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EDITORIAL

The dawn of a new decade

A

s the curtains on the first decade of the 21st century come down, it is time to look back, introspect, plan for the future and move ahead. What a transformational decade (especially the last 2-3 years) has it been for the country and the world! Some of the buzzwords that hogged the headlines in the recent past include slowdown, transformation, diversification, rebound, growth, among others. It will be apt to note here that amid this gloomy phase, there were select trendsetters in the industry who not only believed in the paraphrase ‘Do not waste a crisis’, but also were able to successfully translate the crisis to a window of opportunity. Having said that and not withstanding its share of challenges, the year 2010 was an inflection point for the Indian plastics & polymers industry and the economy, in general. Case in point is the global focus on India as a key growth market and a marked shift in the approach - not as a mere vendor but as a strategic partner. In other words, it signifies the country’s leverage not only on better cost proposition, but also lean and efficient business model as well as faster time-to-market capability.

However, ripple effects of global economies still remain a reality today. Without any clear and strong signs of world-wide business resurgence, it will be pragmatic to have a cautious outlook for the near future. Also, 2011 can be the beginning of a phase, wherein opportunities would be new and would call for greater focus on innovation and novel models of growth. Hopefully, the surging economy, coupled with timely policy implementation, will go a long way in transforming global as well as Indian businesses. Believe, you will find enough value while referring to this special edition with an eclectic mix of the past, present and future of the plastics & polymers industry, as much as we liked putting it together. Of course, we will be keen to hear your opinions, feedback, etc. Here’s wishing you a Great New Year!

Editorial Advisory Board A E Ladhabhoy Plastics Technologist

Dr Sushil K Verma Former Director General, CIPET

Dr Swapan K Dhara Regional Technical Head, Basell Polyolefins India Pvt Ltd

Mohan K Jain MD, Indoplast & past president, AIPMA

P P Kharas Chairman, Ecoplast

Raman M Patel Chairman, Industrial Products Mfg Co

Vijay Merchant President, Polycraft

Manas R Bastia

Editor manas@infomedia18.in Mumbai (Rahul): Tel: 022-3003 4640 Fax: 022-3003 4499 Email: spmktg@infomedia18.in New Delhi (Mukesh/Surendra): Tel: 011-6630 3278 Fax: 011-2332 7884 Email: sipd.delhi@infomedia18.in Pune (Rohit): Tel: 020-3322 3309 Fax: 020-3322 3322 Email: sipd.pune@infomedia18.in Surat (Sunil): Tel: 0261-263 0181 Fax: 0261-263 0974 Email: surat@infomedia18.in Vadodara (Samarth): Tel: 0265-392 6500/1 Fax: 0265-235 6013 Email: vadodara@infomedia18.in

Editor Manas R Bastia Senior Features Writer Beverley Lewis Senior Correspondent Shivani Mody (Bengaluru) Features Writer KTP Radhika Jinoy (Delhi), Annabel Dsouza, Kymberlee Fernandes Correspondent Geetha Jayaraman (Delhi), Anwesh Koley (Delhi) Copy Desk Marcilin Madathil Products Desk Abha Mishra Chief Photographer Mexy Xavier Design Sharad Bharekar Production Pravin Koyande, Dnyaneshwar Goythale,Vikas Bobhate, Ravikumar Potdar, Ravi Salian, Sanjay Shelar, Lovey Fernandes, Pukha Dhawan, Varsha Nawathe, Abhay Borkar, Akshata Rane Marketing & Branding Jagruti Shah, Ganesh Mahale CEO-Publishing Sandeep Khosla Associate Vice President Sudhanva Jategaonkar

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14798/2005. Views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of Infomedia 18 Ltd. Infomedia 18 Ltd reserves the right to use the information published herein in any manner whatsoever. While every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the information published in this edition, neither Infomedia 18 Ltd nor any of its employees accept any responsibility for any errors or

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January 2011 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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CONTENTS

72

28

Highlights of 2010 - National

34

Highlights of 2010 - Asia

38

Highlights of 2010 - World Event Focus: Plastivision India 2011

58

Curtain Raiser

62

Industry Insights

Plastivision India 2011: Towards global opportunities, glorious future Indian plastics & polymers sector: An optimistic future beckons... Vivek Patel, Consultant

68

Roundtable

72

Eco Insights

Surging demand for plastics: Is India ready for the challenge?

Bioplastics: The ‘green’ alternative Perses Bilimoria, CEO and Founder, Earthsoul India Pvt Ltd

91

76 80

Products Showcase India Taiwan

Leaders Speak 84

Christian Velasquez, Global Market Director, Pressure Sensitive Industry, Specialty Chemicals Business, Dow Corning Corporation

91

Blown film extrusion: A ‘bag’ full of opportunities

96

Plastics in automotives: Off the beaten driveway…

Sector Watch Market Trends Material Corner 102

96

Fluoropolymers: Dependable for demanding applications David Seiler and Mandar Amrute, Arkema Inc

Injection Zone 106

Powder injection moulding: Creating complex parts with precision Y R Anand, Partner, Unimark

Case Study 112

Capillary rheometers: Resolving extrusion bottlenecks Dr Anand S Tadas, Product Specialist – Rheology, Malvern Aimil Instruments Pvt Ltd

Technofocus 114

Compression injection moulding: Beyond the conventional Siddhartha Roy, Consultant, RoyPlasTech

Management Mantras 118

Money matters: Tackling root causes of cost M Hariharan, Director, Savoir Faire Management Consultancy Pvt Ltd

118

Preview 122

Advancing towards seamless: Material handling

Report 130

Engineering Expo Pune 2010: Creating a perfect trade ecosystem

134

Engineering Expo Ahmedabad 2010: Taking the triumph forward

138

Frost & Sullivan 2010 India Excellence in Chemicals, Materials and Food Awards: Inspiring performance, imparting knowledge

140

LANXESS Rubber Day: Driving safety and sustainability

142

AutoPlas 2010: Expanding avenues for collaboration

REGUL AR SECTIONS Editorial......................... 25

Product Update............. 146

National News............... 44

Product Inquiry............. 159

Asia News ..................... 48

Advertisement Inquiry........ 161

World News................... 52

Product Index............... 164

Events Calendar........... 127

Advertisers’ List ............ 172

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

Details on page no. 125-126, 143-144 Cover photo courtesy : Rajoo Engineers Ltd

Highlights of Next Issue Sector Watch : Packaging Market Trends : Polymer Compounding Note: ` stands for Indian rupee, $ stands for US dollar and £ stands for UK pound, unless mentioned otherwise


HIGHLIGHTS 0F 2010 - NATIONAL

Awards Rajoo Engineers felicitated

(May) Rajoo Engineers Ltd was conferred the IPMMI – Machinery Design Innovation Recognition (IMDIR) award 2009 by the Institute of Packaging Machinery Manufacturer’s of India (IPMMI) for its vacuum forming machine. The award is given for uniqueness of the design and development of packaging machinery. It belonged to the category of ‘machinery for packaging operations’.

Plastiblends India Ltd receives DSIR certification

(September) Plastiblends India Ltd was awarded the DSIR Certificate for Recognised In-House R&D Facility. The company is the first masterbatch manufacturing and exporting company from India to achieve this honour. By meeting all necessary criteria to achieve this certification, PBI has shown commitment towards excellence in the domestic and global market.

Collaboration LyondellBasell inks manufacturing deal with Hyundai Plastics

Reliance inks pact with Russian firm

(January) LyondellBasell Industries has signed a tolling and marketing agreement with Hyundai Engineering Plastics (HEP) for manufacturing two latest-generation compounds — Hostacom and Hifax. The products would be manufactured at the HEP plant in Chennai and LyondellBasell would have exclusive marketing rights for these products.

(June) Reliance Industries Ltd has formed a joint venture with Russian petrochemical firm SIBUR to make butyl rubber. RIL said butyl rubber would be produced at its integrated petrochemical site at Jamnagar in Gujarat. SIBUR will provide proprietary technology for butyl rubber polymerisation and its finishing, while RIL will supply monomers & its infrastructure and utilities.

LANXESS India signs MoU with ICT

Rajoo and Wonderpack join hands

Kemrock and DSM to manufacture specialty resins in India

Rajoo Engineers collaborates with Bausano & Figli

(June) LANXESS India, the specialty chemicals company, has entered into a collaboration with Institute of Chemical Technology (ICT), Mumbai, for industrial research and scientific projects. The subjects would include process improvement of existing production lines, process development of new products, equipment design and development of catalysts.

(December) Kemrock Industries & Exports Ltd and DSM Composite Resins AG have signed a 51:49 JV. This agreement pertains to the manufacture of unsaturated polyester and vinyl ester specialty resins in India. Through this alliance, Kemrock will fortify its expertise in composite manufacturing, while DSM will strengthen its presence in India.

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

(July) Rajoo Engineers Ltd and Wonderpack Industries Pvt Ltd have come together to provide end-to-end solutions in sheet extrusion and thermoforming. The industry will now be offered sheet extrusion with in-line thermoforming, special purpose thick walled vacuum forming, continuous thermoforming for thick wall applications, automatic vacuum/blister making machines, shrink wrapping, etc.

(December) Rajoo Engineers has entered the Indian pipe and profile extrusion machinery segment through its JV with Italy-based Bausano & Figli. This JV, christened Rajoo Bausano Extrusion Pvt Ltd, will be based in Rajkot and commence operations by 2011. It will also include wood composite profile lines for the Indian market.


HIGHLIGHTS 0F 2010 - NATIONAL

Investments & Expansions SABIC Innovative Plastics augments capacity

UFLEX announces global investment plans

Baerlocher increases production capacity in India

A. Schulman preparing for the Indian adventure

(January) SABIC Innovative Plastics has announced that it has augmented production capacity at its specialty film and sheet facility in Vadodara. It has already increased Lexan* polycarbonate (PC) sheet production with two new, state-of-the-art extrusion lines to boost capacity. These are designed for fast assembly and overall efficiency.

(September) Baerlocher plans to double its capacity for the production of PVC heat stabilisers at its plant in Dewas, India by adding an additional 7,000 tonne capacity with an investment of about Euro 1 million. This will help the continued growth of irrigation and water management projects throughout the country.

(August) UFLEX Ltd has announced its aggressive business and investment plans of more than $ 250 million for the next two years. UFLEX is likely to start production in a state-of-the-art unit in Egypt, the second phase of which is expected to be commissioned in 2011-12. UFLEX will also expand the capacity of its Mexico plant by June 2011.

(December) A. Schulman Inc will open its first Indian plant by the end of 2011. It will begin with a single Farrel continuous mixing line for additive masterbatches. This new plant would be located in Vadodara, with about 25 employees. This will enable the company to leverage on India’s fast-growing flexible packaging sector.

Mergers & Acquisitions Dorf Ketal acquires specialty catalysts business from DuPont

Atul Ltd acquires Polygrip

Huntsman to acquire chemical biz of Laffans

Bilcare acquires Ineos Films

(March) Dorf Ketal Chemicals (India) Pvt Ltd acquired the specialty catalysts business of DuPont Chemicals and Fluoroproducts. This acquisition includes Tyzor® titanates & zirconates and Avitex® hydrocarbon surfactants & antistatic agents. Dupont will assist Dorf Ketal with technology transfer in start up facility and product supply.

(September) Huntsman Corp has announced acquisition of the chemicals business of Ankleshwar-based Laffans Petrochemicals Ltd. This acquisition will boost Huntsman’s sales in India to about $ 260 million, or 3 per cent of total sales. The company is developing its chemicals business in Asia to capitalise on the region’s rapid growth.

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

(July) Atul Ltd, a Lalbhai Group Company has acquired Polygrip – one of the leading rubber & PU-based adhesive brands in India. This acquisition will give Atul a ready access to rubber and PU-based adhesives market in India. The synergetic acquisition by Atul - a large manufacturer with growing marketing network will boost confidence of the existing customers of Polygrip.

(September) Ineos Group has agreed to sell its global films business to the Indian company Bilcare Ltd, for about $ 132 million. The deal, which is to take place under German law between subsidiaries Ineos Films AG of Staufen, Germany and the newly formed Bilcare AG, will include only the films units of Ineos. The group’s PVC compounds and Barex resin units will continue to operate as part of Ineos.


