who have established themselves over a period. Shah opines, “However, they can pose a challenge to each on certain grounds. Like for an SME, the challenge is to produce large-capacity machines, which requires large capital investments. Talking about large-scale companies, the machines made by them have a higher shelf life as against machines offered by SMEs, which have a life of only 2-3 years. Therefore, in the long run, the machines purchased from largescale companies would prove less costly. Thus, it is only the investment cost and non-requirement of a large processor, which prevents the customer f rom buying from large-scale companies.”

Changing trends The Indian SMEs are witnessing a lot of new trends. “As SME owners have begun visiting various exhibitions, they are trying to re-engineer their own machines based on the observations and make similar machines. Thus, the

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quality of machines offered by them is gradually improving. This trend will be seen more often in the future.” He adds, “In India, there is always a thinking that only the machine needs to work well, while all other things are secondary. Thus, the major focus is on the operational efficiency of the machine, but the trend is changing and the SMEs are increasingly making efforts to improve the appearance of their machines. Moreover, with all foreign companies coming in, energyefficient motors, drives, etc are easily avaiable at a cheaper price to the SMEs. Hence, the efficiency of machines made by SMEs is improving day by day.” The SMEs are also continuously involved in innovations. Shah notes, “A lot of SMEs are involved in bringing in new technologies and ideas, but they were earlier not aware of how to get their products patented. Today, the awareness about the same is increasing.”

Future outlook The future prospects of Indian SMEs in the plastics processing machinery sector is bright. However, India needs to gear up for international markets like Taiwan and China, which are offering quality machines at reasonable prices. Thus, the need of the hour is a collective show of strength by Indian SMEs. They should come together and mark their presence on the world map, leaving behind their internal competition. It can be said that the Indian plastics processing machinery sector has a significant presence of the unorganised sector, which accounts for more than 70 per cent of the industry’s turnover. These firms provide a significant level of competition to the organised sector, mainly on grounds of affordable prices. However, since both sectors have different customer bases, they will flourish. However, there is a need to build a proper brand image to survive against the probable competition posed by each other in the near future. Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in


R&D: Plastics in niche applications

Focus on futuristic solutions As a cross-sectional material, plastics is vital to technological innovations across the application spectrum. With medical-grade plastics as a benchmark, Annabel Dsouza outlines some of the futuristic solutions that are establishing India as an R&D hub for the plastics industry. Courtesy: Bayer MaterialScience

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ith India emerging as a global hub for manufacturing, it is imperative to adopt new products, technologies and better manufacturing practices. Plastics processing in India is currently on its journey towards quality solutions, and the subsequent growth in volumes and the industry is striving to keep pace with rapid innovations across the application spectrum. Apart from their conventional advantages of heat resistance, greater chemical and wear resistance, strength & stiffness, plastics offer dimensional stability and design flexibility. Although the initial price is high, performance plastics improve the lifetime cost, which includes processing cost of the fabricated product. In order to overcome some of the major challenges that inhibit further demand for performance plastics across the nation, the polymer processing fraternity is undertaking vast research initiatives to address the pertinent 88

challenges of the Indian industry while also creating export potential. Innovative plastics manufacturing and processing companies play a signiďŹ cant role in shaping India’s plastics market.

Growth drivers Innovations with a particularly high value chain potential are in the development pipeline, which can accordingly be transformed into marketable products and services. The existing value-chain system recognises the fact that plastics not only makes sustainable solutions a reality, but that it is also a long-term driver of market growth. For that reason, innovative networks and chemical–plastics industry clusters are present along the entire value chain of raw materials suppliers, plastics manufacturers, processors, machinery manufacturers, product distributors, and plastics end-of-life businesses. In this regard, the industry is actively strengthening its Research and Development (R&D) positioning

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in the area of polymer composites, nanocomposites, biopolymers, functional plastics, carbon nanotubes, polymer membranes, conducting polymers, fuel cells, synthesis and characterisation of smart materials as well as in the field of technology and product development in niche sectors.

Innovations index Innovations on the research & technology front are introducing the medical devices industry to unique benefits of performance polymers. Medical application has its own set of challenges pertaining to high heat and UV endurance & biostability.


MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: Himalya Tab-4, Pg No. 89 MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: Himalya Tab-4, Pg No. 89


MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: HPMC Tab-4, Pg No. 90 MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: HPMC Tab-4, Pg No. 90


Plastics in niche applications

Processors are now developing applications that range from highly functional coatings and specialpurpose adhesives & plasters for wound dressings to thermoplastics for surgical & diagnostic instruments. Tim Uhrmeister Head of Polycarbonates, Bayer MaterialScience India

dressings to thermoplastics for surgical & diagnostic instruments.” Apart f rom R&D in medical plastics, developments in manufacturing technology and superior technical properties offered by engineering polymers often make it possible to use mineral resources more economically. For example, in metallurgy, near net-shape casting and powder metallurgy can reduce machining requirements by more than 50 per cent and materials by about 30 per cent. The integration of the information industry with manufacturing offers further scope for materials saving. The use of CAD/CAM, adaptive robot systems and computer modeling of functions will help reduce over-design and give adequate strength where required. Such advancements in manufacturing methods and processes constitute a second major area of research.

Overcoming challenges Plastics is an ideal class of materials that cover large application areas in healthcare due to their lightweight, biocompatibility, non-corrosive nature, chemical inertness, low cost and densities comparable with those of human organs. In some cases, they may contain additives or reinforcing agents to modify and/or enhance properties. Plastics used in medical applications must adhere to rigid national and international standards and also be non-toxic, non-carcinogenic, biocompatible and in no way injurious to the biological environment. Tim Uhrmeister, Head-Polycarbonates, Bayer MaterialScience India, says,“In supplying innovation to the world of health by furthering developments and discoveries in medical technology, specialty plastics is extending its range of applications to enhance design, manufacturing, end-use performance for various medical devices and packaging applications. By supplying polyurethane materials and thermoplastic materials and films to manufacturers of medical products, processors are developing applications that range from highly functional coatings and specialpurpose adhesives and plasters for wound 92

In accordance with a general policy of creating a wide-spectrum competence, India carries out materials science research in various fields. Despite its efforts at self-reliance, India has realised the benefits of cooperation with other developed and developing countries in scientific research. International cooperation strengthens national capability in terms of gaining access to latest developments, modernising inf rastructure, enhancing skills and promoting the capability to generate new products & processes. Its greatest benefit could, however, be in benchmarking, knowing where we stand in a specific field in comparison with others. It can also be a means of promoting joint ventures and for sharing of capabilities. The materials revolution is considered as the major driving force for a new industrial paradigm. It is characterised by two decisive breaks with past practice: (1) greater input of knowledge in the materials industry, as opposed to inputs of raw materials and energy; and (ii) creation of specific properties for materials according to need. Advancements in areas like

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theoretical understanding of physical and biological matter, experimental techniques and processing technology have now enabled designing of materials to meet specific demands, and these are called the ‘new’ or ‘advanced’ materials. Polymer technology research has become one of the major driving forces for change in the modern era. Further, to maintain or create global competitiveness, all countries are investing in R&D in this area, with the hope of creating new opportunities in industries. India has also started major research programmes in the material science area, involving a large number of universities and research agencies.

Future scope Materials science research has taken off in India in recent years, though it is still confined to academic level. Applicationoriented research is minimal. Substantial activity takes place in the theoretical area. The preferred areas of collaboration with major countries include superconductivity, metals & alloys and electronic & magnetic materials. Areas such as commodity plastics, performance polymer and metal matrix composites need to be strengthened further since they can contribute to industrial production more than other areas, eg, superconducting materials. Uhrmeister concludes, “Overall, innovations in plastics processing and design are directed towards driving technological change in all three segments of construction, healthcare and automotive, as we consider these key industries to overcome the challenges of global megatrends – particularly technology changes, growing population and urbanisation, healthcare revolution and climate change. These megatrends will, in turn, drive the growth in the field of performance polymers and facilitate continued growth. The latest developments and success stories of polymers globally as well as in India underline that its potential is unlimited and that the future has just begun.” Email: annabel.dsouza@infomedia18.in


R&D: Knowledge investment

Progress through people power With significant progress in various spheres of science and technology over the years, today, India takes pride in having a strong network of research & development institutions, trained manpower and an innovative knowledge base. Annabel Dsouza underlines the role of Indian innovation and acumen in driving the plastics industry at home as well as internationally.

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ndia owes much of its economic prowess to its manufacturing sector driven by globally competitive processes and personnel. Despite recent setbacks in India’s industrial production, it is universally acknowledged that the growth in India cannot be reversed and manufacturing will regain its giant strides. The long-term competitive ability of Indian firms depends on production efficiency, which, in turn, relies on the ability to develop, import and adapt to new technologies and innovations. This is particularly true for the Indian plastics industry, which is growing exponentially in volume as well as application portfolio.

Need for Research and Development (R&D) Given the rapid pace of globalisation, fastdepleting material resources, increasing competition among nations and the growing need to protect intellectual property, it is important to strengthen the knowledge base. While India’s technical talent is recognised the world over, there 94

have been serious institutional gaps in promoting interaction between industry and research institutions. In keeping with the nation’s ambitious development goals, the Indian government has put in significant effort towards strengthening the scientific and technical infrastructure of the country. With more than 250 universities, 1,500 research institutions and 10,428 higher education institutes, India churns out 200,000 engineering graduates and another 300,000 technically trained graduates every year. The combination of state-of-the-art infrastructure and highly qualified manpower ensures that India is poised to be the next global R&D hub. This is increasingly being observed in the plastics processing industry as large multinationals like GE, BASF and Dupont, have opened there R&D centres in India – a first outside their home countries for most of these companies. The cost arbitrage provides immediate incentives for corporations to source high-quality research output from India.

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Advantage for industry With regard to plastics processing, global companies in India are primarily focussing on key growth drivers like automotive and packaging applications. For example, DuPont India has recently inaugurated its Innovation Center in Pune, which serves as a collaborative platform for automotive Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) and component & system manufacturers to come together to support the Indian automotive industry. The companies’ goal is to partner for science-powered solutions that fuel innovation and


Knowledge investment

Technological collaboration is the key to addressing growth in the automotive plastics segment, and this is the approach taken by all auto manufacturers the world over. Amandeep Singh Cheema Business Leader, DuPont Performance Polymers – India, and Project Leader for DuPont India Innovation Center

Until new companies employing cutting-edge technology are established and the existing ones simultaneously upgraded, it would be difficult for the plastics industry to achieve the expected growth in the competitive global market. Dr S C Shit Deputy Director, Central Institute of Plastics Engineering & Technology (CIPET), Ahmedabad

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application development along with customers & partners – in any part of the world. Amandeep Singh Cheema, Business Leader, DuPont Performance Polymers – India, and Project Leader for DuPont India Innovation Center, opines, “Technological collaboration is the key to addressing growth in the automotive plastics segment, and this is the approach taken by all auto manufacturers the world over. Establishing R&D centres is an important step towards staying focussed on the demands of the market in India and developing new technologies to support growth plans.” This makes India second only to the US and ahead of some other more established hubs, such as Japan, Israel and Western Europe, and, for that matter, China. India may be behind China in manufacturing but has taken an early lead in attracting R&D investments. Although India is not yet near the big league of developed economies, it is certainly emerging as a serious contender as a base for new offshore R&D centres. Cheema continues, “The approach should be directed towards a globally collaborative partnership, offering innovative solutions to meet growing needs of the domestic industry. We are committed to leading collaborative and inclusive innovations to respond to challenges facing the world today. Collaboration is the driving force behind establishment of country-focussed innovation centres.”

Academic edge India has a network of scientific and academic institutions engaged in a wide spectrum of research, with research carried out in about 250 research laboratories and institutions. A large part of these belong to scientific ministries. A few research organisations under nonscientific ministries and their public sector industries carry out research programmes of relevance to respective ministries. Most of the research in the academic sector receive financial support from various scientific agencies of the government, namely, Department of

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Space, Department of Atomic Energy, Department of Science & Technology, Department of Biotechnology, University Grants Commission and others. In recent years, several non-scientific ministries have also offered to fund R&D in the project mode with the participation of public and private industry as well as academic institutions. This has given a new synergy to promotion of technology in the areas of concern. Apart from Central Government directives, State Governments are playing an increasing important role in promoting the plastics industry in a given region. Dr S C Shit, Deputy Director, Central Institute of Plastics Engineering & Technology (CIPET), Ahmedabad, says, “It would be difficult for new industries to manage manpower with required skills. To meet this gap, Gujarat Government has initiated some efforts by way of introduction of short-term courses through Anchor Institute and Tribal Development Department. But this would fulfill the demand only up to a certain level.” He continues, “The plastics sector in Gujarat contributes a lot to the state’s petrochemicals-based economy. Until new companies employing cuttingedge technology are established and the existing ones simultaneously upgraded, it would be difficult for the plastics industry to achieve the expected growth in the competitive global market.”

Industry-academia exposure India has been spending 0.8 per cent of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in R&D, which is much less than 2-3 per cent range among most of the developed countries. Even China and Brazil spend more than India on R&D. This is reflected in the relatively poor rankings in innovation in the global competitive index. In order to accelerate the pace of industrial output and overall economic development, the need of the hour is to strike the right balance between academic foundation and industry exposure. Only then will India realise its true potential as the global reservoir of talent and intelligence. Email: annabel.dsouza@infomedia18.in


QUALIT Y ASSURANCE: Food & pharma packaging

Raising the safety bar Food and pharma packaging has evolved with improved processing and packaging practices. Products in these sectors require packages that display all possible information to improve the quality, efficiency and sustainability of processing & packaging. Anwesh Koley highlights the trends towards innovations in the food and pharma packaging sectors. Courtesy: pillar5pharma

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he word packaging encompasses immense considerations and connotations that include physical protection of the product, which involves preventing its exposure to oxygen, water vapour and dust. Effective packaging helps in reducing pilferage, portion control, safe and convenient transportation as well as hygienic storage conditions. It ensures that the product reaches in immaculate condition to the end user.

Quality considerations Quality should be an indispensable consideration in any sector or production process and is integral to the packaging industry, which cannot survive without it. Considering the vulnerability of food and pharma products to external influences, manufacturers must adhere to stringent norms that are essential for product durability. Suresh Singhal, Managing Director, Himalayan Group of Industries, says, “It is unfortunate that quality control 98

does not enjoy a status of prominence in many industries and is rather considered as waste of time, manpower, money and energy. In fact, packaging plays a crucial role in reducing waste across the supply chain and enhances the quality and life of the product manufactured.�

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Progressing with time The Indian food and pharmaceutical packaging business is evolving into a specialised industry. This is supported by a rising confidence of developed countries in domestic pharma and food companies. With rampant malpractices and counterfeit issues in the Indian market, there is a strong trend towards traceability of the product, particularly in pharma companies. Multinational packaging companies have discovered the growth potential in India, and thus set up base here to reap benefits from this growth. This, in turn, has raised the bar on quality and technology of the packaging material, thereby easing the entry into the regulated market.

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Food and pharma products have a direct impact on human life. Therefore, it is even more important that stringent quality regulations are adopted not only at the production level, but extra caution is executed while packing them so as to retain their basic quality. The packaging material should be manufactured in a clean, hygienic and aseptic environment. Strict quality control systems should be implemented right from inception to the final stage of production and packaging. “As businessmen and entrepreneurs working zealously for the benefit of society, it is our moral duty to go ahead and urgently adopt the latest quality control mechanism


Food & pharma packaging

To ensure safety of the domestic and global food supply, government regulations and brand protection demands from customers are on the rise. Thus, to address these growing requirements, food processors across the supply chain have introduced traceability systems. Suresh Singhal Managing Director, Himalayan Group of Industries

in our industries.” adds Singhal. It cannot be denied that automation and use of advanced technology plays a vital role in providing for healthy, aseptic and hygienic packaging of pharma and food products.

Innovations witnessed Innovation and solution providing are the key for success in the demanding and dynamic market of blister and highvisibility packaging for food products. “It is our mission to stay up-to-date on key packaging developments related to blister and high-visibility packaging and also share this knowledge with our customers in order to achieve breakthrough packaging solutions,” adds Singhal. Driven by an increasing demand for quality, innovations in the field of pharmaceutical packaging have also been pushed in the same direction. Keeping in view the demand from the industry, packaging companies have made considerable efforts to develop packs that are senior-friendly,

child-resistant, tamper-evident and patient-interactive. These are on par with the global standards. In particular, for the food industry, packaging represents the starting point of the value chain. The quality of the product impacts all further steps within the process, and its steady supply is the precondition to make medical products available when and where needed. Food products require materials having high barrier properties in order to prevent contamination of the food material inside. Manufacturers of pharma packaging are investing in more modern machinery equipment to maximise outputs and reach a higher quality level. This trend is also supported by pharma companies that export their products to other countries and regions as well as upcoming biotech companies. Stable supply and high product quality are key success factors as far as the packaging side is concerned. This also has an impact on the producers of raw material and glass tubing, which are used by converter companies for production of pharmaceutical containers. Unlike food packaging, pharma packaging companies do not need to focus on a high shelf-life of the product.

Key challenges faced Pre-packaged foodstuffs must comply with compulsory harmonised standards in labeling and advertising. The details that must appear on packaging include the name under which the product is sold, a list of ingredients and quantities, potential allergens (products that may cause allergies), minimum durability date and conditions for storage. In many countries, nutritional information is also required. “To ensure safety of the domestic and global food supply, government regulations and brand protection demands from customers are on the rise. Thus, to address these growing requirements, food processors across the supply chain have introduced traceability systems,” adds Singhal. There are a few more steps that need to be ensured for food packaging quality. The packaging design should meet market

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criteria for performance and cost. It should be manufactured using clean production technologies through best practices and the materials used should be suitable for enduring all-weather conditions. It should be physically designed to optimise material and energy use. The key challenge facing the pharma packaging industry is educating business houses along the entire value chain on processing of packaging material with all its facets. This includes special topics like drug-container interaction, adsorption, chemical resistance and stability of packaging and freeze-drying of certain pharmaceutical agents. Cost has always been a cause of concern for the Indian pharma packaging producers. While the standards must not be compromised below global levels, pharma industries, in general, are not prepared to spend at the same level in India. Hence, balancing the two factors is always a challenge.

The way ahead As an emerging and sunrise industry in India, packaging is all set to grow in terms of quality, innovation and consistency of the product due to the global exposure. In the injectables industry, the focus is currently on shifting to tighter dimensional control, cosmetic properties and a higher stability of the drugs. This is mainly driven by the demand to stand out in the domestic market as well as compete in the international market. The market is roughly divided into 75 per cent of rigid packaging and 25 per cent flexible. The future growth in the flexible industry will be higher as more and more manufacturers are moving in this direction. In developed countries the percentage of flexible packaging is much higher. With more flexible packaging coming into the country, companies can be expected to comply with prescribed norms and the policy makers can be expected to formulate more extensive guidelines, which enable the Indian food and pharma packaging industry to attain global dominance. Email: anwesh.koley@infomedia18.in


QUALIT Y ASSURANCE: Seamless processing

Performance meets profitability Automation in the plastics industry continues to expand as manufacturers across the world are recognising the benefits of robots in everyday operations. This enhances production efficiency and reduces waste, thus increasing productivity. Anwesh Koley takes a closer look at the benefits of automation in the plastics industry. Courtesy: Reisrobotics

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riven by continuous innovation and demand to meet the ever-evolving performance benchmarks, the plastics industry has always been at the forefront of adoption of automation technologies. Primary processing machinery, post-production machinery, auxiliary machines form a diverse range of machines and technologies, which results in diverse demands for control and automation technologies. Varied control disciplines such as sequence control, process control, synchronised speed control, motion control and visualisation, individually or in combination, based on machine types are key control requirements across the plastic machinery segment. Globalisation and changing lifestyles are affecting every industry. Huge consumer demand driving the retail boom is changing the way products are sold, and this is impacting the packaging, aesthetics, shorter life cycles and competitiveness. Being the key industry in the supply chain, it is also affecting the demands and

needs from the plastics industry, including manufacturers and machine builders. Khalil Nathani, General Manager-OEM, Rockwell Automation India Pvt Ltd, says, “Manufacturers in this highly competitive world are continuously demanding machines to drive higher productivity, flexibility, better quality and shorter life cycle costs. Machine builders are responding by adopting new technologies and enhancing use of automation systems to meet these demands. This is further driving demand for automation products and their adoption in the plastics industry.”

Latest technologies Evolution of automation technologies enables convergence of multi-discipline control function on a common control platform. Modern ‘Integrated Architecture’ is an efficient and optimum response to these control system requirements, offering multi-discipline, scalable and information-enabled control platform for machine builders.

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Machine builders are moving towards advanced process control capabilities in the controller for better control of variables like pressure and temperature that impact product quality. This is driving control manufacturers to have capabilities in their offerings. Human Machine Interfaces (HMIs), classically used for parameter setting and alarm annunciation, are being considered for managing product recipes, machine performance and enhanced diagnostics to make machines more informative and user-friendly. Machine builders are also adopting high-performance AC drive systems enabling tight synchronisation to challenge


Seamless processing

Manufacturers in this highly competitive world are continuously demanding machines to drive higher productivity, flexibility, better quality and shorter life cycle costs. Machine builders are responding by adopting new technologies and enhancing use of automation systems to meet these demands. Khalil Nathani General Manager-OEM, Rockwell Automation India Pvt Ltd

regenerative atmosphere between various motors across the machines, helping to enhance product quality. The high-response drive system control also enables scaling up the linear speeds of machines, realising higher productivity without compromising product quality. This impacts maximum asset utilisation and returns on the endusers’ investments. Post-production machinery segment had witnessed increased adoption of electric solution against conventional hydraulic/ mechanical actuators for realising enhanced machine speeds, compact machine footprint and low power consumption. “Evolution of electric motion capabilities, such as electronic CAMs, has helped machine builders to further affect the end-user competitiveness that facilitates machine flexibility. This decreases the burden of keeping change parts, faster product changeover time and low wear & tear, thereby reducing maintenance needs,” avers Nathani. As machine speeds are ramping up, there is a need for appropriate sensing,

monitoring and control of elements that offer inherent safety for the machine as well as operator. Any accident on the machine means loss of productive time, damage to machine and cost towards claims arising from accidents. Thus, safe control system is fast gaining acceptance in the industry. Thus, key drivers in automation adoption by machine builders include better product quality, higher productivity, flexibility, lower lifecycle costs, which greatly impact the end-users’ business performance and competitiveness.

Key areas of improvement The productivity, product quality, machine flexibility & machine & operator safety continue to be the major drivers for the machine builders’ design philosophy the world over. The plastics industry worldwide is witnessing a flurry of new automation technologies that are catching up fast. Going beyond tight drive synchronisation control, the adoption of electronic line shaft-based drive system solution is gaining ground globally, especially in printing, coating and laminating machines. Adoption of torque motors, direct drive motors, linear actuators driven with common DC bus power source for optimal power consumption with a central control for facilitating one point change in case of a changed recipe is gathering momentum in various applications. Evolution in mechatronics capability (motion & actuator) is facilitating increased adoption of electric drives by replacing conventional hydraulic/ mechanical drives, especially in clean room applications in industries such as life sciences, electronics and food. Machine available time is critical for users and based on machine lifecycle. Maintaining high available time of the machine is critical for machine makers. This calls for a disciplined use of software engineering tools incorporating comprehensive diagnostics capabilities and facilities for remote troubleshooting. This approach of modular software engineering and remote diagnostics is currently gaining ground.

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Challenges in automation While globalisation has increased opportunities for the OEMs, it has also increased competition from global players. This has given rise to a smaller window to learn and adopt new technologies enhancing machine performance and still meet delivery deadlines. Thus, reduced machine build and delivery time is becoming critical for machine makers. From the user’s perspective, they see missed opportunity if they are unable to get machine on time and would look for a supplier who can deliver a good performance machine on time. This leads to a need to look for automation suppliers capable of supplying standard off-theshelf products that are part of solution architecture for a machine application. Thus, machine makers need tool sets that can facilitate modular engineering development and deploy software engineering for reuse & scaling of the solution architecture. Similarly, endusers need the capability to maintain the equipment to have high available time to meet rising demands.

What stakeholders want? End customers demand higher throughput out of the line. This can be achieved if machines are built with the capability to communicate upstream and downstream in the setup. The industry is grasping to have standards that facilitate the meeting of these criteria. Likewise, adoption of information solution to facilitate enterprise-level visibility of machine performance and productivity is viewed as an increasing requirement by many users to have visibility on their asset utilisation. Machine makers are seeking standardisation of their supply chain driving them to look for an automation vendor whose products are compliant to various global standards. It is essential for users to have machine makers to build machines that comply with regulations in the geographies they operate. This means the need for an automation vendor who could also be a partner that can extend support with parts and services globally. Email: anwesh.koley@infomedia18.in


SUSTAINABILIT Y: Production ef ficiency

Optimum energy utilisation The plastics processing sector is faced with the need to maximise its output while ensuring lower waste and cost. This requires strategic planning at every stage of operation, thereby maintaining efficiency of production and ensuring optimum energy utilisation. Anwesh Koley explores various processes involved in plastics manufacturing and the means to achieve energy efficiency.

V

arious techniques are used in processing of plastics and depending on their application, manufacturers try to achieve the best possible output from their operations. The key requirement for the processing industry is availability of high-grade polymers. The final plastic product depends heavily on the quality of raw materials available with the manufacturers.

Material woes Manufacturers face an acute problem of low-quality polymers for the industry. The Indian quality is not up to global standards; hence, there is heavy dependence on imports from Europe, especially Germany. Rajeev Bhatia, Chief Executive Officer, Premier Pigments & Chemicals, says, “Dependence on imported polymer has not changed in the past years, with manufacturers finding it difficult to look for domestic options. The industry

requires imports for specific materials such as Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC), which is in short supply.� This has compelled processors to look for alternatives that can produce similar results. This witnessed an increased use of bioplastics using carbon dioxide as raw material. The potential for a process that converts waste carbon dioxide into a useful product is increasing, but whether the material produced using this technique will prove commercially viable will, ultimately, depend on whether the new polymers are cost effective to produce. Consumers have now become aware of hazardous chemicals used in plastics processing, which might cause problems for people as well as the environment. Thus, the plastics industry is using products that are lead free, benzene free and chemically friendly. Although not many manufacturers produce such products, people are willing to spend more for these. Since the last two years,

106 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Cou

rtes

AIO y: V

demand eco-friendly plastic products has risen by 85-90 per cent. Research and Development (R&D) in plastics is going on and manufacturers are looking for biodegradable and eco-friendly alternatives.

Efficiency in processing techniques The individual techniques involved in processing plastics have also evolved over the years to increase output and efficiency. In extrusion, for example, companies have started installing faster extruders, which increase throughput and reduce wastage. “Today we place greater emphasis on energy-efficient,


MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: KPL Tab-5, Pg No. 107 MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: KPL Tab-5, Pg No. 107


MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: Matsui Tab-5, Pg No. 108 MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: Matsui Tab-5, Pg No. 108


Production ef ficiency

Dependence on imported polymer has not changed in the past years, with manufacturers finding it difficult to look for domestic options. The industry requires imports for specific materials such as Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC), which is in short supply. Rajeev Bhatia Chief Executive Officer Premier Pigments & Chemicals

maintenance-free and high-response machines. The currently used machines come with servomotor-driven pump, which saves energy to the tune of 2060 per cent and depends on the cycle time and other conditions,” says Bhatia. Also, due to the availability of advanced

hydraulics and energy-efficient solution, the hydraulic clamping machine is adopted more than toggle-type clamping machine, due to its low maintenance and long life. Even for injection moulding, which is the most widely used technique in plastics processing, the latest technology is used today in equipment industry to develop energy-efficient and automation-oriented equipment. The equipment are now designed with features such as digital control, more precise, fast, compact and easy compatibility with machine controls. Also, manufacturers are modernising and equipping their plants with latest CNC machines and other designrelated software, which helps produce a quality product and compete with the international market. The use of robots across the manufacturing chain helps in substantially reducing output time and minimising errors. Individual equipment manufacturers are equally aware of the need for machines that help in improving the effectiveness of production. In the current scenario, where plants are being modernised, ancillary equipment such as water chillers, low-noise granulators, dehumidifier, in-line hopper feeding system and conveyors have become faster and user-friendly.

Areas of concern While manufacturers of equipment and machinery are all geared up to meet higher demand from customers and also maintain the best quality, there are infrastructural hiccups that need to be addressed. These infrastructural issues remain persistent for the sector as power availability is scarce in many areas, and this affects the timeliness for manufacturers. In terms of energy conservation in plastics production, the availability of power is a major problem for plastics producers. The steps required for implementation of green manufacturing and renewal of energy have not been seriously implemented in the industry till now. Sporadic availability of power is a constraint for smooth functioning of machines. A major reason for this is that its implementation is a costly affair, and if it does not yield adequate returns, it is not worth carrying out. Electricity is a huge problem and having power cuts several times a day is a usual scenario here. Power problem destabilises operations and wastes operating time. While the government has shown enthusiasm in improving the power situation for manufacturers, the bureaucracy involved in the entire value chain across plastics processing is the basic hurdle, which deters potential investors from entering this sector. “Several new players are struggling at various levels of implementation of ideas and remain skeptical about the financial viability of their projects. This, coupled with a long gestation period in some segments, does not encourage people to enter this sector.

Looking forward

Custom moulding machine using First-In First-Out (FIFO) method Courtesy: Berkshire Group

110 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Plastics processing in India is gradually being buoyed towards international standards. The above-mentioned bottlenecks notwithstanding, global competition and market awareness about the latest technology and work ethics are steadily ensuring that the plastics industry not only meets stringent quality norms, but also attains efficiency at every level of operation. Email: anwesh.koley@infomedia18.in


SUSTAINABILIT Y: Safety standards

A green step forward In the current age of rapid urbanisation and industrialisation where we are consuming available natural resources at an alarming rate, sustainable development is the need of the hour for the society at large. Anwesh Koley analyses the need for conducting business in a profitable and sustainable manner. Courtesy: Clearpack

I

rrespective of the size of an organisation and the nature of business and geography, there is an incumbent need for people to take up the challenge of developing ways to meet future demands, while maintaining the necessary balance in the environment. Issues like scarcity of clean water and unexpected climatic changes across the globe are connected to the well-being of every individual, and hence these problems need to be dealt with a collective effort, driven by a mass consciousness. It is important to understand why sustainable development in the plastics industry is essential. However, the industry faces few questions - How can companies achieve the balance on an ongoing basis? Who all or what will be required for an organisation to carry on their efforts for sustainable development? What is the optimal methodology that offers minimum risk yet opens a path of constant innovation necessary to take this forward?

Steps towards sustainability Every product that is manufactured must be analysed for the carbon footprint it lends, or emission of any other potentially hazardous gases during its production as well as application. Industries that consume these chemicals to make their products must also evaluate the environmental impact of the final product. One must look at the extent of consumption of the product in the society. The more widespread the consumption of plastics, the higher is the risk; hence, evaluation should be more stringent. At the same time, the cost of the product and calculation of risk assessment should be considered. If the overall cost is higher than the sales it meets, then the process will not be sustainable. Dr Joerg Strassburger, Managing Director and Country Representative, LANXESS India, suggests, “Business houses need to evolve a methodology in which this process is sustainable. Hence, organisations

112 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

r Cou

: tesy

HP

MC

that do not have scale are unable to focus on areas like risk assessment and environmental impact of products.� Nevertheless, it is important to invest in technology, people and processes to facilitate continuous research and development. Without this investment, it is difficult for organisations to identify areas of improvement both in terms of quality and environmental impact of the product. In the context of the chemical industry, safety is an important parameter as well. Safety standards maintained during the lifecycle of the product, during product handling, packaging and transport is also vital.


Safety standards

Suppliers, vendors, employees and other stakeholders who impact the business should all be informed and trained to abide by the same standards. Dr Joerg Strassburger Managing Director & Country Representative, LANXESS India

This would raise the bar for standards on protection of environment, utilisation of renewable resources and also foster innovation in the community to come up with safer & better ways of pursuing their operations. In order to achieve sustainable development, companies must invest in technology and innovation. Adoption of new technologies and innovation in processes & practices would provide the necessary tools to achieve higher standards of safety, quality and environmental protection. For the chemical industry, it is critical to innovate in order to make products that are high on quality and are developed using sustainable means and also meet the future needs of the customer.

Environment-friendly production Following guidelines For continuous sustainable development, there has to be uniform standards in environment management across the globe and every organisation should be equipped with tools to measure and assess the environmental performance & risks in its areas of operation. This should be audited regularly by the organisations themselves and reviewed by a body of global relevance. These guidelines should be based on international industry practices and standards for environment management and sustainable resource consumption. The guidelines must ensure that these standards are maintained across the supply chain of the business process. “Suppliers, vendors, employees and other stakeholders who impact the business should all be informed and trained to abide by the same standards,� adds Strassburger. These standards should meet all legal requirements in the area of operation and ensure compliance with statutory and environmental regulatory requirements. Overall, organisations need to strive to reduce consumption of renewable resources, develop productive ways of reusing resources and recycling the used/waste resources. Health, safety, quality and environment should form the key pillars of sustainable development.

R&D is involved in developing new products that are higher in performance and safer for the environment & people, in creating more resource-efficient production techniques & processes, new manufacturing technology, assessing the impact on environment and developing new ways of minimising that impact. Overall, R&D is a specialised function that calls for allocated resources in terms of financial investment, infrastructure like laboratories and qualified people such as technicians, scientists and environment engineers. Ideally, this should be a centralised function at the core of the organisation where every business unit and employee can participate in a consistent manner. New ideas for resource optimisation can come from within the organisation. Constant assessment, measurement, analysis of impact and controlling the outcome entails sustainable development. Not only the organisation but the entire supply chain dealing with the organisation must gear up to meet the enhanced standards of sustainable development, including its employees, suppliers & vendors, customers and end users. The industry believes that it is possible to do good business in the plastics and chemical industry, while protecting the interests of

114 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

the community and the environment. All risks related to the health and safety of all stakeholders and environmental protection can be minimised significantly by adopting the following measures, which will go a long way in achieving the desired results.