HIGHLIGHTS 0F 2010 - NATIONAL

New Facility Husky’s new facility in Chennai

(January) Husky Injection Molding Systems recently announced a new investment in its global network with a new facility in Chennai. The new 3,300 sq m manufacturing facility will support Husky’s hot runner business in the region by providing local hot runner and mould refurbishing to reduce lead times.

British Petroleum to set up 1mt petrochemical plant in Gujarat

(May) British Petroleum plans to set up a 1 metric tonne petrochemical plant in India. The plant will come up in Gujarat, at an investment of ` 3,500 crore. The company is currently negotiating with oil refiners in India for the purchase of paraxylene as feedstock to make purified terephthalic acid

Helvoet Pharma to build facility in Pune

(April) Helvoet Pharma NV, manufacturers of rubber and aluminium/plastic closures for pharmaceutical packaging, is planning its first unit in Asia. The factory in Pune, Maharashtra will become operational in 2012. The cost of the project will be around $ 19.1 million.

LANXESS to build new production units for engineering plastics

(July) LANXESS is set to build compounding facilities with a capacity of 20,000 metric tonne/year for the production of engineering plastics Durethan and Pocan at Jhagadia, Gujarat. This emphasises the committment of LANXESS to maintain its growth strategy in the BRIC countries.

Novel Technology Time Technoplast announces launch of high-tech composite

(February) Time Technoplast Ltd announced the launch of its high tech composite cylinders for LPG in the Indian market. These are aesthetically appealing and explosion proof that can withstand three times higher pressure before leaking locally.

Kabra Extrusiontechnik develops LLDPE drip irrigation tube extrusion line

(April) Kabra Extrusiontechnik Ltd has developed a hi-tech LLDPE drip irrigation tube extrusion line. Drip irrigation is a promising solution for water management since water is carried to the plant under low pressure, through plastic pipes of small diameter and delivered by drippers.

Sustainability AIPMA chalks out recycle plan (March) The All India Plastics Manufacturers’ Association, along with 1,500 member companies, has proposed to recycle all of Mumbai’s plastic waste, provided that the state makes land available for a ‘demo plant’. The organisation has involved all stakehoders such as the BMC, Maharashtra Pollution Control Board (MPCB).

Complete plastics disposal plant from RESIL

(April) The Pune-based Rudra Environmental Solution India Ltd (RESIL) has developed a complete plastic disposal plant. This plant produces a poly-fuel, which can be used to run generators and other equipment. For disposing 500 kg of plastics, the plant requires only 50 ltr of poly-fuel.

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

Novel disposal for plastics with BPA

(March) Researchers in Chennai have reported that fungi may prove to be an eco-friendly way of decomposing polycarbonate plastic waste that contains bisphenol A. Scientists said that they pretreated polycarbonate with UV light & heat and exposed it to three kinds of fungi. Fungi uses BPA and other ingredients as a source of energy.

Greendiamz brings bioplastics to India

(July) Greendiamz Biotech, manufacturer of environmentally-safe plastics products has announced that it has commissioned a plant that produces fully biodegradable and compostable plastic material. The 5,000-tonne per annum capacity facility was set up in association with Limagrain-France at a cost of ` 40 crore.


HIGHLIGHTS 0F 2010 - ASIA

Events Taipei Plas 2010 flexes back industry recovery

Cincinnati Extrusion and AMI stage 7th Wood Plastic Composites

(January) Taipei Plas 2010 is expected to provide the plastics industry a unique platform to build new partnerships and expand business to new markets. Machinery that is energyefficient and environment-friendly was showcased. Visitors from around the globe attended this exhibition.

(March) The conference was staged for the 7th time and has long established itself as a leading international meeting point. It was attended by visitors from 30 countries across all continents. It served as a ideal plastform for interaction between key players of the indusrty.

First GPCA plastics summit in Dubai

US Pavilion to be launched at Asiamold 2010

(July) More than 300 key decision makers, players and stakeholders in the regional & international petrochemicals and plastics converting industry gathered in Dubai for the inaugural GPCA Plastics Summit. High-level delegates from more than 120 companies representing the GCC, EMEA, America and Asia were present.

(July) The fourth edition of Asiamold 2010, a dynamic trade show for mould making, tooling, design and application, is scheduled to take place at the Poly World Trade Centre Expo, Guangzhou, China, during September 15–17, 2010. Over 200 key suppliers will attend.

Investments and Expansion

Eliokem invests in Chinese vinyl pyridine plant

Borouge invests $ 400 million in China

Huntsman sets up polyols JV in China

Mitsubishi to market Engel multi-shot units in Japan

(February) French specialty chemicals company Eliokem is continuing its expansion and investment in China with the construction of a manufacturing facility to meet Asian demand for vinyl pyridine lattices. The 30,000 sq m phase is dedicated to VP latex manufacturing in Asia.

(February) Huntsman’s polyurethanes division has created a new, China-based joint venture (JV) with Jurong Ningwu Chemical to research, develop, manufacture and sell base polyether polyol products. The joint venture will be known as Jurong New Ningwu Chemical and will be based in Jurong City, in Jiangsu province.

Formosa to invest $ 650 billion in 2010

(March) Formosa Plastics Group (FPG), Taiwan announced plans to invest $ 650 billion in three major petrochemical and steel projects in Taiwan. The plan includes an investment of $ 280 billion for the expansion of the naphtha cracking complex in Yunlin.

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

(February) Borouge announced investments worth $ 400 million in three projects in China to expand its presence in the country. The company is a joint venture between Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC) and Austria-based Borealis.

(February) Japanese injection machinery maker Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Plastic Technology Co will soon sell multicomponent Engel moulding machines to customers in Japan. The machinery maker, is a subsidiary of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries.

PTT Chemical mulls capacity expansion in neighbouring countries

(March) In a bid to expand its business to new markets, PTT Chemicals, a leading Thai petrochemical maker is prospecting expansion plans within Thailand and its neighbouring countries. With its strength in gas and plastics business, the company is exploring future investments.


HIGHLIGHTS 0F 2010 - ASIA

Investments and Expansion Eastman acquires cellulose-based specialty polymer company in China

Bayer in research agreement to further polycarbonate car glazing

(March) The US-based Eastman Chemical Company announced that it has acquired Tongxiang Xinglong Fine Chemical Co Ltd, a cellulose-based specialty maker, located near Shanghai, China. The acquisition will support Eastman’s coatings, adhesives and specialty polymers.

(March) Moves to increase the use of polycarbonate glazing by the Japanese car industry have been made by Bayer MaterialScience, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Plastic Technology Co and Kyowa Industrial Co which have set up a joint research programme.

EPI growing business in Thailand and Philippines

Huntsman to expand its capacitiy in Singapore

(May) EPI is expandind its network of international distributors. The global leader and pioneer of oxobiodegradable plastics additives, announced that two independent distributors have selected EPI’s totally degradable plastics additives.

Korea’s Honam buys Malaysia’s Titam chemical

(August) South Korea’s Honam Petrochemical Corp made an unconditional takeover offer to Malaysia’s Titan Chemical Corp, having reached an agreement to buy 72 per cent of the polymer producer from its major shareholders.

(July) Huntsman Corporation announced that it would expand manufacturing capacity of its JEFFAMINE facility at Jurong Island, Singapore. This was expected to happen in the third quarter of the year.

Teijin sets up composites production in Germany (August) Japnaese firm Teijin Ltd is setting up a production line in Germany to supply carbon-fibre reinforced plastic laminate sheet to European aircraft maker Airbus for its new aircraft A 350 XWB.

New Facility Synventive inaugurates second facility in China

(March) Synventive Molding Solutions Inc, the US-based manufacturer of hot runners and components announced the expansion of its facility in Suzhou, China. This will be the second unit for the group in the country.

Borouge to develop its own R&D centre in Abu Dhabi

(June) Borouge, the Abu Dhabi chemicals enterprise that makes plastics from natural gas, is developing its own (R&D) capabilities after decades of relying on its European partner.

ContiTech inaugurates Changshu facility

(April) Germany-based ContiTech AG inaugurated its new Euro 40 million development, production, sales and administrative facility in Changshu, Jiangsu province, China.

MRT technology used in a new plant

(October) OCTAL Petrochemicals signed a contract with Uhde Inventa-Fischer to build a 555,000 tonne per year plant for the production of PET resin. This facility will be built at OCTAL’s existing PET complex in Salalah, Oman.

January 2011 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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HIGHLIGHTS 0F 2010 - WORLD NEWS

Awards W Amsler Equipment Inc wins CPIA award

(July) The Canadian Plastics Industry Association (CPIA) awarded the Ontario-based all-electric reheat stretch blow machine manufacturer, W Amsler Equipment Inc with its Plastics Innovator Award. CPIA noted that in 2009, W Amsler unveiled several innovative technologies including an automatic loading system for wide mouth preforms and a flexible PET machine series.

DSM’s bio-based resin bags awards

(November) DSM Composite Resin’s 55 per cent bio-based resin Palapreg® ECO won two innovation awards. Frost & Sullivan awarded the resin its ‘New Product Innovation Award in the Automotive Industry’ for reduction of the harmful impact of fossil-based raw materials to the environment. It was also awarded the first prize for innovation in raw materials category at the China Composites Expo, Beijing.

BASF wins environmental award

(October) BASF has won the ÖkoGlobe environmental award for its contribution to the i-flow concept car, which uses coatings, lightweight plastic solutions and solar cell technology from BASF. The carbon emissions from the Hyundai i-Flow diesel-hybrid concept car are 85 g/km, well below the levels of comparable conventional cars. BASF also provided infrared-transparent & infrared-reflecting pigments for cool plastic interior surfaces.

IAPD recognises Sheffield Plastics’ Responsible Care policy

(December) At the 54th Annual International Association of Plastics Distributors (IAPD) Convention, Sheffield Plastics was recognised for its Responsible Care policy. The IAPD association recognises one company that has demonstrated innovative/exemplary environmental responsibility, and the Board of Directors found Sheffield Plastics’ systemic and deliberate approach impressive.

Investments & Expansion

Klockner Pentaplast invests in new production capacity in the US and Asia

(May) The Klöckner Pentaplast Group announced that it would add to its global production capacity for transversedirection oriented shrink-label films. The new shrink film capacity will be added to the company’s manufacturing facilities at Rayong, Thailand and Rural Retreat, US. The company also announced that it would be adding a PVC production capacity to its Rayong site at Thailand.

LyondellBasell starts operations at HDPE plant in Germany

(October) LyondellBasell Industries has started operations at the 3,20,000 tonne per annum Hostalen advanced cascade process (ACP) high-density polyethylene plant in Münchsmünster, Germany. The plant enhances LyondellBasell’s flexibility to supply advanced HDPE grades to customers in Europe and the Middle East.

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

Borealis invests € 400 million at its Sweden facility (July) Borealis has invested € 400 million at its plant in Stenungsund, Sweden. A new 3,50,000 tonne per annum high pressure LDPE plant along with modernised compounding and material-handling facilities has enabled in increasing its total capacity at the site from 580 tpa to 700 tpa. The company also expanded its Stenungsund

MachinePoint opens sales office in Turkey

(November) European used-machinery trader, MachinePoint has opened a new sales office in Istanbul, Turkey. Cesar Rodriguez, CEO, MachinePoint, said, “Turkey is a meeting point of the continents and plays an important role in the Eurasia region. Turkish plastic and beverage industries are quite young and one can find recent developments & designs applied in a lot of companies.”


HIGHLIGHTS 0F 2010 - WORLD

Mergers & Acquisitions PolyOne enters into an agreement with BASF

Battenfeld and Cincinnati unite to form extrusion machinery brand

DuPont and Tate & Lyle JV to increase production of Bio-PDO

World’s largest extrusion network launched with Austrian expertise

Maag Pump Systems to merge with Automatik Plastics Machinery GmbH

Sibur buys films and tapes company Novatek-Polymer

Mold-Masters acquires PET supplier, announces new brand MasterPET

Teknor Apex closes deal with DSM to acquire Sarlink

(April) PolyOne Corporation and BASF Engineering Plastics announced that PolyOne Distribution would carry a portfolio of BASF’s advanced polymers for healthcare. These materials include high-performance Ultrason® grades based on polysulfone, polyethersulfone, and polyphenylsulfone.