Safety concerns Manufacturers must comply with applicable legal requirements and other requirements related to plant & process safety, occupational health & safety hazards and environmental protection. There is a need to continuously analyse and improve practices & processes to reduce their risk and adverse impacts on the health of people and the environment. Employees must also be encouraged to actively participate in hazard identification, risk assessments, incident investigation and change in management that may affect plant & process safety, occupational health & safety hazards and environmental protection. Appropriate information and training must be provided on the plant and processes, work-related safety and the need and means of environmental protection to everyone working at the site. Regular investigations and analysis should be conducted to access the cause of work-related injuries & illnesses, environment-related incidents or damages, etc and take preventive action to eliminate the cause of occurrence.

Compliance to guidelines Finally, it is essential to undertake regular audit the quality of final products, raw materials, emissions, waste, etc and take action in case their composition does not comply with the set standards. It is after all these criteria have been met that a manufacturer can claim to be sustainable towards the environment. While many of these guidelines might not be stringently followed today by Indian manufacturers, with gradual penetration of global competition, it will not be long before the plastics industry achieves the desired results in sustainability. Email: anwesh.koley@infomedia18.in


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE_Germany

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer

This section provides information about the national and international products available in the market

Hot runner nozzles

M Günther

Heisskanaltechnik

offers hot runner nozzles and standard hot runner nozzles for direct gating from 0.0189 to 5 kg per nozzle. If required, the modular nozzle design allows quick replacement of components. The two-stage shaft (patented) with varying design features assures outstanding insulation in the front area of the shaft and guarantees the lowest possible heat loss between hot runner nozzle and cavity. The individual nozzles of the series SET and DET, due to their extended nozzle head with increased heating output, are also suitable for applications with thermally sensitive materials. This means problem-free processing of technical high-temperature plastics. All standard hot runner nozzles are suitable for processing of glass-filled, VOadjusted plastics and high-temperature plastics. Günther Heisskanaltechnik GmbH

Booth No: 12-D23

Frankenberg/Eder - Germany Tel: +49-6451-50080 Email: info@guenther-heisskanal.de Website: www.guenther-hotrunner.com

Data acquisition systems

M With

the

Absorptometer

C,

Brabender offers the new generation for the established absorptometer E to determine the oil absorption number OAN. In contrast to former

absorptometer

models,

the instrument and burette do no longer stop automatically, enabling evaluation acc to the new procedures B and C of ASTM 2414. Furthermore it fully meets ASTM D 3493. The principle consists in measuring the resistance which the carbon black puts up against the rotating blades during oil addition and in determining the carbon black oil absorption. The Brabender Absorptometer C is the perfect data acquisition system for quality control of carbon black. Brabender GmbH & Co KG Duisburg - Germany Tel: +49-203-77880

Booth No: 12-D15

Email: plastics-sales@brabender.com Website: www.brabender.com

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 117


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE_Germany

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Gearboxes

Pneumatic conveying process

M

M

Zambello Riduttori Group offers

Pelletron

gearboxes for plastic extruders. Two

economical conveying process, trade

catalogues about twin screw extruder

named pellcon3, based on three major

gearboxes, together with the new

process components, viz, StrandPhase,

catalogue (C6-11) of single screw

Pellbows and DeDusters. StrandPhase

extruder gearboxes, are presented.

is a conveying technology for gentle

The new gearboxes have been derived

conveying of granular products; Pellbow

from a considerable extension of the entire gearbox range for single-screw

is a specially designed, patented pipe

extruders that manufactured in the factory.

elbow; and DeDuster is a dust and angel hair removal device.

has

developed

a

new

The new catalogue C6-11 is about single screw extruder gearboxes; catalogue

The average design velocities for StrandPhase conveying range from 15

G1-09 is about gearboxes for co-rotating twin-screw extruders; and catalogue F1-

m/sec to 25m/sec at medium product-to-gas ratios. The design of Pellbow

09 is about gearboxes for counter-rotating twin-screw extruders. Some novelties

resembles a standard short-radius elbow with an expanded chamber between

(as new sizes) involve both ranges of gearboxes (for single and twin screw).

the inlet and the discharge of the elbow. The DeDuster provides cleaning efficiencies below 30 PPM.

The twin screw extruder gearboxes are available in the following versions: HT (high torque); and TST (twin super torque).

The pneumatic conveying process is used for gentle conveying of granular products.

Zambello Riduttori Group - Milano - Italy Magnago (Milano) - Italy Tel: +39-0331-307616

Booth No: 11-C26

Pelletroneurope GmbH Bodnegg - Germany

Email: info@zambello.it

Tel: +49-7520-956620

Website: www.zambello.it

Email: info@pelletroneurope.com

Booth No: 11-C14

Website: www.pelletroncorp.com

Innovative technology

M

Rotary filtration systems

M

The new X-RAY 6000 series is offered for measurement of eccentricity, wall

The patented Gneuss rotary

thickness, inner and outer diameter as

filtration

well as ovality at hose and tube extrusion

fully automatic, process and

lines. This series includes XLL-X-ray

pressure constant filtration.

tubes (eXtra-Long-Life tubes) and

The main characteristic of

provides a measuring rate of 1 to 3 Hz (optional 10, 100 Hz). The innovative

these filtration Systems is

diameter gauges of the Laser series 6000 include a number of technological

the rotary disk with its ring

highlights, one being a measuring rate of 2.5 kHz for highest accuracy.

of screen cavities, located

In addition, the gauge heads are equipped with an integrated LED display

systems

enable

between two solid steel blocks.

with control panel option, which allows the operator to read the diameter value

The Gneuss MRS multi-rotation systems offer new possibilities in the

directly from the device. Equally certain to generate a great deal of interest are

venting or devolatilisation of polymer melts. These allow, for eg, the processing

the dual and triple axis diameter gauge heads of the Laser series 2000. They

of PET without pre-drying. Alternatively, this technology can also be used to

include state-of-the-art CCD measuring technique combined with pulse-

introduce gases (for foamed products) or fillers/additives homogenously into

driven laser diodes for highest accuracy.

the melt.

The Lump series 2000 is used for reliable lump and neckdown detection

Consistent application of latest technology ensures permanent quality control

during production.

during the production process.

Sikora AG

Gneuss Kunststofftechnik GmbH

Bremen - Germany Tel: +49-421-489000 Email: sales@sikora.net Website: www.sikora.net

118 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Booth No: 12-A10

Bad Oeynhausen - Germany Tel: +49-5731-530710 Email: gneuss@gneuss.com Website: www.gneuss.de

Booth No: 12-D9


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE_Germany

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Forward looking technology

M Brückner

Group

presents

forward-looking technologies for sophisticated applications in the plastics and packaging industries.

Brückner

Maschinenbau offers solutions for a highly efficient production of high-performance plastics films. These include: top-quality BOPET film for perfect convertibility; BOPP lines: productivity & efficiency; ultra-thin capacitor films; high output CPP lines; and BOPA lines for modern first class applications. BrücknerServtec offers profitable and power-saving operation of existing lines by introducing the new generation of the remote service tool Travis Callisto. It represents a virtual service specialist, which is worldwide immediately available at the production line for support. Bruckner Maschinenbau GmbH & Co, KG Siegsdorf - Germany Tel: +49-8662-630

Booth No: 12-D1

Email: karlheinz.weinmann@brueckner.com Website: www.brueckner.com

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 119


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE_Germany

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Twin-screw extruders

Screen changers

M

M

The

laboratory

twin-screw

Being

world

market

extruders are cost-effective and

leader for screen changers,

versatile solutions for laboratory

Kreyenborg offers the

applications, recipe

appropriate machine for

and

production

development with

each filtration application.

output rates ranging between 80

processes

Thereby, the spectrum

and 250 kg/h. These machines

ranges from discontinuous and continuous systems to fully automatic backflush

with extremely long variants are

screen changers. The screen changers with process-, pressure- and volume flow

designed for special tasks with side feeders, degassing openings and

constant mode of operation are unique at the market.

injection nozzle.

Relating to throughput the scope ranges from 2-80 kgs/h (Labline 100)

The design is based on time-tested KraussMaffei Berstorff standards

to systems with 35,000 kgs/h. For particularly economic processing of PET,

with innovative highlights, like high wear protection, short retooling time and

BKG has developed the inline crystallisation system CrystallCut. With this

outstanding ease of operation. The machines are calculated for the different

system, pelletising and crystallisation are affected in one process step, without

process tasks.

the supply of additional energy.

The ZE 30 UTX twin-screw extruders are available in a short version for

The screen changers are applied together with the extremely wear-protected

various homogenising applications.

Kreyenborg melt pumps.

KraussMaffei Technologies GmbH Munich - Germany Tel: +49-89-88990

Kreyenborg Group

Booth No: 12-C16

Willich - Germany Tel: +49-251-21405333

Email: info@kraussmaffei.com

Email: s.conrad@kreyenborg.de

Website: www. kraussmaffei.com

Website: www.kreyenborg-group.com

120 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Booth No: 12-D25


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE_Germany

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Optical sensors

Thermoplastic solutions

M

M

Precitec Optronik is expert for

Simona AG manufactures and

optical measurement technology.

offers thermoplastic products,

The

with

company

produces

optical

production

facilities

sensors that are able to measure

and sales offices around the

distance, topography or thickness

globe. Their product portfolio

very accurate, fast and contactless.

includes

The new optical sensor for thickness

products, pipes and fittings,

semi-finished

measurement is the CHRocodile IT

as well as finished parts. The

18-3000 which covers the largest measuring range in the IT series of proven

company presents solutions for industrial applications with particular emphasis

and highly precise CHRocodile sensors.

on the materials PP, PPs, PVC-C-CORZAN, PVDF and E-CTFE.

Measuring range in air extends between 18–3000 μm. For film or

Furthermore, different types of backings such as polyester (SK),

plastic (n = 1.5) the measuring range is between 12 and 2000 μm. With the

polypropylene (PK) and glassfibre (GK) are also offered. The range of products

new CHRocodile IT 18 - 3000 the user can measure inline the thickness

consists of sheets, rods, welding rods, pipes and fittings. Consequently, these

of materials like: opaque & scattering materials, for eg, PP & PET bottles;

products are contributing to people's well-being and quality of life in various

performs, blisters, multi-layer systems, eg, foils

fields of applications and offer high security and best-of-class quality.

Applications are in plastics, multi-layer foils & PET bottles. The sensors can

Displaying superior resistance to aggressive chemicals, these products are

easily be integrated in measuring systems/inline applications.

mainly used for chemical tanks and equipment engineering.

Precitec Optronik GmbH

Simona AG

Rodgau - Germany Tel: +49-6106-82900

Booth No: 12-D28

Booth No: 12-E5

Kirn - Germany Tel: +49-6752-140

Email: info@precitec-optronik.de

Email: mail@simona.de

Website: www.precitec-optronik.com

Website: www.simona.de

Thermal cleaning systems

Biopolymer resins

M

M

Schwing Fluid Technik develops and

The FKuR Group is one

manufactures high-temperature systems

of the leading producers

for thermal cleaning, processing and heat

of

treatment. All advanced thermal cleaning

with a high percentage

technologies to remove polymers and

of renewable resources.

organic contaminations are available. This

These resins are sold

has also been combined with offering

under the brand names

contract cleaning services.

Bio-Flex and Biograde.

For every requirement in terms of application/production process, material,

biopolymer

A

resins

continuous

volume and environment, the company designs the right cleaning system,

development according to

including installation kit and turn-key shop layout. Electric or gas heated

market needs assures the quality of the biodegradable and compostable resins.

fluidised bed systems up to 520°C, vacuum pyrolysis and hydrolysis: all thermal

A main advantage of FKuR´s resins is the easy processing on conventional

principles are ready to be tested with customers’ own parts and polymers.

plastics processing machines.

At several locations around the world, Schwing removes polymers and organic

Biopolymer resins can be used in a wide range of flexible and rigid

contaminations from more than 250,000 metal tools & parts.

applications.

Schwing Fluid Technik GmbH

FKuR Kunststoff GmbH

Neukirchen-Vluyn - Germany Tel: +49-2845-9300

Booth No: 12-A8

Willich - Germany Tel: +49-2154-925120

Email: o.vallinga@schwing-sft.de

Email: sales@fkur.com

Website: www.schwing-sft.com

Website: www.fkur.com

122 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Booth No: 12-F1


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE_Germany

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Shape moulding machines

Injection moulding machines

M

M

Kurtz offers N-LINE shape moulding

Efficient

machines for processing EPS and

compact

EPP materials. N-line shape moulding

series

machines are a solid basic model for

injection moulding

EPS moulding production at low

machines

beginning investment.

by

The N-line series is available in sizes

and the

CX

2-platen offered

KraussMaffei

Technologies

are

S, M, and L covering moulding areas of

internationally recognised for their groundbreaking, multi-technology system

up to 2.5 m². For the moulding process

and process solutions for injection and reaction moulding technology and

the processor can use conventional

factory automation. The hydraulic CX ClassiX, available from 350 up to 6500

moulds or monoblock moulds.The company offers complete equipment and

kN clamping force, featuring the proven 2-platen clamp system is an ideal

engineering for processing particle foam materials.

solution for customers with high production demands and a low investment budget.

Kurtz produces machines like pre-expanders, shape moulding machines, block

Despite a slightly reduced option catalogue, the ClassiX series still satisfies

moulds, cutting lines, handling systems and also complete turnkey plants.

nearly all customer requirements and impresses with its short delivery times

Kurtz GmbH

permit the use of large moulds which are a common occurrence in the case of

and cost effectiveness. The large installation dimensions of the CX series Kreuzwertheim - Germany Tel: +49-9342-8070

Booth No: 12-D26

moulded parts with high demands on the surface or multi-cavity moulds.

Email: info@kurtz.de

The CX 110-380 ClassiX produces closures for yoghurt bottles in a 16 cavity

Website: www.kurtzersa.de

mould for packaging industry.

Deposition systems

KraussMaffei Technologies GmbH

M

Munich - Germany

Leybold Optics is a world leading

Email: info@kraussmaffei.com

machine manufacturer in the field

Website: www.kraussmaffei.com

Tel: +49-89-88990

Booth No: 12-C16

of vacuum deposition using key technologies, such as evaporation, sputter and PECVD. A major area

Machines & accessories

is the deposition of thin films onto

M

plastic substrates (flexible foils as well as moulded plastics). The

Artex Machinery is one of the worldwide leading manufacturers of recycling

company offers complete system

systems for all kinds of thermoplastics. The company offers machines

solutions as well as comprehensive aftersales services.

and accessories for plastic recycling, systems, tools and equipment for

It commercialises deposition systems for precision optics, eyeglass

recycling plants.

coating, the automotive and the electronics industry. Newly introduced is the

The plants are characterised by their state-of-the art innovations, and

CompactMet, an economic, compact and ultra-fast batch-type evaporation

their extremely low energy consumption per kilogram granulate, combined

machine for the coating of 3-dimensional parts. Further machines from their

with low degradation values.

portfolio include: META-M, CAP-M, and FLEX-M. The product range includes complete recycling lines as well as components A top priority is innovation leadership in key areas such as sputtering,

such as pelletising or filter systems at an output of 150 kg/h up to 1600 kg/h.

PECVD, plasma-assisted evaporation, machine automation and software. Artec Machinery GmbH Leybold Optics GmbH Alzenau - Germany Tel: +49-6023-5000 Email: peter.wohlfahrt@leyboldoptics.com Website: www.leyboldoptics.com

124 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Kematen - Austria

Booth No: 12-C18

Tel: +43-7228-69790 Email: office@artec.at Website: www.artec.at

Booth No: 12-B7


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE_Austria

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Injection moulding machines

M

Applications include: production of technical moulded elastomer parts, automotive industry, railway/rail technology, oilfield, mining technology, The product range comprises of

energy production, etc.

elastomer injection moulding machines for rubber, TPE,

Maplan Maschinen und technische Anlagen Planungs- und Fertigungs-

solid silicone and liquid silicone

Gesellschaft mbH

with 15-1000 T clamping force

Ternitz - Austria

and 30-26.000 CCM injection

Tel: +43-2630-35706

volume. The

are

Email: office@maplan.at

offered in versions for top or bottom injection in vertical execution and are

Website: www.maplan.at

also available as horizontal machines. For the machines all required additional equipment, such as shuttle systems for mould centre-plates or brush and demoulding systems as also complex automated manufacturing cells are optionally available.

Flexible woven packaging

M Starlinger &

Co.

GmbH is the market leader

in

the field of machinery and process technology for the production of flexible woven packaging and provides the world’s widest range of plant machinery in this field. Technology offered comprises tape extrusion lines, tape winders, circular looms, coating, printing and conversion lines, as well as laboratory and testing equipment. Innovative

packaging

product

developments by Starlinger are the worldwide patented ADSTAR block bottom valve sack for cement and bulk goods, the woven FFS sack for form, fill and seal applications, as well as the PPSTAR pinch bottom sack and the CBSTAR carrier bag for end consumer use. Used for recycling of a wide scope of plastics, such as PE, PP, PA, PS, BOPP and PET. Starlinger & Co GmbH Vienna - Austria Tel: +43-1-599550 Email: sales@starlinger.com Website: www.starlinger.com

Booth No: 11-B14

machines

Booth No: 12-C21


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE_Switzerland

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Injection moulding machines

M Fostag Formenbau offers

high-

performance injection moulding machines. moulds represent

All produced shortest

cycle-times, highest quality, extreme precision and maximum profitability. The moulds are produced according to a precise schedule. All mould inserts and plates are manufactured as completely interchangeable. These have excellent temperature control, rapid colour change and suitability for complex materials, such as POM, COC, PVC, etc. From complex cavity moulds to stack moulds: high performance moulds with a very long service life are offered. These injection moulding machines are used for stack moulds and multi-component tools. Fostag Formenbau AG Stein am Rhein - Switzerland Tel: +41-52-7422520

Booth No: 12-A5

Email: mail@fostag.com Website: www.fostag.com

Fluorine plastics recycling

M Minger Kunststofftechnik AG specialises in the recycling of fluorine plastics, such as PVDF, ECTFE, ETFE, FEP, PFA, PEEK, also polyamides such as PA 12 and PA 11. Their service programme also includes the refining of polymer parent substances. High-capacity compounds are produced that are resistant to chemicals, highly conductive, abrasion resistant or even flame-retardant. Materials that are absolutely authentic, clean and in reprocessed granular form are offered. By using recycled plastics, customers can save a substantial part of the material costs. Additionally, customers take part in saving the environment, as they use reprocessed, recycled plastics, and being part of the active product life cycle management aspired. The cycle is complete by contributing to saving resources and reducing the impact of plastics processing industry on the environment. Minger Kunststofftechnik AG Appenzell - Switzerland Tel: +41-71-7880129

Booth No: 12-A1

Email: info@minger.ch Website: www.minger.ch

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 131


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE_Switzerland

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Tie bar sensors Sensormate

AG

is

specialised in development, manufacturing and sales of industrial sensors,especially strain and force sensors for the

injection

Industry.

moulding

All

sensors,

systems and software are designed inhouse. Today’s all electric machines need high-end sensors. The fast mounting and high accuracy make thess systems indispensable tools for moulders. They avoid mould spitting and tie-bar breaking, The sensors can also be mounted on platen or toggle-system. The latest is the highend wireless systems with smallest 8-channel receiver. The magnet-mount tie-bar sensors (type QE1008) are used by almost all IMM manufacturers worldwide. Sensormate AG

Booth No: 12-B2

Rikon-Zurich - Switzerland Tel: +41-52-2421818 Email: info@sensormate.ch Website: www.sensormate.ch

Injection moulded precision parts

M Techno is

Synthetic

specialized

in

moulding and overmoulding of microprecision parts used in a wide range of applications. Able transform tech

to highmaterials,

such as peek, PC, PA, PE, PP, PS, etc, disposing of an engineering oďŹƒce

(DA/CAO

3D

(IGS-JPEG), a

mechanical

workshop

to

build the moulds and 20 moulding machines from 4-125 T (Arburg, Netstal, Demag) there is almost no limit to what can be realised in plastic. Applications are in motors, aeronautics, sports, medicines, etc. Techno Synthetic SA La Chaux-de-Fonds - Switzerland Tel: +41-32-9253505 Email: info@technosynthetic.com Website: www.technosynthetic.ch

132 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Booth No: 12-C1


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Co-extrusion casting film lines

M

Simcheng Plastics Machinery Co manufactures and offers multi-layer coextrusion casting film lines. These multi-layer co-extrusion casting film lines feature delicate nonstop filtration system; speedy precise cooling forming system; fully automatic double station winding system; and improved operation control system. They are used for non-stop filtration, speedy precise cooling forming, etc. Simcheng Plastics Machinery Co, Ltd Foshan - China Tel: +86-757-8120700

Booth No: 14H-E18

Email: ad@simcheng.cn Website:www.s-c.cn

Packaging machines

M

Zhongshan Fengyuan Plastic Machinery Co offers polyethylene air bubble film machines and automatic small batches packaging machines. Since its establishment, the company has shown strong product development with its range of packaging machines. The machines are ideal for those who are new to the packaging business, or those planning to expanding their operations. Zhongshan Fengyuan Plastic Machinery Products Co Ltd Taizhou City - China Tel: +86-760-85319122 Email: manages@fengyuanco.com Website:www.fengyuanco.com

134 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Booth No: ODH14B-20


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE_China

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Plastic thermoforming machines

M Zhejiang

Honghua

Machinery &

Plastic

Rubber

offers

Co

HFM-700

thermoforming machines.

These

are combination of mechanical, electrical and

pneumatic

components,

and

the whole system is controlled by micro PLC. The

machine

has

man-interface

operation

and

sends

sheet

by chain. The cutting takes place by moulds knives, and overturned mould can automatic stack products. These machines combine pre-heating, material feeding, heating, drawing, forming, cutting and stacking into one process. Suitable for manufacturing PP, PS, HIPS, PVC, PET sheets to produce cups, bowls, trays, lids & boxes and other products. Zhejiang Honghua Machinery Plastic & Rubber Co Ltd Foshan - China Tel: +86-577-65139801 Email: saifei@honghua.com

Booth No: 14H-D5

Extrusion dies

M JCtimes

Group

is

the biggest extrusion die

manufacturer

and has developed & constructed all types of flat dies, including standard

dies,

automatic control dies, fast lip open dies, optical quality dies and hollow profile dies. Besides, the company also tailed design and supply dies for special applications, such as manifold die, co-extrusion dies, up to 11 layers. The company also supplies highest quality and widest range of dies, screen changers, melt pumps & feedblocks. JCtimes Group Taizhou City - China Tel: +86-10-59003588 Email: jingcheng_times@vip.163.com Website:www.jc-times.com

136 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Booth No: 14H-E13


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE_Taiwan

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Flexographic printing machines

Gears

M

M

Jih Ching Machine Co offers 8-colour

Offering

flexographic printing machines (model

transmission

JH/CF 80125BD) that are wall-type

high torque and safety

central impression drum, chrome-plated

coefficient design, gears

with accurate grind, equipped with

from Sun Lung feature

water or air cooling circulation systems.

grinding precision of up

Automatic ink circulation and quick

to DIN 1~3 grade, with

washing system for optional equipment shorten ink exchange and cleaning cycle.

operation

The machines also feature PLC memory module type (300 sets) servomotor auto position control system for impression adjustment. Single

the

best

efficiency,

noise

kept

below 80 dB. The

cooling

filter

full colour LCD monitor aids in register setting. The equipment also features

excellent heat dissipation. Top-quality SKF or FAG bearings are selected and

perfect drying loop design with exhaust system and electronic type auto edge

incorporated with NOK oil seals. CE & TUV certificated, the product has

position control (EPC) on unwind unit.

been applied for worldwide patents.

High precision doctor blade chamber system with ceramic anilox roller renders

The new plastic injection machine gearboxes are designed for all-electric

the machines suitable for printing superfine quality.

machines.

Jih Ching Machine Co Ltd Tainan Hsien - Taiwan Tel: +886-6-5011351

systems

and

chip advanced printing video inspection system (Sony or E+L brand) with

ensure

Sun Lung Gear Works Co, Ltd

Booth No: 14FP-7

Tainan - Taiwan Tel: +886-6-2639969

Email: swtcandy@ms31.hinet.net

Email: david@slgear.com.tw

Website: www.jih-ching.com

Website: www.slgear.com.tw

138 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Booth No: 11FP-124


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE_Taiwan

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Injection moulding machines

Breathable films

M

M

Shine

Well

Chi Chang Machinery

Machinery Co

Enterprise

offers SW-MB

breathable films that are

Co

offers

series multiple

especially designed for

cylinders

baby diaper and mask.

injection

These breathable films

moulding

help to prevent stuffiness

machines that range from 400 tons to 2300 tons clamping force.

and rashes. Some of their

Instead of equipping conventional toggle mechanism, the MB

advantage are: better air

series applies locking gears to position exact stroke of moving platen

circulation, air goes out

and also generates clamping force by hydraulic cylinders. Unique

and liquid does not leak.

multiple cylinders design could reduce total machinery length, as well as

These also helps in keeping the baby skin dry, comfortable and healthy.

provide more than twice mould opening stroke in contract with toggle

These machines use a 2.6 M wide auto flat T-die from EDI or Cloeren Co

injection machine.

with an auto thickness gauging system from NDC, USA. They are designed to be completely automatic and easy to operate.

The MB series is most appropriate machine model for producing longer or deeper articles.

These have been used as unique ventilating outer covers with micropores.

Shine Well Machinery Co Ltd Tainan - Taiwan Tel: +886-6-3563470

Chi Chang Machinery Enterprise Co Ltd

Booth No: 14FP-40

Tainan - Taiwan Tel: +886-6-261 2121

Email: shinewell@shinwell.com.tw

Email: chichang2008@extrusion.com.tw

Website: www.shinwell.com.tw

Website: www.extrusion.com.tw

Booth No: 14FP-17

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 139


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE_Taiwan

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Extrusion machines

M

Leader Extrusion Machinery Ind Co specializes in manufacturing plastics hollow profile extrusion machines for PC, PET, PP and other materials. The plastics sheet extrusion machines are used for TPU, EVA, PC, PS, ABS, PMMA, PET, etc. The plastics film extrusion machines are used for PE, TPU, EVA, PP, PVC, PLA, PI, form sheet extrusion lines, etc. Leader Extrusion Machinery Ind Co Ltd Taichung County - Taiwan Tel: +886-4 2638 0888

Booth No: 11FP-102

Email: leader.ex@msa.hinet.net

Co-extrusion blow moulding machines

M Full

Shine

Machinery

Plastic

offers

co-

extrusion blow moulding machines with special designed

co-extrusion

die heads to combine up to 6 different materials, incorporating

high-

efficient melting screws, linear function for swift and steady production, parison control, and auto deflashing system. The specially designed die-head for multi-layer co-extrusion ensures qualitymelted material of non-scorch and best combination. The company is capable of making up to 6-layer co-extrusion technology. Blow pin units and deflashing units have the innovative designs for perfect neck and bottom deflashing. Adjustable extruders are for easy mould changing and alignment. All the equipment are in accordance with CE standards and ISO:9001 quality control. Co-extrusion bottles/products are applicable in agricultural containers, chemical containers, auto parts, long-storage food packages, cosmetic containers, and recycled material re-use. Full Shine Plastic Machinery Co Ltd Tainan County - Taiwan Tel: +886-4-22765071 Email: fulshine@ms7.hinet.net Website: www.full-shine.com

140 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Booth No: 14FP-41


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE_India

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Injection moulding machines

Twin screw extruders

M

ME

Focusing

on

These are co-rotating twin-screw

m i n i m u m

extruders that have made it possible

thickness

0.38

to produce high quality, specialty

mm

to

0.5

plastic compounds used in the most

mm

container

common products as well as highly

production, Wai offers

Jon

engineered products. The twin screw

Machinery

extruders are mainly used in plastic

the

top

and polymer applications and have

performance machines on thin wall world. With R&D design inhouse and

also penetrated several different

serious quality control, the company introduces the high quality products and

niche markets.

advanced technology, like servo motor power saving system.

By using the side feeder of the co-rotating twin screw extruder calcium

The TW series thin wall container injection moulding machines are

carbonate (talc) can be filled unto 80 per cent and glassfibres can be filled up

equipped with even further improved functions for the pursuits of high-speed

to 60 per cent without compromising on the quality of the end product. This

performance, ease-of-use and field-proven reliability.

feature brings down the cost of raw material significantly and hence makes the co-rotating twin screw extruder a winner.

Furthermore, turnkey solutions, including machines, mould, in-mould labelling automation and peripheral units are also offered.

Applications are in direct compounding, producing masterbatches, plastic alloys, PVC soft cable grade compounding, inline compounding, natural/

Jon Wai Machinery Works Co Ltd

wood fibre composites and recycling.

Booth No: 14FP-51

Taipei - Taiwan Tel: +886-2 25954867

Hindustan Plastic & Machine Corporation

Email: jonwai.mc@msa.hinet.net

New Delhi

Website: www.jonwai.com

Tel: 011-25471114

Booth No: 18H-28A

Email: info@hindustanplastics.com

Multi-layer blown film lines

Website: www.hindustanplastics.com

M

Plastic injection moulding machines

M

J P Extrusion in collaboration with Alpha

Marathon,

Canada,

offers

multilayer blown film lines in India,

D&M

for manufacturing high barrier film

offers plastic injection

for packing meat, liquid packing, oil

moulding

packing, etc.

manufactured by Der

These machines are available with

Enterprises

Gang

machines Machinery

advanced technology having ADSS

Co,

Ltd,

(patented) DIE from Canada with

Accumulating of over 25 years experience for promotion of quality, Der Gang

Taiwan.

IBC system, gravimetric dosing with

had developed and modified the J-series to DG Multi series. This modification

extrusion control, automatic thickness

is a focus on precision, energy saving & humanistic.

control with fully-automatic surface

The injection moulding machines are available with possible combination

winder having center winding, surface

of different clamping and injection unit. They are equipped with German-make

winding and center surface with gap winding.

servo motor drive and control for effective and high-speed performance.

These find applications in medical grade films, chemical packing, stretch

They are equipped with German-make servo motor drive and control for

films, shrink films, green house films and geo-membrane films.

effective and high-speed performance.

J P Extrusion Ltd

D&M Enterprises

Bharuch - Gujarat Tel: 02646-221134

Booth No: 6H-M1

Chennai - Tamil Nadu Tel: 044-42184295

Email: info@jpextrusiontech.com

Email: sales@dmeindia.net

Website: www.jpextrusiontech.com

Website: www.dmeindia.net

142 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Booth No: 14FP-33


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE_India

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Automatic slotting machines

Gravimetric blenders

M

M

These slotting machines

Shini Plastics Technologies offers SGB

cover full range for pipe dia

series gravimetric blenders that can be used

40-630 mm and length 3-6

in the field of injection moulding machines,

metres. Also available are

blow moulding machines and extrusion

special slotting machines

lines for proportional and precise mixing

for HDPE pipes, slotting

of several types of materials (like resins,

2/3 aarea, slotting zig-

master batches, additives etc). This series of

zag pattern, etc. Slotting

machines have Siemens PLC controllers

follows any standard, 6

and latest ingredients calculation methods.

metres long machine with double slotting head, twin pipe slotting, etc, also with different combinations.

The machines are controlled by an advanced microprocessor with a digital

The machines are provided with HSS cutters, powered with 20 HP AC

display which is simple to calibrate and

motors. Slots are cut at 450 mm length per stroke at a time. The machines

use. The self-compensation and calibration function ensure accurate material

are controlled by PLC with HMI. They require max 25 HP AC power and a

dosing percentages. A high precision electronic weighing scale is used to

connection of airline with 6 bar pressure from existing plant, only.

ensure precise weighing of every batch and can operate with ±0.1~0.3 per cent accuracy.

The machines are used for neat & clean operation and dust could also be collected & recycled for making pipes.

The SGB series blenders are useful for large scale mixing of master batch, additives & virgin materials accurately and satisfactorily.

BJS Engineers

Booth No: 1H-A12

Faridabad - Haryana Tel: 0129-2236462

Shini Plastics Technologies (India) Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra

Mob: 9810526696

Tel: 0250-3021125

Email: bjsengg@rediffmail.com

Email: sales@shiniindia.com

Website: www.bjsengg.com

Website: www.shini.com

Plastic extrusion systems

Dual temperature chillers

M

M

Liansu

Machine

high-tech that

a

Reynold India offers DuoChill series dual

enterprise

is

temperature chillers that are designed

specialises

in

keeping in mind the cooling requirements

developing

of the processes where the required

and manufacturing plastic

temperatures of the fluid are varied, at

extrusion

different utility points.

researching,

extrusion

equipment, moulds

and

Booth No: 1H-D2

These are actually fusing the features

injection fitting moulds.

of two differently set chillers into one,

It also provides high quality plastic pipe production line for water supply

thereby saving largely on the capital and

systems, sewage systems, irrigation systems, gas systems, plastic profile

running costs of the chillers, utilising lesser foot print area as well as being

extrusion lines, plastic sheet & panel production lines, cast film production

able to maintain the total need through just one set of auxiliary equipment

lines, etc.

instead of one.

Turnkey projects on various WPC profile and recycle systems are also

These are used for increased efficiency, and wired as well as wireless connectivity

offered.

for remote operation & data logging.

Electronica Plastic Machines Ltd

Booth No: 18M-23

Reynold India Pvt Ltd

Pune - Maharashtra

Noida - Uttar Pradesh

Tel: 020-22922212

Tel: 0120-3053055

Email: epml@electronicapmd.com

Email: chillers@reynoldindia.com

Website: www.elpml.com

Website: www.reynoldindia.com

144 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Booth No: 1H-B3


MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: IMI Tab-6, Pg No. 145 MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: IMI Tab-6, Pg No. 145


MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: Aeromac Tab-6, Pg No. 146

AEROMAC

MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: Aeromac Tab-6, Pg No. 146


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE_India

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Shovel elements

EOAT & grippers parts

M

MS

The Snow plough comes to the rescue of

Neejtech India offers worldclass

co-rotating twin screw extruder application.

gripper

The Steer SFV screw elements are capable

SPA, Italy. Gimatic manufactures

of achieving intake capacity of over 300 per

pneumatic components for plastics

cent (in starve feed) compared to normal

and handling, like grippers, rotary

screw elements.

actuators,

The shovel elements (SFV & RFV)

systems

linear

from

Gimatic

actuators

and

pick-&-place for many industries.

and fractional elements (FKB & FME)

Dynamism, flexibility

are an integral part of some of Steer’s generation next co-rotating twin screw

reaction time are all factors that

and

fast

extruder brands.

distinguish the company.

Certain applications, especially powder feeding requirements are greatly

products are covered with patent. Thanks to their hi-tech features, original

benefited by this breakthrough.

design and reliability, Gimatic, products are truly unique. Specifically developed

Gimatic regularly produces and implements innovative ideas. All Gimatic

profiles, high flexibility at a reasonable price, each point of the part is attainable, Steer Engineering Pvt Ltd

ready-to-use as per design, with more than 200 patented products, customised

Booth No: 6H-M2

Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-23723309

applications, dynamic & flexible.

Email: info@steerworld.com

These are used in robots as end arm in industries, like automotive, packaging,

Website: www.steerworld.com

medical, etc.

Scroll chillers

Neejtech India

M

Ahmedabad - Gujarat

Drycool Systems India offers scroll

Email: info@neejtech.com

chillers that are manufactured with

Website: www.neejtech.com

Booth No: ODP18-M5-6

Tel: 079-26561312

highly reputed scroll compressors from

PP compounds

Danfoss/Copeland/Bitzer.

M

The scroll chillers are offered with up to 4 nos. Scroll compressor in one machine but having separate

Plast Alloys India, with a

and

refrigeration

renowned brand name Prefil

worldclass

has introduced many high-

individual

circuits. These

are

chillers, manufactured in an ISO 9001 certified factory with an option of using

performance PP compounds

CFC-free refrigerants R-407C & R-134A complete with inbuilt process

for the automotive and home

pump and stainless steel chilled water expansion tank.

appliances

The chillers are also rated for an ambient of up to +50° C. Features include: wide range of capacity from 1 TR to 120 TR; main parts designed/

industry.

The

company's specially made PP compounds have highest flexural modulus with well-balanced izod impact to replace the ABS with appropriate gloss level.

manufactured by Drycool in its plant; main critical components of the unit, ie,

With the complete setup of inhouse laboratory for the lightest polymer

expansion valve, LP/HP switch, dryer, etc, of International Standard; control

in the plastics world, PP polypropylene, the latest development in the world

panel with PLC for auto operation (optional); and high quality product due to

of plastics by Prefil are PP compounds with lightest density, which are able

stage wise inspection & testing before dispatch.

to replace many heavy materials, from polymers, like Nylon/ABS to rubber compounds and also metals up to an extent.

These air-/water-cooled scroll chillers are fully microprocessor-based and suitable for process cooling applications from +20°C up to -5°C.

Also the ranges of TPE/TPV have shore-A hardness starting from 50.

Drycool Systems (I) Pvt Ltd

Plast Alloys India Ltd

Noida - Uttar Pradesh Tel: 0120-2401068

Booth No: ODP1B-R15

New Delhi Tel: 011-47717111

Email: rk@drycoolsystem.com

Email: corporate@plastalloys.com

Website: www.drycoolsystem.com

Website: www.prefil.in

148 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Booth No: 16H-R1


PRODUCT S SHOWCASE_India

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Slitter rewinders

Ceramic band heaters

M

M

Kody

Equipments

manufactures high-speed slitter rewinder machines that are equivalent to European standards. The

company

has

a range of models in

Elmec Heaters & Controllers offers ceramic band heaters that are made of

this category, like model

helically wound nickel chrome resistance coil precisely stretched and strung

Nuzen S-917 with 350

through steatite ceramic cores forming a flexible heating mat. These are then

mpm speed; model Nuzen S-557 with 350 mpm (suitable for foil industries);

placed in flexible stainless steel housing with ceramic fibre insulation.

model Nuzen S-737 with 450 mpm speed; model Nuzen S-359 with 600

The heaters are very flexible and can be fitted easily. Every technically possible

mpm speed; and model Nuzen TR-359 with 700 mpm speed.

heater is built as per customers' requirements. Features include: nickel chrome resistance wire; ceramic fibre insulation reduces power consumption by 20

These machines are useful for printing and packaging industries, paper

to 30 per cent; available with heating & cooling combination; maximum 7

industries, flexible packaging industries, foil Industries, etc.

W per sq cm; maximum temperature 250°C; and terminal box, European plug option.

Kody Equipments Pvt Ltd

Booth No: 15H-P16/16A

Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-65131345

Applications are in plastic processing machinery, injection & blow moulding, extruders, etc.

Email: sales@kody.co.in Elmec Heaters & Controllers

Booth No: 18UG-D35

Chennai - Tamil Nadu

Injection moulding machines

Tel: 044-2225 0313

MS

Mob: 09383123566

These

Email: sales@elmecheaters.com worldclass

all-

Website:www.elmecheaters.com

electric horizontal IMMs from Japan range from

Thermoforming moulds

50 tons to 1000 tons with

Elpie Engineers manufactures thermoforming moulds for PP, PET, PS, PE,

vertical version ranging

PVC, multilayers, mineral-filled materials, bio-materials and for polystyrene

from 30 tons to 150 tons.

foam products (EPS). Long-term experience and utilisation of high quality

Shot size (PS) ranges

materials ensure you can count on a reliable, durable tool.

from 20 grams to 4550

High output is achieved by maximum cool capacity in combination with

grams. Due to no oil use

the right form air technology. The tools are constructed with a tool layout

these machines reduce maintenance and repair cost of hydraulic system.

for minimum scrap. Save material by down gauging, because of an optimal

The IMMs are very precise due to no deviation through oil viscosity,

material distribution.

compressibility, through drifting hydraulic valve action time. They increase up time and decrease material wastage. Total annual saving of

The thermoforming moulds are used for various applications, like: cups, lids,

100 ton electric IMM will be around Rs 6.5 lakh/year over 100 ton

trays, etc. Several quick-change systems keep changeover time as short as

hydraulic IMM.

possible.

The all-electric injection moulding machines are ideally suitable for medical,

Elpie Engineers Pvt Ltd

automotive, pharmaceutical-healthcare and packaging moulding segments of

Rajkot - Gujarat

the industry.

Tel: 0281-294522

Booth No: 18UG-D45A

Email: jjaghera@elpie.in Neejtech India Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-26561312

Booth No: ODP18-M5-6

Email: info@neejtech.com Website: www.neejtech.com

150 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/ distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities


IN CONVERSATION WITH: K M Shah

“The demand is highest in the automotive sector”

…opines K M Shah, Managing Director, NU-VU Conair Pvt Ltd. In an exclusive interaction with Avani Jain, he emphasises that demand for plastic auxiliary equipment is set to increase drastically, as they help improve productivity, product quality and reduce energy consumption during processing as well as ensure accurate and quality processes in all industry sectors.

152 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


K M Shah

What is the current demand for plastic auxiliary machines? The total plastics usage of the country is more than 200 million metric tonne per year. The increase in plastics consumption means that the plastics processors need to enhance their production but keep the cost minimum due to the rise in energy and raw material costs. Here, plastic auxiliary equipment have a large role to play. Due to increased usage of plastics in automotives, the demand for auxiliary machines is the highest in the automotive sector (50 per cent) followed by packaging sector (30 per cent), electronic & electrical items (30 per cent), extrusion (22 per cent) and household items (15 per cent).

Key demand drivers influencing the growth of the industry… All big plastics processors are aiming at higher turnovers with a focus on energy efficiency. Further, the per capita consumption of plastics is low in India as compared to the US, China and German markets; thus, there are innumerable growth opportunities for the plastics industry. Since auxiliary equipment plays a major role in the plastics processing industry, its demand is set to increase further in the future.

With rising raw material costs, what are the solutions to enable production efficiency? Considering the rising costs, we provide techno-creative products to our customers, which consume less energy and are maintenance free. Our machines are user-friendly, as they reduce manpower effort, decrease rejection ratio and yield higher output, and these features help us sustain our business in the long run.

What are the efforts made by the company to ensure sustainability? We have developed various products, which help in reducing the energy cost of the processors. Our dehumidifiers consume 35 per cent less energy and give optimum production result as compared to products offered by our competitors. We have another product, loss-in-weight

system, which consumes less energy and reduces wastage of material. We also ensure minimum waste generation. The major waste at our unit includes injection and blow moulding screws. These are grinded by our granulators and reused further. Thus, no product is discharged in the environment.

As this industry is highly fragmented, what is your strategy for future success? Considering the current scenario, only those companies will attain success in the long run, which make efforts to understand the customer’s needs such as cost reduction and increased operational efficiency. For this, we have taken support from technical institutes like Central Institute of Plastics Engineering and Technology (CIPET) to establish our technical knowledge and understand the actual requirement of our customers. We are committed to finding and delivering process solutions to make a real difference to customers in terms of cost & energy efficiency.

Elaborate on the challenges faced by the industry... First, it is important to have good market survey skills, a strong supply chain and service back-up, in order to sustain the business in the long run. Second, sound technical knowledge defines the success of any company. For example, we are a joint venture company and our partner – Conair USA – has helped us gain the essential technical knowledge in this field. Third, strong competition and cost-effectiveness is another challenge. Availability of land, infrastructure and quality raw material is another important task for companies.

was delivered to the customer on time. Thus, I am always willing to take risks, as they are a part of your life.

Things that you keep in mind while starting a new venture… It is important to gather information about the company’s latest technology and business strategies. It is also necessary to evaluate the history, customer base and growth prospects of the concerned company. Apart from these, calculating the other entity’s enthusiasm for work is also a primary area of concern.

Tell us about your growth plans for the company... Our turnover for the first year was ` 2 crore and, at present, it is ` 28 crore. Thus, every year, our growth is more than 100 per cent. This year, our sales target is about ` 32 crore. At present, we are manufacturing only 10-11 products but in future, we want to manufacture all products that are manufactured by the parent company. This year, we aim to launch new products such as BFS Volumetric Feeder, Energy Smart Dehumidification system and Mould Sweat Protector, which will be highly energy-efficient and best in quality. Thus, our basic aim is to seize the maximum marketshare.

What motivates you the most in your life? My wife has always been a source of motivation for me. She managed the house effectively even when I earned less right at the beginning of my entrepreneurial career. Another thing is that I always look out for positive points in an individual or situation. This approach helps me to sail through any tough situation. I like in reading and listening to good thoughts.

Your message to aspiring entrepreneurs in this domain…

What has been the toughest business decision taken by you? When we received a big order worth ` 2.5 crore from a prominent customer, right at the nascent stage of the business, I was doubtful whether we will be able to meet the requirements of the client. Nevertheless, I took the risk, and the order

For any aspiring businessman, it is important to always stay update with the current scenario in order to not remain behind in the league. An extremely important element is fulfilling commitments on time. Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 153


SPECIAL FOCUS

Extrusion Extrusion techniques: Striving towards zero-error processing ........................................................... 156

Extrusion challenges: Prevention is the best strategy......................................................................... 160

Interface: Sunil Jain, President, Rajoo Engineers Ltd .................................................... 166

PVC pipes: Outperforming existing parameters ................................................................ 168

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 155


SPECIAL FOCUS: Extrusion techniques

Striving towards zero-error processing With the government providing huge subsidies to extruded products, manufacturers have begun exploring techniques extensively to improve productivity and are gearing up to new manufacturing methods, which can provide innovative solutions for faster extrusion. Anwesh Koley explores the wide area of applications of the extrusion process.

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he plastics extrusion industry in India is evolving rapidly, especially sectors such as blown film extrusion, Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) profiles and reprocessing. PVC pipes, in particular, have garnered a lot of attention as their applications have increased through the use of better raw materials and highercapacity extrusion processes.

Co-rotating twin-screw extruder Twin-screw extruders have evolved in design, performance and productivity over several decades. The twin-screw extruders facilitate production of

high-quality, specialty plastic compounds used in the most common products as well as highly engineered products. These provide humans with a higher quality of life and enable them to reach a higher level of technology. One such innovation is co-rotating twin-screw extruder. This extruder is mainly used in plastics applications and has penetrated different niche markets. Some of its applications are direct compounding, producing masterbatches, plastic alloys, PVC soft cable-grade compounding, in-line compounding, natural and wood fibre composites and recycling.

Using side feeder of the co-rotating twin-screw extruder, calcium carbonate can be filled upto 80 per cent and glass fibres can be filled upto 60 per cent without compromising on the quality of end product. Mangesh Manjrekar, Director, Raj Engineering Works, says, “This feature brings down the cost of raw material significantly, making the co-rotating twin-screw extruder a winner. In the plastics recycling industry, the use of co-rotating extruders is becoming a preferred solution as compared to conventional technologies (eg, single-screw extruders).� This specially designed extruder uses, among other features, a particular degassing and filtering system that can treat demanding scrap materials that are treated to obtain quality materials ready for new applications.

PVC four-pipe extrusion line

Courtesy: Hindustan Plastic & Machine Corporation

156 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

On this plant, four PVC pipes can be simultaneously extruded using one die. Smaller-diameter PVC pipes can be manufactured using this plant. It has 70 per cent higher capacity than the common extrusion plant. This extrusion line is highly successful worldwide due to high output and low power consumption. It can produce about 5-7 tonne daily, with power consumption as low as 90 kWh per tonne. In this extruder, all four pipes are produced independently, so it results in less wastage. It saves on labour and space, making it a preferred choice for conduit pipe manufacturers.


Extrusion techniques

In the plastics recycling industry, the use of co-rotating extruders is becoming a preferred solution as compared to conventional technologies (eg, single-screw extruders). Mangesh Manjrekar Director, Raj Engineering Works

Inline flat drip irrigation pipe plant Drip or trickle irrigation is an efficient method of applying water and nutrients to crops. For many crops, the conversion from sprinkler to drip irrigation can reduce water use by 50 per cent. Crop yields can increase through improved water and fertility management and reduced disease and weed pressure. When drip irrigation is used with polyethylene mulch, yields can increase even further. These benefits are possible only when a drip irrigation system is properly designed, managed and maintained. An innovation in drip irrigation in India is introduction of flat inline drip irrigation pipe extrusion line. The drip irrigation pipe plant has maximum line speed of 54 metre per minute for 600-mm dripper spacing. The line is controlled by Programmable Logic

Controller (PLC) 10.3-inch touch panel and the dripper insertion is controlled by high-precision servo motor. The dripper is automatically screened centrifugally before insertion and the vacuum tank is made up of stainless steel that is 6 metre long. Drilling is done by pneumatic rotary drill and haul-off is equipped with pneumatic cylinders to accommodate the dripper inside the pipe while passing through it. This haul-off is controlled by two-geared motors of 1.1 K2 each for perfect synchronisation between two belts. It has a two-station winder and a separate torque motor, which is perfectly synchronised with the line speed of machines.

Double-wall corrugated HDPE pipe High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) double-wall corrugated pipes have a smooth-surfaced inner wall surrounded by a profiled outer wall. The corrugated outer wall provides optimum strength under compressive loading from covering layers and traffic (high ring stiffness). The bright yellow colour of the inner pipe improves visibility in Ultraviolet (UV) inspection, providing optimum conditions for acceptance testing. The HDPE double-wall corrugated pipe is preferred over concrete pipe because of its flexibility, while concrete pipe is rigid. Both pipes when buried underground behave differently in bearing external load. Flexible pipe does not get damaged under certain distortions, whereas concrete pipe cracks even under small distortion. The roughness coefficient of HDPE corrugated pipe is 0.009 and that of concrete pipe is 0.014; thus, under identical working conditions, the conveying capacity of corrugated pipes can increase by about 40 per cent of concrete pipes with the same flow volume.

Advantages of double-wall corrugated HDPE pipe

Courtesy: Hindustan Plastic & Machine Corporation

Corrugated pipes are lightweight and sturdy, which helps prevent lossess during storage and transportation. Due

158 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

to their light weight, the pipes can be nested during transportation and storage. “Corrugated pipes are light, and so heavy equipment are not needed during installation. Due to easy joining methods, the speed of completion of the project is faster,” adds Manjrekar. These are used in building sites in cities and short season construction sites. When sockets and in-line coupling are assembled in the joining process, the impermeability is maintained up to 0.5 bar pressure. So sewage water will not percolate to ground water, thus protecting the environment. In areas where ground water level is high, the entry of water from outside into the sewage system is prevented. Minimum service duration of a corrugated pipe is 50 years. As compared to other pipe materials, corrugated pipes are low in hydraulic purity; therefore, a reduced diameter can be chosen by diameter optimisation. This helps reduce the project cost. Also, the pure form of the pipe’s surface obstructs the hard particles sticking to the inner surface and prevents narrowing of the cross-section (bottleneck) of the pipe. Corrugated pipes are flexible and can adjust to movements of the ground and will not get distorted. The pipes without sockets can be produced in any sizes as per customer requirement.

Areas to work on With advancements in technology, demand for skilled labour has increased. There are enough innovations for making quality products, but a shortage of skilled labour, especially in unorganised sectors such as thermoplastic recycling. “Here, there is a need for incorporating technology so as to simplify machine operations. This will only happen if there is a collaboration in the true sense between manufacturers and their buyers and also with the layman who will operate the machines,” concludes Manjrekar. Hence, incorporating technology for simplifying extrusion operation is the need of the hour. Email: anwesh.koley@infomedia18.in


SPECIAL FOCUS: Extrusion challenges

Prevention is the best strategy The right combination of materials, temperature and controls is necessary in the extrusion process. As today’s designs call for tighter tolerances and thinner walls, the margin for error is slim and chances of failure are greater if all variables are not planned properly. Anwesh Koley explores how proper planning helps overcome the obstacles.

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iven the number of variables that go in to an extrusion process, various obstacles can present themselves here. Working with a partner who is experienced in dealing with as many of these as possible can give a company the confidence that any issues will be dealt with effectively or, better yet, anticipated and prevented before they occur.

Challenges and solutions It is essential for companies to do extensive homework when choosing an extrusion machine and machine manufacturer. They must take extra care to ensure that the extruder manufacturer has experience of working with the materials the client intends to use, and that it is capable of making the types of products the client designs, and also that it understands the documentation & process requirements. The supplier must understand all product requirements on the front end of the development process. The more knowledge he can get on the front end, the more the manufacturer can assist the client with product planning,

and the better he is able to meet the clients’ requirements and timetable. The supplier must make available qualified extrusion engineers to provide after-sales service and support as well. One of the biggest challenges in extrusion is ‘lot-to-lot’ consistency in raw materials. The substances used to make extruded items are not uniform in how they are made by different manufacturers. In some cases, there can be inconsistencies in the lots from the same manufacturer. This results in variation in the end product, and it must be accounted for and documented. Umakant Sharma, Marketing Manager, Matsui Technologies India, says, “In order to understand and deal with inconsistency of materials, it is essential that the provider creates a document history with each material and makes this information available to the client. This way, one can identify the true obstacles and overcome them via a joint effort with the material supplier and the customer. Testing multiple lots of material is the best way to identify and overcome the obstacles related to material.”

Energy efficiency through technology Improving efficiency is a priority for extrusion companies and is one of the major development objectives for machine manufactures. High-technology extruder screw/barrel units and extrusion dies are key factors in this respect. Maximum melt throughput with good melt quality plus the ability to process a broad range of raw materials with the same screw are the major advantages when using barrier/ mixing screws in single-screw extruders. The combination of grooved barrel conveying, barrier melting mechanism and multiple-zone mixing can substantially enhance the performance of single-screw extruders. Furthermore, improvements in throughput rate and melt temperature control are evident for a broad range of resins. The latest technology in screw and barrels is introduction of a bimetal. Bimetallic construction provides a protective wear surface fused to the highstrength backing material. The design delivers efficient energy transfer between the bore and the backing material. This feature allows for rapid detection

Courtesy: Hindustan Plastic & Machine Corporation

160 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


Extrusion challenges

In order to understand and deal with inconsistency of materials, it is essential that the provider creates a document history with each material and makes this information available to the client. Umakant Sharma Marketing Manager, Matsui Technologies India

of process condition changes, quick response to heat and cool commands, precise control and uniformity of barrel zone temperatures. The engineered ID lining improves component compatibility between the screw and barrel wear surfaces, minimises wear gap and prolongs productive life. It is important to involve the extrusion machine manufacturer from an early stage, so that the numerous challenges inherent in the process become much

easier to tackle. “It starts with clients having a strong sense of what they need to know about potential extrusion partners in order to find the right one. Subsequently, it proceeds with clients and their partner determining the working of the process, well in advance, so that all potential problems can be anticipated and fixed early on,� adds Sharma. Errors occur if the machine manufacturer is charged with developing complex extrusions in a short span of time. The client and the supplier need to determine in advance what might be a realistic lead time that gives the project the best chance to meet quality demands as well as the marketing timetable. Moreover, downstream processes and equipment have significant impact on the quality and stability of the process.

Having the right operator The machine operator is critical in successfully running an extruder. Occasionally, an operator may not be capable of running a process correctly. Having properly trained, educated and experienced operators is extremely important, but finding them can often be a difficult task. Extrusion is not a process where one can simply press a button and have everything turn out the same every time. There are various inherent inconsistencies in the process, and operators have to know how to adjust for them.

Courtesy: Hindustan Plastic & Machine Corporation

162 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Features of bimetallic screw and barrel Efficient energy transfer High performance backing Strength resistance to fatigue Increased screw and barrel life Increased process control Optimum performance

The operator must be good at not only running an established process, but also at developing processes and knowing which inputs affect which outputs. Reacting to differences in materials in the correct way is critical. Taking the time to find the right operators also makes a big difference. Operator training will only go this far. So the people running the extrusion process must be skilled operators who should be able to do much more than simply put in a programme and press start. The key is to find someone with the processing ability and a proven ability to solve problems and train the individuals involved in the extrusion process and all other nuances that go with it.

Planning is key Extrusion is as much an art as it is a science. A lot of issues associated with extrusion can be overcome with proper planning. All individuals involved in the process also must understand that extruded products are becoming less of an off-the-shelf commodity. Customers f requently look for a specialised component that will interface with an application or product. This entails cutto-length sizes, co-extrusion and other special requirements, all of which need to be handled rather differently. It is important to have state-of-theart downstream equipment and operators capable of making adjustments to these processes. Last but not the least, the most critical issue to consider here is that it requires patience to overcome these obstacles. Email: anwesh.koley@infomedia18.in


MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: Lohia Tab-7, Pg No. 163 MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: Lohia Tab-7, Pg No. 163


MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: Kody Tab-7, Pg No. 164 MPP Jan_2012 Ad Name: Kody Tab-7, Pg No. 164


SPECIAL FOCUS: Inter face - Sunil jain

“We must be prepared for the imminent revolution to avoid loss of opportunityâ€? ‌advises Sunil Jain, President, Rajoo Engineers Ltd, who believes that the entry of organised retail in the country will not only improve demand levels for the plastics industry, but also boost quality through increased competition. He highlights the evolution of the plastics extrusion industry and areas of improvement, in an interaction with Anwesh Koley. improve, along with the rise in demand from packaging. Promising a paradigm shift, major retail chains have begun to use these technologies, so all they need to do is transfer it to India as the formats are identical. Organised retail requires maintaning higher quality for end products. The technology and machines both are available, but proper implementation is key.

What innovations has the extrusion industry witnessed over the years? Tell us about the extrusion machinery sector in India. The extrusion sector has a wide ambit in terms of its applications. These include sheets, pipes and non-woven textiles; hence, one has to look at it from a sectoral point of view. Most of the extruded plastic films produced are used in flexible packaging, and this segment will continue to grow. If Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in retail is allowed, the growth rate will double every year.

What will be the impact of FDI on the India plastics industry? With FDI in packaged retail, the industry will witness a lot of packaged food at super markets, since in organised retail, the major chunk is of food and groceries. These can be sold only in packages and to ensure this, manufacturers will have to pack products in plastic packaging material. Companies are already doing this, but the quantity and quality will

Over the years, the output levels per machine have gone up. Half a decade back, the film extrusion segment would produce 150-200 kg/hr, while today it is not less than 500 kg/hr. This is achieved by having high-capacity extruders. These extruders require substantially higher investments, but there are some manufacturers whose operations justify such heavy investments. For higher output levels, a certain level of automation is required, and this is being used extensively in extrusion technology. Today, people talk about extrusion machinery that can handle a range of polymers. The extruders should be designed such that a variety of polymers, with their varied characteristics can be handled. The use of such machines can reduce costs and improve energy consumption. Manufacturers have moved on from monolayered machines to fivelayered machines. On the sustainability f ront, manufacturers can contribute by saving

166 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

energy, reducing wastage and increasing output through recycling.

What are the challenges faced by the industry? The biggest challenge is to be prepared when organised retail comes to the country. Machinery manufacturers are ready, but the processing industry is waiting and watching when changes will happen. We must be all set for the revolution that will be coming and taking preemptive steps to avoid any loss of opportunity. Another major problem is power. The biggest cost centre second to price of polymers is cost of power. By making higher capacity extruders, we can reduce our energy consumption, as the output increases without wasting energy. People are aware of this and want to know about the energy consumption in Kilo-WattHour (KWH). The availability and quality of power has also improved considerably, though not up to the levels required.

What is the urgent need for the plastics industry? The plastics industry must create a platform where their problems can be addressed. However, this industry does not have a strong lobby on the policy front. This will materialise only when the industry puts forward it demands and problems before policy makers. Until the industry people tell the government about their requirements, the government will not have any information on them. Email: anwesh.koley@infomedia18.in


SPECIAL FOCUS: PVC pipes

Outperforming existing parameters The increasing number of applications for extruded pipes across sectors has prompted manufacturers to improve the quality of Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) pipes, which is warranted by a fast expanding market and growing awareness among manufacturers and end users alike. Amit Kalra

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olyvinyl Chloride (PVC) yields a wide range of valuable properties, which make it one of the most versatile of all pipe materials, a fact affirmed by a variety of applications and markets served by extruded PVC pipes. The rationale for using PVC pipes is justified on the basis of any or several of the following attributes – corrosion resistance, chemical resistance, strengthto-weight ratio, light weight, flexibility, long-term tensile strength, water-tight joints, aberration/wear resistance, impact strength, low maintenance, thermal insulation, water safety, flame resistance, favourable cost and many more. However, there are several factors that should be considered for manufacturing high-quality PVC pipes.

What makes PVC the preferred choice? Pipes made of PVC have widespread applications in a number of industries, ranging from residential plumbing to complex water treatment systems. The material properties of PVC make it highly valuable as a thermo-resistant structure, fire retardant fabric and high-quality water conduit in various construction applications. Pipes made of PVC are superior to those made of most other modern materials due to its environment-friendliness, chemical resistance, inherent toughness, heat resistance and because it is electrically non-conductive as well as non-corrosive. PVC is useful to make pipes used in secure connections between other pipes (reducing leakage), in order to maintain quality in water and reduce the potential for injury in construction applications. PVC pipe manufacturers purchase raw materials in one of the two forms:

Blended PVC extrusion compound or basic PVC resin and other ingredients for preparing their own compounds. Most major manufacturers purchase PVC resin and commence their manufacturing process with the preparation of PVC pipe extrusion compounds. Rigid PVC compounds are a mixture of PVC resin and some combination of stabilisers, extenders, lubricants, pigments and modifiers. Rigid PVC compounds made for PVC pipe extrusion are carefully designed and developed to provide specific properties, which are application dependent. Depending on the quantity or type of plasticiser used, the characteristics of PVC can be dramatically altered to have high impact strength and relatively low hardness and rigidity. Unplasticised PVC pipes are quite rigid with high strength and good chemical resistance. These properties make it attractive for use in above and below the ground plumbing

168 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

applications. However, at reduced temperatures, the impact strength of PVC drastically decreases. This means that at low temperatures, the ability of PVC to dissipate energy from sudden impact is limited and may result in part failure. This situation can be improved by using a plasticiser that gives high impact strength at a much lower temperature. However, the gain in one property usually means a compromise of other properties, which in this case is the loss in stiffness.

Manufacturing PVC pipes An additive often used to reduce cost is calcium carbonate, unfortunately, at a significant reduction of impact strength. A reduction in the calcium carbonate added to the base material will significantly improve the impact strength of the PVC pipe. Alternatively, conical twin-screw extruders can be used for manufacturing PVC pipe, as these are specifically designed for holding higher calcium


PVC pipes

carbonate loading without compromising on the strength. In a conical twin-screw extruder, the screw surface area in the feed zone is considerably larger, as compared to parallel screw, but offers the same output. As a result, transmission of heat energy and the plastification in the feed zone is much more efficient. Moreover, due to a larger feed zone, the plastification work is spread out over a larger section of the screw, thereby significantly improving the quality of the pipe. The meshing surface area of conical twin screw is larger in the plasticising section, which results in a higher but controllable energy input through shear. In the metering section, the meshing surface area of conical twin screw is less, giving lower energy input, and hence homogeneous melting. A good quality PVC pipe should have the following additional properties – sustain in harsh environments such as mining and civil construction sites, trend to larger diameter & pressure classes, easy in handling and installation, safety in underground installations and predictability of long-term performance.

Characteristic advantages Extruded PVC pipes are environment-friendly due to the source of the raw material used to make PVC resin. Salt, quite literally abundant everywhere in the world, is used to create the resin that makes up PVC pipes. Salt is unlikely to ever diminish as a natural resource. Because PVC pipes last for decades, it will cost less in the long run to recycle. Additionally, PVC pipes are light enough in weight so that more PVC pipes are transportable per truck load than metal pipes. This means that the fuel used in transportation of the material is reduced. Another major advantage of these pipes is that they are acid resistant. Acids produce electrochemical reactions in other materials, but PVC pipes are non-conductive in the interior as well as on the exterior surfaces. Because of the property of chemical resistance, PVC pipes find wide applications in agricultural farming, where the pipes are exposed to destructive soils, fertilisers and chemicals (eg, pesticides). Even salts corrode metal pipes, but are ineffective on PVC pipes. In the long run, PVC pipes allow for considerable costsavings for the buyer because these do not need to be replaced as often as corrosive metal pipes. While metal pipes need to be cleaned or replaced within a year, PVC pipes need be replaced only every 7-15 years. PVC pipes can resist temperatures of up to 140°F. The chemical resistance of PVC enables it to be often used as a protective cover in metal piping applications (including plumbing systems). Amit Kalra is Director of Hindustan Plastic and Machine Corporation. Email: info@hindustanplastics.com

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 169


FACILIT Y VISIT: Polymechplast Machines Ltd

Scaling new heights of quality Domestic processors are now looking for new-generation machines with modern technology, productivity and performance levels to compete with global players. As leaders in thermoplastic injection and blow moulding machines, Polymechplast Machines Ltd strives to provide competitive products to its customers at a moderate cost. Avani Jain tracks the company’s journey and milestones achieved on the way.

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s Gujarat’s plastics industry surges at a Compounded Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of over 15 per cent, there is tremendous demand and subsequent growth potential in the plastics machinery sector. Since processors in the state are seeking to widen their base in both the domestic & export market, the quality of their machinery is making all the difference in terms of increased productivity and better delivery. As the industry takes greater strides and machinery demand surges to new height, Polymechplast Machines Ltd is creating a niche in the thermoplastic injection and blow moulding machines segment and has

gained foothold in the domestic as well as international market. K R Bhuva, CMD, Polymechplast Machines Ltd, notes, “The increased usage of plastics in all sectors like construction, electrical and electronics, household, surgical, cosmetics, packaging and, especially, automotive, has boosted the demand for injection & blow moulding machines. The demand for injection moulding and blow moulding machines is about 7,000 per year and 550 per year, respectively.”

Milestones achieved The company has the distinction of being the pioneer and the only successful manufacturer till date of the

three colour marble effect injection moulding machine in India. This machine was installed in 2003, especially for household segment. The company had successfully launched its first double-colour marble effect injection moulding machine in 1986, which was used specifically for household products, followed by the smallest screw-type fully automatic injection moulding machine in 1987.

Manufacturing facility Housed in Gujarat Industrial Development Corporation (GIDC), Makarpura, in Vadodara, the company began operation in 1978. “At that time, we were a small company with only

Photo: Vijaykumar Soneji

170 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


Polymechplast Machines Ltd

7,000 sq ft of land area but today, we have a total land area of 45,684 sq ft. Thus, gradually, we have established ourselves and also introduced many new products in the market,” says Bhuva.

Product Portfolio The company mainly manufactures injection and blow moulding machines. These machines are sold under the registered brand name of GOLDCOIN. The company offers two types of machines in the injection moulding machine category – single colour and marble effect double/triple colour concept moulding machine. Other machines include hydraulic-operated blow moulding machine, pneumatic blow moulding machine and compression moulding machines.

Research & development The company houses state-of-the-art technology and Computer Aided Design (CAD) workstations to upgrade existing technology & develop breakthroughs. The company is continuously involved in designing & developing new products, specifying raw material and tolerances, prototype manufacturing and evolving new techniques to enhance efficiency to keep the company abreast of international technological developments.

measures include a wide range of tests such as chemical and ultrasonic tests during various stages of production and vendor inspection. There is constant monitoring, attention to complaint resolution, online communication and information exchange at various levels to further enhance the quality of machines. The company also follows EUROMAP standards. “Every machine is tested thoroughly before dispatching it to the customer, so that the customer is satisfied,” avers Bhuva.

Ensuring cost efficiency Providing high-tech and quality machines to customers at lower prices is one of the key strengths of the company. Bhuva avers, “We buy raw materials directly f rom the manufacturers. We use manpower efficiently, as people are trained for multi-tasking. This helps the company in reducing its overhead costs.”

Competitive analysis

The company adheres to the business philosophy of offering total quality products. It is an ISO 9001:2008 certified company, and enforces stringent quality control measures at all stages to achieve near zero defect. These

Various factors give the company an edge over others in the segment. “First, we provide high-tech and quality machines at affordable prices to the customers. Second, we have a wide sales and service network. Third, the aftersales services provided by our company also hold us in good stead. Fourth, we export to about 28 countries, which implies that our machines are at par with machines offered by international companies. Finally, we make a wide range of machines, and this helps us maintain a strong position in the market,” details Bhuva.