(June) A joint venture between DuPont and Tate & Lyle will help expand its London facility to increase production of bio-based 1,3 propanediol (Bio-PDO) by 35 per cent. The JV produces Bio-PDO from corn instead of petroleum-based feedstock using a proprietary fermentation process.

(July) Switzerland-based Maag Pump Systems AG is merging with Germany-based Automatik Plastics Machinery GmbH. Through the merger, both firms will reinforce their market position with a turnover of about € 100 million. They will appear on the market under their existing brand names for the time being.

(November) Hot runner and tooling manufacturer, Mold-Masters Ltd, has purchased components supplier ABBA Systems, a former partner in PET preform mould building. The terms of the deal have not been disclosed. Their working relationship with ABBA and its shareholders has allowed this move only after nine months in the marketplace.

(June) Battenfeld Extrusionstechnik, Cincinnati Extrusion and B+C Extrusion Systems (Foshan) Ltd, have combined their strengths under the new brand of BattenfeldCincinnati. Together with American Maplan Corporation, they form one of the largest global suppliers of extrusion lines with manufacturing plants in three continents.

(July) Gruber Extrusion concluded an agreement with Battenfeld-Cincinnati for co-operation on turnkey projects. Gruber Extrusion will use Battenfeld-Cincinnati extruders in all turnkey projects worldwide, while extrusion lines and calibration tables will come from Gruber Extrusion. The new partnership was sealed at the AMI Conference, Vienna.

(October) Russian petrochemicals group Sibur Holding has acquired the polymers business of the country’s second ranked natural gas producer, Novatek group. Sibur sees Novatek-Polymer, manufacturer of plastics pipeinsulation and packaging films, as a ready downstream outlet for its increasing polyolefins production.

(December) The acquisition by Teknor Apex Company of the Sarlink thermoplastic vulcanisate (TPV) elastomer business was completed upon the closing of a deal with DSM. The Sarlink operation, including technologies, compounding capabilities & sales operations on three continents, is now part of Teknor Apex’s Thermoplastic Elastomer Division.

New Facility Kraussmaffei opens ultra modern STC

(April) KraussMaffei inaugurated its new Surface Treatment Center (STC) in Munich-Allach. The STC will have two separate sections: an indexed system and a combi system. In the indexing system, KraussMaffei can paint machine components weighing up to 32 tonne. When the system operates at full capacity, it can handle the equivalent of the take-off weight of an Airbus.

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

SABIC Innovative Plastics boosts resin capacity by 35 per cent

(November) SABIC Innovative Plastics opened its new Ultem* polyetherimide resin production facility in Spain. This marks a 35 per cent increase in Ultem resin capacity for global customers. The € 300 million facility encompasses capacity for producing ultra-high performance resin grades and specialty intermediates (anhydrides).


HIGHLIGHTS 0F 2010 - WORLD

Novel Technology Amcor Rigid Plastics unveils a new replacement glass

(May) Amcor Rigid Plastics has launched a 12 oz ring neck PET bottle as a glass replacement option for premium food and beverage brands. The stock hot fill container offers a PET alternative that delivers significant performance and cost advantages including portability, light weight, and reduced transportation costs and reduced carbon footprint.

New line of machines from Negri Bossi

(August) Negri Bossi is now presenting its new line of all-digital Bi-Power machines. These new models are the result of the synergy created between Negri Bossi and Sacmi, the company’s principal shareholder & supplier of presses for the ceramic market. It represents a double challenge for Negri Bossi, in terms of its size as well as the extremely demanding market towards which it is headed.

Sustainability

Use of plastics can help lower CO2 emissions

(February) A study by consultancy firm McKinsey and Oko Institute of Germany claims that reduction in carbon emissions due to usage of plastics in industries exceeds the amount of greenhouse gas emitted during production of plastics. The findings are based on an analysis that compared carbon emissions through use of chemical (products made of plastics) and non-chemical products.

Recyclable alternative for composite car parts (October) Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology, Pfinztal, have developed a method for producing thermoplastic fibre-reinforced composite materials, designed for large-scale vehicle construction. After these materials have reached end-of-life, they can be shredded, melted down and reused to produce new high-quality parts.

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New research tool to benefit electronics industry

(November) A powerful microscope that will be used for the development of plastic electronics has been installed at the University of Cambridge, to support research. The new electron microscope was officially unveiled recently by David Willetts, Minister for universities and Science.


NATIONAL NEWS

DEMAND PROJECTION

F&S predicts growth in polypropylene compounds market

The Indian passenger vehicles market has grown from 0.2 million units in 2001 to 2 million units in 2009, at an average annual growth rate of 13.6 per cent. This robust growth coupled with provisional antidumping duties levied on PP imports has led to the emergence of new participants in the PP compounds market in India. An extensive market survey recently carried out by Frost & Sullivan reveals that the Indian PP compounding market achieved volumes of 70,000 metric tonne in 2009 and estimates this to reach 1,85,000 metric tonne by 2016. With PP technology making headway in terms of bio plastic and self-reinforced polymers, local PP resin manufacturers must step up collaborative efforts with automotive OEMs to ensure competitive growth.

INDIA FOCUS

Lubrizol opens applications and business centre in Mumbai The Lubrizol Corporation recently announced the opening of a new regional applications and business centre in Mumbai to support its advanced materials business segment. This is an important milestone in the company’s geographic expansion plan in South Asia. Eric S c h n u r , Corporate VP & President, L u b r i z o l Advanced Materials, said, Eric Schnur “Lubrizol has a long history of investing in the South Asian market, particularly in India.” This facility includes a world-class laboratory and office for commercial, technical and administrative talent. The laboratory has formulation and applications testing capabilities in multiple personal care and coatings applications as well as a pharmaceutical centre. At present, Lubrizol has one manufacturing facility in India located in Vadodara.

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MARKET EXPANSION

Carclo to expand its medical market in India Carclo Technical Plastics Ltd announces the opening of its new manufacturing facility in India. Adjacent to its current facility in Doddaballapur, Bengaluru, this new facility has been designed around the global Carclo model of manufacturing. It consists of two discrete assembly areas and two moulding areas fully serviced by a central material feed and air & water cooling systems. The facility has a 1,000 sq m footprint with the possibility to expand by 50 per cent. The moulding areas have a capacity for 10 injection moulding machines in the 50-150 T range. COLLABORATION

LANXESS co-operates with Indian rubber research institute Specialty chemicals group LANXESS is expanding its global research network and has signed an agreement with a leading Indian rubber research institute, Hari Shankar Singhania Elastomer and Tyre Research Institute (HASETRI), headquartered in Rajasthan. “With HASETRI’s acknowledged expertise, we will accelerate the development of our business in high-performance and safe tyres in India’s rapidly growing market,” said Dr Axel Heitmann, Chairman, LANXESS Board of Management. Under this agreement, HASETRI will assist current and future customers on the subcontinent of LANXESS’ high-performance

Both moulding and assembly areas have been designed around white room requirements in line with Carclo’s business strategy in India, namely to target medical applications. These areas have a controlled entrance area for controlled material access and finished goods exit. There are 30 employees on site at present and the site is currently accredited to ISO 9001. Accreditation to ISO 14001 is scheduled for January 2011 and EN 13485 is planned. butadiene rubbers and solution styrene-butadiene rubber with application issues.

The institute has modern facilities and acknowledged expertise in tyre and rubber research, designs, machinery, equipment and testing of rubber materials & products. HASETRI will work with LANXESS’ innovation group function and business units Asian experts. Through the resulting studies, LANXESS will acquaint local tyre manufacturers with the advantages of its highperformance rubber products manufacture. Three years ago, LANXESS established a similar collaboration with the Beijing Research and Design Institute of the Rubber Industry in China.


MPP Jan 2011 Ad Name: Alok Pg No. 35 MPP Jan 2011 Ad Name: Alok Pg No. 35


MPP Jan 2011 Ad Name: Steer Pg No. 36 MPP Jan 2011 Ad Name: Steer Pg No. 36


NATIONAL NEWS EXPORTS GROWTH

Raffia to lead the way for Indian plastic exports to Japan

(L-R): Rajan Kalyanpur, Satish Khanna

Announcing a huge Indian participation in ArabPlast 2011 to be held in Dubai, Rajan Kalyanpur, ED, PlexCouncil, said that raffia, a new plastic that lends itself to processes like textiles is the new bluechip product for plastics. Japan is the

second-largest importer of plastic raffia in the world and at present does not import from India. Indian plastic exports that touched $ 3.5 billion in 2010 are expected to go up to $ 4.2 billion in 2011 and up to $ 8.4 billion by 2014. Products like raffia and polyester films are the new innovations to be tabled at ArabPlast 2011 by Indian companies. UAE and the EU also import raffia. ArabPlast 2011 will see participation from blue chips like L&T, Kabra Extrusion, Nilkamal Ltd and Rajoo Engineers among others. Satish Khanna, organiser of Arabplast 2011, added, “Arabplast 2009 saw Indian companies occupying space of 500 sq m. This year, they will occupy 1,400 sq metre space and transact business worth $ 125 million.”

INVESTMENT PLANS

Reliance reveals major investment plans

Reliance Industries is evaluating investments in a number of chemicals including olefins and derivatives, acetyls, elastomers and fibre intermediates to increase its petrochemicals production portfolio. “We would like to maximise our refineries, swing product slate from fuel to petrochemicals and eliminate low value products such as petcoke and fuel oil,” said Partha Maitra, President, Petroleum Business, Reliance. Maitra said the new petrochemical investments would result in deeper integration with refinery operations and reduce fuel exports from Jamnagar, where the company operates two huge refineries with a combined capacity of 1.23 million bbl/day. Reliance seems to be studying opportunities along the entire carbon chain.

Reliance is also planning its fifth cracker in India with a capacity of 1.365 million tonne per year based on refinery offgases. Derivatives being planned downstream of the cracker include 7,30,000 tonne per year of monoethylene glycol, 5,00,000 tonne per year of LLDPE and 4,00,000 tonne per year of LDPE. In the aromatics business, the company is considering production of 1.5 million tonne per year paraxylene and 3,00,000 tonne per year of benzene.

EVENT UPDATE

PLASTINDIA 2012 officially launched

The 8 th edition of PLASTINDIA was unveiled recently. It will be held from February 1-6, 2012, at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi. This is the leading international exhibition and conference for the Indian plastics industry. The chief guest at the unveiling ceremony was M Raman, 46

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

Secretary, Department of Chemicals & Petrochemicals, Ministry of Chemicals and Fertilizers, Government of India. Speaking at the event, Ashok Goel, President, Plastindia Foundation

MARKET EXPANSION

Tredegar opens film plant in India

US-based company Tredegar Corporation announced that its subsidiary, Tredegar Film Products, has formally opened its new manufacturing plant near Pune. Nancy Taylor, President and CEO, Tredegar Corporation, said, “We believe that the addition of production capability in India will provide an important growth opportunity for our global films operations, as we develop a presence as a local producer of films in this emerging market.” The plant will initially specialise in films for the hygiene market, and the structure’s design will enable production to expand as demand increases. Monica Moretti, President, Tredegar Film Products, added, “We are excited about the opportunity that this plant affords us; to tap into a wealth of talented professionals and operate a cost-effective plant with a continuing company focus on quality and safety. Bringing on local management and staff should allow us to learn and adapt our product offerings to regional market needs.” Tredegar has been ranked 17th in Plastics News’ recent survey of North American film and sheet manufacturers, with $ 455 million in relevant sales. emphasised the role of the PLASTINDIA Foundation in creating a platform for members to come together and explore avenues of diversification and growth. He introduced the launch the Plastindia Academy of Knowledge & Management at Vapi, Gujarat. At this event, the Foundation also launched the new logo of PLASTINDIA 2012 which symbolises new opportunities for the industry.