Machine assembly line

Work on thermoplastic extrusion blowmoulding

Maintaining quality

Photo: Vijaykumar Soneji

Plastics has penetrated in every sphere of our daily life. The increased usage of plastics in sectors like construction, electronics, packaging and automotive, has boosted the demand for injection and blow moulding machines. K R Bhuva Chairman & Managing Director

Sustainability efforts The company is continuously making efforts to reduce energy consumption. Bhuva notes, “ We use variable displacement pumps and servo motors in the machines, which reduce energy consumption to a large extent. We do not pollute the environment and do our best to reduce waste. We make our components with optimal use of raw materials and avoid overall wastage.”

Future outlook The future of Indian plastics processing industry is bright. Considering this, the company intends to increase its production and make larger-sized machines in the future. The company has acquired 2,50,000,000 sq ft of land to facilitate its production capacity in the future. The main aim of the company as Bhuva puts is, “To serve its customers with better solutions and continuously work towards offering the best technology at affordable cost. We want to do something different every time, so that we can create a special image in the mind of the customer. We have done this so far and will continue doing so in future as well.” Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 171


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK

Plastics in Automotive / Transportation Automotive plastics: Changing gears for growth ................................................................................................................................................... 174

FRP in automotives: Fortifying growth opportunities ........................................................................................................................................... 178

Interface - Aschak Damani: Executive Director, Zylog Plastalloys Pvt Ltd ..................................................................................................................... 184

Roundtable: How are automotive applications shaping the injection moulding industry? ...................................................................... 188

PVDF fluoropolymer process aids: Increasing throughput, reducing downtime .......................................................................................................................... 190

Injection moulding: Quality control through cavity monitoring........................................................................................................................... 194

Designing playground equipment: Not a child’s play ................................................................................................................................................................... 198

Six Sigma methodology: Quantifying financial benefits ..............................................................................................................................................204

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 173


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: Automotive plastics

Courtesy: SABIC Innovative Plastics

Changing gears for growth Recent innovations in automotive plastics underscore the way automakers and their suppliers are working to add function, improve aesthetics and reduce weight & cost of cars in India. With a challenging economic scenario ahead, Annabel Dsouza reveals the secrets of safety, sustainability and profitability in the Indian automotive industry.

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utomobiles have assumed a place of prominence in the Indian economy. This industry is currently manufacturing 2.2 million passenger cars, which is expected grow to about 10 million vehicles by 2020. Automotives are poised to contribute nearly 10 per cent of national Gross Domestic Product (GDP) by 2016 and the turnover will reach $ 145 billion by 2016 from $ 33 billion in 2009. After having recorded a strong double-digit volume growth over the last two years, the auto and auto components industry is currently facing strong headwinds in 2011-12, leading to moderation in growth

contributed by firming up of commodity prices, rising fuel costs and interest rates.

Sustaining profit margins While the industry has made large strides over the last decade towards improving internal efficiency, and thereby partially offsetting input cost pressures, automotive Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) are turning to engineering plastics in order to combat cost pressures and leverage on the green ticket. As the industry is working towards intensifying cost-effective vehicle systems in the product pipelines and existing model refurbishment programmes, the

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Investment Information and Credit Rating Agency of India Ltd (ICRA) expects usage of common parts, vehicle lightweighting, engine efficiency improvement and other prudent engineering themes to take centrestage in the Indian automotive market in the future. Increasing focus on these areas is likely to be one of the key strategies of industry participants to sustain volume growth and ensure stability of profit margins. As the Indian industry seeks to keep pace with global innovations and costcompetitiveness, automotive OEMs need to rethink vehicle architecture and materials requirements. Versatile, durable


Automotive plastics

Engineering plastics help reduce weight, increase safety and comfort, reduce noise levels, increase design flexibility, offer the possibility of modularisation that helps in lean manufacturing and enhance the aesthetics of the vehicle. Herman Althoff Senior Vice President, Engineering Plastics Asia Pacific, BASF

Lack of package space for integration of electronic components and restrictions on new styling & aesthetics has been a major drawback in conventional steering wheel design. Using injection moulding to process advanced polymers is a fresh approach to this. Umamaheswaran Venkatakrishnan Automotive Director-Products, Marketing and Technology, SABIC Innovative Plastics

and lightweight plastics, composites & plastic-metal hybrid materials that increase the efficiency, crashworthiness and functionality of today’s vehicles hold immense potential to radically enable and optimise advanced vehicle technologies for the future. Herman Althoff, Senior Vice President, Engineering Plastics Asia Pacific, BASF, says, “Engineering plastics are increasingly replacing metals in many areas under-the-hood as well as in the interiors and chassis. Engineering plastics help reduce weight, increase safety and comfort, reduce noise levels, increase design flexibility, offer the possibility of modularisation that helps in lean manufacturing and enhance the aesthetics of the vehicle. Leading OEMs globally have been using it for over two decades – the technology is tried and proven and the risk of adaption is low.” The plastics industry has been an active partner in the process of innovation and remains committed to action. Globally, the World Health Organization and the United Nations are increasingly focussing on automotive safety as a growing concern, particularly in developing nations with rapidly expanding economies. Innovations in automotive plastics applications highlight the industry’s strong commitment to enhanced automotive safety.

Fueling economy Plastics plays a major role in improving fuel efficiency and today’s use of 70 kg of plastics per car is expected to touch 100 kg/ car by 2016. In contrast, 130 kg and 150 kg of plastics per car is used in China and the US, respectively. This clearly shows a huge potential in India for plastics consumption in automobiles and spells immense opportunities for automotive manufacturers, OEMs, compounders, vendors, raw material suppliers, plastic machinery manufacturers and process engineering industries. Umamaheswaran Venkatakrishnan, Automotive Director-Products, Marketing and Technology, SABIC Innovative Plastics, says, “Lack of package space for integration of electronic components and restrictions on new styling & aesthetics

176 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

has been a major drawback in conventional steering wheel design. Using injection moulding to process advanced polymers is a fresh approach to this. Hollow rims reduce weight and provide space for electronics. Compared to die casting and finishing, injection moulding offers greater design flexibility, avoids secondary operations and streamlines production while reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the manufacturing process.”

Vrooming into the future With European automakers producing cars in India, the quality and standards of components & materials being used in cars manufacturing are at par with cars being manufactured elsewhere in the world. This has put pressure on Indian OEMs/vendors to rise to international standards. Despite the constraints, 75 per cent localisation of automobile components has been achieved in less than two years. Indian automobile manufacturers are focussing on innovations to match international standards as seen in computer-controlled painting of cars, which is a revolution in India. Certain techniques like thermoforming for exteriors and Long-Fibre Reinforced Thermoplastics (LFRT) for replacement of metals are yet to take off in India, and these have phenomenal potential. Margin pressures due to rise in commodity, manpower and power costs, besides intense competition, are not new to the Indian automotive industry. However, the measures required by the industry to placate these challenges on an ongoing basis may need to be directed to areas related to design optimisation and economical engineering, where results become visible only over a relatively longer time. This may require the industry players to incur more investments; however, the longer term benefits and resultant structural changes could alter the automotive design paradigm, change cost drivers and provide greater value to customers. ICRA expects focus on these areas to be critical for industry participants to sustain their volume growth and achieve stability in profit margins. Email: annabel.dsouza@infomedia18.in


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: FRP in automotives

Fortifying growth opportunities Properties like high strength and design flexibility of fibre-reinforced plastics have enabled its widespread applications across the global manufacturing industry. With regard to challenging applications in the automotive sector, Annabel Dsouza traces the trend in innovations as well as volume consumption.

T

he burgeoning manufacturing sector and heavy investments in infrastructure is expected to provide an impetus to the ` 5,000-crore composite (reinforced plastics) industry in India. Production of composites involves combining polymer and glass fibre or carbon fibre to produce a material that is lighter yet stronger than steel. The Indian composite plastics industry is expected to grow at a remarkable rate of about 25 per cent in the next 4-5 years, leveraging opportunities predominant in segments like transport, infrastructure, wind energy and oil & gas. Composites offer the advantages of high strength, low maintenance costs and corrosion resistance.

Potential of composites The automobile industry is one of the key sectors where significant amounts of composite materials are used in passenger cars, scooters and helmets. In recent times, the Indian composite industry has a strong manufacturing base (with automated processes) and good design

& development expertise. As global companies enter the Indian market and establish a strong base for export & local demand, the need of the hour is consolidation and automation. Several players are investing in new technologies to improve productivity and quality to meet increasing market demands. There is a huge potential for use of composites in the Indian automobile industry, especially for catering to the transportation needs of a growing middle-class population. Today, FibreReinforced Plastics (FRP) is employed in hoods, cabs, frames and cargo containers and many other locally built vehicles. Other opportunities for the Indian composites industry include refrigerated freight containers, pressure vessels, fishing boats, walkways and piles for building foundations and air intake manifolds.

Innovation index Polymer composite materials have conventionally been used in a wide range of structural applications in the aerospace, construction and automotive industries

178 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

due to their light weight & high specific stiffness & strength. A variety of materials, ranging from low-performance glass fibre/ polyester used in sail boats & two-wheelers, are being used in manufacturing highperformance carbon fibre/epoxy systems that find applications in military aircraft and spacecraft. However, the use of composite materials is still evolving in the automotive industry in terms of innovations and volume consumption. Composite materials offer great potential in reducing vehicle weight, thus increasing fuel efficiency and reducing CO2 emissions. Besides weight and fuel savings, the number of individual parts can be significantly reduced, making the high-volume composite car concept a cost-effective one. Current applications of composite materials in high-volume automotive structures are limited to secondary exterior structures like body panels, wheel housings or energy absorbing bumpers. Milan Vignjevic, General Manager, Asia Pacific, Semi-Crystalline Products (SCP), LANXESS, says, “To improve fuel efficiency and minimise CO2 emissions,


FRP in automotives

auto manufacturers are looking at reducing the weight of vehicles. This step will trigger greater use of high-tech plastics in Indian cars. LANXESS’ emphasises on environmental savings, which is reflected in the plastic–metal hybrid. The hybrid is based on innovative, glass fibre-reinforced polyamides and used by most automakers today. While 30 years ago, plastics accounted for about 7 per cent of a car’s content, today, this figure is nearly 20 per cent and still growing. This technology is being used in over 40 million cars worldwide for construction of parts ranging from frontend structures to brake pedals, support brackets, seating, etc.

Embracing lightweight technology New trends in the automotive industry are assessed in terms of manufacturing cycle times, reduced production cost through automation, decreased environmental impact, improved comfort and safety, improved acoustic performance, and the amount of new material that can be recycled. With continuous increase in the cost of petroleum and raw materials such as steel, manufacturers are seriously considering Carbon-Fibre-Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) for designing their

Advanced Aluminium composites 75% 50% Fibres 33% Ceramics 19%

19% Steel

41% Bio-based material

56% Plastics

Material poised for growth

cars. The weight-to-performance ratio of CFRP positions it as an attractive prospect for manufacturers’ aiming to reduce the weight and overall performance of a vehicle. CFRP is widely used in the aerospace industry and for making lightweight racing cars; however, the lack of suitable design processes means that the mass production car market has not yet been able to fully embrace the technology. Thermoplastic composites are used extensively in interior parts of a car, eg, sun shades, door panel trim, bumpers, parcel shelves, etc. It has been a significant challenge to develop processes that can produce structural exterior parts, without taking away the crash safety standards of the vehicle. Another challenge here is to make the use of CFRP economically viable in a large-scale production scenario.

Challenging the convention

To improve fuel efficiency and minimise CO2 emissions, auto manufacturers are looking at reducing the weight of vehicles. This step will trigger greater use of high-tech plastics in Indian cars. Milan Vignjevic GM, Asia Pacific, Semi-Crystalline Products (SCP), LANXESS

A major challenge in the design of structural automotive parts made from FRP is the joining and load introduction aspect. This can arise through joining of composite parts to metallic space-frames, or in attachment of secondary structures such as seat mountings and suspension systems. Introducing loads into composite laminates has been more complicated than in metallic materials due to material anisotropy, poor interlaminar strength and the absence of local stress relief such as plasticity. While a number of load attachments and joints can be integrated into the components manufactured by Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM), the need to join or attach secondary structures

180 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

is unavoidable. Thus, development of joining techniques for composite structures is necessary. The need for a shorter cycle time for a typical composite moulding process is quite challenging. Short cycle times achieved by faster cure times may result in products with a shorter shelf life and lower quality. Shortening cure times may not be a feasible option; hence, strategies to determine the most suitable processing method for a given application are needed. Multiple, parallel production lines could be used to improve the viability of polymer composite manufacturing processes for high-production-volume applications. Although parallel lines may reduce the capital advantage of polymer composites, a significant reduction in material cost and further integration & combination of parts in the design will improve the overall economic viability of composites.

Future viability Research areas like design data/test methodologies, joining and inspection, and recycling & repair, have a direct bearing on the cost and are important for the overall economic viability of automotive composites. There is a need to develop design methodologies, material use philosophies and durability of data that will enhance material choice. Improving material choice will enhance the economic viability of the class of materials. Economic viability assessment of composite joining and inspection technology helps determine whether reduced assembly costs (from parts consolidation) offsets the higher manufacturing cost (of large parts). The recyclability of thermoplastics shows a great promise, but DOE must continue developing cost-effective means of recycling, including separation of fibres from the resin matrix material. Therefore, an aggressive R&D portfolio need to be be followed. Several orders of cost reduction resulting from major breakthroughs are needed before composites become the material of choice for the automakers. Email: annabel.dsouza@infomedia18.in


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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: Inter face - Aschak Damani

“Plastics processors will enjoy a two-pronged growth” …opines Aschak Damani, Executive Director, Zylog Plastalloys Pvt Ltd. In an enlightening conversation with Annabel Dsouza, he highlights the impact of rising costs on the automotive industry. He also shares insights on innovations in processing technology to augment high-volume production while reducing carbon footprint and fuel consumption. How will rising fuel prices and interest rates impact automotive plastics processors in India? The rising fuel prices and interest rates have hurt automotive sales, with a dip in volumes, specifically for petrol vehicles. Large Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) like Maruti Suzuki and Hyundai, have witnessed not only decreased demand from customers, but also increased competition in the small- and medium-sized car market from OEMs like Toyota, GM, Ford, Nissan and Volkswagen. Many OEMs are launching diesel vehicles to tone down these losses, but the expanding automotive segment is able to accommodate the new entrants. Plastics processors having moulders/ convertors as tier I vendors and compounders (eg, Zylog) as tier II vendors to auto OEMs have been adversely affected due to the demand slump and rising costs of raw materials like Polypropylene (PP) & elastomers. Plastics processors will enjoy a two-pronged growth, due to rising volumes and increase in per-vehicle plastics consumption.

How will plastics help mitigate fluctuating profit margins in the automotive industry? Despite the relatively smaller market size, competition has come in quite fast

to India. The growth slump in North America and Western Europe is the major reason why countries like India, Brazil and Russia are witnessing a lot of activities in the form of new plants/joint ventures/acquisitions by multinationals. This, coupled with the highly pricesensitive nature of the Indian consumer, has put further pressure on profit margins of auto companies. Constant innovation besides reduced time to market and lead times for new products is driving value additions. Automation of production and processes is the need of the hour. Companies need to make tough and fast decisions to grab business away from competition and increase volumes. Major system suppliers and compounders are pushing for consolidation of plastic material specifications across automotive OEMs, which could provide better economies of scale.

How can plastics make cars ‘green’ and safe? Plastics provides several advantages over other materials/metals such as better aesthetics, low weight, easy recyclability and enhanced safety. It is replacing metal for various functional and performance parts, ensuring further reduction of fuel consumption and carbon emissions.

184 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Glass-filled polymers are replacing sheetmetal, steel and aluminium in various under-the-hood components. Technology has pushed the envelope of performance for commodity plastics such as PP to enhance safety of people inside and outside vehicles by better energy management system, absorption of front & side impacts, head form impact, knee bolster, etc.

What will be the implications of use of composites on the plastics industry? Composites are primarily dominated by thermoset resin-based materials. These materials are tough and can sustain severe conditions and are corrosion resistant. The use of thermoplasticbased composites is gaining momentum. Materials like PP/polyamides mixed with natural fibres like jute, kenaf, hemp or synthetic fibres such as carbon, glass and aramid find use in applications ranging from automotive to aerospace. Constant innovation in processing technology has enhanced penetration of these materials by way of simpler processing methodologies, use of conventional equipment and better manufacturing cycle times, thus allowing high-volume production. Email: annabel.dsouza@infomedia18.in


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: Roundtable

How are

automotive applications shaping the injection moulding industry? The global market for plastics processing machinery is projected to surpass $ 13 billion by 2015, driven by increased demand from emerging markets of Asia-Pacific and Latin America. With automotive applications propelling growth of the plastics industry, Annabel Dsouza assesses the impact of automotive applications in shaping technology trends in the injection moulding machinery market. Ed Murch Tooling Manager, MAMCO Precision Moulding

Mark Hasting

Automotive applications are of particular significance to the plastics industry in developing markets. Studies on manufacturing processes for automotive plastics components have emphasised on over-moulding. It is an injection moulding process where one material is moulded onto a second material to form hybrid structure components. Plastics, elastomers, metals, ceramics, fabrics are used in this process. This is particularly important where processors are looking to gain technological advantage over rivals by adding value to their products. In such processes, two or more types of materials are used for manufacturing components to better utilise the properties of materials. While tooling costs can be higher, cost savings can be achieved by eliminating assembly steps. There are many advantages of using components that consist of more than two materials. Multimaterial moulding is widely used in Europe and is gaining significant market appeal in India as well.

Senior Business Development Manager, Maxell Moulding Services

Editorial take:

With large numbers of automotive Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) venturing into emerging markets, it is essential to understand the standards and requirements of this application. Although over-moulding provides many advantages, it also has potential problems. Compatibility is important for interfacial adhesion. Different materials have varying rheological properties and optimal moulding conditions, which can limit material choice. This area offers vast opportunity for research, as only few studies have been done on co-moulding incompatible polymers. On the other hand, two-shot moulding process is being used for the first component moulding. Here, the moulded part is transferred to the second cavity for injection of the second material to form a two-component part. The over-moulding process helps produce plastics components with coloured polymer resins and eliminates the downstream painting process.

Wolfhart Hauser CEO, Intertek Automotive Moulding Services

The automotive industry today has become quite competitive. High performance, fuel efficiency, low cost and stylish design are some of the factors that attract customers. Applications of over-moulded plastics components can meet many of the demands in the automotive industry, as the properties of different polymers can be better utilised and various modern design features can be easily implemented. To further develop and commercialise the over-moulding technologies for automotive applications, a plan has been drafted to work with industrial partners in India. The co-injection moulding process is employed to mould vehicle components with the outer layer being a coloured resin with good surface finish and resistance. This serves to produce multi-shot and in-mould painted components with improved surface performance for body panel and window applications. As compared with plastics parts fabricated through moulding and then painting process, this method has numerous advantages.

Over-moulding technique is making inroads in the conventional injection moulding process, owing to phenomenal growth in the automotive plastics industry. This enables cost savings by eliminating assembly steps, but can increase overall tooling costs and limit part material choices.

188 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: PVDF fluoropolymer process aids

Increasing throughput, reducing downtime Fluoropolymers are an effective aid in the extrusion of polyolefins, particularly blown films. Here is an outline of a specific family of fluoropolymers, namely, polyvinylidene fluoride and vinylidene fluoride/hexafluoropropylene copolymers that are used as fluoropolymer process aids, their benefits and high-efficiency products for film & other applications. Courtesy: Arkema

Viral Vora and Joshua Gingras

F

luoropolymer Process Aids (PPAs) aid extrusion of polyolefins and other polymers. Most notably, these are used to eliminate melt fracture in Linear Low Density Polyethylene (LLDPE) films. These reduce operating pressure, delay onset of die build-up and enable faster transitions and start-ups, resulting in higher throughput, improved surface finish, reduced downtime and energy savings. PPAs allow for use of narrow die gaps

to achieve better balance of properties in film extrusion. These benefits are seen in various extrusion processes, eg, pipe, fibre, wire & cable, and also blow moulding. Two versions of Vinylidene Fluoride/ Hexafluoropropylene ( VF2/HFP) compounds, eg, Fluoropolymer and Fluoroelastomer, are used as PPAs. Fluoropolymer versions are based on Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) and VF2/HFP resins and contain less than 13 per cent of HFP. Fluoroelastomer products contain higher amounts of HFP and increase the cost and require the use

mPE+300ppm PPA

Vsurf. ~ Vbulk

Vsurf. = Vbulk

Vsurf. Vbulk Vsurf.

x: Kvnar flex PPA Figure 1: PPA mechanism

190 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

of partitioning agents. The polyolefin processors that used fluoropolymer processing aids for LLDPE have achieved performance equivalent to VF2/HFP fluoroelastomer. With equivalent or better performance and lower manufacturing cost, fluoropolymer PPAs offer a superior alternative to fluoroelastomer PPAs.

PPA mechanism During processing, narrow die gaps and high extrusion rates result in high shear rates. High shear rates, along with drag on the die wall, put stress on the melt as it exits the die. Resins like metallocene grades of LLDPE (mLLDPE) have narrow molecular weight distribution and high stress on the melt even at low output rates. The PPA coats the metal surface of the die, as it has high affinity for metal and low compatibility for polyolefin. The low surface energy of the fluoropolymer reduces the drag on the die walls, allowing the melt to slip through the die. Figure 1 shows that PPA helps the velocity of melt in the bulk to remain similar to that of melt at the wall. This delays onset of melt fracture and allows high output rates for difficult-to-process resins.


PVDF fluoropolymer process aids

Melt fracture and pressure drop PPAs are used for elimination of melt fracture in polyethylene films. Figures 2 and 3 show the melt fracture in the LLDPE blown film before and after addition of Fluoropolymer PPA [300 Parts Per Million (ppm)]. Another benefit and a method to measure performance of PPAs is the amount of pressure drop in the extruder. Laboratory results show a pressure drop while extruding a flat sheet of mLLDPE by using 300 ppm of PPA. The pressure drop at the entrance of the die can be as high as 30 per cent with the use of PPA. Besides the usual improvements in surface

Figure 2: LLDPE film before adding PPA

appearance, throughput of the extruder also increases. These benefits are seen in filled systems containing other additives. PPAs do not adversely affect the performance of other additives, but some additives can interfere with the performance of PPAs. Hindered Amine Light Stabilisers (HALS), antiblocks, pigments and stearates are certain products that can reduce the efficacy of PPAs. Figure 4 shows pressure drop of three PPA products in LLDPE with 1.6 per cent TiO2 and 2,000 ppm of HALS. Before the new trial campaign, the complete die to avoid contamination from previous extrusions. All PPAs were loaded at 200 ppm and, after running each formulation, the equipment was purged. Purging was critical to the credibility of results. All traces of PPAs had to be eliminated from the screw and die. Between the two trials, the die and screw were purged with high content-filled polyethylene for one hour and then with LLDPE for one hour. Virgin LLDPE was run until pressure and the defects stabilised. The masterbatch with additive was introduced next. KYNAR FLEX速 5300 showed a larger pressure drop versus the competitive products and stabilised quickly at low pressure.

Die build-up

Pressure (bars)

Figure 3: LLDPE film after adding 300 ppm of PPA

Die build-up is caused by degradation of material during extrusion. This can be a material recirculating in the extruder and

Kynar flex PPA 5300 Competition-1 Competition-2 Time (s) Figure 4: Pressure drop of PPAs in filled systems

192 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

made of low molecular weight components or fillers used in the formulation. When materials degrade, they have a higher tendency to stick to die walls. When the process begins, other materials can degrade at the same site, causing buildup of a mixture of degraded materials. Occasionally, this build-up releases and deposits on the surface of the film or other extruded products. This build-up can be seen as a black spot or gel on the product and may interrupt extrusion. In a similar mechanism, PPAs coat the die walls, creating a low surface energy layer that prevents build-up. The probability of degradation decreases due to the lower residence time and reduced accumulation of degraded materials. The reduction of build-up allows longer run times between clean outs and consistent surface quality during production run.

Conclusion Fluoropolymer PPAs are a cost-effective solution for extrusion problems and provide several benefits when used with polyolefins. Eliminating melt fracture, reducing die build-up, increasing throughput and reducing downtime are among these benefits. Optimised products are available for use in filled systems that have reduced interactions with other additives. Viral Vora has done B Tech in Plastics and Polymers from MIT, Aurangabad, and Masters in Polymers from Aalen University, Germany. He is working with Arkema India for the last six months as Executive Marketing. He looks after sales, marketing and Business Development of PVDF in India for applications in various sectors. Email: viral.vora@arkema.com Joshua Gingras holds a B S Chemical Engineering degree from Northeastern University and a Masters Degree from Villanova University. He has been with Arkema Inc for 11 years. He is currently Market Manager for Chemical Processing, Electrical Products and Polymer Process Aids. Email: joshua.gingras@arkema.com


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: Injection moulding

Quality control through cavity monitoring The lack of consideration for the fate of the plastic melt and its behaviour inside the mould is a matter of concern. Resolving these problems requires careful monitoring of the activities inside the cavity with regard to pressure or temperature by using sensors to ensure consistent part quality. Y R Anand

O

ver the past decade, many injection moulding and general manufacturing shops have rapidly increased in their capacity and number of machines on the shop-floor. To some extent, it is easy to manually track machine performance, material planning, maintenance schedule, inventory management and various other functions. An important problem faced by every injection moulder is how to monitor and control the quality of the parts, preferably by using computerised measurement systems. High-quality injection moulding machines will have good quality measurement systems built in the machine. But these will at best

Cooling

be able to measure machine functions and regulate part quality. No attention is paid to what actually happens to the plastic melt, and how it behaves inside the mould. This is a matter of serious concern and more acute in case of parts supplied by external vendors.

Factors affecting part quality Keeping track of the process conditions is the key for making precise parts. Since the process takes place in the mould, it has to be monitored, controlled and documented there. Large outsourcing programmes face a major problem of consistency of the parts produced by multiple vendors. In an increasingly competitive world, there is constant pressure on regulating part price without sacrificing part quality. In Heat dissipation

Raw material humidity environmental conditions (Temperature)

Dimensions, part weight are different

Mould temperature variations

Melt temperature variations

Constant machine settings

Process settings to ensure making precise parts Source: Unimark

194 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

this trade off, the consistency of parts could become a victim. Rare is the case when all moulders have the same type of sophisticated moulding machines with advanced inbuilt quality systems. Different moulders have different machines – outsourced or manufactured in-house. Moreover, same mould can produce different results on different machines. The results could vary depending on the experience of different operators, even on the same moulder. Another factor affecting part quality is variation in the melt flow index (and hence, behaviour) of plastics from batch to batch and often within the same batch. After huge improvements in production methods and processes, there remains inadequate understanding of the term ‘closed loop’ injection moulding in a majority of cases.

Alleviating the problem There are solutions at hand that can ease this problem. Monitoring activities inside the cavity by way of sensors for pressure or temperature (or both) and using these to make the switch from injection speed to holding pressure will ensure consistent part quality. This is despite the presence of external forces or raw material variations. These require the use of pressure or thermal sensors as well as systems to use these signals for controlling the switchover point in different cavities or points within a large cavity. It is not sufficient to simply position sensors and hope for the best.


Injection moulding

The control system (similar to a black box) plays a vital role in quality control. There are several manufacturers of sensors; thus, it is important to choose a supplier who offers complete solutions and not just parts of hardware. It is also important to opt for systems that can deliver consistent parts in each cavity and shot.

Functional principle of switchover to holding pressure The classical switchover to holding pressure by cavity pressure sensors utilises a fixed-pressure threshold value to initiate where the switchover takes place. Yet, the viscosity and its constant variation play a major role. Viscosity changes represent changes in volumes. A change in viscosity of the material during production strongly influences the process. Therefore, with fixed-level pressure switchover, the moulded parts are either under-moulded or overmoulded and are subject to variations. In contrast, automatic switchover based on flush-mounted cavity temperature sensors at the end of the flow path gives an instantaneous indication of the melt front. An external signal for switchover is sent to the moulding machine within 4 milliseconds, when the mould is volumetrically full. Any material viscosity changes are automatically compensated for. In case of a blocked nozzle, for example, the melt will not reach the cavity temperature sensor. This can be ascertained by a good system, and the bad part as a result of the blocked nozzle can be automatically contained.

Common misconceptions A common misconception about quality is that a constant machine setting leads to consistent moulding of part weight and dimensions. In fact, quite the opposite is true. The classical switchover methods are based on screw position or cavity pressure. These usually use a permanently set switchover threshold optimised during mould set up. Here, the switchover to holding pressure occurs at the highest

possible volumetric filling. In such cases, the settings cannot be changed without undergoing another series of set-up parameters, as any change in injection speed changes the injection volume. This results in the need for resetting the switchover pressure or point. There is a similar connection between constant machine settings and natural variations in melt viscosity (which happens due to batch variations), or when regrind is processed or due to the influence of humidity. In other words, every process variation in injection moulding alters the melt flow behaviour and, with permanently set switchover thresholds, leads to greater or lesser

Quality control using sensors yields multiple benefits Reducing material wastage by eliminating over-packing Avoiding short fills Consistent weight and dimensions (irrespective of machines used) Balancing hot runners dynamically Avoiding costly off-line inspection Reduction of secondary process steps Avoiding weld line problems Controlling sequential injection process for larger parts deviations. In case of extreme variations, this results in either unfilled cavities or overfilled parts.

Control of hot runner Hot runner moulds are subject to natural variations caused by changes in ambient influences and differences in mould temperature or melt viscosity. Therefore, injection moulded parts differ in consistency, weight and dimension. Without active hot runner control, there are natural limits to precision of any process. The hot runner can be controlled by automatically detecting the melt position in the cavity and adapted via nozzle temperatures in the hot runner.

196 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Most errors are systematically detected and automatically corrected. The original idea for this control was to use cavity pressure, rather than cavity temperature sensors. The functionality of the method could be demonstrated in the simple case of a multi-cavity mould with identical cavities. This principle had clear limitations: Hot runner balancing was based on a pressure increase, which, in contrast with cavity temperature, does not transform into a signal prior to the compression phase, ie, long after filling and switching over to holding pressure. Therefore, control based on melt position is impossible when cavity pressure sensors are used. Various applications, such as melt flow control in car bumpers, or while processing fluid silicon cannot be implemented without the knowledge of the actual melt position. Moulded parts shrinkage and the final dimensions depend largely on mould tempering and temperature distribution on the mould surface. These parameters, in turn, can only be detected and regulated by cavity temperature sensors.

Intelligent process control Intelligent use of cavity pressure and temperature sensors for process control is quite new in India, and hence the knowledge about this is scarce. Although with reasonable investment, it can yield generous returns to moulders and end-users in terms of consistent quality independent of local conditions. Besides, the use of such technologies can only grow in the future. Y R Anand holds a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from University of Mysore and a Master’s degree in Production Engineering from IIT, Kharagpur. He worked for a little over nine years in manufacturing industries in Mumbai. Since 1980, he has been a partner in UNIMARK. The company sells and services machines in plastics processing, tooling industry, microelectronics and wire mesh welding industry. Email: anand@unimark.in


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: Designing playground equipment

Not a

child’s play Different needs, interests and developmental levels of individual children necessitate playground equipment that can inspire them to play, exercise and communicate and are safe as well. Understanding these needs, a US-based toy company used a new software to design playground equipment that are durable and meet today’s safety and sustainability standards as well. A case study…

N

atural outdoor environment has a positive effect on humans, as it reduces stress and creates a feeling of wellbeing. This is especially true for small children who prefer playing in natural landscape. Thus, a playground must have quality equipment that encourage children to play, exercise, think, communicate and cooperate with each other. Taking cue from this, BigToys Inc – a toy company – used a new software to design playground equipment that are durable, environment-friendly and high on safety quotient.

Child-friendly reputation For 40 years, BigToys Inc (BigToys) has earned a reputation as a manufacturer of high-quality commercial playground

equipment for children of all ages and abilities. Located in Olympia, Washington, USA the company is known for caring for the environment as much as for children. BigToys’ sturdy and durable steel & plastic play structures contain 100 per cent USmade recycled materials. For designing its award-winning playground equipment, BigToys used Autodesk® solution for digital prototyping. The use of Autodesk® Inventor® software to create ThreeDimensional (3D) digital prototypes helped the company to: Design, visualise and simulate products before manufacturing Develop more innovative and flexible product designs Achieve efficient design process

Basking in the bliss of childhood

198 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Create safe and friendly play spaces

environment-

The challenge Until the late 20th century, seesaws were found in nearly all public parks and school playgrounds in the US. But, due to safety concerns and increased litigation, seesaws disappeared by early 21 st century. Seeing this, in 2005, BigToys sought to reinvent the traditional seesaw with a new design concept to meet today’s safety and sustainability standards while providing children with same movements and sensations that have been loved by generations of riders.