ASIA NEWS

NEW PRODUCT

Songwon introduces innovative additive formulations

Songwon, a leading additives supplier to the polymer industry, has recently announced the development of a new and innovative range of high heat, low colour distortation, and low emission additive formulations for thermoplastics. These formulations deliver significant benefits to compounders, moulders and end-users. Market demand for improved performance and durability in end-use applications has driven the requirements for absolute service-life and average operating temperature to new levels. For materials such as filled or unfilled TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENT

Sarlink TPV enables weight savings for new M6 multipurpose vehicle UV-resistant grades of Sarlink thermoplastic vulcanisate (TPV) elastomer offer weight and cost

polypropylene (PP), typically injection moulded in thicker wall sections, the need for increased properties and longer lifecycles are becoming a constant factor. Environmental, health and safety standards have also become more critical with a key focus on the reduction of emissions. Klaus Keck, Manager - Global Applications and Technical Service Community, stated, “Songwon has created a significant win-win solution. Not only can we outperform current industry standards by more than 50 per cent when required; we are also able to meet these standards with reduced additive loadings. This in turn generates the additional benefits of low colour distortion; often a problem when higher loadings are required. Lower loadings have a direct and positive effect on emissions.” savings for the roof seals of the new M6 seven-seat multipurpose vehicle built by China’s BYD Auto. This was announced recently by the Thermoplastic Elastomer Division of Teknor Apex Company. The seals run the length of the vehicle roof on either side and contribute to the stylish, streamlined look of the M6 model. Each is co-extrusioned onto a sheet metal strip of two Sarlink compounds, 5790B4 and 5765B4, with Shore A hardnesses of 87 and 65, respectively. The seals, produced from Sarlink TPV weigh 25 per cent less, saving a total of 0.15 kg per vehicle.

industries. Capacities for the polyurethane raw material MDI are to be more than doubled. The company also intends to significantly strengthen its R&D activities there. Moreover, the headquarters of the Polycarbonate Business Unit will be relocated from the main Leverkusen

site to Shanghai. The intention is to ensure even greater proximity to the booming polycarbonates market in Asia. “The expansion of our capacities in China is an important step in strengthening our presence in the emerging economies,” explained Dr Marijn Dekkers, Management Board Chairman, Bayer AG. “We want to increase Group sales 5 billion by in China to around 2015.” In fiscal 2009, the Bayer Group in China recorded sales of 2.1 billion,” he added.

Bayer mulls expansion of Shanghai polycarbonate plant by 50 per cent

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Premium on imported LLDPE film over domestic prices in China

Imported LLDPE film prices are carrying a premium over domestic prices in China. This suggests some downward pressure faced by this market as demand from Chinese buyers has begun to slow down due to ongoing government measures to restrain inflation as well as the upcoming year-end book-keeping period. One Middle Eastern producer has already announced January offers for HDPE film and LLDPE film. After trading mostly at par for most of November, import LLDPE film prices have exhibited a steadily rising premium over a few weeks. According to data from ChemOrbis Price Wizard, import LLDPE prices including customs duty (where applicable) are currently carrying a premium of $ 50/tonne over domestic LLDPE film prices on an ex-warehouse, cash not including VAT basis, with the size of the import premium holding steady currently, after witnessing an increase earlier.

EXPANSION

Bayer intends to significantly expand its capacities for the production of high-grade materials in China by 2016. Investments of around 1 billion are planned at the Shanghai site. This means Bayer will focus even more intensively on the Asia-Pacific region, where it expects consistent growth in its customer

FILM PRICING


ASIA NEWS MARKET SUPPORT

NEW MANUFACTURING UNIT

Upstream costs support Chinese PS market

IRPC plans new 1,60,000 tpa propylene unit by 2014

In China, some PS deals concluded with discounts, although in general the PS ranges do not indicate much change. The range is unchanged since sellers are not willing to offer much ground pointing to their high upstream costs. Accordingly, Asian spot styrene prices gradually gained ground from the beginning of December, gaining $ 30/tonne on FOB Korea basis and $ 40/tonne on CFR China basis. The spot styrene market recorded increases on the back of firm demand, despite a steady trend earlier. Steadily increasing prices and not so comfortable availability pushed buyers to take positions, which supported the market level for spot styrene as well as higher oil prices surpassing the $ 88/bbl threshold as on December 9, 2010. In China’s PS market, weak demand caused deals to be concluded with discounts from the sellers’ initial offer levels as it is in the final month of the year. However, overall offer ranges for both dutiable and nondutiable PS remained mostly steady on a week-over-week basis on CFR China/FCA Hong Kong basis.

In a move that will help increase production of higher-value specialty products, Thailand’s IRPC plans to build a 1,60,000 tpa propylene plant by 2014, subject to board approval. The location and the value of the project are not known. The new plant will help meet all of IRPC’s feedstock requirements to make polypropylene, and create a surplus of propylene that will be used to produce more specialty products. At present, IRPC has a total propylene capacity of 3,12,000 tpa from its steam cracker in Rayong province. In addition, IRPC currently

AWARD

LianDi awarded contracts for supply to Sinopec Mitsubishi Chemical LianDi Clean Technology Inc, a provider of clean technology, downstream flow equipment, engineering services and software to China’s leading petroleum and petrochemical companies, has been awarded four contracts to supply 222 valves to Sinopec Mitsubishi Chemical Polycarbonate Ltd. The company expects to deliver products to Sinopec Mitsubishi Chemical in

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buys propylene from shareholder PTT in order to make polypropylene. It has to buy at least 1,20,000 tpa of propylene, if its steam cracker and 4,75,000-5,00,000 tpa PP plant at Rayong are run at full capacity. The company is in the process of building a metathesis plant or olefins conversion unit at Rayong, with capacity to produce 1,00,000 tonne per annum of propylene. H1-2011. LianDi will supply all the valves in Sinopec Mitsubishi Chemical’s new polycarbonate production facilities that will incorporate Japan Mitsubishi Chemical’s proprietary melting method technology.

CAPACITY EXPANSION

Coal-to-olefin production capacity to rise in China

China is expected to form an annual coal-to-olefin production capacity of 10 million tonne by 2020, at a required investment outlay of 250 billion yuan ($ 37 billion). China has included coal chemicals in the Twelfth Five-Year Programme development plan, promising to steadily promote coal chemical projects in the 20112015 period. Newly built capacities in this year include 8.6 million tonne of methanol, 1.48 million tonne of coal-to-liquid and 1.55 million tonne of coal-to-olefin. Although third in global coal reserves, after the US and Russia, China is the world’s leading user and producer of coal, according to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA). Half of the coal dug up is for non-power related industrial uses, says the EIA; and Chinese coal production is projected to increase at a rate of 10-15 per cent every year. In partnership with its international suppliers Metso and Leser, LianDi will provide the critical components to Sinopec Mitsubishi Chemical’s first polycarbonate production lines as Sinopec looks to capture the increasing domestic demand for polycarbonate and bisphenol A. Polycarbonates, due to their resilient and transparent properties, have become a popular material for manufacturers of consumer and industrial products such as eye glasses, car brakes and Blu-ray discs.


WORLD NEWS

EVENT UPDATE

SPF films conference introduces materials

Several high-performance polymers were introduced at the SPF 2010 plastics films conference in Dusseldorf, organised by Maack Business Services. They included latest metallocene-catalysed polyethylenes from ExxonMobil and Ineos, high-stiffness terpolymers from Borealis, extensions to DuPont’s ionomer resin family and tie-layer resins based on new technology for multilayer films. Equistar Chemicals, part of LyondellBasell, included Plexar tie-layer resins for multilayer barrier films in its portfolio, the first ever tie-layer resins made in North America. The new resins, are based on LLDPE. The agenda of the conference, f e a t u r e d discussions on some highly innovative barrier technologies, new additives, new film extrusion technologies, market & application developments in oriented films, biopolymers & brand owner perspectives. COLLABORATION

Ford to use bio TPU from Merquinsa

Merquinsa, a TPU specialty company, announced that Ford Motor Company, Inc has chosen to collaborate with Merquinsa and its Pearlthane® ECO thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPU) for the automotive industry. Merquinsa’s bio-based TPU is made from renewable sources. Ford Motor Company’s initiative in the use of sustainable materials prompted RECOGNITION

SPI is now accepting nominations for Plastics Hall of Fame Nominations are now open for living individuals to be inducted into the Plastics Hall of Fame, as announced by SPI: The Plastics Industry Trade Association. To be eligible, nominations must be submitted no later than September 30, 2011. 52

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ACHIEVEMENT

Biosafe Inc receives US composition of matter patent The US Patent Office has issued to Biosafe Inc a composition of matter patent on the siloxane polymer that is the keystone of the company’s proprietary antimicrobial technology. This was announced by Max Fedor, President and CEO. The chemistry underlying the Biosafe® antimicrobial causes it to molecularly bond to the treated surfaces of film, sheet, moulded plastics,

Max Fedor

nonwovens, metals, wood and other substances, enabling it to resist leaching or migration and providing long-lasting protection against bacteria, mould, mildew and fungi. Additionally, the antimicrobial punctures and ruptures the cell walls of target microbes rather than leaching into the cells. Fedor said, “Biosafe polymer is being used to combat harmful bacteria and viruses commonly encountered in clinical settings. Medical textiles treated with the polymer have demonstrated a 99.999 per cent [5 logs] reduction of certain microorganisms within five minutes. Among the microbes involved in tests required for submission to the FDA were MRSA, VRE, Influenza A, and staphylococcus aureaus.” Biosafe Inc holds two previous US patents on its antimicrobial technology.

the selection of Pearlthane® ECO for the console door and proved that such material substitutions can be done costeffectively. With the new materials in this part, Ford has realised a cost savings proving that environmentally green parts can be green by netting cost savings for the company too. “With Pearlthane® ECO moulded parts, Ford is reducing its impact on the environment while setting the standard for performance and aesthetic design,“ said Dennis Lauzon, VP and General

Manager, Merquinsa North America. Merquinsa’s Bio TPUs, with properties similar to petrochemical-based TPU, it reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

SPI is administering the nominating process on behalf of The Plastics Academy, whose officials will make up the initial screening committee. The induction ceremony and banquet will take place on April 2, 2012, during SPI’s NPE2012 exposition, slated for April 1-5 in Orlando, Florida, US. “Election into the Plastics Hall of Fame is an honour bestowed on individuals who, by consistent

dedication and extraordinary accomplishments, have contributed to the growth of the plastics industry,” said John Kretzschmar, Chairman, The Plastics Academy. “Individuals from any country in the world may be nominated, and submissions may be made by anyone using the official form provided by the Academy and accompanying it with appropriate supporting information,” he added.


WORLD NEWS INVESTMENT

Dow may use 30 per cent more ethane to make plastics

Dow Chemical Co, plans to use more ethane to make plastics and may form a venture to separate it from natural gas because of low US prices. Dow plans to increase cracking of ethane by 20-30 per cent at ethylene plants on the US Gulf Coast over the next two to three years. That will increase Dow’s global use of ethane for making ethylene to as much as 65 per cent, from about 55 per cent. Andrew Liveris, CEO, who tried unsuccessfully to sell a 50 per cent stake in Dow’s basicplastics unit in 2008, has said he is no longer planning such a deal. Dow said it is reviewing joint venture options to build a natural-gas liquids fractionator, a plant that separates the components of natural gas to secure supplies of ethane. ACCOMPLISHMENT

EconCore NV wins Bioplastics Award 2010 As one of many highlights, the Bioplastics Award 2010 was conferred for the first time during the European Bioplastics Conference, held in Düsseldorf, Germany on December 1 and 2. The prestigious Bioplastics Award was given to EconCore NV, a company from Leven, Belgium. EconCore offer innovative technologies with regard to cost efficient

MARKET FORECAST

IK expects another cost explosion in 2011

Germany’s plastic packaging companies will struggle with higher costs next year because of high raw material and energy costs, as well as strong competition, warns the industry association IK Industrievereinigung Kunststoffverpackungen e.V. The IK rates the business development as positive with a turnover growth of 15 per cent for 2010. For 2011, the IK predicts the economic trends to be continually positive, however entailing a further explosion of costs. It is already definite that the assessment according to the German Renewable Energy Bill will be increased by 70 per cent.