The solution BigToys used Autodesk Inventor software to develop a new product


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Endeavour

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Designing playground equipment

called Rock ’n Cross™, which redefines the concept of seesaw by combining a multi-rider teeter-totter with a dynamic overhead activity. The unique design of the Rock ’n Cross eliminates the dangers of traditional teeter-totters by eliminating pinch points and sudden stops through an internal spring-assisted action. Designed to meet or exceed all applicable safety standards, it provides children with opportunities for physical and social development in a fun & exciting play activity. Brian Lovgren, Engineering Manager, BigToys, says, “Designing with Inventor software is seamless. We can go from the initial idea to finished part with minimum need for redesign. We also have the added benefit to better communicate our design intent to others and eliminate potential manufacturing errors.” The flexibility and faster iterative capability realised by using Inventor has led to more innovative product designs and a more efficient design process. Lovgren continues, “Its intuitive interface ensures that our time is spent designing, and not searching for toolbars & dialog boxes.” While developing the Rock ’n Cross, BigToys focussed on three key steps – customer collaboration, concept development and prototype testing. Customer collaboration: As part of the early design work on the Rock ’n Cross, BigToys collected input from different potential customers – children aged five and above, playground supervisors and schoolteachers, playground equipment specifiers, safety standards organisations like the Federal Consumer Product Safety Commission and the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International as well as installation & maintenance workers. Focussing on meeting customer requirements helped BigToys to identify the market opportunity for the product. These included enjoyable and developmentally appropriate play experiences, minimal supervision, overall durability, cost-effective installation & maintenance, compliance with government and industry safety

The unique design of the Rock ’n Cross eliminates the dangers of traditional teeter-totters by eliminating pinch points and sudden stops through an internal spring-assisted action. standards and the ability to be surface-mounted or installed in-ground. Concept development: BigToys contracted with John Underbrink, an industrial designer specialised in playground equipment and worked closely with the company to develop ideas for cooperative play products. He considered the decline of the traditional seesaw as an opportunity and presented sketches of the Rock ’n Cross. In the sketches, the tilting of the traditional seesaw was replaced by a mechanism that moves the riders in the same circular path as in the traditional one, but using a rotating arc rather than a pivot. While seesaws balance due to weight distribution, this concept was centred using springs. The idea of using springs to centre seesaws was not new, as there are units on the market where springs not only centre the riders rotationally, but also support them and provide lateral stiffness. The performance of such a seesaw depends on the weight of riders, and it was unconstrained in its motion about all axes and all directions. The Rock ’n Cross, on the other hand, was constrained to a single degree of freedom similar to a traditional seesaw. Prototype testing: As the initial concept was further developed in the Inventor software, all springs and guides were made internal to the part, above the ground. This design change enabled the Rock ’n Cross to be

202 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

surface-mounted for easier installation. “Inventor’s ability to check interference and employ collision detection allowed us to verify fit and function throughout the full range of motion,” informs Lovgren. After digital testing with the three-dimensional Inventor model, a prototype was built from plastic materials, and it was sufficient for testing the functionality with children in an internal environment. A second prototype was made and installed in the playground at a local school. In this phase, BigToys observed and interviewed the children. The company learned that five-year olds played on this unit differently as compared to 12-year olds. Younger children were more cooperative, with some helping those sitting on the Rock ’n Cross. The older children were more competitive and enjoyed the challenge & risk of hanging on the middle while others tried to shake them off. This graduated play challenge added a unique appeal to the Rock ’n Cross.

In safe hands The Inventor software helped BigToys minimise the number of physical prototypes needed. “A bill of materials was exported, making implementation of the product much simpler and accurate,” says Lovgren. He added, “Inventor also made it possible to determine shipping weights and dimensions early in the process.” Thus, BigToys used this software, to develop a 21st century seesaw that not only meets today’s safety and sustainability requirements, but is a favourite play structure of children and playground supervisors – proving to be fun & challenging, while fostering cooperative play. Courtesy: Autodesk David G Ullman, Reinventing the See-Saw at BigToys: A Case Study for The Mechanical Design Process, 2009. Read the full story at http://www.mhhe.com/ullman4e. David G Ullman does not endorse nor support the use of any specific engineering support system, technology or methodology.


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: Six Sigma methodology

Quantifying financial

benefits The previous edition proposed a methodology for quantifying improvement initiatives, tracing them to seven triggers of the bottom line; namely, product mix, sales volume, selling price, change in costs, release of fixed cost resource, working capital and release of fixed asset. Here, we use the Six Sigma methodology as an example to illustrate the same.

M Hariharan

S

ix Sigma is a widely used (and at times abused) quality methodology. It has triggered a lot of interest and debate among practitioners, academicians & users across the world. Originally developed at Motorola, the methodology was successfully adopted and further developed by General Electric. Six Sigma uses many of the tried, tested and classical quality tools like Statistical Quality Control (SQC), Failure Mode Effects Analyses (FMEA), Repeatability and Reproducibility studies, Logic Tree, Why-Why Analysis, etc. Six sigma framework unites these quality tools with commitment and support from the top management. Success depends on the commitment of resource and meticulous application to identify & eliminate sources of variability.

Addressing variability Six sigma identifies the variability of a process in terms of specifications of the product, so that product quality and reliability meet and exceed today’s demanding customer requirements. It

refers to a process capability that generates 3.4 Defects Per Million Opportunities (DPMO). Most organisations today operate in the four-to-five sigma range (6,000-67,000 DPMO), as moving to Six Sigma is a challenge. The process of Define, Measure, Analyse, Improve and Control (DMAIC) is the key to achieve this breakthrough improvement in performance. It is a nonlinear process – if any step yields new information, earlier steps in the process are re-evaluated. Efficient use of data-driven Six Sigma concepts enables enterprises to minimise and eliminate waste, hidden rework and undesirable variability in their processes (MURA). This improves quality and cost. Persistent application of the Six Sigma methodology can lead to reduction of defects, improvement in yield and customer satisfaction. Reduction of variability in processes enables continual improvement and, ultimately, improve the investor value. However, often, Six Sigma application is restricted to manufacturing. Variability affects every aspect of the supply chain and the support services as well. For example, variability in customer order processing leads to a customer walking away, and variability in accounts finalisation leads to

204 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

resource commitment & over-stretching of resources. Another flaw in some organisations is the narrow application of Six Sigma as a cost reduction tool. Its impact on the bottom line is more than just cost reduction. Here, the Savoir faire framework© of quantification of bottom line impact can be applied to find out the possible impact to bottom line.

Five-stage methodology of Savoir faire© Stage 1: Identifying the activities pre-and post-implementation of the initiative Stage 2: Identifying the resources required pre-and post-implementation of the initiative Stage 3: Comparing the resources required pre- and post-implementation of the initiative Stage 4: Tracing impact of changes to the seven triggers of bottom line Stage 5: Quantification of benefits/costs of initiatives

Impact of Six Sigma on seven triggers of bottom line The benefit of Six Sigma lies in a systematic methodology of addressing variability. Here is an illustrative list of the bottom line impact.


Six Sigma methodology

variability is minimised, the most probable delivery date can be given. Reduction of waste to 3 Parts Per Million (ppm) or 3 Parts Per Trillion (ppt) levels leads to better negotiation. If the marketing team is confident of the quality of product it sells, it is in a better pedestal to negotiate a more favourable term. Quantification of sales price impact is difficult, rather improbable, as there are many owners for sales price increase.

20σ each side from the mean 10σ each side from the mean 900 Number of parts produced

800 700

600

Mean=16

500

10σ=2.5

400 300 200 100 0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 11

12

13

14

15 16

Time interval (2 mins each) Six Sigma quality

Six Sigma impact on cost

Six Sigma impact on investment

1) Reduction of cost Minimising variability in yield can help minimise scrap loss. Addressing first time pass, setup losses and quality rejects can lead to sustainable cost reduction. Minimising variability can lead to de-hiring of resources. Generally, resources requirement is planned considering the peak requirement. Thus, if variability is high, there will be a lot of unused resources. Minimising variability can help release surplus resources. In such instances, the cost impact should be measured within the organisation.

3) Reduction of working capital investment Reduced Work In Process (WIP) inventory due to operations stability. Variability within the system leads to accumulation of WIP inventory across processes. A stable process minimises the need for holding buffers to overcome the variability. Reduced cycle time leads to reduced waiting in the system, and thus to general reduction of all inventory types. Finished goods inventory can be minimised by addressing variability in cycle time. The output rate is more predictable, minimising the need for holding finished goods inventory. Generally, impact on the work capital is quantifiable with lesser effort.

2) Release of fixed cost capacity Minimising resource requirement due to minimisation of variability. Expanding the second observation under ‘Reduction of cost’; it is not always advisable to de-hire resources in case of variability minimisation, as it can lead to a negative reaction within the organisation. This can result in resistance to any quality improvement movement. Howe ver, redeploying the resources can save additional cost in future. Benefits leading to release of capacity is the most difficult to quantify, unless the costing experts make serious attempts to do it.

4) Postponement of investment Minimising variability releases capacity in assets. The observation made for release of fixed cost resource is applicable for this as well. Usually, companies have higher capacity than what is intended to use due to variability. Quantification of fixed asset investment is difficult to justify.

Six Sigma impact on sales 5) Sales price Fulfillment of promised lead time results in better negotiation. If the

206 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

6) Sales volume Released capacity is made available for better utilisation for productive sales. 7) Sales mix Minimising variability leads to minimising over-production, and thus to facility availability for variety. If the process takes longer time to set up due to more wastage at the beginning of the process, the production team will minimise number of changeovers as much as possible. This leads to over production. However, minimising variability here can lead to reduced lot size, enabling companies to compete better. Minimising losses in changeover leads to smaller lot sizes. Variability during changeover leads to higher lot sizes. If this is minimised, then we have a winner in place.

Criticality of value addition Cost experts must understand the concept of Six Sigma. Accountants are no longer just the conscience keepers, but need to create value for their customers, ie, users in operations and sales.

M Hariharan practises consultancy in the field of cost management, lean thinking, constraint management, management control system and business excellence as Founder Director at Savoir Faire Management Services. Savoir Faire helps organisations to improve their profitability by aligning their people and processes to customer value and articulate the bottomline impact using the cost excellence (CE©) model. Email: hari@sfccostmanagement.com


AUTOMATION TRENDS: Injection moulding machiner y

Optimising equipment efficiency To be a winner in the plastic injection moulding sector, it is imperative to use machines that enable energy savings by lowering energy consumption, wastage, pollution, operating costs, etc. Here we see how the use of an inverter with built-in Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) feature helps achieve energy savings and control flexibility in moulding machines.

I

njection moulding is a manufacturing process for producing parts from both thermoplastic and thermosetting plastics materials. Material is fed into a heated barrel, mixed and forced into a mould cavity where it cools & hardens to the requisite configuration. After a product is designed, usually by an industrial designer or an engineer, moulds are made by a mould maker (or toolmaker) from metal, either steel or aluminium, and precision-machined to form the features of the desired part. Injection moulding is widely used for manufacturing a variety of parts, from the smallest component to entire body panels of cars. The objective of this application is to control injection moulding machine and reduce energy consumption during operation. In this application, the hydraulic pump is operated by standard squirrelcage induction motor. The moulding cycle consists of clamping, injection, holding and ejection. Normally, this motor runs continuously at a fixed speed for moulding cycle, irrespective of power requirements. At certain stages of the moulding process, the power requirement from the moulding machine will be less than at peak times. If motor is run continuously at higher than required speed, energy is wasted.

speed of induction motor is the basis of energy saving. This is known as Cube Law, and derived as follows: Torque Îą (speed)2 Power = torque * speed Power Îą (speed)3

Thus, a 10 per cent reduction in speed reduces 25 per cent of power requirements, which results in energy saving. The cycle of machine is divided into following operations, along with probable pressure requirements. The maximum savings occurs during cooling operation, while measurable Process stage

Pressure requirements

Mould close

60%

Mould lock

70%

Injection

100%

Refilling

80%

Cooling

5-10%

Mould open

60%

Basic principle of energy saving The relationship between power and 208 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

savings takes place in other stages such a mould close, mould lock, refilling and mould open. The inverter controls the speed of motor as per the current stage of operation.

How to achieve energy savings? This application can be done by using an inverter and small Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) to control machine operation. For this application, FR-A700 series inverters from Mitsubishi are available with built-in PLC. This reduces the cost of additional PLC for machine control and provides close interaction with Variable Frequency Drive (VFD). The PLC directly controls the operation of VFD. Built-in PLC of the inverter can handle 64 DI, 64 DO 3 analog inputs and two analog outputs. The motor speed is controlled based on the feedback from the machine, ie, the stage of operation. For feedback, discrete inputs (mould close, refill, cooling and mould open) and analog inputs of PLC are used. Speed is controlled by using a special register for frequency input to VFD.

The result Typical plastic

inject

machine ion moulding

The machine operation was compared with the old machine


Injection moulding machiner y

Pellets Clamp

Total production in 24 hours = 33 kg With above-mentioned details, per unit calculation comes to be 0.96 /kg and 0.62/piece

Hopper thoat

Barrel

Nozzle

Energy saved Total units consumed in 24 hour without VFD = 1,184 Total units consumed in 24 hour with VFD = 800 Units saved per day = 384 Units saved per month = 11,520 Units saved per year = 1,38,240

Mould

Cavity

Screw

Heaters

Motor/ drive

Cross section of plastic injection moulding machine

Achieving efficiency without VFD and following observations were made:

Without VFD Total production in 24 hour = 1,300 pieces Average weight of each piece = 645 gm Total unit consumed in 24 hour = 1,184 units

Total production in 24 hour = 838.5 kg Using the above-mentioned details, per unit calculation comes to be 1.41 /kg and 0.91/piece

With VFD Total production in 1 hour = 51 pieces Total unit consumed in 1 hour = 32 units

The major achievements by using this method include 35-40 per cent savings in energy consumption. Since inbuilt PLC is used, hardware cost of separate PLC is also saved; and communication f rom PLC to VFD is not required. Therefore, the overall equipment efficiency is optimised. Courtesy: Messung Systems

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 209


ENERGY MANAGEMENT: Motor ef ficiency

Getting to heart

of the matter Rapid rise in energy price and the need for monitoring and reducing energy consumption have drawn processors’ attention towards motors used in machines, which consume maximum energy. Avani Jain analyses the ways of reducing energy consumption in plastics processing machines through the use of energy-efficient motors.

A

lmost two-thirds of the energy costs in plastics processing is due to the energy consumed by motors. Yet motors are often overlooked while considering energy usage. The motors in the main processing equipment such as compounders, moulders and extruders are obvious, but a majority of motors are hidden in other equipment such as compressors, pumps and fans. When the energy cost of running a motor for 1,000 hours can exceed purchase cost and when the whole life costs reach over 100 times, then the purchase cost failing to take action with all the motors in a factory can be rather expensive. A B Joshi, General Manager, Polymechplast Machines Ltd, says, “To ensure energy efficiency, selection of motor is important. Unlike old motors that consumed a lot of energy, today’s High Efficiency Motor (HEM), Variable Speed Drive (VSD), digital displacement pumps and servo motors help increase cycle times and reduce energy usage. ”

Motor management policy When the running costs over the initial purchase price increase, it means that

companies need to change the way they approach motors, which consume the maximum energy. Thus, to reduce costs, companies must develop and implement a motor management policy for purchase and operation of motors. This policy should include guidelines on purchase, repair and replacement based on lifetime cost of the motor. Repairing a failed motor may appear cost-effective in the short term, but it can reduce energy efficiency by up to 1 per cent and may not be the most economical long-term action.

Right sizing Motor sizing assumes importance as the correctly sized motor helps reduce energy consumption. Motors are most efficient when their load equals, or is slightly greater than, the rated capacity. If machines larger than that required are used, then the motor will not reach the design load and never run at optimum efficiency. Oversized motors are inefficient and equipment must be carefully matched with demand. Joshi notes, “Correct size of the motor is important for increasing the energy efficiency of the machine. While designing the machine, we decide on the

210 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

capacity and size of motor based on the output required. Thus, the correct sizing of the motor depends on machine design and application.”

Variable speed drives The speed of an AC motor is fixed by the number of poles and supply frequency. As a result, the hydraulic pumps in many processing machines are driven at a constant speed, even though the demand varies considerably during the cycle. The flow demand changes from the hydraulic pump are controlled by a relief valve and recirculation of the hydraulic fluid. Another way of meeting the varying demands is to fit a VSD to the motor. Joshi notes, “A VSD allows the speed of an AC motor to be varied, and the pump output can be matched to the variable demand. The application of VSD can significantly reduce energy costs.” Further, reduced demand on the hydraulic system means that the hydraulic oil runs at a lower temperature and requires less cooling, which can serve as an additional cost-saving measure. VSDs require less maintenance cost. These can be applied to fans, water pumps and air compressors where the load varies considerably.


Motor ef ficiency

Future trends

VSD allows the speed of an AC motor to be varied, and the pump output can be matched to the variable demand. The application of VSD can signiďŹ cantly reduce energy costs.

With energy management concerns rising worldwide, in future, companies will have to adopt other measures to lower their energy consumption. The development of energy-efficient motors in plastic processing machines have addressed this

issue to a great extent, but there is still a long way to go, as new technologies in terms of efficient motors are expensive. Thus, significant measures must be taken to make the technology available to the processors at a convenient price. Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in

A B Joshi General Manager, Polymechplast Machines Ltd

Servo motors Companies today are increasingly using servo motors for energy efficiency. A servo motor drives the shaft required for the moulding process, creating a direct exchange of energy and ensuring lower energy consumption. Joshi notes, “Servo motors are better than VSDs, as in case of a VSD, the motor is continuously working, but in a servo motor, the motor stops in an idle cycle automatically. Thus, no energy is consumed at that time. The response time for decreasing or increasing the desired levels is higher in VSDs than servo motors, where you can get the desired levels in five seconds. Thus, servo motors give more accurate results than VSDs. These motors help reduce cycle times, thereby increasing the speed. The servo drive facilitates high energy efficiency, accuracy, precision and good control.� January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 211


POLICIES & REGULATIONS: Reducing carbon footprint

A

business

imperative Looking at the numbers, India’s per capita emission of greenhouse gases is a quarter of the global average. Although plastics processing machinery manufacturers have taken significant steps in this regard, there is still a long way to go. Avani Jain analyses the initiatives taken by the plastics processors in this regard.

A

s regulatory frameworks on businesses for permissible carbon emission limits and carbon trading are tightening across the globe, businesses are taking proactive initiatives to record their carbon emissions and devise ways to reduce the same. While Greenhouse Gases (GHG) inventory reporting is currently not mandatory in India, progressive companies are identifying risks associated with GHGs and are voluntarily taking stock of their emissions. Thus, as a responsible sector, the plastic processing machinery industry also needs to focus on reducing their carbon footprints. The purpose of reducing carbon footprint is to minimise the use of energy & power for a sustainable world and conserve resources by reducing pollution.

Government’s initiative The Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) and Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) have undertaken various awareness programmes. Various Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) are also working with Ministry of Environment and Forests for this purpose. Rohan Shrikant Shahane, Regional Director-South East Asia, Machine Point Consultants SL, notes, “The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) method, which is used to accurately determine the carbon footprint of the company, is internationally

accredited by ISO 14000 standards. This is a process by which the environmental consequences of materials can be evaluated for production, application and end-of life aspects. LCA also provides an estimation of the waste and pollution resulting from the production, use and disposal of products.”

Plastics processor’s initiative Plastics processors have realised the need of reducing their carbon footprint and have taken various steps for that. Shahane avers, “The machinery manufacturers are focussing on manufacturing energyefficient machinery as a primary step to help the cause of reducing carbon footprints.” It is for the same reason that the companies are increasingly using servo motors and variable displacement pumps, which help in reducing energy consumption by machines. Further, energy cost reduction measures have multiple aspects – including uses of solar energy, reducing traveling of employees, cutting down paper usage, etc. Moreover, LCA can be used as an efficient tool. Shahane observes, “In the plastics industry, LCA can be used to compare the carbon emissions and waste generation while manufacturing plastic products.” These days, the plastics processors also regularly go for energy audits

212 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

and implement steps to reduce power consumption. Shahane points out, “The plastics manufacturing plants can certify their carbon reduction and waste diversion performance through a nonprofit organisation that performs energy and waste audits at the manufacturing sites. Also, increased recycling of the plant discharge help in this regard. In future, companies need to follow the Kyoto Protocol, reduce their fuel and power consumption and replace old motors with new ones. Processors can also install rainwater-harvesting mechanism and invest in machinery to minimise water loss.” Thus, industry players have their own ways of participating in the Green Revolution. Today, many corporate houses and multinationals have taken to reducing carbon consumption as part of their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activities. Although companies have taken various steps in this regard, yet there is a long way to go.

Demystifying the myth It is often said that the use of plastics adds to global warming, but this is a myth. A study conducted by consultancy firm McKinsey and Oko Institute, Germany, states that the increased use of plastics in industries like packaging and automobiles, among others, has helped in reducing global


Reducing carbon footprint

The LCA method, which is used to determine the carbon footprint of a company, is internationally accredited by ISO 14000 standards. This is a process by which the environmental consequences of materials can be evaluated for production, application and end-of life aspects. Rohan Shrikant Shahane Regional Director-South East Asia, Machine Point Consultants SL

carbon emission levels. In the packaging industry, due their lower weight as compared to other materials, the use of plastics results in lowering the carbon footprint of companies. Thus, even as carbon emission for producing plastics is higher than glass, the use of plastics for packaging allows lower carbon emission as compared with glass. This is because plastics is lighter than glass. Further, plastics provides significant energy savings, strongly contributing to reduction of harmful emissions. These include consuming 2.4 billion Gigajoules less energy per year than alternative materials and saving 53 million tonne of crude oil per year. Shahane shares, “It is also seen that the processes involved in manufacturing plastic bags have less harmful impact on the environment as against the processes involved in making paper bags. Plastic bag manufacturing process emits less carbon dioxide, consumes less energy, produces much less waste and requires significantly less water as compared to paper bag manufacturing.�

Towards a green future The future initiatives will focus on source reduction, energy conservation and increasing production levels to achieve economies of scale, which will ultimately help in reducing the carbon footprint. Keeping in mind the current trend of reducing carbon footprint, it has become necessary for the plastic processing machinery manufacturers to chalk out a carbon strategy for ensuring their growth in a carbon-constrained economy and maximise their carbon assets. The carbon strategy will not only help companies to identify climate risks and opportunities, but will also aid in reducing costs and enhancing the image of the company. Thus, with greater awareness among consumers as well as statutory pressures, companies will increasingly take steps to reduce their carbon footprint. Although companies in India are at a nascent stage with regard to this issue, but the future does look positive. Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 213


STRATEGY: Biodegradable plastics

Integrating business with environment Bioplastics are the most prominent among recent innovations for packaging applications such as films, bottles and food service products. The increasing focus on environment consciousness has prompted the bioplastics industry to continuously grow and thrive. Avani Jain finds out how these eco-friendly alternatives are increasingly being used by packaging companies to ensure sustainable packaging.

P

roduct protection and branding are driving the evolution in packaging. As far as the growing processed foods industry and its demands are concerned, the major factors that influence the decision of food packaging materials include preservation, protection and safety. Packaging must protect the contents from physical damage as well as external contamination, eg, microbiological contamination. It should preserve the quality of contents, whether for a short shelf life of some days or extended shelf life for several months. This has led to various innovations in the packaging industry, one of which is the advent of bioplastics or biodegradable plastics.

Renewable sources of plastics Often referred to by their chemical component – Polylactic Acid (PLA) – bioplastics is a form of plastics derived from renewable biomass sources, such

as vegetable oil, corn starch, pea starch or microbiota, in contrast to fossil-fuel plastics, which are derived from petroleum. Bioplastics is made from 100 per cent natural materials and its manufacturing consumes 65 per cent less energy than that of conventional plastics. PLA is more popular and used to manufacture bags and water bottles. The biodegradable plastics packaging market is gradually gaining significance in the vast global packaging industry and is expected to reach $ 1.85 billion in 2011. Three major reasons for this growth include escalating demand for environment-friendliness, sustainable packaging of goods, healthier lifestyles worldwide and rapidly developing emerging markets with growing consumer demand for biodegradable plastics packaging across all sub-markets. Rajesh K Pandya, Vice PresidentOperations, Parikh Packaging Pvt Ltd, notes, “The term biodegradable plastics

214 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

is also used by producers of specially modified petrochemical-based plastics, which appear to biodegrade. Conventional plastics such as polyethylene are degraded by Ultraviolet (UV) light and oxygen. To prevent this process, manufacturers add stabilising chemicals to these plastics. However, with addition of a degradation initiator to the plastics, it is possible to achieve a controlled UV/oxidation disintegration process. This type of plastics may be referred to as degradable plastics or oxy-degradable plastics or photodegradable plastics because the process is not initiated by microbial action. Also, some, but not all, bioplastics are designed to biodegrade.”

Initiatives by companies Among the few companies in India is Parikh Packaging Pvt Ltd, which has recently started manufacturing biodegradable plastics for products having a short lifecycle. Pandya avers, “Bioplastics


Biodegradable plastics

is used for making disposable items, such as packaging and catering items (eg, crockery, cutlery, pots, bowls, straws, etc). It is also used for making organic waste bags, where it can be composted together with the food or green waste. Some trays and containers for fruit, vegetables, eggs & meat, bottles for soft drinks & dairy products and blister foils for fruit & vegetables are manufactured from bioplastics. Non-disposable applications include mobile phone casings, carpet fibre, car interiors, fuel line and plastic pipe applications. New electro-active bioplastics are being developed that can be used to carry electrical current. Here, the goal is not biodegradability, but creating items from sustainable resources.” He further elaborates, “The usage of biodegradable plastics in packaging applications is still a new concept in India. The technology is currently not cost-competitive with petroleum-derived plastics. Further studies are required to probe the compatibility of products and bioplastics.”

Advantages offered Biodegradable plastics offer added value to the packed products in those applications where recycling of conventional plastics is difficult, for example, food packaging. Biodegradable plastics further provides system benefits in applications like shopping bags. Under composting conditions, PLA degrades completely to

water and carbon dioxide, leaving behind a small biomass within a short period, which could be 45-90 days depending on composting conditions. Pandya notes, “The use of biodegradable plastics also leads to reduced recycling, less incineration of plastics and less scrap, which, in turn, reduces costs.” However, the decision to use either biobased or conventional plastics is best made on a case-to-case basis. The key decision parameters include lifecycle analyses for different options that have to be compared, including the parameter system costs, which can vary depending on the plastics used.

Green packaging Increasing concerns over environmental hazards, carbon footprint emission and waste reduction targets specified by different countries and the trend towards ‘green packaging’ are driving the demand for biodegradable plastics packaging solutions in the country. Thus, the bioplastics market is on a strong growth path, with maximum growth expected to come from renewable-based polyolefin substitutes. “As per estimates, plastics derived from plant materials currently constitute 0.2 per cent of the roughly 350 million metric tonne of plastics consumed each year. But that volume could jump substantially over the next decade or so, owing to the growing demand for eco-

Non-disposable applications include mobile phone casings, carpet fibre, car interiors, fuel line and plastic pipe applications. Here, the goal is not biodegradability, but creating items from sustainable resources. Rajesh K Pandya Vice President-Operations, Parikh Packaging Pvt Ltd friendly packaging and other products that will use biomass as feedstock,” Pandya notes. Although the eco-friendly alternatives to plastics are gaining foothold in the consumer products category, they are yet to prove their durability and pliability as the good old plastics. Currently, bioplastics lack heat resistance and impact-absorbing powers of ordinary plastics. And as with all new environment-compatible technologies, development costs can be high and companies in the segment have yet to achieve economies of scale and a benefit of mass production. Due to these factors, only few companies have taken to manufacture bioplastics.

Future footprint Overall, the future of bioplastics is bright due to their usage in almost all sectors, including agriculture, food packaging, waste disposal, hospitality and retail. The rising number of companies producing biocompatible plastics indicates a greater number of alternatives to plastic packaging, and therefore a better chance at a greener future. Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 215


TIPS & TRICKS: Injection moulding process

Key advantages in niche applications Going by the increasing applications of injection moulding and its design versatility, plastics manufacturers are adopting this technique on a larger scale to achieve higher returns and better quality output. Anwesh Koley underlines some of the advantages of using this process in product manufacturing. Anwesh Koley

T

he injection moulding process has several advantages over other moulding processes. A variety of products are

manufactured using the injection moulding process, which vary greatly in size, complexity and applications. In the process, the raw material is melted in the injection moulding machine and injected into the mould, where it cools

and solidifies into the final part. The versatility of the process allows great flexibility to manufacturers who often need to customise their products as per customer requirements. Email: anwesh.koley@infomedia18.in

The following are some of the advantages that the industry can expect by using the injection moulding process:

It allows for high production output rates. It can be designed to minute details and sculpted in a flexible manner. The process can be carried out repeatedly within tolerable clearances, and can process different materials that vary in properties and characteristics. The Fast-In Fast-Out (FIFO) method used in the process ensures lower time and higher productivity.

Close tolerances on small intricate parts is possible. It involves producing all forms of moulding and can easily be cost controlled. Scraps f rom the finished moulds can be recycled, thereby cutting costs. It maximises quality and requires minimum material handling. The process reduces the usage of extra energy, thereby saving costs.

Injection moulding is generally automated and produces high-quality products, with lower costs, reduced logistical requirements and shorter production cycles. Little post-production work is required, as the parts usually have a finished look upon ejection. A single operator can run many machines and labour requirement is low, thus increasing efficiency.

While manufacturing the product, the manufacturer may use inserts within the mould. The process involves low labour cost, as it requires less manpower for doing the same. It requires little or no finishing of parts, as it has a crystallised smooth finish product with minimum scrap losses. This provides higher design flexibility to the finished product.

Customers today demand machines that can handle a variety of polymers, which reduces energy consumption. More than one material may be used in the co-injection moulding process. Complex geometry and fine features are easily produced, as high pressures are possible. Cycle times are low and a single mould can produce many parts, which makes high volumes possible.

The process has minimum or zero scrap losses. The required heat comes from action in the compression zone of the screw, the heat input through preheating and the heat input through heaters on the barrel. This results in higher repeatability within tolerances and the heat is drained off through the water circulating in the mould during cooling.

With inputs from: Naveen Gupta, Senior Branch Manager-North India, Polymechplast Machines Ltd.

216 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


MPP Jan_2012-Tab-10 Ad Name: AB Diachem Pg No. 217 MPP Jan_2012-Tab-10 Ad Name: AB Diachem Pg No. 217


REMICA

MPP Jan_2012-Tab-10 Ad Name: Remica, Pg No. 218

MPP Jan_2012-Tab-10 Ad Name: Remica, Pg No. 218


EVENT LIST

National

Indore

Aurangabad

Madhya Pradesh Jan 6-9, 2012 Poddar Plaza, Nr Gandhi Hall

Maharashtra Feb 17-20, 2012 Garware Stadium, Chikkalthana

For details contact: 113, Building No 2, Link Road Malad (W ) Mumbai - 400 064 Tel: 022 28803977/28803978 Fax: 022 28819008 Email: intelexpo@vsnl.net Website: www.intelexpo.com

DIEMOULD 2012 India’s premier industrial trade fair on products and technologies related to Machine Tools, Hydraulics & Pneumatics, Process Machinery & Equipment, Automation Instrumentation, Packaging & Auxiliaries, IT Products, Electrical & Electronics, Material Handling and Safety Equipment.

For details contact: Infomedia 18 Ltd, Infomedia 18 Ltd, Ruby House, 1st Floor, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. Tel: 022 3003 4651 • Fax: 022 3003 4499 • Email: engexpo@infomedia18.in • Web: www.engg-expo.com

Plastindia 2012 This is the premier exhibition of the Indian plastics industry. It will be a strategic meeting point for all large and small players from the global arena; February 1-6, 2012; at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi For details contact: Plastindia Foundation 401, Landmark B, Suren Road Off Andheri Kurla Road, Andheri (East), Mumbai - 400093 Tel: 022 26832911 Fax: 022 26845861 Email: info@plastindia.org Website: www.plastindia.org

Intelpack 2012 This event will display various technology and converting applications for the future of plastics packaging. Visitors will find innovations & solutions to make their business more efficient and profitable; February 23-25, 2012; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai

With plastics processing scaling new heights in India, the die & mould industry is of particular significance to plastic parts manufacturing. This event will focus on Hot Runner Systems, CAD/ CAM solutions, Rapid Prototyping & Modeling, Moulding machine/ Die Casting machine Texturising Gauges Die Spotting, etc; April 19-22, 2012; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Tool & Gauge Manufacturers Association of India (TAGMA) A-33, NandJyot Industrial Estate, Safed Pool A.K. Road Mumbai - 400 072 Tel: 022 - 28526876 / 28508976 Fax: 022 - 28503273 Email: mumbai@tagmaindia.org Website: http://www.tagmaindia.org

Indian Medical Devices Conference 2011 This event will focus on the growing range of applications and oppotunities in the Indian medical manufacturing industry; March 23-24, 2012; at Ahmedabad Management Association (AMA) Complex, Ahmedabad For details contact: D L Pandya Classic Computer Services B-4, Mandir Apt, Opp P & T Colony Satellite Road Ahmedabad - 380 015 Tel: 079 26740611 Fax: 079 26754867 Mob: 09825457563

220 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Email: mpds00@vsnl.com / dlpandya gmail.com Website: www.imdiconferences.com

Plast Expo 2012 This is a unique opportunity for exhibitors to develop a direct relationship with their clients. It will be an interactive platform to display raw materials, chemicals & auxiliaries, equipment & services, moulds, dies, etc; October 7-10, 2012; at Rajkot Race Course Ground, Rajkot, Gujarat For details contact: Brijesh Purohit Saurashtra Plastic Manufacturers Association, “Laxman”, 3rd Floor, Paramount Hall Bhutkhana Chowk, Rajkot - 360 002 Gujarat Mob: + 91 9426249072 Tel: +91-281-2228802 Fax: +91-281-2223798 Email: spma@plasticmanufacturer.org Website: www.plasticmanufacturer.org

India Chem 2012 As the Indian industry is soaring in commodity plastics as well as engineering polymers, this event will focus on the specialty polymers, fine chemicals, agro plastics, masterbatches, pigments, additives, etc, with special emphasis sustainable processing and effluent management; October 4-6, 2012; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Vishal Ganju FICCI Mumbai 33/B, Krisnamai Building Pochakanwala Road Worli Mumbai – 400030 Tel: 022-2496 8000, 2496 6633 - 39 Fax: 022-2496 6631/32 Email: vishal.ganju@f icci.com Website: www.indiachemgujarat.com


EVENT LIST

International Polyester and PET Chain 2012 The 16th annual polyester world congress brings together industry leaders from around the world to focus on the new technology, product and application directions needed to sustain growth and maintain profitability as markets recover worldwide; February 1416, 2012; at Swissôtel, Zurich, Switzerland For details contact: Nicole Morris MBS Polymer Events A unit of Chemical Business Media 110 William Street, 11th Floor New York, NY 10038 Tel: 1-212-621-4978, Fax: 1-212-621-4970 Email: events@mbspolymer.com Website: www.mbspolymer.com

Plastica 2012 This is a biennial exhibition that aims at presenting new developments, trends and technologies in plastics and rubber processing. Raw materials, petrochemicals, polymers, resins, mixtures, specialty chemicals, additives, masterbatches, semifinished and finished polymers, processing machines, moulds, ancillary equipment, etc will be exhibited; February 17-20, 2012; at Athens Metropolitan Expo, Athens, Greece

PLAST 2012

For details contact: Guillaume Vouioux Journals and Exhibitions 25 boulevard de l’Amiral Bruix Paris-75116, France Tel: +33 1 58 36 15 07 Fax: +33 1 58 36 15 19 Website: www.jeccomposites.com

NPE 2012 A leading international plastics technology trade fair held in the US will showcase a broad range of polymer technologies for the packaging industry. It will present innovative polymer technologies to advance medical device industry as well as automotive manufacturers; April 1-5, 2012; at Orange County Convention Center (OCCC), Orlando, Florida USA For details contact: Hemah Saxena Comnet Exhibitions Pvt. Ltd # 217 B, 2nd Floor, Okhla Industrial Estate Phase III, New Delhi - 110 020, India 011 - 42795055/42795000 Email: hemasaxena@eigroup.in Website: http://www.npe.org

For details contact: Promaplast Centro Direzionale Milanofiori Palazzo F/3 - 20090 Assago Milan, Italy Tel: 039 02 8228371 Fax +39 02 57512490 Email: info@promaplast.org Website: www.plastonline.org

Plastivision Arabia 2012

Chinaplas 2012 For details contact: 3EK Organization of Exhibitions L. Pentelis 28 152, 35 Vrilissia, Hellas, Greece Tel: +30 (210) 8056205/207/208 Fax: +30 (210) 8056209 Email: info3ek@otenet.gr Website: www.plastica-expo.gr

Among the world’s leading markets for plastics processing machinery, Italy is at the forefront of technology and innovations. This event will highlight machines for foam, reactive and reinforced resins, laboratory control and test equipment, ancillary equipment, raw materials, acrylics, polyamides, polyolefinics, styrenes, vinylics, thermoplastic polyesters, masterbatches, fillers, reinforcements, additives; May 812, 2012; at Fiera Milano, Milan, Italy

JEC Europe 2012

This edition of Chinaplas will continue the legacy of bringing solutions to the global plastics industry while highlighting the opportunities within Asia. The exhibition will showcase the most innovative and advanced plastics and rubber machinery and raw materials; April 18-21, 2012; at Shanghai New International Expo Centre, PR China

JEC is a composite industry organisation dedicated to developing products and services for its customers and for the composite industry. This conference will address the booming composites market’s requirements of raw materials and automation solutions. It will be a meeting ground for the scientific community, R&D professionals across Europe; March 27-29, 2012; at Porte de Versailles, Paris, France

For details contact: Lillian Tse Adsale Exhibition Services Limited 6th Floor, 321 Java Road North Point, Hong Kong Tel: (852) 2516 3374 Fax: (852) 2516 5024 Email: publicity@adsale.com.hk Website: www.chinaplasonline.com

While serving as an international platform for the Indian plastics industry, this exhibition will facilitate business prospects for all major global players in the region. This event will promote opportunities and provide exposure to manufacturers of raw material & machinery, auxiliary equipment, pigments & additives, dies & moulds, etc; May 14-17, 2012; at Expo Centre Sharjah, United Arab Emirates For details contact: AIPMA House A-52, Street No. 1, MIDC Marol, Andheri (E) Mumbai - 400 093 Tel: +91 22 28217324 / 25, 28352511 Fax +91 22 28216390 Email office@aipma.net Website: www.plastivisionarabia.org The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective organiser. In any case, it does not represent the views of Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 221


EVENT REPORT: Automotive Plastics India 2011

Time to leapfrog into the future The Indian automotive plastics sector today seems to be at the cusp of a mega makeover, thanks to the automotive industry speeding like never before. In this fast changing way ahead, the recently held conference Automotive Plastics India – 2011 and the outstanding outcomes thereof have assumed immense significance. A report… Manas R Bastia

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lastics continues to consolidate its preference over conventional materials because of versatility for designers, functionality for engineers, safety & environmental benefits as per statutory norms, and last but not the least, value for money for consumers.

The conference witnessed convergence of over 250 delegates from India and abroad representing several stakeholders of the industry related to use of plastics in automobiles. They included automotive manufacturers, Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMS), compound suppliers and vendors, raw material manufacturers, plastics processing machinery manufacturers & investors.

A maiden effort Named as Automotive Plastics India – 2011, this was the first dedicated conference on automotive plastics organised by Chemicals and Petrochemicals Manufacturers Association (CPMA) and Elite Plus Business Services Pvt Ltd. Held on November 24, 2011, in Mumbai, this oneday conference was supported by Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers (SIAM), Automobile Component Manufacturers Association of India (ACMA), The Automotive Research Association of India (ARAI), All India Plastics Manufacturers Association (AIPMA) and Organization of Plastics Processors of India (OPPI).

Mind over matter Automotive Plastics India – 2011 conference saw a galaxy of illustrious minds analysing and providing their distinct perspectives on a wide array of related topics such as an automotive wish list for India, Original Equipment Manufacturers’ (OEMs’) expectations on technical advancements from vendors, material & machinery and vendor development strategy to meet OEMs’ expectations, to list a few. Amid many eminent speakers, domain experts and panellists from Europe & India, the keynote speaker was R Gopalakrishnan, Director, Tata Sons Ltd. An orator par

222 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

excellence, in his engaging address, he drew the attention of the audience towards the concept of leapfrogging, and thereby taking the Indian industry to a higher trajectory. He also reflected upon the customary comparison of India and China along with the ‘head room’ available to the Indian automobile industry for future growth. For example, India currently has 12 cars per 1,000 persons, whereas there are more than 500 cars per 1,000 persons in developed countries such as the US. Some of the distinguished dignitaries present included Kamal P Nanavaty, Vice President & Member Coordination, CPMA and President-Strategy Development, Reliance Industries Ltd; Arshad Khan, Advisor Technology, Bright Autoplast Ltd; Ken J Braney, President, Society of Plastics Engineers, USA; Sugato Sen, Senior Director, SIAM; I V Rao, HeadEngineering, Maruti Suzuki India Pvt Ltd; Mahesh Kodumudi, Executive Director, Volkswagen India Pvt Ltd; among numerous prominent authorities on the dais as well as in the audience.


Automotive Plastics India 2011

Glimpses of the conference

The presentations in the first two sessions mostly elaborated on the vision and outlook of the automotive industry in India, besides the growth opportunities & challenges facing it and the changing customer preferences. To make it complete, the last two sessions highlighted the growing significance of plastics usage in automobiles and discussed how automotive plastics can serve as a means to meet the fast changing customer needs in the country in the changing scenario. A key highlight of this conference included bestowing of ‘Pioneer Organisation of Plastics Industry Award’. The accolades went to Bright Autoplast Ltd and Tipco Industries Ltd.

Promising prospects According to a study by SIAM, the production figure for Passenger Cars & Commercial Vehicles (PC + CV) segment is expected to surge from 3.7 million in 2010 to 13 million in 2020 (for reference, China reached 13 million level in 2009). While production of PC alone is likely to touch 10 million by 2020 (from 2.2 million in 2009), the two wheelers segment will grow at a Compounded Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 11 per cent to reach 33 million in 2020 from production levels of 10 million in 2009.

Going by industry reports, the total turnover of the automotive industry is expected to touch $ 145 billion in 2016 from $ 35 billion in 2009. Further, as per the ‘Automotive Mission Plan’, this industry would contribute about 10 per cent of the national Gross Domestic Product (GDP) by 2016. Therefore, it is quite evident that India is on the threshold of an automotive revolution. With safety and fuel efficiency fast emerging as key drivers for the growth of this industry, the value & volume contribution of plastics will play an increasingly important role for producers and passengers alike.

Need of the hour Enthusiastic deliberations at the conference reinforced the automotive industry’s recognition of plastics as a preferred material solution, which not only meets, but in many cases sets, automotive performance & sustainability parameters. At the same time, OEMs are focussing on vehicle weight reduction, product differentiation through innovative styling and raising the vehicle’s fuel economy. The plastics industry would do well to consider some of the following key challenges in polymer localisation in order to meet the latest global requirements: Augment current industry testing standards

Local materials should meet the required tackiness in outdoor weathering tests Adhere to stringent scratch resistance standards Comply with thermal ageing tests, emissions tests, etc Maintain consistency in formulation to ensure consistent part performance Meet cleanliness standards for metallising, painting, etc Better process control know-how and stringent quality norms Develop adequate skilled manpower Put in place better project management skills to meet commitments Have technologies such as chrome plating on nylon, and slip coating on Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) rubber seals, which are currently not available in India

A new era beckons As India races towards the milestone of $ 1,000 per capita GDP by 2013, it would be an inflexion point for even higher demand growth of automobiles. Considering the relatively young demography of India along with the rising need to meet stringent safety standards, plastics would be expected to become the driving force as primary automotive material, and usher in a new era of passenger safety and a richer ride value. Email: manas@infomedia18.in

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 223


EVENT REPORT: Engineering Expo Pune 2011

SYNERGISING

the manufacturing

PROWESS Galaxy of dignitaries at the inauguration (L-R) R V Krishnan, C M Venkateshwaran, V Gokul Das, Sandeep Khosla, R Bhaskar and Asheesh Sharma

The sixth edition of Engineering Expo Pune brimmed with enthusiasm and positive demand, which echoed the industrial confidence of the region. With latest technologies and breakthrough solutions on display, the event was thronged by decision makers and professionals to ameliorate their understanding of the latest offerings in the Indian manufacturing industry. Visitors exploring state-of-the-art technologies at the expo

Swapnil Pillai

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ustifying the buzz surrounding it, the much-awaited engineering exhibition of the region witnessed a tremendous response from visitors and exhibitors alike. Over the years, the event has become synonymous with offering exuberant business opportunities to its participants. The current edition showcased an exhaustive range of costeffective and technologically advanced solutions in the complete product segment of manufacturing.

Advantage Pune The overwhelming support received by this year’s edition of Engineering Expo Pune, organised by Infomedia 18 Ltd,

is a testimony to its growing popularity in the region. Around 12,894 delegates who flocked the event from November 18-21, 2011, at Auto Cluster Exhibition Centre, Pimpri, generated business worth ` 81.10 crore. This year’s event witnessed a team of 22 delegates from Japan, and also executives from Tata Motors, Mahindra & Mahindra, Bajaj Auto Ltd, John Deere, Force Motors, Forbes Marshall and Siddheshwar Group of Industries. The inauguration function was graced by the presence of eminent dignitaries like Asheesh Sharma, IAS, Commissioner, Pimpri Chinchwad Municipal Corporation; R Bhaskar, Plant Head – CVBU, Tata Motors Ltd, Pune; C M Venkateshwaran, COO, Aker Powergas

224 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Subsea Pvt Ltd and Immediate Past Chairman, Process Plant & Machinery Association of India (PPMAI); V Gokul Das, MD, HRS Process Systems Ltd; R V Krishnan, Chairman, Business Development Bureau India Pvt Ltd; and Sandeep Khosla, CEO, Publishing, Infomedia 18 Ltd. While addressing the media during the inaugural event, Sharma, said, “Engineering Expo has grown from strength to strength over the years and Infomedia 18 Ltd has been doing a great job in organising this show.” He also highlighted the importance of good exhibition centres to boost trade in the region and announced plans to set up a state-of-the art exhibition centre in Pune.


Engineering Expo Pune 2011

Fostering business ties Pune, which is home to many ‘start-up’ SMEs with hi-tech products that meet the requirements of defence establishments and private companies, has over the years witnessed a steady growth of SMEs in the region. According to Bhaskar, “The growth of the Indian economy depends, to a great extent, on the growth of the manufacturing sector. Moreover, India’s growth has to cover all sections of the industry and forums, like Engineering Expo, which not only give manufacturers an opportunity to showcase their products, but also allows technology-related learnings to be shared and transferred among all stakeholders like OEMs, customers and both big and small entrepreneurs. Such forums not only help customers find the right product and right company, they also aid manufacturers in collaborating with the right partners and herein lies their importance.” As a trendsetter, Engineering Expo offers an excellent platform for companies to launch cost-effective products and create awareness about their capabilities. Venkateshwaran said, “The timing for the Engineering Expo could not have been better, as it is the end of the year when companies take a stock of what they have done over the year, and it is the time when companies try to foresee what the future would be like. The vast section of manufacturing, which is represented by SMEs, play a major role in the growth of Indian economy, and forums like Engineering Expo provide an excellent platform for companies to come under one roof and exchange their views. It is a fantastic forum for companies to discuss the latest in the industry as there is a lot of innovation happening in the SME segment. The timing, the growth-oriented economy and the platform organised by Engineering Expo is a winning combination for strengthening business.” Seconding these thoughts, Gokul Das said, “The enormous contribution of the SME segment to provide competent services to larger companies is truly an

outstanding aspect in Pune’s growth and success story. This has also largely been possible due to Pune’s spirit of entrepreneurship. Initiatives like Engineering Expo offer a potent platform to discuss and highlight various issues & challenges; meet & connect with peers from the industry; and finally to realise that the moment & opportunities to collaborate and grow are here, and now.”

Adhering to the market dynamics The event hosted an interesting mix of exhibitors ranging from companies showcasing the latest in ERP solutions to clients offering second-hand machinery. Anant Chind, Executive Director, Chind Iron and Steel Industries Ltd, said, “Over

Engineering Expo Pune at a glance

225 exhibitors 12,894 visitors 15,000+ products displayed ` 81 crore worth business generated 45,000 sq ft exhibition area 1,00,000 kg machinery moved 8,834 business leads generated the years, Engineering Expo has grown rapidly, and has become a crucial enabler for the transfer of technology and knowhow. We are into sheetmetal working and machine tools, and consider this event as the best platform to find more business & gain know-how of the current scenario in the industry. The event provides Indian companies an excellent opportunity to find new technologies, which will help local manufacturers to meet global standards.” The evolving customer demands have necessitated the requirement for quicker solutions with better productivity and reduced cycle time. The yearly frequency of the event enables companies to showcase

their latest technologies. Navneet Punj, Head – Business Operation, Wide Bridge Consulting Pvt Ltd, noted, “We are showcasing our latest technology here and have generated a good response from the visitors. The event has provided an excellent platform to launch our costeffective products. It has enabled us to reach the right audience and create awareness about our capability to offer a combination of cost-effective and highly productive technologies.” Adding to this Milan Supanekar, Proprietor, Welding Technologies India, who has been associated with Engineering Expo for the past couple of years and is one of the exhibitors who have already expressed interest to participate in the 2012 edition of the event, said, “Engineering Expo has over the years upgraded itself to international standards; the infrastructure and quality of visitors has improved year after year. We are happy to be associated with this event and wish to grow with it over the years. At this edition, we showcased our latest technologies and products, which have generated good response among some of our esteemed customers.” The event also served as a foreground to showcase live demonstrations to customers. CTR MFG IND Ltd capitalised on this opportunity to launch their new product and showcase its technical & functional aspects to customers. “We showcased our newly developed product for the first time to the general public at Engineering Expo Pune. The show has enabled us to demonstrate its live functioning to the curious customers. This has generated a substantial number of business queries and we are optimistic about the success of the product,” said an elated S U Tale, Senior Marketing Engineer, Handling Equipments Division, CTR MFG IND Ltd. With more national participation and exciting live demonstrations, the forthcoming editions of Engineering Expo are projected to set the trend for the next manufacturing leap. Email: swapnil.pillai@infomedia18.in

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 225


EVENT REPORT: Engineering Expo Chennai 2011

Capturing the southern stronghold Chennai

(L-R) S Raj, Regional Director, Indo-German Chamber of Commerce cutting the ribbon with Dominic Savio, Head – Thermal-Business Unit, Valeo. Also present are Sudhanva Jategaonkar, Associate Vice President – B2B Publishing, Infomedia18; T Murrali, Editor, Auto Monitor & Aftermarket

Bhargav TS

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hanging business paradigms and uncertain market conditions are pushing companies to deliver better than the best. Keeping up with the tradition, the fourth edition of Engineering Expo Chennai proved to be a true facilitator in terms of fructifying business deals and cashing in on southern opportunities. The Chennai edition, held during December 8-11, 2011, showcased the best in terms of engineering innovations and technologies and served as a platform for the business fraternity to grow and gain a competitive edge. Organised by Infomedia18, the event provided exhibitors from various sectors an opportunity to spread awareness about their products & services. Held at Chennai Trade Centre, Chennai, the show was inaugurated by S Raj, Regional Director, Indo-German Chamber of Commerce and Dominic Savio, Head-Thermal-Business Unit, Valeo. The event also witnessed the release of the Engineering Expo Chennai exhibitors’ directory. Offering insights into the significance of such trade fairs, Raj, during

Leveraging on the southern potential, the fourth edition of Engineering Expo Chennai lived up to the expectations of exhibitors & visitors in harnessing envious business deals. Having generated over 12,692 business leads, this edition was a huge success in not only offering companies an opportunity to explore the southern market, but also helping them garner successful partnerships. A report… the inaugural address, highlighted, “Trade fairs offer huge opportunities in terms of introducing new products, technologies and ways & means to access the market. Trade shows also offer a platform for exchanging technologies and help in raising joint ventures and technical collaborations.” Giving the organisers’ perspective, Sudhanva Jategaonkar, Associate Vice President – B2B Publishing, Infomedia18, said that currently, the Engineering Expo is held in six different cities in India. Rather than doing a show and waiting for customers to come, our ideology is to take the show to the customer’s doorstep.

The Chennai edge Tamil Nadu is a favoured destination for investments in the service and manufacturing sectors due to the availability of abundant talent pool and infrastructure facilities including sea, air, rail and road networks. Since its launch in 2008, the Engineering Expo Chennai has grown from strength to strength and helped Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) gain growth pastures. Over the years, it has become one of the most lucrative platforms for enhancing business opportunities. Also,

226 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

(L-R) S Raj, Regional Director, Indo-German Chamber of Commerce lighting the lamp with Dominic Savio, Head – Thermal-Business Unit, Valeo. Also present are Sudhanva Jategaonkar, Associate Vice President, B2B Publishing, Infomedia18; T Murrali, Editor, Auto Monitor, & Aftermarket

the Expo serves as an ideal networking platform for companies that want to reach out to Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs). Tracking the past, the third edition of the Engineering Expo held last March saw over 200 exhibitors and attracted close to 12,000 business visitors generating a business worth ` 34 crore and about 5,500 business leads. Considering the visitors’ portfolio, exhibitors and the leads that were registered in the 2011 edition, the Expo had broken all its previous records. Moving up the ladder, the fourth edition saw more than 175 participating exhibitors and more than 5,000 products were on display. Spread over more than 42,000 sq ft area, the Expo attracted 11,359 business visitors f rom across India. On this, Sandeep Khosla, CEOPublishing, Infomedia18, said, “The last three editions of Engineering Expo have contributed immensely to the engineering and service industries from this part of the country. Besides, it has significantly benefitted the SMEs in spreading their wings, as the event provided an ideal platform to connect the buyer and sellers.”


Engineering Expo Chennai 2011

Commenting on the event, Raj said, “We need such shows to showcase our strength particularly in Tamil Nadu, which is strong in manufacturing and engineering. This gives us hope that the mandate for the government to have 25 per cent GDP coming from manufacturing is possible.”

Expo as a one-stop resource The event witnessed some of the latest packaging technologies on display and presented the latest material handling technologies, like conveyors and cranes. Few companies also displayed their range of CNC machines used in the field of component manufacturing. Citing the example of Germany, which has emerged as the preferred destination in organising such trade shows, Raj said, “In Germany, the trade fairs are well organised and there are about 24 exhibition centres with 2.7 million sq mt of space for both national and international fairs. Of the 10 top exhibition companies worldwide, six are from Germany. In 2010, the trade fair industry was € 2.9 billion, which is roughly ` 20,000 crore. The trade fairs also have a multiplier effect; about € 12 billion was spent on trade fairs in Germany during 2005-08, and all these have been reported to have contributed to the country’s production of about € 23.5 billion. So, the spending that happens on trade fairs whether it is exhibitors, visitors or exhibition companies improving infrastructure, has helped create 2,26,000 full time jobs.” Satisfied with the response generated during the four power-packed days of the trade event, exhibitors are all geared up for the next edition of Chennai Expo. Sanjay V Pawar – CEO, Narahari Engineering, commented, “Engineering Expo Chennai has provided us good business since it has a wide range of clients. During the exhibition, we received more than 230 enquires, which is about ` 85 lakh worth of business.” Another exhibitor, Eraimozhi

Quick Facts Spread across 42,000 sq ft 12,000 business visitors Business transactions worth around ` 41.98 crore Pan-India participation by 175+ exhibitors Spread over 42,000 sq ft 11,359 Indian business visitors 12,692+ business leads generated 5,000+ products displayed from different industries Over 85,000 kg machinery moved in for display 70 per cent of the exhibitors got the expected visitors at the show 36 per cent exhibitors are looking for partnerships & JVs R of Global Water Systems, pointed out, “We are participating in an expo for the first time. We have made some initial spot sells and have some hot projects in the pipeline. I have generated a business of about ` 1 lakh. Our future plan depends on the sales during this Engineering Expo, though according to the enquiries we have received here, we would like to expand it into the future.” V Janardanan, Manager-Business & Pre-sales, Redington India, whose company specialises in 3-D printing solutions, elaborated, “We would like to meet maximum visitors and educate them about the new concepts of 3-D printing. Educating the market on these new technologies will help us enhance our business and reach in the long run.”

Delighted visitors Overwhelmed with the vast product

spread, visitors were able to get a glimpse of the latest technologies in the offing. A visitor at the expo, K Shivprasad, Sales Executive, Crompton Greaves, agreed, “My visit to this Expo has given me some good leads, which I hope to convert into business.” Gaurav Toshniwal, Director, BST Press Metal Components, stated, “My experience at the Engineering Expo was amazing as I was looking out for CNC machine manufacturers. I got a chance to meet a company who supplies the equipment. Overall, the ambience at the Expo was good.” Ezhil Arasu, Senior Engineer – Sales, Electronica HiTech, added, “Engineering Expo provides us with information about the various products in this segment available in the market.” The Expo enabled visitors to witness some of the innovative offerings from the leading exhibiting companies including Atlas Capco, Bhavya Machine Tools, Black & Decker India, CTR Manufacturing Industries, Dijet Industrial Co, Emtex Machinery, Fein Power Tools, Keyence India, Tussor Machine Tools India, Ramco Systems, Shutter Enterprises and Wendt India.

Growing in expanse Going by the sentiments of exhibitors & visitors, Engineering Expo Chennai marked another year of success in offering companies a perfect platform for profit. While plans are bullish for the next edition, the brand has something more to offer to the engineering community. To this, Jategaonkar added, “We plan to take Engineering Expo outside India. In another few months, we will be announcing our international foray. Currently, we are in a process of shortlisting the locations.” With such ambitious plans in place, there is no stopping the success bandwagon called Engineering Expo! Email: bhargav.t@infomedia18.in

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 227


BOOK REVIEW

Custom Molding of Thermoset Elastomers Author : Bernie Stritzke Price : ` 7,500

Specialized Molding Techniques Authors : Hans-Peter Heim, H Potente Price : ` 12,040

This is an excellent reference book for Thermoset Elastomer (TSE) moulders, as it gives comprehensive guidelines to understand TSE, compounding techniques, product design, testing & moulds and processing techniques (preoperational and post-operational). The book is intended for custom moulders of TSE, who have a working knowledge of a majority of moulding methods. It will help the industry people to improve their existing process, troubleshoot processes and find out a cost-effective process. The book also covers thermoset millable elastomers and Liquid Silicone Rubber (LSR) processes and troubleshooting guidelines for every difficulty. It explains in brief the processing of TSE. In general, a comparison of the plastic injection moulding and TSE moulding appear to be the same, but this book identifies a unique difference between the two processes. The industry (TSE) people should use this book to understand the methods of moulding, prototyping, equipment and testing. Often TSE moulding is put in the same category as plastic injection moulding. This book emphasises on unique differences in TSE moulding in comparison with plastic injection moulding, and can be used as a general guide by the industry people.

A surge of new moulding technologies is transforming plastics processing and material forms to a highly efficient, integrated manufacturing that will set industry standards in the early years of the new century. This book is a survey of these technologies, putting them into context and accentuating opportunities. The relationships among these technologies are analysed in terms of: Products – auto parts (eg, bumpers, trim, keyless entry module, blower switch housing), chassis, pallets, furniture, handles, television housings, covers, golf club shafts, connectors, notebook casing, switches, sensors, antennas, sockets, lighting, cellular phone housing, submicron parts and medical devices. Materials – composition, resin consideration, blends, structure (skin/core), shrinkage, viscosity, weld line strength, structural properties, morphology, reinforcement and surface roughness. Processing – macroscopic structure, size & shape, flow length, injection pressure prediction, process simulation, processing parameters, tooling issues, rheology, rheokinetics, flow equations & simulation, no-slip boundary conditions, pressure loss, surface appearance, manufacturing cost, leakage modelling, setup criteria, optimisation of moulding parameters non-return valve applications. Geometry – function and complexity, moulding window, filling of complex-art, design optimisation, x-ray tomography, image reconstruction, acoustic imaging, warpage calculation, simulation & calculation, flow channels and tight tolerance. The book will be of immense help to engineers and technicians at manufacturing companies in the plastics industry that employ injection moulding technology processes.

Reviewed by: Ashish Kothavade, Senior Manager-Business Development, Plastiblends India Ltd Avaliable at: Wisdom Book Distributors, Hornby Building, 1st floor, 174, D N Road, Mumbai 400 001 Tel: 022-2207 4484/6631 8958 • Telefax: 022-2203 4058 • Email: thadam@vsnl.com

228 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


This section provides information about the national and international products available in the market

PRODUCT S

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Thermic fluid heaters

M Aerotherm offers themic fluid heaters and hot water generators that have capacity ranging from 30,000 kcal/hr to 20,00,000 kcal/ hr max. Operating temperature is 300°C for thermic fluid and 130°C for hot water. Concentric coils are made from

MS

asthma

seamless

106

tube

GR-B.

of

These

unit are equipped with high efficiency oil/gas burner with air pre-heater arrangement that gives high thermal efficiency 87 ±2 per cent on NCV. The thermic fluid heater units are outside pruview of IBR. Aerotherm Systems Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-25890158 Email: contact@aerothermsystems.com Website: www.aerothermsystems.com

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 229


PRODUCT S

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Keyless transmission elements

M NMTG

Mechtrans Techniques

offers keyless transmission elements that entirely eliminate shafts/hub keyways. This method is very simple. By expansion of the outer and shrinkage of inner rings of the elements, shaft and hub frictional connections are established. These transmission elements have great absorbing capacity of kinetic energy by elastic radial deformation of tapered rings. They are available in a wide range from 10 mm dia to 400 mm dia and in various models. Features include: no keyway, no extra machining, no notch effort; perfect true running; high fatigue strength under alternating torsional stress; free from wear; overload protection effect; easy adjustability; easy mounting and removal; and maintenance-free. Used for connection of gear wheels, chain sprockets, levers, cam plates, belt pulleys, brake drums, flywheels, couplings and clutches, etc. NMTG Mechtrans Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-22821527 Email: nmtg@nmtgindia.com Website: www.nmtgindia.com

230 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


PRODUCT S

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Variable inlet vane dampers

M Energy savings with fans untilising variable inlet vanes, these dampers are oered that are used for capacity modulation. They give accurate modulation and power saving over other styles of dampers at reduced air ow. When an inlet vanes is partially closed, each blade directs the air into the wheel in the direction of rotation and so the air is pre-spun. For every inlet vane posistion there is dierent capacity vs static pressure curve and capacity vs brake horsepower curve generated by the fan. The variable inlet vane dampers are designed with mechanical principle of adjustment. Inlet guide vanes are synchronously adjustable in the same angular position by a connecting element. Applications are in chemical industries, pharmaceutical industries, food industries, and dairy industries. Vacunair Engineering Co Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-22910771 Mob: 22910773 Email: info@vacunair.com Website: www.vacunair.com

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 231


PRODUCT S

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Continuous inkjet printers

M Bakshi Mark offers the mostefficient continuous Linx inkjet printers that are renowned globally for their ease-of-use, reliability and low-cost of ownership. Linx printers benefit from a unique, robust, sealed MK VII printhead, only in the industry, which contributes to the reliability of these printers. The Linx 7300 range of printers is designed to avoid hidden costs and save you money with every print. These printers provide fast, non-contact printing of static & dynamic codes, messages on almost any moving surface on the production line. It provides a flexible coding solution, which is designed to be easy-to-use in any environment. Linx 7300 has come out with exciting new features: USB message/printer backup & restore; and mistakeproof refills with Surefill codes. Bakshi Mark Pvt Ltd New Delhi Tel: 011-25262395 Mob: 09711200744 Email: info@markode.in Website: www.markode.in

232 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


PRODUCT S

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Sinewave vibro viscometers

M A&D India a direct subsidiary of A&D Co, Japan, oers sinewave vibro viscometers. The sinewave vibro is arguably world’s most userfriendly and fastest viscometer, which gives result in just 15 seconds (claims the company). It achieves a measurement accuracy of repeatability (standard deviation) of 1 per cent, and accuracy of 1 per cent on the result value and not the full range. It has continuous measurement over a wide range of viscosity without replacing the sensor plates. There is no need to change the sensor plates as compared to rotational type. The temperature sensor to measure the sample temperature is installed as standard. It is located between the two sensor plates. Therefore, the accurate detection of the relation between temperature and viscosity is possible. Other features include: measurement of a non-Newtonian uid containing bubbles: thin plate type sensor does not deform the sample structure. A&D Instruments India Pvt Ltd Gurgaon - Haryana Tel: 0124-4715555 Email: info@aanddindia.in Website: www.aanddindia.in

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 233


PRODUCT S

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Digital colour mark sensors

M Lubi Electricals oers SUNX (a brand of Panasonic) LX-100 series digital colour mark sensors that can detect any marking because they are equipped with red, green and blue LED light emitting element. Furthermore, to expand the functionality these sensors come with dual mode, ie, mark mode (ultra high-speed response) and colour mode (high precision mark colour discrimination) to suit any application. These sensors come with MODE NAVI technology for enhancing features and easy to use. The other special features includes 4-digit digital display, super simple teaching, external teaching, 12-bit A/D converter, D-code, key lock, timer, NPN or PNP outputs, IP67 protection, etc. Amazingly all this comes in the size of 57 mm (W) x 24 mm (D) x 38 mm (H) body. The digital colour mark sensors can be used eectively in many applications/ industries, especially in packaging, food, pharma, textile, plastic, etc. Lubi Electronics Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-22205471 Mob: 09327497006 Email: info@lubielectronics.com Website: www.lubielectronics.com

234 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


NEW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES invites you to

17 - 20 Feb 2012 CUT HERE

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AURANGABAD Garware Stadium, Chikkalthana Business Visitors: 10 am to 3 pm General Visitors: 3 pm to 7 pm


Engineering Expo organised by Infomedia18 is one of the engineering industry’s biggest events in country. The 2010-11 edition of Engineering Expo saw business transactions worth over Rs. 161 crores. Launched in Ahmedabad in the year 2002, the event today boasts of a fabulous visitor turnout. The Expo is a preferred destination for SME’s and manufacturing & engineering companies to transact, network, tie-up and exchange ideas for the growth of the industry.

Exhibitor Profile Auto & Auto Components | Light & Medium Engineering | Chemicals & Allied Products | Electrical & Electronics | Hydraulics & Pneumatics | IT Products & Services | Automation & Instrumentation | Material Handling Eqpt | Packaging Machinery | Wires & Cables | Machine Tools & Acc. | Pipes & Fitting | Plastics & Polymers | Safety & Security | Process Machinery & Eqpt | Testing & Measuring Instruments Brought to you

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For Further Details, Call Varsha + 91 98195 52270 Or Email engexpo@infomedia18.in


PRODUCT S

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer AC motors

M NBE Motors oers AC motor. The housing (stator frame) is of cast iron body with coiling ribs.The rotor is of core of insulated lamination with a high pressure die-cast aluminum cage. The whole rotor assembly is dynamically balance to ensure quiet and vibration free operation. Shaft is made from high carbon steel, the terminal box is located at right hand side of the drive end side, sealed against ingress of moisture and is provided with conduit entry. The current standard range is from 0.12 to 40 kW in various polarities in frame sizes of 56 to 200 in 2, 4, 6, 8 pole design. Conformance is to IS:325 and for dimensions is to IS:1231 and 2223. Each motor undergoes total tests during manufacturing process and prior to despatch. Type of cooling is as IS:6362. High airow external bi-directional polypropylene fans assure low temperature rise to give an extended life of motor. These motors are suitable for a variety of industrial, domestic and other general-purpose applications, chemical, pharma and machine tool industry. NBE Motors Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-22740546 Email: info@newbharat.com Website: www.newbharat.com

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 237


PRODUCT S

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Flame-retardant fillers

M Nabaltec AG manufactures, develops and distributes highly specialised products based on aluminum hydroxide (ATH) and aluminum oxide, as well as other raw materials, on an industrial scale through its functional fillers and technical ceramics divisions. The product range includes halogen-free flame-retardant fillers and eco-friendly additives for the plastics industry. The company also produces base materials for use in technical ceramics, the refractory industry and catalysis. Unlike halogenated flame retardant fillers, the products manufactured by the company´s functional fillers division contain no hazardous substances and do not require separate disposal. Rather, the company´s flame retardant fillers actually decrease the development of fumes hazardous to human health and the environment in the event of fire. Used in cables (in tunnels), airports, high-rise buildings & electronic devices; and additives replace stabilisers containing heavy-metals in PVC processing. Nabaltec AG

Booth No: 12-A11

Schwandorf - Germany Tel: +49-9431-53458 Email: fillers@nabaltec.de Website: www.nabaltec.de

Plastic extruders

M Intype

Enterprise

manufactures

Co plastic

extruders. Their PP tubular film blowing making machine gains good reputation at good machine performance, easy maintenance,and crystal-clear of final PP film. The crystalclear PP film is designed for stationery application. The company not only focuses on good quality but also creates a costeffective production system, maximise profitability and flexibility. Combined with computer control system by PLC or PC BASE, the touchscreen control panel centralises all the machine's component from material feeding to film winding, which continually monitors and manages all set of equipment, flat, smooth, and with accurate specification. The plastic extruders are used for making sheet projectors, file folders, etc, and could be with different embossing design. Intype Enterprise Co Ltd Tainan - Taiwan Tel: +886-6-2614196 Email: extruder@intype.com.tw Website: www.intype.com.tw

238 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Booth No: 14FP-47


PRODUCT S

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Nylon products

M Zig Sheng Industrial Co manufactures

and

offers

nylon products, including nylon

chips,

DTY

and

filaments, engineering

compounds. Total

solutions

for

compound products are also provided to satisfy customers’ requirements.