For an average company in the plastics packaging industry with an electricity consumption of around 18,000 megawatt hours, this entails additional costs of almost € 3 million. With approximately 400 member companies IK Industrievereinigung Kunststoffverpackungen e.V., Germany is currently the largest association of plastics packaging within the plastics industry in Europe.

honeycomb sandwich structures. Here the honeycomb cores as well as the skin layers are made from PLA, a biodegradable polyester resin made from renewable resources. For higher mechanical demands, the skins are made from flax-fiber reinforced PLA is still 100% renewable. The two trade publications bioplastics MAGAZINE and European Plastics News jointly presented the 5th Bioplastics Award. The jury based its decision on the innovative approach

to use intelligent design in order to increase the mechanical properties of a PLA product. This innovation offers the potential to considerably reduce weight and materials needed in construction as a result of the consistently applied sandwich. The products of EconCore would contribute decisively to more sustainable construction.

lower system and production costs for automotive system suppliers and manufacturers (OEMs). Borealis Xmod GB306SAF is a pioneering high stiffness, 36 per cent glass fibre

reinforced engineered PP compound and offers improved dimensional stability, and therefore more consistent processing. It contributes improved process handling and reduced energy usage. Lower processing temperatures and no necessity for pre-drying further reduces energy consumption and eliminates extra manufacturing steps to achieve more cost-effective production. Borealis Xmod can be used with existing manufacturing equipment and processes.

AWARDS

Borealis receives Frost & Sullivan Automotive Innovation Award

Borealis, a provider of chemical and innovative plastics solutions, has received the Frost & Sullivan 2010 Global New Product Innovation Award in the category ‘Automotive under the Hood Plastics’. The award recognises the unique capabilities of Borealis Xmod™ GB306SAF polypropylene (PP) compounds, which significantly

Ulf Kelterborn, MD, IK

January 2011 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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EVENT FOCUS

Curtain Raiser ..................................................................................58 Industry Insights ..............................................................................62 Roundtable ..................................................................................... 68 Eco Insights ....................................................................................74 Products Showcase - India ................................................................76 Products Showcase - Taiwan ............................................................ 80

With the turn of the decade, the world of plastics is entering a new era. The significant growth experienced in the recent past as well as future projections present a host of opportunities for this industry. PLASTIVISION INDIA 2011 can further boost these limitless possibilities by virtue of its global platform. We take a closer look...

January 2011 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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CURTAIN RAISER

PLASTIVISION INDIA 2011

Towards global opportunities, glorious future

A glimpse of the previous edition

PLASTIVISION INDIA 2011, one of the largest exhibitions for the plastics industry, is all set to ring in opportunities for the industry at the onset of 2011. This event is expected to attract a large number of overseas participants, thereby providing a platform to grasp industry trends, meet potential suppliers and strategic partners among others. A preview…

T Showcasing the best

Technology for the future

he plastics industry in India has grown significantly in the last two decades. To meet the ever-increasing demand, there is a growing need for products made from plastics to cater to the requirements of various sectors such as agriculture, automobiles, building & construction, processed foods, consumer durables, pipes & conduits for water management, gas distribution, electricals and healthcare. PLASTIVISION INDIA 2011, one of the largest exhibitions for the plastics industry, offers opportunities for market leaders to explore this booming market by providing an ideal networking platform for both manufacturers and visitors.

Show facts

Seizing the opportunities

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Since plastics play an important role in everyday life, the All India Plastics Manufacturers’ Association, popularly known as AIPMA, will be organising the 8th PLASTIVISION INDIA from January 20 to 24, 2011, at Goregaon, Mumbai. Over 1,100 domestic & international exhibitors will showcase their products over

a sprawling area of approximately 55,000 sq m. Large-scale international participation is expected from countries like Taiwan, Hong Kong, China, Korea, Europe, UAE, Japan, UK, USA, Malaysia, Singapore, Switzerland and The Netherlands.

Event at a glance PLASTIVISION INDIA is held every three years as an international event to promote the Indian plastics industry. The upcoming edition will not only highlight the industry’s progress, but also prove India’s potential as an emerging market for plastics and machinery. It is also expected to provide Indian entrepreneurs with considerable opportunities to consolidate and strengthen their trade globally. PLASTIVISION INDIA 2011 will showcase products such as plastic packaging machinery & technology, raw materials, chemicals & auxiliaries, machines & equipment for recycling, machinery & plant for processing, post-processing machines, moulds & dies, ancillary equipment, semi-finished products, technical parts & reinforced plastics and finished plastic products.


CURTAIN RAISER

From the visitors’ point of view, PLASTIVISION INDIA 2011 would be beneficial for marketing managers, technical experts, traders, distributors, dealers/retailers, manufacturers and suppliers among others. This year there are two dedicated events that will focus on conserving energy and reusing waste: PLASTICA and the Green Pavilion.

PLASTICA A dedicated pavilion earmarked for various applications of plastics is the brainchild of AIPMA to enable manufacturers to showcase various plastic products used in the field of agriculture, eg plastic pipes in sprinkler irrigation systems, plastic films in green houses, plastic nets in horticulture, heavy duty flexible membrane lines for canal lining that prevents water seepage. In addition, this pavilion will exhibit a range of automobile plastic-moulded components used in automobile industry. It will also feature consumer products such as houseware, thermoware, toys, sporting goods, fridges and washing machines. PLASTICA will also focus on energy conservation and recycling.

Green Pavilion In present times, the effective management of waste is gaining prominence and is a cause for great concern. It affects all households, corporations and public authorities everywhere. Waste management should be closely monitored and regulated. Disposal methods are becoming increasingly costlier as landfill space decreases. “The Green Pavilion is expected to demonstrate and educate the general public about environmental issues,” says Yogesh P Shah, President, AIPMA. People will learn about improving the environment through ‘reuse of waste’. Simply put, reuse means using an object or material again and again, either for its original purpose or for a similar purpose. However, reuse is not recycling, because recycling alters the 60

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

Yogesh P Shah President, AIPMA

Key factors driving this event Overall, India is becoming a hub for the plastics industry, especially in the areas of automobiles, white goods, and other goods that are directly or indirectly connected to plastics. Also, the world is becoming more aware of India’s capability to develop new technology. PLASTIVISION INDIA 2011 is a platform for manufacturers and visitors looking for new technologies. Besides, this year we are expecting huge foreign participation along with increased response from local manufacturers and visitors. AIPMA’s goal Our goal is to provide maximum opportunities by promoting exhibitions and creating a platform for buyers and manufacturers. International participation International participation has been growing steadily in the last few exhibitions because foreign manufacturers have realised that the market in India is growing significantly. Also, such exhibitions facilitate exchange of knowledge and information. So, people do not have to go abroad to know about emerging trends worldwide in a particular field, as these exhibitions offer a good platform to exchange information with our foreign counterparts.

physical form of an object or material. Reuse prevents objects and materials from becoming waste. Some items are specifically designed to be reused, eg rechargeable batteries or ‘real nappies’. PLASTIVISION INDIA 2011 is expected to team up with local manufacturers to educate people on ‘reusing waste’. It will also enable NGOs and municipal bodies to ensure that information and knowledge about ‘reusing waste’ is spread across the country.

This year there is also a dedicated pavilion for raw materials, polymers & resins, additives & colourants manufacturers. Ajay Desai, Chairman, PLASTIVISION INDIA 2011, asserts, “We have made an attempt to ensure hall-wise participation to provide visitors with focussed spectrum exhibitors and better business options. Hall 1 & 7 will house machinery, moulds & accessories; Hall 2 – PLASTICA and Vibrant Gujarat, Hall 5 – raw materials, polymers & resins, additives & colourants manufacturers; Hall 6 – international exhibitors.

A glimpse into the past PLASTIVISION INDIA 2007 was spread over an area of 45,000 sq m and witnessed more than 850 global participants. AIPMA is also the founder of the Plastindia Foundation, established in 1987, to jointly promote the interest of the Indian plastics industry at an international level. AIPMA has representations at various Union & State Government Ministries to voice concerns and difficulties faced by the industry, budgetary structure recommendations and monitor uniformity in government regulations for the plastics industry.

What next? Through PLASTIVISION INDIA 2011, AIPMA intends to make India a hub for the global plastics industry. Going forward, it intends to establish polytechnic colleges, which will impart knowledge and skills to people so that India will have all the skills to manufacture machinery, thereby placing India on par with China. “We will then have a skilled labour force that will be able to compete with China and the rest of the world. Skilled manpower will help improve conditions in the industry and accelerate its growth prospects,” adds Shah. A promising platform to build business alliances and increase channels to better expand one’s prospects in this region, PLASTIVISION INDIA 2011, will serve as a timely event for professionals involved in this dynamic sector.


INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

Indian plastics & polymers sector

An optimistic future beckons... In the last five years, India has witnessed a 12 per cent growth in the consumption of plastics and an increased production capacity of polymers. The total plastics consumption is projected to grow by a CAGR of 16.4 per cent for the next five years (2011-2016). Moreover, the untapped and fragmented market is expected to provide a platform for high growth of domestic and foreign investments. Vivek Patel

T

he Indian plastics industry is characterised by the presence of a large number of players in end-use applications consisting of over 26,000 small, mid-sized and large manufacturers or fabricators along with 16 major raw material producers. Plastics consumption grew exponentially in 2010, with the total consumption reaching 8.8 million metric tonne (MMT). The current growth rate in Indian polymer industry is 14.6 per cent as compared to 2009 (12.4 per cent). The market is driven by the tremendous growth in packaging, building & construction, consumer goods and automotive industries. The per capita plastics consumption reached 7.4 kg in 2010 from 4.6 kg in 2005. Due to the widely fragmented market, supplier power is low in the Indian plastics industry. The presence of many suppliers relative to the overall size of the industry segment leads to high levels of competition thus tends to keep average profit margins at a modest single-digit level, except for those firms that specialise in custom products.

Marketshare The Indian plastics market is characterised by regional players and also a large number of local suppliers. There is also a sort of polarisation between small, medium and big sized companies as large organisations 62

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

deal in highly specialised end-use products while the smaller ones deal in commodity products. Almost 75 per cent of the market is in the unorganised sector and is highly competitive. There are some excellent polymer producers in India that have sophisticated and modern automated plants. A good amount is also exported outside. However, there is an absence of sufficient supply of speciality polymer, which is imported. Among the Indian polymer suppliers, Reliance Industries Ltd (RIL) has the largest marketshare, of more than 70 per cent. Commodity polymers, including polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) enjoy 85 per cent marketshare of the total Indian polymer market, thanks to their low cost, high performance, acceptability and easy formability. Polyolefins (PP & PE) account for about 61 per cent of the total plastics consumption, followed by PVC at around 24 per cent, and others by 15 per cent like engineering plastics, speciality plastics and thermosets. In 2010, among the commodity polymers, low density polyethylene (LDPE) has shown the strongest growth rate of 18 per cent, followed by PVC 17 per cent, PP 15 per cent, and high density polyethylene (HDPE) & linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE), both 14 per cent. The highest growth rate for LDPE consumption can be attributed to the steadily increasing demand in


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3 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0 2005

2006

PP

LDPE

2007 LLDPE

2008 HDPE

2009

2010

PVC

Others

Plastics consumption (MMT)

Plastics consumption (MMT)

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

7.0 6.0 5.0 4.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 0

Others 15%

PP 29%

PVC 16% LDPE 5% 2011

2012

PP

LDPE

2013 LLDPE

2014 HDPE

2015

2016

PVC

Others

HDPE 16%

LLDPE 11%

Consumption trend by types of polymer

Consumption forecast by types of polymer

Market distribution of polymers in 2010

packaging film, plasticulture and favourable price differential with LLDPE. The healthy growth of PVC is mainly driven by demand from building & construction, including infrastructure, wires & cables and footwear sectors.

and infrastructure, over the next few years, is on the anvil. Even the government is offering subsidy to farmers who are adopting drip irrigation systems. PVC is widely used in applications like pipes & fittings, windows & doors, wires & cables, films & sheets, profiles, footwear, medical tubing & pouches and floor tiles. PP import has declined from 2005 to 2010 due to increased domestic production capacity of PP while PE import is still buoyant; and Indian plastics converters still heavily depend on PVC imports.

quality and consistent volume of MODAR, vinyl esters, epoxies and SMC resins in India. Global players in specialty resins like Cray Valley, Scott Bader, Reichhold, Ashland and AOC are catering to the needs of the Indian market and have set up or are in the process of setting up their units in India. This is fuelled by demand from global customers who are expanding to India as well as local fabricators attaining manufacturing capability of high-end composite products.