ZISLLOY

brand is offered for a full range of engineering compounds, including PA6, PA66, PP, PA6/12 and PPS products. These are widely used in automotive, electrical & electronics, sports, power tools, blowing tube, blowing film and fishing line industries. Zig Sheng Industrial Co Ltd Tainan Hsien - Taiwan Tel: +886-2-25591357

Booth No: 11FP-106

Email: bruce_lin@ zigsheng.com Website: www.zigsheng.com

Cutting & boring systems

M Stanny

Machine

Tools

Co

gained

has the

market’s positive responses to the new

high-speed

cutting and boring systems. This cutting

series

of tools

features excellent dynamic balance up to G2.5. For eg, a BT40, H•BOR50P tungsten carbide arbour with MR or MK cutting insert holder, tool ranges from Ø11 mm to Ø32 mm, spindle speed 12000 RPM, the boring diameter/ depth ratio can be 1:7. Such an outstanding performance expands boring capacity with higher spindle speed, and still keeps extraordinary dynamic balance. Stanny Machine Tools Co Ltd Tainan Hsien - Taiwan Tel: +886-4-26710805 Email: stanny88@ms45.hinet.net Website: www.stanny-tool.com

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 239


PRODUCT S

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Lab stations

M With a speed range of 0.2–350 min-1, the 16 kW-powered Plasti-Corder lab stations are beside operating the measuring extruder type 19, the conical twin screw extruder, the co-rotating twin screw extruder TSE20/40 and measuring mixer type 30/50 and P600 especially suited for Brabender single-screw extruder type 30, twin screw extruder 25 and mixer type 350. The smaller Plasti-Corder lab-station EC with a speed range of 0.2–200 min-1 and 6.8 kW-drive unit fulfills the possibility to adapt Brabender single screw extruder type 19, conical twin screw extruder as well as mixer types 30/50 and P 600. The Brabender Plasti-Corder lab stations/lab-station EC represent the new generation of torque rheometers for all kinds of processtechnical investigations or processing tasks in laboratories and simulation. The Plasti-Corder lab stations and lab-station EC are suited for mixers and extruders including a temperature control. Brabender GmbH & Co KG Duisburg - Germany Tel: +49-203-77880 Email: plastics-sales@brabender.com Website: www.brabender.com

240 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Booth No: 12D-15


PRODUCT S

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Titanium dioxide

M Anatase-type titanium dioxide (GA-100) oered by Jiangxi Tikon

Titanium

Co

are

white powder, with no surface treatment. These have excellent optical capabilities, high purity, whiteness and hiding power. The product is easily dispersible. Technical speciďŹ cations include: TiO2 Content ? per cent 98.5; tint reducing power(compared with standard sample) ? 100; oil absorption g/100g ?22; residue on mesh(45 um) per cent ? 0.05; water soluble object per cent ? 0.5; pH value of aqueous suspension 6.58.0; and volatile at 105 ? 0.5. The Anatase-type titanium dioxide is recommended for production of internal coating, indoor decoration paint, primer, rubber, paper-making, leather, etc. Jiangxi Tikon Titanium Co Ltd Fuzhou City - China Tel: +86-794-8355555 Email: yxb@tikon.com.cn Website: www.tikon.com.cn

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 241


PRODUCT S

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Servo motors

M Enaiviv Machinery Industrial Co offers servo motors as energy Complete

saving

solutions.

solutions

for

a

whole range of machine are provided. These

not

only

include servo motors, but also to apply energy-saving on hydraulic systems, cooling systems and heater systems. This makes the total energy saving rate much higher than the machines only with servo motors. This feature is able to apply to all types of Enaiviv machines, from 30~3500 tons machines and from thermoplastic machines to thermosetting machines. Enaiviv Machinery Industrial Co Ltd Tainan Hsien - Taiwan Tel: +886-6-2544328 Email: jimmy_fang@enaiviv.net Website: www.enaiviv.com.tw

Cast film lines

M Reifenhauser offers cast film lines with 4.6 m slot die for thin PP films. The lines for the production of three-layer PP cast films have three extruders; one extruder of 180 mm screw diameter, 30 L/D and two co-extruders of 90 mm screw diameter, 30 L/D. The slot dies have widths up to 4,600 mm. Besides, due to coat hanger channels, these have optimum melt flow and automatic control of film thickness with thermal bolt or translator bolt die up adjustment. Using the patented co-extrusion adapter REI co-feed, three-layer PP films in thickness of 20-120 microns can be produced. The casting unit, with main chill rolls of 800 or 1,000 mm, can be adjusted in height and moved in operating direction. Compared to the usual film lines with width of 2-3 m, these films are used for engineering and processing technology. Reifenhauser GmbH & Company KG Duisburg - Germany Tel: +49-2241-481357 Email: Eike.Wedell@reifenhauser.com

242 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


PRODUCT S

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Injection moulding machines

M The CNT series toggle inward injection moulding machine series uses the high quality parts, such as high-performance motors, Japanese microcomputer control system, imported bearings, and high strength non-tempered tie bars, etc, to ensure high-precision and long service life for the machines. The design concepts of the CNT series are structural rigidity and stability which exhibit its extraordinary performance. The personiďŹ ed operational interface makes the machine operations easy and ensures the production quality. Also provided is comprehensive aftersales service to provide most convenient and speedy information. Shuenn Jann Machinery Co Ltd Tainan Hsien - Taiwan Tel: +886-6-2339590 Email: dearday@ms15.hinet.net Website: www.soongiant.com.tw

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 243


PRODUCT S

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Laboratory extruders

M Coperion Werner & Pfleiderer GmbH & Co KG offers ZSK 18 MEGAlab, a laboratory extruders with a screw diameter of 18 mm.These extrduers come with a diameter ratio of 1.55, a specific torque of Md/a³ = 11.3, and a maximum speed of 1,200 min –1. Reliable basic tests can be carried out due to its extensive performance range, from batches of 200 g up to a throughput of 40 kg/h. The processing section of the extruder is supplied in two models; with 10 barrels, ie, with a screw length of 40 D (D = screw diameter), designed for developments in the handling and compounding of engineering plastics as well as of masterbatches of all types. Formulation constituents can be added directly to the melt downstream via the ZS-B twin-screw side feeder, whose flange connection has a quick action coupling. These extruders are designed for developing formulations of plastics compounds, masterbatches, powder coatings in the test laboratories of production facilities. Coperion Werner & Pfleiderer GmbH & Co KG Duisburg - Germany Tel: +49-711-8972507 Website: www.coperion.com

244 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


PRODUCT S

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Quick die changing systems

M Forwell Precision Machinery oers automatic and labour-saving quick die changing systems and printed circuit board punching and stripping systems.

The

automatic

mould

changing trolley systems contain one-button full-automatic move-in and move-out as well as semi-automatic move-in and move-out types, which can perform move-in and move-out, positioning, mould locking and other fully automatic operation of 3-15 t large-scale die. The price of this newly developed mould changing trolley system is cheaper by one-third of that of Japanese products. These enable practitioners to be safe, faster when doing mould changing operation, greatly saving operation time and improving capacity. This can reduce purchase cost for practitioners, and help improve market acceptability and rate of utilisation of the product. Forwell Precision Machinery Co Ltd Zhenjing. Ningbo - Taiwan Tel: +886-4-86599196 Email: forwell@forwell.com Website: www.forwell.com

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 247


PRODUCT S

M Manufacturer E Exporter D Dealer I Importer Plastic injection moulds

M Aplus

Molds

&

Plastics

Co

manufactures and offers plastic injection moulds. The product line includes various plastic product designs, OEM, ODM, injection moulding and mould design development. These are used for mould makers, A/C, HVAC parts/components, auto parts/ components, OA furniture, 3C parts/ components, plastic houseware, etc. Aplus Molds & Plastics Co Ltd Tainan - Taiwan Tel: +886-2-27235390 Email: green-maxi@umail.hinet.net Website: www.chenlueng.com

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/ distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

248 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


LIST OF PRODUCT S

To know more about the products in this magazine, refer to our ‘List of Products’ or write to us at spedit@infomedia18.in or call us at +91-22-3003 4684 or fax us at +91-22-3003 4499 and we will send your enquiries to the advertisers directly to help you source better. Sl No Product 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93

Pg No

A1000 for crane controls .................................. 157 Abs ...................................................................... 239 AC motors .................................................... 45, 237 Accumulators....................................................... 245 Additive masterbatches .............................. 12, COC Additives ............................................................... 31 Adhesives .............................................................. 97 Agglomerator & densifiers.................................... 81 Agglomerators ..................................................... 230 Air audits blowers ............................................... 105 Air bellows .......................................................... 145 Air bubble sheet plants ................................... 10, 77 Air chillers............................................................. 25 Air cooled die face pelletisers ............................. 205 Air nozzles .......................................................... 200 Air rings ................................................................ 33 Air treatments ....................................................... 87 Air-conditioner parts ........................................ FGF Air-cooled chillers ................................................. 41 Aluminum extrusion ........................................... 230 Ammonia liquid chillers ..................................... 175 Analytical balances ................................................ 72 Anatase tio2 ........................................................ 135 And die face cutters ............................................ 181 Auto dosing & mixing systems........................... 169 Auto vacuum loaders........................................... 169 Automatic dynamic visco-elastometers.................................................. 72 Automatic leak testing machines ........................ 177 Automatic material handling systems ................................................. 205 Automatic slotting machines .............................. 144 Automatic vacuum forming machines .................. 73 Automatic vacuum PP forming machines ........................................... 73 Automation panels .............................................. 157 Automation systems ............................................ 246 Automation ..................134, 199, 223, 227, 257, 259 Automotive............................................................ 55 Auxiliary equipment............................................ 134 Aviation cog wheels ............................................ 200 Axial flow fans .................................................... 237 Bag making machines ...................................... 213 Barrel screws ....................................................... 183 Barrels ................................................................ BIC Batch counters..................................................... 193 Batching plant chillers .......................................... 41 Battery chargers .................................................. 147 Bearing bushes .................................................... 200 Bed knives ............................................................. 99 Bi-axial plants ..................................................... 263 Bio-degradable additives ....................................... 31 Biodegradable masterbatches ...........................COC Biopolymer resins................................................ 122 Black master batches ............................ COC, 12, 31 Blenders.................................................. FIC, 33, 69 Blending units ................................................... FGF Blister sealing machines ........................................ 73 Blow molding extrusion ...................................... 209 Blow moulding machines.................... 154, 177, 261 Blower series ....................................................... 246 Blowers & fans.................................................... 237 Blown film extrusion systems ............................. BC Blown film extrusions ......................................... 139 Blown film plants ................................................ 230 Blown film systems ............................................... 33 Bobbin winders ................................................... 143 Boilers ................................................................. 217 Both conical & parallel ....................................... 251 Bottle testing equipment....................................... 61 Box strapping plants ..................................... 81, 230 Braided/suction hose plants ................................ 230 Brake motors ......................................................... 45 Breathable films .................................................. 139 Brine chillers/liquifiers .......................................... 41 Bubbles .................................................................. 33 Bulk milk coolers ................................................ 175 Buschjost series ................................................... 145 Butterfly valves .................................................... 175 Cable compounds ............................................ 129 Calcite ................................................................... 91 Calorifers ............................................................. 217 Cam followers ..................................................... 232 Car battery cases ................................................. 231 Carat balances ....................................................... 72 Carbon fibre re-enforced products...................... 200 Casi (coating) ........................................................ 97 Cast film lines ................................. 10, 77, 209, 242 Central material conveying systems .................... 169 Centre/surface slitters ......................................... 164 Centrifugal air blowers........................................ 237 Ceramic band heaters ......................................... 150 Chain pulley blocks............................................. 232 Chemical pump vane & fluid dispensing parts .......................................... 200 Chemicals ............................................................ 107 Chillers .......................................................... 41, 244

Sl No Product 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185

Pg No

Circular weaving looms ....................................... 218 Circular weaving machines ................................... 16 Clamps ................................................................ 244 Cleaning ovens ................................................... BIC Cleanroom applications......................................... 37 Closures ............................................................... 123 Cluster facia ...................................................... FGF CNC machines ..................................................... 53 CNC vertical machining centres .......................... 93 Coating raw materials ......................................... 125 Co-extruded sheets & telecom cables................... 85 Co-extrusion blow moulding machines ............................................. 140 Co-extrusion casting film lines ........................... 134 Co-extrusion dies .................................................. 10 Co-extrusion moulding machines ....................... 209 Co-extrusions blown film plants........................... 10 Color masterbatches....................... COC, 12, 31, 35 Colour additives .................................................... 31 Colour mark sensors ........................................... 157 Colouring extrusion plants.................................. 263 Compact chillers ............................................. 25, 65 Compact film plants ........................................... 230 Components & dedusters ................................... 120 Compound & reprocessing plants ...................... 230 Compounded PP ................................................ 201 Compounding extrusion plants........................... 263 Compounding extrusion ..................................... 263 Compounding mixers.......................................... 263 Compounding systems ........................................ 129 Compounds ................................................... 31, 248 Compressed air dryers......................................... 219 Compressed air systems ........................................ 36 Compression moulding hydraulic presses .................................................. 154 Compressor air chillers ......................................... 20 Compressor valve plates ...................................... 200 Compressors .................................. 36, 105, 237, 243 Conductive compounds....................................COC Conical twin screw extruders ................................ 63, 90, 167, 205 Connectors ........................................................ FGF Continuous inkjet printers .................................. 232 Continuous screen changers............................... BIC Control panels ..................................................... 247 Control systems................................................... 157 Controllers ............................................................ 33 Converters ................................................... 193, 247 Conveying blowers .............................................. 237 Conveying systems .................199, 23, 227, 257, 259 Coolant pipes ........................................................ 46 Cooling pads ....................................................... 217 Cooling towers .............................................. 87, 217 Cordage machinery ............................................. 143 Counters & power supplies..................................... 9 Counters .............................................................. 193 CPVC pipes .................................................... 14, 21 Crabs ................................................................... 232 Cranes ......................................................... 186, 232 Crushers .............................................................. 169 Crystallisers ......................................................... 219 Cutlery ................................................................ 123 Cutting & boring systems .................................. 239 Cutting & stitching machines .............................. 16 Cyclic olefin copolymer (coc) .................Belly-Band Dairy machinery .............................................. 175 Dan line extrusion plants .................................... 143 Data acquisition systems ..................................... 117 Datalogging software .......................................... 247 DC motors ............................................................ 45 Dehumidified air dryers ........................ 25, 65, FGF Dehumidified dryers .......................... 108, 169, FIC Deposition systems ............................................. 124 Design concepts .................................................... 75 Die & Mould India international exhibition ....................................... 130 Digital colour mark sensors ................................ 234 Digital panel meters .............................................. 18 Digital temperature controllers ........................... 189 Doctoring & inspection machines ...................... 164 Dolomite ............................................................... 91 Door trims ........................................................ FGF Dosing & blending machines199, 223, 227, 257, 259 Dosing & mixing machines ................................ 246 Double girder cranes ........................................... 186 Double inlet blowers ........................................... 232 Double shaft gearboxes ................................. 51, 172 Double-column vertical machining centres ................................................. 53 Downstream extrusion equipment ...................... 209 Drip irrigation systems ....................................... 217 Drive & automation...................................... 83, 147 Drives .................................................................. 189 Dry-break couplings ........................................... 105 Drying & dehumidifying systems....................... 246 Drying ..................................199, 223, 227, 257, 259 Drymax air-hot air dryers .................................. FIC

Sl No Product 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276

Pg No

Drymax dryers ................................................... FIC Drymax pet-dehumidified dryers....................... FIC Dual channel with modbus................................. 189 Dual temperature chillers.................................... 144 Dust & waterproof digital scales .......................... 72 Dust collector systems ........................................ 237 Dyestuffs ............................................................... 54 Dynamic controllers ............................................ 189 Ejectors ........................................................... 105 Elastomer injection moulding machines ............................................. 229 Elastomer refinery/petrochemicals ........................ 97 Electric injection moulding machine gearboxes ................................................ 11 Electrical panels .................................................. 157 Electricals .............................................................. 55 Electro-active polymers ....................................... 125 Electronic devices.................................................. 83 Element shrink discs ........................................... 232 Embedded systems .............................................. 147 Encoders.................................................................. 9 Energy-saving machines ....................................... 43 Engineering plastics filled compounds ................................................. 248 Engineering products .......................................... 107 EOAT & grippers parts ...................................... 148 EOT/HOT cranes .............................................. 232 EPDM base PP compounds ................................. 71 Exhaust valves ..................................................... 145 Exhibition organisers .......................................... 103 Exhibitions .................................... 52, 103, 116, 130 Extruder & extrusion production lines ........................... 134, 161 Extruder feeding systems .................................... 240 Extruder machines .................................. 23, 39, 134 Extruders & cutting machines ............................ 132 Extruders & extrusion machinery ....................... 134 Extruders & extrusion plants .............................. 132 Extruders for polymer processing ....................... 117 Extruders ............................................................... 33 Extrusion blow films ........................................... 209 Extrusion coating lamination plants............................................. 10, 77 Extrusion coating lines.......................................... 16 Extrusion compounding foam moulding .................................................... 132 Extrusion dies ............................................. 136, 264 Extrusion films & sheets .................................... 209 Extrusion laminating & coating ......................... 209 Extrusion lamination machines .......................... 109 Extrusion lamination plants ................................ 109 Extrusion machineries......................................... 151 Extrusion machines ............................................. 140 Extrusion pipes ........................................... 134, 209 Extrusion plants .................................................. 263 Extrusion pumps ................................................. 115 Extrusion single screw extruders ......................... 209 Extrusion systems................................................ BC Extrusion tape stretching machines .................... 109 Extrusion tape stretching plants ......................... 109 Extrusion twin screw extruders ........................... 209 Extrusions ........................................................... BC Factory production displays ............................. 193 Feeding & conveying .................................. 219, 246 Ferrous castings ................................................... 230 Fibreglass cables .................................................. 243 Fibrillated tape extrusion .................................... 139 Filler compounds................................................... 31 Film agricultural films ......................................... 231 Film dies................................................................ 33 Film stretching lines............................................ 233 Finished packages.................................................. 75 Fixtures ................................................................ 244 Flame retardants ................................................... 31 Flameproof hoists ............................................... 232 Flameproof motors................................................ 45 Flame-retardant fillers......................................... 238 Flame-retardant master batches ............................ 12 Flange mounting motors ...................................... 45 Flexible hose making plant ................................. 230 Flexible woven packaging machines ................... 129 Flexographic printing machines.......................... 138 Flexoprinting machines....................................... 213 Flow rate indicator & totalisers .......................... 193 Flow regulators ................................................... 145 Fluorescent ............................................................ 54 Fluorine plastics recycling ................................... 131 Foam moulding ................................................... 209 Foam ................................................................... 231 Forged components ............................................. 230 Forward looking technology ............................... 119 Four-axis shaft gearboxes .................................... 138 Freewheel-oneway-clutches................................. 232 Fuel burners ........................................................ 237 Fueling systems ................................................... 105 Fully automatic strapping plants ........................... 77 Gantry cranes .................................................. 186

FGF - Front Gate Fold, FIC - Front Inside Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, BGF - Back Gate Fold, BC - Back Cover

250 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


LIST OF PRODUCT S Sl No Product 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371

Pg No

Gases ................................................................... 107 Gear motors .......................................... 79, 182, 165 Gear pumps........................................ 115, 240, BIC Gear seals ............................................................ 200 Gearboxes .......................51, 118, 138, 172, 182, 232 Geared motors ...................................................... 45 Gears ..................................................... 51, 138, 172 Genioplast ................................................... 231, 233 Glass reinforced .................................................... 71 Goliath cranes ............................................. 186, 232 Goods lifts........................................................... 232 Granulating & recycling ..................................... 246 Granulators & grinders ......................................... 81 Granulators .............................FIC, 25, 65, 219, 231 Granules .............................................................. 230 Gravimetric blenders ..................................... 65, 144 Green purified gearboxes .................................... 138 Grinders ................................................................ 25 Grip pliers ........................................................... 244 Hard/sofa & free expansion sheet making plants ......................... 209 HDPE bottles ..................................................... 231 HDPE caps and containers .................................. 89 HDPE pipe plants ................................................ 10 HDPE woven sack manufacturing plants........................................... 109 HDPE................................................................. 239 HDPE& LLDPE ............................................... 201 HDPE/PP raffia tape plants .............................. 230 Head lamps & tail lamps .................................. FGF Heart valve frames .......................................... 58, 59 Heat transfer rolls .............................................. BIC Heater controllers................................................ 147 Heater cooler mixers ................................... 205, 230 Heating & cooling systems ....................................... .....................................199, 223, 227, 246, 257, 259 Heating cooling mixers ......................................... 81 Helical gearboxes .................................................. 79 Helical inline geared motors/reducers ................................................... 182 Helical speed reducers................................... 51, 172 High cavitations .................................................... 37 Highly specialised single-piece closure solutions .............................. 121 High-performance plastics .................................. 200 High-performance screws .................................. BIC High-precision hydraulic clamping injection moulding machines ............................................. 197 High-pressure reciprocating air-compressors.............................. 248 High-speed injection moulding machines ............................................. 245 High-speed mixers .................... 23, 39, 81, 229, 230 High-speed precise injection molding machines ................................ 245 High-speed rotogravure printing machines ............................................... 213 High-wear resistance........................................... 131 Hips..................................................................... 239 HM/HDPE/LDPE/LLDPE ............................... 77 HM/LDPE film plants......................................... 81 HMHD............................................................... 239 Hold backs .......................................................... 232 Hopper dryers ............................................... 25, 169 Hopper loaders................................................ 25, 65 Horizontal handle clamps ................................... 244 Hot air dryers...................................... 65, 108, FGF Hot runner nozzles ............................................. 117 Hot runner systems............................................. 246 Hot runner temperature controllers .................... 157 Hydraulic injection molding machines ............................................... 245 Hydraulic presses ................................................ 205 I-fix gauge controls ............................................ 33 IML techniques .................................................... 37 Impellers.............................................................. 232 Imtex Forming-2012 exhibition ........................... 52 Industrial automation .......................................... 113 Industrial chilling equipments ............................ 241 Industrial control & sensing devices ....................... 9 Industrial coolers ................................................... 87 Industrial electronic plastic parts ........................ 203 Industrial pumps ................................................. 240 Infrared dryers .................................................... 240 Infrared heaters ................................................... 157 Injection & blow moulding machines .................. 20 Injection cylinders ............................................... 238 Injection machines .............................................. 137 Injection moulded precision parts....................... 132 Injection moulding machinesFGF, 19, 27, 57, 81, 95, 124, 129, 131, 139, 140, 141, 142, 150, 154, 159, 179, 187, 195, 207, 217, 241, 242, 243, 245, 261, BGF Injection moulding-multi-components ...................... 159, 242 Injection moulds ................................................. 123 In-line drip irrigation plants ............................... 234 Inline drip tubings .......................................... 14, 21 Inline shaft mounted helical geared motors/reducers ............................ 182 In-mold labeling & injection molding machines ................................ 245 Innovative technology ......................................... 118 Insert moulding machines................................... 261 Instrumentation & controls ................................ 157 Instrumentation..................................................... 83 Internal bubbles cooling systems .......................... 33 Inverter/variable frequency drives ........................... 9 Inverters .............................................................. 147 ISO star............................................................... 145 Isolators ............................................................... 193 Jib cranes ......................................................... 232

Sl No Product 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477

Pg No

Jigs....................................................................... 244 Jumbo bag dumping stations .............................. 205 Jumbo bag manufacturing machines ................... 109 Jumbo blown film plants..................................... 218 Kamlok & drylok couplings ............................. 240 Kaolin .................................................................... 91 Keyless transmission elements .................... 230, 232 Knobs & switches ............................................. FGF Lab extruders ................................................... 205 Lab mixers .......................................................... 205 Lab stations ......................................................... 240 Laboratory extruders ........................................... 244 Lamination machines.......................................... 213 Lamination plant for tarpaulin ........................... 218 Large flow water heaters ..................................... 246 LDPE.......................................................... 201, 239 Length counters .................................................. 193 Level controllers ...................................................... 9 Lintra rodless cylinders ...................................... 145 Liquid crystaline lymer (lcp)...................Belly-Band Liquid ring vacuum pumps ................................. 237 Load cell indicators............................................. 193 Loaders............................................................... FIC Loading arms .............................................. 105, 240 Locking force sensors ......................................... 119 Machine safety solutions .................................. 149 Machined components ........................................ 230 Machines & accessories ...................................... 124 Manual & hydraulic screen changers................................................... BIC Manufacturing & supplying of PET containers ................................ 89 Mass comparators ................................................. 72 Masterbatch feeders ............................................ 169 Masterbatch mixers ............................................. 205 Masterbatches ......................... 12, 31, 55, 71, 85, 97 Material dryers ...................................................... 69 Material handling equipment ............................... 57 Material storage systems ....................................... 65 Material testing instruments ........................... 61, 72 Measuring & monitoring relays.............................. 9 Medical & surgical devices ................................. 200 Medical food ......................................................... 55 Medical moulds..................................................... 37 Medium-voltage AC drives .................................. 83 Melt-pressure transducers ........................... 117, 157 Melt-temperature sensors ................................... 117 Metal working machines....................................... 57 Metals.................................................................. 107 Mica & wollastonite ............................................. 71 Microfine pulverizing systems ............................ 263 Mixer unit series & feeding systems................... 161 Moisture analysers................................................. 72 Mono & multi-layer sheet lines............................ 16 Monofilament extrusion machinery .................................... 139, 143 Monofilament lines ............................................... 16 Monofilament plants ........................................... 218 Monolayer blown film lines ................................ BC Monolayer blown film plants ................................ 10 Monolayer blown films ................................... 14, 21 Monorail trolleys ................................................. 232 Motion controls ...................................................... 9 Motorised chain pulley blocks ............................ 232 Motors................................................................... 45 Mould changing systems .................................... 211 Mould sweat protectors......................................... 20 Mould temperature controllers ................................................ 25, 65, 108 Moulding compound injection moulding machines ............................................. 245 Moulding machines .............................................. 37 Moulds ............................................................ 23, 39 MTC .................................................................. FIC Multi-component moulds ..................................... 37 Multi-layer blown film lines ..................16, 142, BC Multi-layer blown film plants ......................... 10, 77 Multi-layer blown films .................................. 14, 21 Multi-layer cast film lines ..................................... 16 Multi-layer co-extrusion blow film plants .................................................. 230 Multi-layer co-extrusion sheet lines ................... 191 Multi-stage centrifugal air blowers ..................... 237 Multi-stations...................................... 141, 159, 242 Neat resins ......................................................... 54 Non-destructive tests ............................................ 72 Non-ferrous castings ........................................... 230 North American website ..................................... 125 Nozzles ................................................................ 240 NPE-2012........................................................... 249 Nylon products.................................................... 239 Nylons ................................................................. 239 OEM controllers ............................................. 193 Oil chillers............................................................. 41 Oil coolers ........................................................... 244 Oil/gas firing equipment..................................... 237 Online b2b marketplace ...................................... 250 Optic sheet extrusion lines.................................. 191 Optical brighteners ..........................................COC Optical sensors .................................................... 122 Oscillating haul-offs.............................................. 33 Overhead crane ................................................... 186 PA fibres .......................................................... 231 Packaging development engines............................ 75 Packaging machines ............................................ 134 Palletising machines ............................................ 181 Panel coolers ....................................................... 244 Paper & allied chemicals..................................... 107 Paper chemicals ..................................................... 54 Paper lamination plants ...................................... 218 Paperless recorders ................................................ 18 Parallel & right angle axes gearboxes ................... 11

Sl No Product 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 580 581

Pg No

Parallel shaft helical gearbox ............................... 172 PCs...................................................................... 239 Pelletiser - dry cut strand type.............................. 99 Pelletisers & recycling equipment....................... 132 Pelletisers............................................................ BIC PET bottle testing equipment .............................. 61 PET bottling compressors .................................. 248 PET box strapping plants ..................................... 77 PET fibres........................................................... 231 PET masterbatches ............................................... 12 PET non-woven ................................................. 231 PET perform dedicated machines ........................ 43 PET recycling lines ............................................... 81 PET recycling plants ............................................ 10 PET sheet extrusions .......................................... 191 PET/PE washing lines ......................................... 16 Pharmaceuticals/cosmetics .................................... 97 Photoelectric sensors ............................................... 9 Physical properties testing instruments ................................................ 72 PID controllers ................................................... 247 PID temperature controllers ............................... 193 Pipe extrusion lines for PVC/PPR/PE ....................................... 134, 187 Pipe extrusion lines ............................................... 81 Pipe making machines ................................ 141, 159 Pipelines .............................................................. 217 Pipette accuracy testers ......................................... 72 Piston rings ......................................................... 200 Planetary gearboxes ....................................... 51, 172 Plast compactors for pet film.............................. 231 Plastic articles ..................................................... 203 Plastic board production systems ........................ 133 Plastic compounds .......................................... 31, 97 Plastic conveyor belts ............................................ 39 Plastic extruders .................................................. 238 Plastic extrusion machinery ................................ 229 Plastic extrusion machines .................................... 81 Plastic extrusion systems ..................................... 144 Plastic industrial parts......................................... 203 Plastic injection moulding machines ............................... 29, 142, 247 Plastic injection moulds ...................................... 248 Plastic mould products........................................ 200 Plastic moulding machines ........................... 97, 154 Plastic processing machinery ancillaries & spares............................ 183 Plastic processing machinery .......................... 16, 81 Plastic products ................................................... 200 Plastic recycling & extrusion ancillaries ............................................... 81 Plastic scrap grinders .......................................... 229 Plastic sheet extrusion plants .............................. 109 Plastic sheet plants .............................................. 230 Plastic sheets ....................................................... 101 Plastic textile & machinery................................. 163 Plastic thermoforming machines ........................ 136 Plastics extruders ................................................. 143 Plastics extruding machinery .............................. 143 Plastivision Arabia-2012 ..................................... 116 Plate heat exchangers .......................................... 175 PLCs ................................................................... 189 Plug valves........................................................... 175 Ply yarn twisters .................................................. 143 Plybutylene erepthalate (pbt) ..................Belly-Band PMMA ............................................................... 239 Pneumatic conveying process .............................. 118 Pneumatic conveying systems ..................... 120, 237 Pneumatic valves ................................................. 175 Polyacetal copolymers (pom) ..................Belly-Band Polyaryletherketone ............................................. 200 Polycarbonate & pc-blend films ......................... 125 Polycarbonate sheets ........................................... 125 Polycarbonates & PC blends .............................. 125 Polyetheretherketone ........................................... 200 Polymer allies products ....................................... 107 Polymer conveyer belts .......................................... 25 Polymer valves ..................................................... 240 Polymeric compounds ......................................... 248 Polyolefin pipes ............................................... 14, 21 Polyphenylene sulfide (pps) ....................Belly-Band Polypropylene FR compounds .............................. 71 Polypropylene ...................................................... 201 Polystyrene hips & GPPS .................................. 201 Polystyrene products ........................................... 101 Polyurethane systems .......................................... 125 Pom polyacetal .................................................... 201 POMs.................................................................. 239 Portable loaders ................................................... 237 PP caps.................................................................. 89 PP compounds .................................................... 148 PP containers ........................................................ 89 PP glass-filled compounds .................................... 12 PP mineral filled compounds................................ 12 PP products ................................................. 201, 239 PP TQ film plants ................................................ 81 PP TQ plants ........................................................ 77 PP woven sack manufacturing machines ..................................... 109 PP/ HDPE-semi-automatic strapping plants ..................................................... 77 PP/HDPE rafffia tape lines ................................. 77 PP/HDPE/PET box strapping plants.................. 10 PP/HDPE/PET monofilament plants ............................................. 10 PP/PE sutli plant .................................................. 81 PP/PP/TQ film plants .......................................... 10 PPCP .......................................................... 201, 239 PP-R pipes ...................................................... 14, 21 Precision balances.................................................. 72 Precision fabrication works ................................. 244 Precision gears ..................................................... 138

FGF - Front Gate Fold, FIC - Front Inside Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, BGF - Back Gate Fold, BC - Back Cover

252 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012


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LIST OF PRODUCT S Sl No Product 582 583 584 585 586 587 588 589 590 591 592 593 594 595 596 597 598 599 600 601 602 603 604 605 606 607 608 609 610 611 612 613 614 615 616 617 618 619 620 621 622 623 624 625 626 627 628 629 630 631 632 633 634 635 636 637 638 639 640 641 642 643 644 645 646 647 648 649 650 651 652 653 654 655 656 657 658 659 660 661 662 663 664 665 666 667 668 669 670 671 672