Applications The application of plastics can be found in industries like packaging, building & construction, consumer goods, mass transportation, among others. Packaging is the highest application area for plastics in India and accounts for 47 per cent of the total consumption followed by building & construction - 18 per cent, consumer goods - 15 per cent, industrial products 14 per cent, and other industries - 6 per cent. Packaging and automotive sectors are the largest consumers of polyolefin. In the packaging segment, it is used for bulk packaging of cement, chemical & food grains, and flexible packaging of snack food & garments. At present, plastics consumption in agriculture is a meagre 1 per cent – supporting demand for polymers like drip irrigation systems, mulch film, shade nets, film & sheets for pond & reservoir lining and coverings for greenhouses, etc. In this segment, companies like Jain Irrigation, John Deere, Plasson, and Netafilm are doing well. The demand for PVC and HDPE pipes is lucrative as implementation of various government schemes like the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM), and those focussing on irrigation 64

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

Commodity polymers accounted for the major share of 85 per cent in the total plastics consumption in India for the year 2010. The composites industry in India has registered a sharp growth in the past five years resulting in a significant gap in terms of availability of quality resins as well as consistent volume supplies. The unsaturated polyester resin industry was restricted mostly to hand lay-up manufacturing for small-scale applications. However, with greater demand for new applications like windmill blades, turbines, pipes, underground petroleum tanks, oil & natural gas pipelines, tanks & vessels, insulation products, auto components, building materials, pleasure industry applications, there has been continuous import of high

Market analysis of polyolefins PE, the largest consumed commodity plastics, represents 32 per cent of total polymer market. The PE demand for the year 2010 was 2.9 MMT, and grew at an impressive 14 per cent over the previous year. In India, demand for LDPE grew at a strong 18 per cent while that of HDPE and LLDPE grew by 14 per cent and 12 per cent respectively during 2010. In the next five years, PE demand is expected to grow by about 17 per cent, accelerated with the huge demand in packaging film applications and penetration in injection moulded products. In 2016, total PE demand will account for 7.2 MMT. It is expected that about 2.5 MMTPA of PE capacity will be added within 2013. In 2010, PP demand in India was 2.5 MMT, which represents a growth of 15 per cent over 2009. The market is driven by the healthy growth in BOPP films for flexible packaging and bulk packaging for cement, raffia, automobile and FMCG products. In 2016, total PP demand is estimated to be 6 MMT while the double-digit


INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

Packaging 47%

Building & Construction 18%

Consumer goods 15%

Others 6%

Industrial 14%

Market distribution by applications in 2010

growth in the packaging, automotive and FMCG sectors will propel PP demand during the next five years. PP nonwoven is another promising area where its demand will be high. RIL, Haldia Petrochemicals Ltd (HPL), and Gas Authority of India Ltd (GAIL) are the major manufacturers of polyolefins. In 2010, 1.25 MMT capacity of polyolefin has been added by the Indian Oil Corp Ltd (IOCL). About 1 MMTPA of PP capacity will be added by 2013. In 2010, PE imports showed 12 per cent annual growth rate (AGR) while PP accounted for a negative growth of 17 per cent over the previous year. PE imports totalled 0.6 MMT due to strong demand of PE in flexible packaging, edible oils packaging and wire & cable segment, while PP imports were pegged at 0.3 MMT because of increased domestic capacity, with the start-up of a 0.6 MMT PP plant of IOCL.

Polyvinyl chloride resin Current demand of PVC in India is 2.1 MMT, of which 67 per cent of the demand is met by the domestic resin suppliers and rest 33 per cent is being imported. The demand is projected to grow by about 18 per cent CAGR during the next five years. In 2016, total PVC demand will account for 5.8 MMT. There are five main players in the PVC resin segment – Reliance, DSCL, Finolex, Chemplast and DCW. Pipes and fittings will be the major market, accounting for 75 per cent of domestic PVC demand and boom in building & construction, and demand of pipes in agricultural sector will keep the momentum for PVC growth. Finolex, 66

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

Astral, Ashirwad, Ajay, Jain Irrigation Systems, and Prince Pipes & Fitting Pvt Ltd are major manufacturers of pipes & fittings. Chlorinated polyvinyl chloride (CPVC) resin is making inroads into the Indian plastics industry where it is being used for hot & cold water plumbing and industrial applications. DCW, a Mumbai-based company has entered into a technical license agreement with Arkema of France to manufacture 10,000 tonne per annum of CPVC resin and 12,000 tonne per annum of CPVC compound that will make DCW the first Indian producer of CPVC resin & compound and reduce dependency on the imports. In hot & cold water plumbing segments, Astral, Ashirwad, and Ajay Corporation are market leaders and they are licensees of Lubrizol’s FlowGuard technology. Since 2010 onwards, Lubrizol Corporation, a US-based company, is going to expand its specialty polymers business in India.

Manufacturing process Extrusion-based manufacturing process dominates the Indian plastics industry and accounts for 62 per cent of the total amount of plastics processed, followed by injection moulding process with 27 per cent. Products from extrusion are used in compounding, packaging, building & construction, agriculture and electrical sectors. Over 30 per cent of all extruders in the plastics processing industry are operated for the manufacture of blown films. Injection moulding is mainly used for the manufacture of automotive products, consumer goods, household products, packaging, medical and electrical products. Blow moulding and rotational moulding processing techniques constitute a small share of 5 per cent and 1 per cent respectively; and help manufacture products like tanks, bottles and drums, among others.

Outlook for plastics industry The consumption of plastics will increase about 2.5 fold from 2010

to 2016. The commodity polymers will have the largest share at 88 per cent while polyolefins will remain at about 61 per cent marketshare of total Indian plastics consumption. In India, extrusion-based methods account for 62 per cent of the total amount of plastics processed, followed by injection moulding at 27 per cent. From the plastics business perspective, Gujarat and Maharashtra appear attractive on account of availability of raw materials, conducive environment and policy support for investments. The growth for polyolefin is expected with the boom in retail, as well as rise in consumption of PP nonwoven, raffia, packaged food among others. LLDPE has witnessed good penetration in agricultural film, while HDPE will see a growth in irrigation pipes. The automotive sector is expected to drive PP demand, as India’s automotive industry is growing around 15 per cent due to the launch of new vehicles in the small car segment. Polyethylene will see tremendous growth as healthy tractions witnessed in flexible packaging, BOPP film, retort packaging, laminates and bulk packaging, and intermediate bulk containers. In 2010, Uflex and Jindal Poly Films raised BOPP film capacity. The demand of profiles for the building industry, wire & cable, pipes in irrigation, drinking water supply, and sewerage applications is high that indicates future growth for PVC. The other promising sector is conduit pipes for telecommunication cables and drip irrigation. Vivek Patel is a consultant and an expert in the field of polymers/plastics/chemicals/ composites. He has industry experience in market research, consultancy, technical sales & marketing, R&D, QC, IPR and business development. He has developed zero halogen flame retardant compounds and TPE compounding formulations. Email: vivepatel@gmail.com


ROUNDTABLE

Surging demand for plastics

Is India ready for the challenge? India’s consumption of plastics is expected to grow from 7.5 million tonne to 15 million tonne by 2012. This tremendous growth presents a host of new opportunities as well as challenges for everyone connected with the industry. Beverley Lewis engages some industry leaders to analyse whether India is ready to meet the boom in demand for plastic products as the country is poised to become the world’s thirdlargest plastics consuming nation.

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ROUNDTABLE

David Seiler, Global Fluoropolymers Technical Advisor, Arkema Inc Compared to other leading countries like Japan, China and the US, the per capita plastics consumption is still low in India. In addition, there is a large global export market to cater to, which will boost India’s consumption by 2012. India has the potential to become one of the leading exporting countries in the Asian subcontinent. However, it needs to improve its current industrial infrastructure, road networks and material handling systems. Planning and forecasting needs to be done ahead of time to avoid possible bottlenecks in production. The amount of money spent on research in plastics is negligible and the government should consider developing resources for the plastics industry. The government must encourage more people to join this sector. Currently, there are only a few courses with regard to plastics available in India, which needs to be addressed.

Dr Babu Padmanabhan, Managing Director, STEER Engineering Pvt Ltd India is favourably poised to meet over 70 per cent of the market requirement in polymer resins and further conversion into alloys, blends, compounds and masterbatches using compounding. It is only natural that further processing by moulding and extrusion will grow to keep up the demand for plastic products. India’s plastics industry is growing at an impressive CAGR of 15 per cent; with polymer consumption set to reach 10 million tonne in 2012. However, the need of the hour is to enhance the talent available in the sector. Plastic waste recycling is an important requirement to keep the industry green and meet the growing demands for plastic products. Innovation is the key to match global pace with the changing needs of the customer. Organisations must inculcate a culture that promotes innovation by imagination.

Mahendra Patel, Chairman & Managing Director, Mamata Group First, we need massive investments in manufacturing capacities in every aspect of the plastics industry beginning with polymer resin production, masterbatches and compounds. The plastics processing industry needs to embrace mechanisation/automation at a faster pace to improve productivity with consistent quality. Traditionally, this is overlooked. But, if we are to deliver high quality to compete with the best in the world, processors must invest heavily in technologies, which produce consistent high quality in large quantities. The current scenario for the polymers and plastics industry as a whole, on face of it, is good. The outlook for the next few years appears positive. As long as the liberal economic policies continue and perhaps open up further, there is every reason to believe that the plastics industry in India will grow.

Mirisch Damani, Chairman & Managing Director, Zylog Plastalloys Pvt Ltd

Rajesh Nath, Managing Director, German Engineering Federation (VDMA) India

Over the past several decades, India has built up tremendous capacity to produce goods for the consumer and industrial sectors. Local demand for plastics has been gradually rising, providing impetus to the growth. Also, India has absorbed technology in manufacturing plastics and plastic goods to its own advantage, thus favourably competing in the global market. With respect to quality, India needs to catch up with its western counterparts. Technology, quality and pricing will always remain the key focus areas to sustain competitiveness in the plastics and polymers industry. Some of the key strategies to remain competitive and maintain long-term growth in the industry are innovations in technology and business management. Conducive government policies, far better infrastructure and removal of bureaucracy & red tapism would boost the progress of the plastics industry. If the government recognises this and provides support, India can really move fast and far ahead in a short span.

The Indian plastics industry has been growing at a rate of 12 per cent over the years, and with its true potential harnessed, the consumption is all set to reach 12.5 MMT, making India the third-largest consumer of plastics by 2012. To match this figure, India would require 42,000 new machines and around $ 10 billion of project investment by 2020. The Government of India is trying to set up economic reforms to elevate & boost the plastic industry through joint ventures and foreign investments. Further, global manufacturing and management practices with an eye for quality and design have to be adopted. This would lead to development of new products and applications. Moreover, the government should facilitate foreign direct investments in the downstream sector, especially SEZs, through tax benefits. To counter the threat from cheap import of plastic processing machinery, the industry should develop R&D facilities across the country.

January 2011 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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ROUNDTABLE

Subba Bangera, Managing Director, Sidel India Pvt Ltd India is not yet ready for the demand forecast of tremendous growth to be seen beyond the year 2012. The growth will be exponential as urbanisation of India is the key for such growth. The industry has always been waiting for demand to increase, but has never planned for such a scenario. It is time we start thinking big like China, as the growth of plastics industry is linked to that of automobile, infrastructure, agriculture and food processing industries. Moreover, change in lifestyle also drives the market for plastics and packaging industries. We need adequate skilled manpower to become competitive globally. The industry has to convince the government on a soft policy for the plastics & polymer industry as it is one of the largest employers in the country. Once we get into production with high quality equipment, cheap machines will no longer be used.

Vimal Kedia, Managing Director, Manjushree Technopack Ltd S B Dangayach, Managing Director, Sintex Industries Ltd In the present global scenario, the demand and supply gap in terms of materials will be well met by imports. There are new capacities coming up in India. We are aware of the big capacity build-up in several parts of the Middle East and thus, there will be no sustained shortages in 2012. Productivity, innovation, value-addition and differential offerings will help companies with design and intellectual capabilities to carve a special niche for themselves. It is my observation that some Chinese companies are adopting reverse engineering with appropriate innovations to simplify machinery designs and construction to get final products or solutions that deliver value for the processor or user. We need to adopt similar innovations to grow and succeed.

Vineet Seth, Managing Director – India & Middle East, Delcam Plc India’s per capita consumption of plastics is roughly about 1/5th of the world average, so it is quite obvious that there is a large area for growth. Whether or not we will become the world’s third-largest plastics consuming nation by 2012 is debatable. In 2005, it was expected that our domestic plastic consumption would have crossed 12 MMT by 2010, which has not happened. As far as the question of readiness is concerned, we still need to go a long way in terms of having organised recycling centres, alternative usage/rejuvenation of aged polymers, standardisation, etc, which are not currently an issue, but will be when we reach critical mass. The packaging and consumer goods processed polymer industry in India contributes nearly 25-30 per cent of the total produce. Focus should be on these verticals and particularly on technology implementation/upgradation segments. Also, China is about 20 times ahead of India in the processed polymer domain, and also accounts for a large amount of low-value goods exports – both to India and the world. The government needs to provide the much-needed impetus to the plastics industry in India. As far as capacity is concerned, there needs to be an evolved marketing of the plastics sector.

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

Presently, I do not think we are fully ready to take on the larger packaging requirement in plastics; we should be ready by 2015. Most of the manufacturing units use equipment that has lower production capabilities. In order to meet the rising demand, our industry needs to be ready with higher production facilities and the equipment should be completely automated, as the availability of manual labour is going to be difficult. In terms of strategies required for productivity improvement and innovation, we require to import world-class production lines supported by smaller ancillaries and equipment as well as set up testing facilities, modern tool rooms with latest machines and design centres with improved design on closures, bottles as well as other items required for packaging. The need of the hour is skilled manpower, which is scarce. The government needs to set up institutes offering scientific skill development courses for plastic production and moulds technology. With regard to cheap imported machines in plastics processing, the demand will automatically subside in the near future, as competition is high in every product range and manufacturers are focussing on better quality of packaging with 100 per cent accuracy in terms of performance and aesthetics. The requirements have also increased by 25 to 30 per cent every year, and in such a scenario, the cheaper imported machinery will not be able to deliver, thereby automatically going out of circulation. Also, polymer production in the country is important for the plastics industry, else we will have to bow down against the global polymer cartel.


ECO INSIGHTS

Bioplastics

The ‘green’ alternative Bioplastics are environment-friendly, unlike petroleum-based or synthetic plastics. Yet, its penetration into the Indian market is limited on account of the cost factor and lack of an adequate manufacturing base. Moreover, various types of plastics that are not genuine bioplastics are sold in the market under its tag. A reality check…

Perses Bilimoria

G

reen is the latest buzzword, and unfortunately also, one of the most misused & misrepresented words in the world. Green plastics are better known as ‘bioplastics or biopolymers’. Generally, bioplastics or biopolymers refer to: Plastics based on renewable resources (normally the raw materials) such as starch, non-edible vegetable oils, plant extracts, etc Plastics that will compost almost completely (98 per cent) into the soil within a period of 180 days or less Some bioplastics based on fossil resources, and hence are not renewable and sustainable

Recent trends Several types of plastics that claim to be oxo degradable, photo degradable, etc, and often proclaim to be bioplastics or biopolymers are now available in the marketplace. However, not all these plastics are genuine. Oxo degradable and other plastics, which contain or 72

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

are made up of additives consisting of heavy metals such as cobalt, are even more harmful than normal synthetic plastics. Research papers provide evidence that these plastics end up as endocrine disruptors in living beings. Several Western nations are imposing restrictions on these plastics. However, in India there are still a large number of ‘oxo’ bags polluting the environment. There are two main reasons for this: Ignorance of consumers on what a bioplastic actually is The manufacturers taking advantage of the lack of authentication and implementation of certifications There is a disproportionate sale of genuine bioplastic bags – around 60 metric tonne (MT) per annum – and large amount of oxo degradable bags – over 1,000 MT per annum – are sold in India. The current trend for bioplastics would have been excellent, had it not been for the infringement of additive plastics in the marketplace at much cheaper prices. A number of plastic manufacturing facilities in India are printing the term


ECO INSIGHTS

‘bioplastic bag’ on an ‘oxo’ bag and charging customers twice the price. This might not come as a surprise to many in a country, where more than 40 per cent of the drugs sold are not authentic. Presently, worldwide there are a handful of actual manufacturers of bioplastics such as Cargill, Dupont, Novamont, BASF, and a few in China, Japan, Thailand, etc. The total production capacity of bioplastics worldwide is around 4,00,000 MT per year. This is not even 13 per cent of the total polymer capacity globally. Clearly, the potential is enormous. However, as with any new product or technology, the time span for commercialisation is around 40 years, and bioplastics has a long way to go. The key factors behind driving the growth of bioplastics in India include price and availability. Unfortunately, currently the raw material has to be imported from overseas. Hence, the burden of import duties, CENVAT, VAT, etc is added to the already high price of bioplastics, making it largely unviable to the mass market. The Central Government can help bring about a change through the exemption of import duty for all compostable bioplastics, especially, when used in the area of solid waste management. The other areas where bioplastics hold better prospects include the automobile, catering, beverage, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and agriculture sectors.

The need of the hour The promotion and availability of genuine bioplastics in the domestic

India is rich in natural resources. It would be beneficial for a conglomerate to locate a bioplastic manufacturing facility in India that could cater to the domestic and overseas markets. market call for the unconditional support of both the Central Government and State Governments. This will encourage and mandate the use of bioplastics and bring down the use of synthetic plastics, which is impacting the environment. So far, there has been only a small amount of lip service or vested interest in this area. It is interesting to note that worldwide, bioplastics are growing at 25 per cent year on year. Yet, India one of the world’s fastest growing economies, is showing no signs of growth. The reason is simple and obvious – bioplastics are too expensive in the country, with no manufacturing base here. Being a pioneer of the bioplastic products since 2001, the Indian scenario currently appears to be a typical chicken and egg situation. Unless a substantial and rapid growth in the application and usage of bioplastics takes place, the

Courtesy: Dordan

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country will not be able to have a level-playing field in terms of pricing with synthetic plastics.

Future trends The future of bioplastics in India depends on how determined the government is to create a level-playing field for local companies within the Indian market. India is rich in natural resources and it would be a win-win situation for a conglomerate to locate a bioplastic manufacturing facility in India, which could cater to both the domestic as well as the already matured market overseas. This will enable our R&D sector in this area to grow exponentially. Currently, there are about two or three bioplastic converters in India, which account for 60 to 80 MT of bioplastic products in the country. It is essential to be cautious in the approach to bioplastics in India. It is common to find entrepreneurs with little knowledge in the field of bioplastics establishing large-capacity converting facilities without a marketing plan in place. Unfortunately, these enterprising entrepreneurs come into the marketplace and destroy the efficacy of bioplastics by competing with synthetic plastics out of sheer desperation to make sales. This should never be the case. To sum up, bioplastics has a significant role in one’s day-to-day life. It would be prudent to mention that unless the biopolymer is produced in India, the sustainability of the business model is difficult. However, initiatives that would make bioplastic products more affordable to the masses are going on. A conservative current assessment, of the bioplastics industry in India could be interpreted as – great interest, weak implementation – while the future (within the next five years) assessment would be bright. Perses Bilimoria is the CEO and Founder of Earthsoul India Pvt Ltd. E-mail: earthsoulindia@hotmail.com


SHOWCASE -- INDIA

Extruders

1 Hall H 02 1/ Stall B

STEER Engineering offers Omega series extruders. These generation next co-rotating twinscrew extruders with deeper flights have supreme process capability. These offer the best feeding ability, greatest energy efficiency and the highest speed of operation that is practical (Do/Di = 1.71 and specific torque > 11.3 Nm/cm3). These extruders have applications in automotive compounds; polymer blends; de-volatilising; reactive processing; speciality polymers; thermo plastic elastomer/vulcanisers; natural fibres compounding; WPC; bio polymers; thermo set polymers; nanoparticle compounding; solvent extraction; processing of shear sensitive material such as PVC and PSU; fibre grade polyster, polyethylene masterbatches; and engineering. The Omega series come in pilotplant and production models and in various sizes (20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 75, 80 and 100 mm), capable of outputs in excess of several thousand kg per hour. STEER Engineering Pvt Ltd Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-2372 3309/10, Fax: 080-2372 3307 Email: info@steerworld.com

Seal pouch making machine

1 Hall 0 /1 7 Stall B

Pulveriser

N A Corporation offers specially developed next generation pulveriser machines suitable for processing of PVC pipes, LLDPE, LDPE, HDPE, EVA, PS, silicon rubber, PET & master batch manufacturing. To achieve the optimum production and consistent quality in the finished products, the Naroto pulverisers play an important role in solving the problem. Instead of blending the colour pigments/additives with granules the granules are pulverised in the pulveriser machines to produce the resin powders. The polymer resin powders get blended with the required colour pigments/additives in conventional mixers and are processed in the compounding machines/extruders to get superior quality of colour blending and additives distribution in the final products. The master batch may also be pulverised to required powder size (mesh) to special application for blending to achieve the required shades in typical moulding machine requirements. The next-generation pulveriser will bring a new era in rotomoulding/ masterbatch manufacturing and will ensure superior quality standards. N A Corporation Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2584 0374/1821 Fax: 079-2584 0809 Email: info@naroto.com

Additive masterbatches

Star Technocrates offers model Star 405. This is designed to make centre seal pouch, three side seal pouch, two side seal pouch, perforation pouch in different laminates. Pouches made on this machine can be used in detergent packing, biscuit and chocolate packing, gutkha and tambaku packing, snacks, etc. Its draw length is maximum 500 mm and minimum 50 mm, film thickness consists of maximum 80 microns and minimum of 30 microns. The pouch width is minimum 400 mm and minimum 75 mm and the machine speed consists of 180 strokes/min depending on pouch type, material thickness, width and draw length.

Blend Colours offers various kinds of additive masterbatches, which have desired properties to its end users. Its additive masterbatch range includes UV stabiliser, antistatic, conductive, slip, antiblock, polymer processing aid (PPA), dessicant, flame reardant, purging compound, antimicrobial, antioxidants and foaming agents.