Pg No

Precision moulds ....................................... 203, FGF Precision temperature controls ............................ 247 Preform injection moulding machines ............................................. 245 Presses ................................................................. 133 Pressure gauges...................................................... 46 Primary slitter rewinders ..................................... 164 Priming valves ..................................................... 105 Printing & cutting/rewinding machines ............... 16 Printing presses ................................................... 133 Process controllers ......................................... 18, 247 Process tanks ....................................................... 175 Processing machinery includes dispersion kneaders ............................... 181 Procurement & auditing servicing ...................... 107 Product assemblies .............................................. 230 Products exporting ................................................ 89 Profile controllers ................................................ 189 Profiles................................................................. 231 Programmable logic controllers .............................. 9 Programmable terminals ......................................... 9 Proportional valves .............................................. 145 Proximity sensors .................................................... 9 PTFE insulated wires (Teflon) ........................... 243 PTFE sleeves ...................................................... 243 PU parts .............................................................. 203 PU tubes................................................................ 46 Pull action clamps ............................................... 244 Pulverisers ............................................... 23, 39, 231 Pumping filtering units ....................................... 237 Pumps ......................................................... 105, 237 Push fittings .......................................................... 46 PVC & other materials ....................................... 231 PVC compounds ................................................... 85 PVC flexible braided hoses ................................... 46 PVC foam core pipes ...................................... 14, 21 PVC garden pipes ............................................... 230 PVC Kisan pipe plants ....................................... 218 PVC mixer coolers .......................................... 14, 21 PVC palletising lines ...................................... 14, 21 PVC pipes ............................................... 14, 21, 217 PVC products........................................................ 97 PVC profile lines ............................................ 14, 21 PVC profit & whole set equipment ................... 161 PVC suspension grade ........................................ 201 Quick connectors............................................. 111 Quick die changing systems ....................... 211, 247 Quick mould change systems ............................. 211 Raffia tape lines ................................................. 10 Rail tankers ......................................................... 175 Railway products ................................................. 147 Receptacles .......................................................... 240 Recycle/reclaim machine systems ....................... 134 Recycled polymers................................................. 31 Recycling lines ...................................................... 16 Recycling machines ..... 199, 213, 223, 227, 257, 259, Refrigerant pumps .............................................. 175 Refrigeration systems .......................................... 175 Reprocessing plants ............................................. 218 Reprocessing/recycling plastic plants .................... 81 Resin dehumidifiers ............................................ 219 RFID....................................................................... 9 Right angled helical bevel geared motors reducers ............................................................... 182 Right angled helical worm geared motors reducers ............................................................... 182 Rigid injection molding machines ...................... 245 Rigid polyurethanes for refrigerated applicatin .. 125 Robot systems ................................................. 25, 27 Robotics .............................................................. 136 Robots ................................................................ FIC Rock-n-roll machines ..................................... 23, 39 Rope making machinery ..................................... 143 Rotary automatic hot colour marking machines 146 Rotary cutters ........................................................ 99 Rotary filtration systems ..................................... 117 Rotary filtration systems ..................................... 118 Rotational moulding machines ........................... 263 Rotational moulds ............................................... 263 Rotogravure printing machines........................... 213 Rotogravure printing presses............................... 164 Rotomoulding machines ..................................... 263 Round table carrousels .......................................... 39 Roundline cylinders ............................................ 145 RTDs .................................................................. 247 RTO cables ......................................................... 243 Rutile tio2 ........................................................... 135 Safety access equipment ................................... 105 Safety light curtains ................................................ 9 San ...................................................................... 239 Sandwich BOPP lamination............................... 109 Scanners .............................................................. 193 Screen changers ................................... 117, 120, 240 Screw & barrels ..................................................... 81 Screw compressors .............................................. 175

Sl No Product 673 674 675 676 677 678 679 680 681 682 683 684 685 686 687 688 689 690 691 692 693 694 695 696 697 698 699 700 701 702 703 704 705 706 707 708 709 710 711 712 713 714 715 716 717 718 719 720 721 722 723 724 725 726 727 728 729 730 731 732 733 734 735 736 737 738 739 740 741 742 743 744 745 746 747 748 749 750 751 752 753 754 755 756 757 758 759 760 761 762 763 764 765 766 767

Pg No

Screws & barrels ......................................... 132, 238 Screws ........................................................... 33, 183 Scroll chillers ....................................................... 148 Sealants ................................................................. 97 Secondary slitter rewinders ................................. 164 Self-adhesive tapes .............................................. 234 Sensors ................................................................ 157 Servo drives ......................................................... 157 Servo energy saving machines .............................. 43 Servo motors ....................................................... 242 Shaft-mounted speed reducers...................... 51, 172 Shape moulding machines .................................. 124 Sheet calendering lines ....................................... 133 Sheet extrusion lines ............................................. 81 Sheets .................................................................. 231 Short-stroke cylinders ........................................ 145 Shovel elements................................................... 148 Shredders............................................................. 231 Shut off nozzles ................................................. BIC Shuttle roto-moulding machines ........................ 263 Shuttle series plants ............................................ 263 Side channel blowers........................................... 237 Side sealing-bag making machines ..................... 213 Sight flow meters ................................................ 240 Silane grafted XLPE compounds ....................... 248 Silicon wires ........................................................ 243 Sinewave vibro viscometers ................................. 233 Single bag feeding systems ................................. 205 Single girder cranes ............................................. 186 Single inlet blowers ............................................. 232 Single mill pulverisers ..................................... 23, 39 Single screw extruder gearboxes............................ 11 Single screw extruder plants ................... 63, 90, 167 Single screw extruders ......................................... 205 Single shaft extruder gearboxes..................... 51, 172 Single shaft shredders ......................................... 181 Single-/two-stage reciprocating air-compressors 248 Slipring crane-duty motors ................................... 45 Slitter rewinders .................................................. 150 Slitting machines ................................................ 213 Software for central monitoring ......................... 219 Solar power ......................................................... 147 Solenoid valves .............................................. 46, 145 Solid granulators ................................................. 263 Solid silicone & liquid silicones.......................... 229 Solid-state relays ................................................. 247 Spare twin screw barrel sets ................................ 251 Spares .................................................................... 99 Special granulators for pipes ............................... 231 Special silos ......................................................... 240 Spool valves ......................................................... 145 Sprinkler systems ................................................ 217 Sprockets ....................................................... 51, 172 Stabilisers .............................................................. 33 Stack moulds ......................................................... 37 Storage tank equipment ...................................... 105 Straight-line action clamps ................................. 244 Strand palletisers ................................................. 205 Strapping band extrusion .................................... 139 Stretch blow moulding machines ....................... 261 Stretch films ....................................................... 231 Sulphuric acids .................................................... 135 Switching devices ................................................ 157 Switching relays ...................................................... 9 Swivels................................................................. 240 Synthetic string plants (sutli plant) ...................... 10 System integration ................................................ 83 System solutions.................................................. 246 Talc ................................................................... 91 Talcum & calcium................................................. 71 Tank truck equipment......................................... 105 Tanks & silos ...................................................... 175 Tape extrusions ................................................... 139 Tape stretching lines ............................................. 16 Tarpaulin manufacturing machines..................... 109 Tea....................................................................... 107 Technical moulds .................................................. 37 Teflon parts ......................................................... 203 Temperature controllers .................... 9, 18, 189, 247 Temperature measuring equipment .................... 134 Temperature sensors............................................ 247 Tensioner nuts ..................................................... 232 Testing & measuring instruments ...................... 134 Testing instruments............................................... 61 Thermal cleaning systems ................................... 122 Thermic fluid heaters.......................................... 229 Thermocouple wires............................................ 243 Thermocouples.................................................... 247 Thermoformers ................................................... BC Thermoforming & PS foams.............................. BC Thermoforming glass machines ............................ 73 Thermoforming moulds ...................................... 150 Thermoforming moulds ...................................... 237 Thermoplastic alloys ............................................. 54 Thermoplastic compounds .................................... 54

Sl No Product 768 769 770 771 772 773 774 775 776 777 778 779 780 781 782 783 784 785 786 787 788 789 790 791 792 793 794 795 796 797 798 799 800 801 802 803 804 805 806 807 808 809 810 811 812 813 814 815 816 817 818 819 820 821 822 823 824 825 826 827 828 829 830 831 832 833 834 835 836 837 838 839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847 848 849 850 851 852 853 854 855 856 857 858 859 860 861 862 863 864

Pg No

Thermoplastic solutions .............................. 119, 122 Thermoplastics polyurethanes ............................. 125 Thermosets............................................................ 97 Thick & wide plastic sheet extrusion lines ......... 191 Thin wall packaging systems .............................. 123 Three-arm bi-axial roto-moulding machines . 23, 39 Three-axis shaft gearboxes .................................. 138 Thyristorised power controllers .......................... 247 Tie bar sensors .................................................... 132 Tie-bar-sensors ................................................... 119 Timers ............................................................. 9, 193 Titanium dioxide ........................................ 135, 241 Toggle action clamps .......................................... 244 Toggle presses ..................................................... 244 Tooltech-2012 exhibition ...................................... 52 TPE/TPU compounds ......................................... 12 TPEs ................................................................... 229 TPU masterbatches ............................................... 35 TPU products ..................................................... 125 Track rollers ........................................................ 232 Transfer trolleys................................................... 232 Transmissions & PTOS...................................... 105 Transmitters ........................................................ 193 Trim handling systems ........................................ 237 Tube extrusion lines .............................................. 66 Turned components ............................................ 230 Twin-mill pulverisers ...................................... 23, 39 Twin-roll mills .................................................... 205 Twin-screw co-rotating extruders ................... 58, 59 Twin-screw elements....................................... 58, 59 Twin-screw extruder gearboxes ............................. 11 Twin-screw extruders ...................... 58, 59, 120, 142 Twin-screw extruders ............................................ 81 Twin-screw extrusion lines...................... 63, 90, 167 Twin-screw extrusion plant machinery .............. 251 Twin-screw extrusion plants ............................... 230 Two-colour cane plants ....................................... 218 Two-layer blown films .................................... 14, 21 Two-platen injection moulding machines .......... 245 Two-stage reciprocating air-compressors ............ 248 UHMWPE products .......................................... 161 Ultrasonic flow meters .......................................... 18 Underwater palletisers ......................................... 205 Underwater pelletising systems ........................... 240 Universal controller ............................................. 189 Universal input temperature scanners ................. 247 Universal master batches ....................................... 12 Universal quick mixers ........................................ 240 Universal testing equipment ........................... 22, 72 UPS systems........................................................ 147 Utility support equipment................................... 147 UV & PU master batches ..................................... 12 UV stabilised & pre-colored special compounds .. 71 UV stabilisers ...................................................COC Vacuum dryers ................................................. 108 Vacuum forming machines ................................. BC Vacuum loaders ................................................. FGF Vacuum pumps & systems .................................. 105 Vacuum pumps............................................ 237, 243 Valve seats ........................................................... 200 Vane dampers ...................................................... 237 Variable displacement pumps ................................ 43 Variable inlet vane dampers ................................ 231 VDMA cylinders ................................................ 145 Ventilators ........................................................... 234 Vertical handle clamps ........................................ 244 Vertical injection moulding machines................. 242 Vertical machining centres ............................ 53, 245 Vibratory screening systems................................ 263 Vibroscreens .................................................... 23, 39 Vision sensors ......................................................... 9 Volumetric dosing units ...................................... 219 Warehouses...................................................... 133 Washing lines for post consumer waste .............. 231 Waste plastics recycling reprocessing .................. 161 Water & soft drinks for pet bottles .................... 121 Water chillers ...................................................... 219 Water jetting machines ....................................... 105 Water-cooled chillers ............................................ 41 Water-cooled reciprocating air-compressors ....... 248 Water-ring vacuum pumps ................................. 237 Welding guns ...................................................... 217 WFR .................................................................. FIC White master batches .......................... 12, 31, COC Winders............................................................... 218 Windsors ............................................................... 33 Wire & cable plants............................................ 230 Wire & cables ....................................................... 55 Wire EDM ........................................................... 93 Wire rope hoists ................................................. 232 Wires ................................................................... 243 Wollastanite........................................................... 91 Wood & plastic products .................................... 161 Worm reducer gearboxes............................... 51, 172 Worm reducers .............................................. 51, 172 Woven sack tape plants for PP/HDPE.............. 218 Yarn machinery ..............................................143

FGF - Front Gate Fold, FIC - Front Inside Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, BGF - Back Gate Fold, BC - Back Cover

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 257


LIST OF ADVERTISERS Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

A & D Instruments India Pvt Ltd

72

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

T: +91-124-471-5555 E: k-newseela@aanddindia.in W: www.aandd.jp Aawadkrupa Industries

143

T: +91-278-2443959 E: info@akiropes.ocm W: www.akiropes.com AB Diachem Systems Pvt Ltd

217

T: +91-11-25155456 E: sales@scalewatcher.in W: www.scalewatcher.in Adinath Controls Pvt Ltd

247

T: +91-2764-286573 E: info@adinathcontrols.com W: www.adinathcontrols.com Adroit Control Engineers

157

T: +91-11-47600700 E: sales@adroitcontrol.com W: www.adroitcontrol.com Aerodry Plastics Automations Pvt Ltd

199,223,227,257,259

146

T: +91-250-2454915 E: hvt@aeromec.in W: www.aeromec.in Alok Masterbatches Ltd

35

263

T: +91-40- 23550551 E: info@aviadditives.com W: www.aviadditives.com B J S Engineers

251

T: +91-9832926696 E: bjsengg@yahoo.co.in W: www.bjsengg.com Battenfeld-Cincinnati Austria Gmbh

151

T: +49-8662-630 E: karlheinz.weinmann@brueckner.com W: www.brueckner.com

T: +91-22-28488742 E: jshah@esenpro.com W: www.esenpro.com

Buss Asia Pacific Pte. Ltd.

129

125

Chamunda Equipments

244

T: +91-40-2436 1499 E: info@blendcolours.com W: www.blendcolours.com Our consistent advertisers

258 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Ferromatik Milacron India Pvt Ltd

T: +91-79-27522437 E: clamp@chamundaequip.com W: www.chamundaequip.com

T: +91-79-25890081 E: salesfmi@milacron.com W: www.milacronindia.com

Chi Chang Machinery Enterprise Co., Ltd. 209

Flu Tech

T: +886-6-261-2121 E: johnny@extrusion.com.tw W: www.extrusion.com.tw

T: +91-79-40084051 E: flutech@yahoo.com W: www.flutechindia.com

Chuan Lih Fa Machinery Works Co., Ltd. 159

Corvaglia Group

121

D R International

201

239

116

Fluid Energy Controls Inc

25

154

240

Forwell Precision Machinery Co., Ltd.

211

T: +886-4-834-5196 E: forwell@forwell.com; forwell@forwellnb. com; sales@forwellnb.com W: www.forwell.com FOSTAG Formenbau AG

123

Freeze Tech Equipments Pvt Ltd

244

T: +91-44-42152387 E: info@freezetechequip.com W: www.freezetechequip.com

Dongguan Alfa Automation Machinery Limited

136

T: +86-769-8318-0326 E: info@alfarobot.com W: www.alfarobot.com

Fuji Electric India Pvt Ltd

83

T: +91-22-40104870 E: pinal-mehta@fein.fujielectric.com W: www.fujielectric.co.in 179,207

Gardner Denver Engineered Pro (I)

105

E: info.ahm@gardnerdenver.com W: www.gardnerdenver.com

Elpie Engineers Pvt Ltd

237

Gem Equipments Ltd

87

T: +91-422-3267800 E: sales@gemindia.com W: www.gemindia.com

ENAIVIV Machinery Industrial Co., Ltd.

Endeavour Engineering

165

T: +41-52-742-2520 E: mail@fostag.com W: www.fostag.com

Dirco Polymers Pvt Ltd

Electronica Plastic Machines Ltd

101

T: +91-44-42083536 E: sales@fecindia.com W: www.fecindia.com

137

T: +886-6-254-4328 E: enaivivs@ms19.hinte.net W: www.enaiviv.com.tw 12

Expo Centre Sharjah

Pg No

T: +91-22-67778899 E: sales@plastivisionarabia.org W: www.plastivisionarabia.org

T: +65-6837-3768 E: info@busscorp.com W: www.busscorp.com

T: +91-2827-294522 E: info@elpie.in W: www.elpie.in

T: +91-22-25311299 E: ccdc.india@bayer.com W: www.bayer.co.in Blend Colours Pvt Ltd

Essential Power Transmission Pvt Lt

T: +91-22-32531959 E: vkt@electronicapmd.com

T: +91-098207 01960 E: shah.d@battenfeld-cincinnati.com W: www.battenfeld-cincinnati.com Bayer Materialscience Pvt Ltd

Bruckner Maschinenbau GmbH & Co., KG 233

T: +91-124-4367450 E: ajay.kapoor@dirco.in 31

Essen Speciality Films Pvt. Ltd T: +91-2827- 252021 E: sales@essenspeciality.com W: www.essenspeciality.com

T: +91-11-45061900 E: dr@drinternational.com W: www.drinternational.com

T: +91-79-22811879 E: info@ashwinengineersindia.com W: www.ashwinengineersindia.com AVI Additives Pvt Ltd

36

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

T: +91-44-43009610 E: s.sriram@boge.com W: www.boge.in

T: +41-71-973-7777 E: m.buff@corvaglia.ch W: www.corvaglia.ch

T: +91-11-41612244 E: sales@alokindustries.com W: www.alokmasterbatches.com Ash Win Engineers

Boge Compressed Air System

T: +886-6-253-2111 E: clf@clf.com.tw W: www.clf.com.tw

T: +91-120-4766777 E: info@aerodry.com W: www.aerodry.com Aeromec Marketing Co Pvt Ltd

Pg No

Glaves Corporation

99

T: +91-141-2460324 E: sales@glaves.biz W: www.glaves.biz 200

T: +91-79-65123263 E: endeavour.engineering2000@gmail.com W: www.endeavourengineering.com

Gneuss Kunststofftechnik GmbH

117

T: +49-57-315-3070 E: gneuss@gneuss.com W: www.gneuss.com

FIC - Front Inside Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, BC - Back Cover


LIST OF ADVERTISERS Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details Gujarat Machinery Pvt Ltd

Pg No 109

T: +91-79-29295988 E: growth@gujaratmachinery.com W: www.gujaratmachinery.com Heattrans Equipments Pvt Ltd

230

231

232

T: +91-79-22778675 E: ritesh434@gmail.com W: www.coolingblower.com Hikon Innovating Plastic Teconologies

81

T: +91-11-25410553 E: harvinderhk@gmail.com W: www.hikonindia.com Himalayan Packaging Industries Pvt Ltd

89

T: +91-120 4269355 E: info@himalayangroup.co.in W: www.himalayangroup.co.in Hinds Machineries

247

Hindustan Plastic And Machine Corporation 63 T: ‘+91-11-25473361 E: poonam@hindustanplastics.com W: www.hindustanplastics.com T: +91-11-25473361 E: poonam@hindustanplastics.com W: www.hindustanplastics.com 147

245

BGF

52

167,250

T: +1800-200-4444 E: pr@indiamart.com W: www.indiamart.com Ingeco Gears Pvt Ltd

172

T: +91-2717-651551 E: info@ingecogears.com W: www.ingecogears.com Instron India Pvt Ltd

22

T: +91-44-28293888 E: instronindia@instron.com W: www.instron.com 213

T: +91-9737992000 E: sales@ishan-intl.com W: www.ishan-intl.com 16

T: +91-2646-222163 E: Iinfo@jpextrusiontech.com W: www.jpextrusiontech.com 177

T: +91-22-25955678 E: info@jagmohan.com W: www.jagmohan.com 139

T: +886-5-237-6175 E: sales@jennchong.com.tw W: www.jennchong.com.tw Jiangsu Lianguan Science & Technoogy Development Co.,Ltd.

161

T: +86-512-5857-8000 E: ceo@lianguan.cn W: www.lianguan.cn

T: +91-22-25706316 E: snair@husky.ca W: www.husky.ca T: +91-2764-291022 E: icemake1@gmail.com W: www.icemakeindia.com

IndiaMART InterMESH Limited

Jenn Chong Plastics Machinery Works Co., Ltd.

T: +91-9825739634 E: j.v.papaiyawala@huarong.com W: www.huarong.com.tw

IC ICE Make Refrigeration Pvt Ltd

145

T: +91-80-66246600 E: info@imtex.in W: www.imtex.in

Jagmohan Pla-Mach Pvt Ltd

T: +91-79-23827180 E: v_jaikumar@hirel.net W: www.hirel.com

Husky Injection Molding Systems P L

IMTEX

J P Extrusiontech Limited

Hindustan Plastic And Machine Corporation63,90

Huarong Plastic Machinery Co Ltd

IMI Norgren Herion Pvt Ltd

Ishan International

T: +91-124-28124921 E: hinds@rediffmail.com

Hi-Rel Electronics Pvt Ltd

175

T: +91-120 4089500 E: enquiry@norgren.co.in W: www.norgren.com

T: +49-6226-9320 E: Siegfried.engel@herbold.com W: www.herbold.com Hetal Industries

IDMC Limited

Pg No

T: +91-2692-225399 E: idmc@idmc.coop W: www.idmc.coop

T: +91-79-25840105 E: info@heattrans.com W: www.heattrans.com Herbold Meckesheim GmbH

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

241

Jiangxi Tikon Titanium Co., Ltd. T: +86-794-835-5555 E: yxb@tikon.com.cn W: www.tikon.com.cn

135

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details Jing Cheng Mold Machinery Co., Ltd T: +86-576-8461-0001 E: jc@jingcheng.com W: www.jc-times.com Jon Wai Machinery Works Co., Ltd. T: +886-2-2595-4867 E: infor.tw@jonwai.com.tw W: www.jonwai.com.tw JR Group T: +91-24937033 E: jrgroup@jrmehta.com W: www.jrgroups.com Jyoti Cnc Automation Pvt Ltd T: +91-2827-287081 E: info@jyoti.co.in W: www.jyoti.co.in K P L International Ltd T: ‘+91-11-43606200 E: rohit@kplintl.com W: www.kplintl.com Kabra Extrusion Technik Ltd T: +91-22-2673 4822 E: sunil@kolsitegroup.com W: www.kolsite.com Kody Equipments Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-65131345 E: sales@kody.co.in W: www.kody.co.in Konark Plastomech Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-22891670 E: sales@konarkplastomech.com W: www.konarkplastomech.com Kreyenborg Group T: +49-251-214-050 E: k.engelhardt@kreyenborg.de W: www.kreyenborg-group.com L & T Plastics Machinery Ltd T: +91-44-26812000 E: handigolg@larsentoubro.com W: www.larsentoubro.com Lanxess India Pvt Ltd T: +91-22-21729200 E: rekha.kumar@lanxess.com W: www.lanxess.in Larsen & Toubro Ltd T: +91-22-6752 5656 E: ss-ccd@lth.ltindia.com W: www.larsentoubro.com Lohia Starlinger Ltd T: +91-11-30641770 E: prom.lsl@lohiagroup.com W: www.lohiagroup.com

Pg No 264

141

57

53

107

14,21

164

77

240

FGF

185

113

163

January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 259


LIST OF ADVERTISERS Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details Loxim Industries Limited

Pg No

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

54

T: +91-2717-308000 E: info@loxim.com W: www.loxim.com M G Engineers

186

131

33

T: +91-79-22821527 E: nmtg@nmtgindia.com W: www.nmtgindia.com Nu-Vu Conair Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-25841181 E: nuvu@conairgroup.com W: www.conairgroup.com

189

T: +91-79-26870825 E: info@mifasystems.com W: www.mifasystems.com Mona Chem Additives Pvt Ltd

97

242

T: +886-3-318-0090 E: davidwu@multiplas.com.tw; mindy@ multiplas.com.tw W: www.multiplas.com.tw Multispan Instruments Co

193

23

Pelletroneurope GmbH

120

T: +49-7520-956-62-0 E: m.huber@pelletroneurope.com W: www.pelletroneurope.com Piovan India Pvt Ltd

219

Plast Alloys India Ltd

71

Plast India Foundation

103

T: +91-22-26832911 E: lalit@plstemart.com W: www.plastindia.org 238

Plastiblends India Ltd

COC

T: +91-22-67205200 E: rsd@kolsitegroup.com W: www.plastiblendsindia.com

T: +886-6-201-7773 E: a2546200@ms22.hinet.net W: www.nyi.com.tw Neejtech India (Braunform)

51

T: +91-11-47717111 E: corporate@plastalloys.com W: www.plastalloys.com

T: +91-79-25840374 E: info@naroto.com W: www.naroto.com Nan Yun Industrial Co.,Ltd

Panchal Machinery

T: +91-22-28560450 E: amit.bajaj@piovnindia.com W: www.piovan.com

T: +91-79-22770865 E: marketing@multispanindia.com W: www.multispanindia.com N A Corporation

9

T: +91-80-40726400 E: in_enquiry@ap.omron.com W: www.omron-ap.com T: +91-79-25620953 E: info@panchalmachinery.in W: www.panchalmachinery.in

T: +91-261-2894847 E: sales@monachem.com W: www.monachem.com Multiplas Enginery Co., Ltd.

10

T: +91-79-22902200 E: oceanextrusions@gmail.com W: www.oceanextrusions.com Omron Automation Pvt. Ltd.

108

232

65

Ocean Extrusions 229

T: +91-120-4243862 E: rahuldeep@mass.motherson.com Mifa Systems

203

NMTG Mechtrans Techniques Pvt Ltd

T: +43-2630-35706 E: gregor.goebel@maplan.at W: www.maplan.at Matsui Technologies India Ltd

Nidhi Poly Plast

20

T: +91-79-66309800 E: sales@mamata.com W: www.be-ca.com Maplan Mashchinen u. techn. Anlagen Planungs-u. Fertigungs-GmbH

205

T: +91-79-25630319 E: nidhiplast@gmail.com W: www.nidhiplastindia.com

T: +91-265-2353886 E: info@madhu-group.com W: www.madhu-group.com Mamata Brampton Engineering

Neoplast Engg Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-25830602 E: info@neoplastindia.com W: www.neoplastindia.com

T: +41-44-278-8200 E: DianaVogel@maag.com W: www.maag.com Madhu Machines & Systems Pvt Ltd

19

T: +91-9909974224 E: contact@niigataindia.com W: www.niigataindia.com

T: +91-79-25840404 E: mgengineers@hotmail.com W: www.mgengineers,in Maag Pump Systems AG

Neejtech India (Nigata)

Pg No

37

T: +91-79-26561312 E: info@neejtech.com W: www.neejtech.com Our consistent advertisers

260 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Plastic Technologies T: +91 9322215410 E: pvs.prasad@plastictechnologies.com W: www.plastictechnologies.com

75

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Poly Mechplast Machines Ltd 261 T: +91-265-2631211 E: goldcoin@polymechplast.com W: WWW.polymachplast.com Polylink Polymers (India) Ltd 248 T: +91-79-26427800 E: rpg@polylinkpolymers.com W: www.polylinkpolymers.com Polyplastics Marketing (India) Pvt Ltd Belly Band T: +91-22-67587668 E: tushar.birje@polyplastics.com W: www.polyplastics.com Power Build Ltd 182 T: +91-2692-231070 E: infopbl@elecon.com W: www.pbl.co.in Prasad GWK Cooltech Pvt Ltd 39 T: +91-79-25830112 E: plastics@prasadgroup.com W: www.prasadgroup.com Premium Transmission Ltd 79 T: +91-20-66314100 W: www.premiumtransmission.com Presto Stantest Pvt Ltd 61 T: +91-129-4085000 E: gaurav@prestogroup.com W: www.prestogroup.com Procon Technologies Pvt Ltd 18 T: +91-79-27492566 E: info@procon.co.in W: www.procon.co.in Qingdao Friend Plastic Extrusion Technology Co.,Ltd 134 T: +86-532-8662-2399 E: info@fet66.com W: www.fet66.com R R Plast Extrusions Pvt Ltd 191 T: +91-22-42461500 E: info@rrplast.com W: www.rrplast.com Raj Engineering Works 229 T: +91-20-65104541 E: raj.engg.wks@gmail.com W: www.rajengg.net Rajoo Engineers Ltd BC T: +91-2827-252701 E: kcdoshi@rajoo.com W: www.rajoo.com Remica Platics Machinery Manufactur 218 T: +91-79-25712741 E: remicaplastic@dataone.in W: www.remicaplastics.com Reynold India Pvt Ltd T: +91-120-4664000 E: v.bali@reynoldindia.com W: www.reynoldindia.com Rockwell Automation T: +91-120-4671694 E: dghosh@ra.rockwell.com W: www.rockwellautomation.com

41

149

FIC - Front Inside Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, BC - Back Cover


LIST OF ADVERTISERS Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details S&T Engineers

Pg No

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

93

T: +91-422-2590810 E: stycm@stengineers.com W: www.stengineers.com Sacmi Engineering India Pvt Ltd

195

T: +91-7600003968 E: sales@negribossi.in W: www.negribossi.com Sai Machine Tools Pvt Ltd

66

T: +91-731-4081200 E: mail@saimachinetools.com W: www.saimachinetools.com Sai Thermoformers

73

T: +91-11-32913304 E: info@saithermoformers.com W: www.saithermoformers.com Saimona Air-Mech Pvt. Ltd.

248

T: +91-79-22870666 E: sales@saimona.com W: www.saimona.com Samson Extrusion Ind Pvt Ltd

46

T: +91-22-23436320 E: samson7@vsnl.com W: www.samson-grp.com Sanity International

183

T: +91-79-65227458 E: info@sanityindia.com W: www.sanityindia.com SCJ Plastics Ltd T: +91-11-25439950 E: vball@scjgroup.net W: www.scjindia.com SENSORMATE AG T: +41-52-242-1818 W: www.sensormate.ch

85

119

Shanghai Alpha Machinery Co., Ltd.

132

T: +86-21-6695-4579 E: alphawu@alpha-mach.com; assistant@alpha-mach.com W: www.alpha-mach.com Shanghai Forward Machinery Co.,Ltd

133

T: +86-21-5990-8899 E: forward_sale@exalt.com.tw W: www.forwardsh.com Shanghai Zhaohui Pressure Apparatus Co.,Ltd 134 T: +86-21-6775-5188 E: info@zhyqsensor.com W: www.sinosensor.com Shine Well Machinery Co., Ltd.

140

T: +886-6-356-3470 E: shinewell@shinwell.com.tw W: www.shinewell.com.tw Shini Plastics Technologies India Pvt Ltd

246

T: +91-250-3021166 E: jnbhat@shiniindia.com W: www.shini.com Shree Sai Cable Industries

243

T: +91-79-40085351 E: saicable@yahoo.in Our consistent advertisers

262 Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2012

Pg No

Shree Siddhivinayak Industries 243 T: +91-22-28458372 E: minivacs@hotmail.com W: www.minivacpumps.com Shri Ram Polytech 55 T: +91-9717005342 E: priti.nainwalchandola@shrirampolytech.com W: www.shrirampolytech.com Shuenn Jaan Machinery Co., Ltd. 241 T: +886-6-233-9590 E: dearday@ms15.hinet.net W: www.soongiant.com.tw SIMONA AG 119 T: +49-6752-14-997 E: eric.schoenel@simona.de W: www.simona.de Society of Plastics Industry - NPE 249 W: www.npe.org Sreelakshmi Traders 234 T: +91-44-24343343 E: sreelakshmitraders@gmail.com W: www.sreelakshmitraders.com Sri Sai Plasto Tech 43 T: +91-44-42994365 E: sspt_plastics@live.in W: www.srisaiplastotech.com Steer Engineering Pvt Ltd 58, 59 T: +91-80-23723309 E: info@steerworld.com W: www.steerworld.com Sun Lung Gear Works Co., Ltd. 138 T: +886-6-263 9969 E: david@slgear.com.tw W: www.slgear.com.tw Supermac Machinery 197 T: +91-9998040433 E: info@supermachinery.com W: www.supermacmachinery.com Suresh Engineering Works 234 T: +91-731-2527872 E: suresen@aittelmail.in W: www.sureshengg.com Tagma 130 E: mumbai@tagmaindia.org W: www.tagmaindia.org Techno Industries 232 T: +91-79-25830742 E: info@technoind.com W: www.technoind.com The Indian Electric Co 47 T: +91-20-24474303 E: icemktg@indianelectric.com W: www.indianelectric.com Toshiba Machine (India) Pvt Ltd 95 T: ‘+91-11-43291111 E: dineshelija@toshiba-machine.co.in W: www.toshiba-machine.co.jp Twist Engineering Works 230 T: +91-79-25842878 E: tiwst24@rediffmail.com W: www.twistplasticmachinery.com

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Unimark (Staubli Faverges Sca)

111

T: +91-22-25506712 E: infomum@unimark.in W: www.unimark.in Unimark (Arburg Gmbh)

27

T: +91-22-25506712 E: infomum@unimark.in W: www.unimark.in Unimark (Maguire)

69

T: +91-22-25506712 E: infomum@unimark.in W: www.unimark.in Vacunair Engineering Co Pvt Ltd

237

T: +91-79-22910771 E: info@vacunair.com W: www.vacunair.com Wacker Metroark Chemicals Pvt Ltd

231,233

T: +91-22-42365500 E: aditya.nawalgaria@wacker.com W: www.wacker.com Windsor Machines Limited

187

T: +91-79-25841591 E: sales.imm@windsormachines.com W: www.windsormachines.com Witte Pumps & Technologies

115

T: +91-11-41613643 E: witte@goodiesons.com W: www.witte-pumps.de Wittmann Battenfeld India Pvt Ltd

FIC

T: +91-44-42077009 E: info@wittman-group.in W: www.wittmann-group.com Wolkem India Limited

91

T: +91-294-2415111 E: praveer@wolkem.com W: www.wolkem.com Woojin Selex Co Ltd

29

T: +91-9941342299 E: ryanrhee@gmail.com W: www.woojinselex.com Xaloy Asia (Thailand)Ltd

BIC

T: +91-79-27541971 E: m.sanghvi@th.xaloy.com W: www.xaloy.com Xtreme Machines

181

T: +91-11-28343195 E: rubplast@gmail.com W: www.xtrememachines.in Yann Bang Electrical Machinery Co.,Ltd.

169

T: +886-4-2271-6999 E: yb@yannbang.com; debby1205@hotmail. com; judy.w@yannbang.com W: www.yannbang.com Zambello Riduttori Group

11

T: +39-0331-307-616 E: info@zambello.it W: www.zambello.it

FIC - Front Inside Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, BC - Back Cover


Modern Plastics & Polymers

January 2012


Modern Plastics & Polymers

January 2012


Reg No: MH/MR/WEST/234/2012-2014 RNI No: MAHENG / 2008 / 25265 Licence to Post at Mumbai Patrika Channel Sorting OfďŹ ce, Mumbai GPO., Mumbai 400 001. Date Of Posting 1st & 2nd Of Every Month / English & Monthly. Date Of Publication: 28th Of Every Month.

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Supplement January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | Supplement January 2012


Supplement January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | Supplement January 2012


Supplement January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | Supplement January 2012


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Modern Plastics & Polymers | Supplement January 2012


Supplement January 2012 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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Reg No: MH/MR/WEST/234/2012-2014 RNI No: MAHENG / 2008 / 25265 Licence to Post at Mumbai Patrika Channel Sorting OfďŹ ce, Mumbai GPO., Mumbai 400 001. Date Of Posting 1st & 2nd Of Every Month / English & Monthly. Date Of Publication: 28th Of Every Month.

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Modern Plastics & Polymers - January 2012