Star Technocrates Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Mob: 099099 82476 Email: sales@startechno.in

Blend Colours Pvt Ltd Hyderabad - Andhra Pradesh Tel: 040 -2436 1499/ 2436 0887 Fax: 040-2436 0894

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3 Hall B Stall 6

Hall 5 3 Stall E


SHOWCASE -- INDIA

Dehumidification system

Hall 1 1 1/ Stall C

Allied Solutions offers Moretto’s Eureka, a revolutionary project for PET dehumidification. The project has been developed to reduce drastically the energy consumption and improve the performance in the PET drying systems. The modularity of the X MAX dryers allows having large drying systems, up to 20.000 m3/h. The units can be configured from 3 to 10 with up to 32 drying hoppers. The regeneration is made by rotation while one dryer is in regeneration, the other units continue operation; this guarantees a constant performance. The variable airflow adjusts automatically according to the process requirements avoiding the polymer thermal stress and viscosity variations. Flowmatik is an automatic integrated system for the process air distribution in the multi-hopper systems. It supplies the exact quantity of process air needed by the hoppers. Allied Solutions India Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-4221 0100, Fax: 022-2557 6234 Email: info@alliedsolutions.com

January 2011 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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SHOWCASE -- INDIA

Reclosable packing products and solutions

Hall 5 11 Stall J

SVP Packing Industry offers series of flexible reclosable packing products and solutions that are tailor made for customer requirements. The product range consists of PP and PE ziplock bags; PP and PE zipper profiles; PP and PE slider bags; and biodegradable ziplock bags. Various salient features of special low sealing temperature include a zipper manufactured from advanced polyolefin/specialty polymers; seal with laminates at a very low temperature; increases machine speed by 20 per cent; reduces wrinkles on films due to low temperature requirement; avoids delamination as temperature required is very low; and has good bonding between zipper and laminates. The latest development is soft seal zipper. It crushes at a very low temperature and pressure. Soft seal zipper does not leave gaps or pins-holes on side sealing pouches and is good for hydroscopic material, pharma products, etc. SVP Packing Industry Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2494 5116/17 Fax: 022-2494 5118 Email: info@svpmagicseal.com

Granulators

Hall 1 2 2/ Stall A

Yudo Hot Runner India offers new efficient range of granulators for different types of materials and products. Its capacity starts from 20 kg/hr to 400 kg/hr with low and high speed of crushing. These granulators are available with various options like titanium coated blade, strong 2-axis crushing blades. These are easy to move with a handle, easy to check blade through transparent window with CE certified controller. These are compact in size and have elegant design. Yudo Hot Runner India Pvt Ltd Thane - Maharashtra Tel: 0250-245 1155/56 Fax: 0250-245 1158 Email: sales@yudo.co.in 78

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

Centralised conveying system

Hall 1 3A 2/ Stall D

Shini Plastics Technologies offers centralised conveying system with a single solution for material handling and conveying. Its storage and material handling system is designed to provide full solution for material transport. It has a large selection of vacuum pumps to transport material, with different capacity and covering different distances to load or unload. The distribution branches have durable construction and flexible design for ensuring long life and flexibility for any area, type and material to handle. The hopper dryers in the centralised control system are designed for uniform heat distribution to ensure an adequate drying. Designed specially so that dry air blows in downward-direction and materials get uniform drying. Also this cyclonic exhaust enhances the efficiency of the operation process. Suction boxes are used for conveying the dried materials to the processing machine without an increase in its moisture contents anymore. The built-in sensors in hopper receivers guarantee that the material is supplied to the desired location when it is needed and no production downtime due to shortage of material. Central filters have large dust collector bins and accumulated compressed air is used to blast cartridge cleaned from inside out. Shini Plastics Technologies (India) Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 0250-3021125/36, Fax: 0250-3021100 Email: sales@shiniindia.com

Plastic raw materials

Hall 5 0 2 Stall R

AVI Additives offers various plastic raw materials products. Having considerable experience in this domain, the company boasts of necessary infrastructure and equipment to come up with suitable compounding solutions for plastic and polymers industry. Its other products comprise plastic masterbatches, plastic compounds, calcium filled polyropylene, tale filled polyethylene, colour masterbatch, fluroscent masterbatch, afterglow masterbatch, performance additives, engineering compounds, flame retardants and alloy. AVI Additives Pvt Ltd Hyderabad - Andhra Pradesh Tel: 040-2355 0551/52/53 Email: info@aviadditives.com


MPP JAN _2011_TAB 3_ENG EXPO PG_125 MPP JAN _2011_TAB 3_ENG EXPO PG_125


MPP JAN _2011_TAB 3_ENG EXPO PG_126 MPP JAN _2011_TAB 3_ENG EXPO PG_126


SHOWCASE -- INDIA

PVC pipe threading machine

Hall 2 0 Stall 1

Vikrant Special Machines offers PVC pipe threading machines model 'WPD2E' and 'WPD4E' complete with tangential diehead and chaser holders, motors, and DOL starter. These machines are used for cutting external thread on PVC pipes by chasing method. HSS tangential chasers are used as cutters. BSP, Metric, BSPT, NPT, BSW, threads can be cut on this machine depending upon the type of chasers. The PVC pipe threading machines are designed to give maximum efficiency and reliable performance under the most severe conditions of service with minimum maintenance cost. Vikrant Special Machines Pvt Ltd Kolkata - West Bengal Tel: 033-2551 3070, Fax: 033-2337 7053 Email: vikrantspecial@rediffmail.com The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

January 2011 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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SHOWCASE -- TAIWAN

Plastic injection moulding machine

Hall 6 4 Stall E

Fu Chun Shin Machinery Manufacture Co offers HT-SV series plastic injection moulding machine, which comes with servo motor and pump. Its features include high energy saving, high precision, high response, low noise and easy to use. In addition, the machine is provided with highly sensitive pressure feedback equipment. The close loop design helps the machine move precisely.

Hall 6 2 02 Stall C

Jon Wai Machinery Works Co offers injection moulding machines. The annual production of the company is 700 sets or up to 3,000 tonne injection moulding machines. The company offers a full range of injection moulding machines, and best value for turnkey solution. For the 3C precision industry, it has high pressure

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Jon Wai Machinery Works Co Ltd Taipei - Taiwan Tel: +886-2 2595 4867, Fax: +886-2 2593 2358 Email: jonwai.mc@msa.hinet.net

T-die for sheet and film

Fu Chun Shin Machinery Manufacture Co Ltd Tainan County - Taiwan Tel: +886-6 5950 68, Fax: +886-6 5951 120 Email: fcsco@fcs.com.tw

Injection moulding machine

series, thermosetting series, two-colour/mix-colour series, thin wall packaging series, PVC fitting series, preform injection moulding machines, cosmetic/closure moulding system, ball pen turnkey plant.

Hall 6 3 02 Stall B

GMA Machinery Enterprise Co offers T-die for sheet and film. It has specialised in the design and manufacture of T-die for sheet and film production. T-dies ranging from 10 mm to 8,000 mm are manufactured by the company and these are used for producing sheets and films with thickness ranging from 0.08 to 100 mm. Precise manifold design raises the quality of product thickness to achieve best thickness distribution in multi-layer coextrusion process. GMA Machinery Enterprise Co Ltd Taichung - Taiwan Tel: +886-4 2630 3228, Fax: +886-4 2630 3208 Email: glonical@ms67.hinet.net


SHOWCASE -- TAIWAN

Injection moulding machine

Hall 6 6 04 Stall A

Multiplas Enginery Co offers injection moulding machines. The company specialises in the design and manufacture of injection moulding machines for a wide range of applications. The vertical injection 'V' series of injection moulding machines feature up/ down clamping for easy insertion and enhanced safety, while allowing for wider operation area on four sides of the machine. Lead frame device can be equipped to make the insert moulding process automatic. Multi-mould option can be selected to improve productivity, for quality control and efficiency, while the vertical structure of the machine and its flexible arrangement of wires and pipes allow easy assembly, disassembly and maintenance. The machine occupies less floor space and its 2/3-colour process saves time and improves efficiency. Multiplas Enginery Co Ltd Taoyuan - Taiwan Tel: +886-3-3180090, Fax: +886-3-3974598 Email: sales@multiplas.com.tw

January 2011 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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SHOWCASE -- TAIWAN

Multiple cylinders injection moulding machine

Hall 6 1 01 Stall B

Shine Well Machinery Co offers multiple cylinders injection moulding machine. The 'SW-MB' series multiple cylinders injection moulding machine has clamping force ranging from 400 to 2,300 tonne. Instead of equipping conventional toggle mechanism, this multiple cylinders injection moulding machine comes with locking gears to position exact stroke of moving platen and generates clamping force by hydraulic cylinders. Unique multiple cylinders design could reduce total machinery length, as well as provide more than twice mould opening stroke in contrast with a toggle injection machine. Shine Well Machinery Co Ltd Tainan - Taiwan Tel: +886-6-3563-470, Fax: 886-6-3560-082 Email: shinewell@shinwell.com.tw

Bag-making machine

Hall 6 0 02 Stall A

Plas Alliance offers 'PL42BFWFA-V+SL4' roll to roll bag making machine and 'BFWFA-V+SL' series garbage bag on roll machine. These combine full automatic production with multi-tracks roll. With these machines, there is no longer any need to manually operate or wait to change the rollers. This series can supply side slitting seal to enable multi-tracks roll to roll at the same time to save on space and operating costs. This series uses the heavy-duty unwind bobbin of up to 1,000 mm diameter for faster production. Plas Alliance Ltd Chia-Yi Hsien - Taiwan Tel: +886-5-221 7005, Fax: +886-5-221 1929 Email: plas@pal-plas.com

Injection moulding machine

Hall6 4 Stall E

AFTA Technology Co offers servo power-saving injection moulding machine, HT-SV series. Power consumption is 40 per cent less than that of variable displacement pump and 70 per cent less than that of fixed displacement pump. Its servo gearshift dynamic control system is equipped with pressure feedback device for improved precision and sensitivity. AFTA Technology Co Ltd Tainan City - Taiwan Tel: +886-6 209 4858, Fax: +886-6-209 8977 Email: susan@afta.com.tw 82

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011


SHOWCASE -- TAIWAN

Hall 6 3 02 Stall B

Extrusion machinery

Leader Extrusion Machinery Ind Co offers extrusion machinery for film/ sheet applications. The company has more than 20 years experience designing and manufacturing plastic extrusion machinery. It specialises in PP, PS, PVC, PC sheet extrusion lines and PP, PC PET hollow profile sheet extrusion lines. The company has built a solid foundation utilising its knowhow and latest technology to offer highly reliable machinery for its customers. The company also develops customised machinery. Leader Extrusion Machinery Ind Co Ltd Taichung County - Taiwan Tel: +886-4 2638 0888 Fax: +886-4 2638 0333 Email: leader.ex@msa.hinet.net The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

January 2011 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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LEADERS SPEAK

‘Innovative technologies attract competition’ …says Christian Velasquez, Global Market Director, Pressure Sensitive Industry, Specialty Chemicals Business, Dow Corning Corporation. He is actively involved in promoting sustainability for the industry and educating people about its importance. In an exclusive interview with Geetha Jayaraman, Velasquez highlights the importance of innovation and sustainability. Innovation and market evolution for silicone manufacturers… Over the years, all market innovations inevitably mature. Innovative technologies attract competition that ultimately results in better quality products. While the industry continues to develop new products & applications, it is also creating a larger collection of mature businesses. Market demand keeps evolving. For a market innovator like Dow Corning, growth was achieved in two businesses within one business model. This business growth is largely attributed to innovation. Commitment to customers and being ‘innovative’ always commands a higher place for manufacturers. Same is the case with our company and over time, its business model, systems, processes and organisational management further evolved to strengthen its innovation focus with its customers and dominate the segment. Parallelling its success were customers who were innovating and growing their businesses using our silicone materials. Many customers in these maturing markets need not only innovative technology, but also expect the products to create value through lower costs in their mature product lines, thereby staying competitive in their markets. We offer solutions to develop new 84

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

products, expand into new geographic markets, improve productivity and drive down costs. We offer services, solutions and choices that one could have never imagined. Importance of silicone… Manufacturers, formulators, consumers and artisans have sophisticated needs. They require quality materials that provide creative and economical alternatives. Silicones can be used with or applied to other materials, improving their overall performance. Some of its characteristic features are as follows: Stable and resistant: Silicones are remarkably stable polymers. They are highly resistant to the damaging effects of age, sunlight, moisture and chemical exposure. Silicones retain their performance properties when exposed to extreme changes in their environment. They also have exceptional insulation features. Clean: Silicones are water-resistant and prevent the growth of bacteria or fungi. Products made with silicones are easy to clean. In building materials, they help prevent damage from moisture and mildew. Products made with silicones can be kept sterile without difficulty. Durable: Silicones can withstand a tremendous amount of stress, wear & tear. Unlike many synthetic materials,

they retain their fundamental chemical and physical properties when exposed to stressful environments over time. Silicones offer a level of reliable performance that improves the life span of many materials. India as a market… Indian market is cost-sensitive. Everyone is aiming to reduce costs. In order to gain a competitive edge, one must produce innovative, cost-effective and efficient materials. Dow Corning has recently launched pressure sensitive adhesives, which deliver a combination of benefits that help increase productivity while reducing overall raw material consumption and manufacturing costs. In addition, they deliver the reliable release performance expected by customers. Thus, delivering value to the customer is pivotal. The Advantage Series solventless line has proved its ability to reduce costs in coating operations worldwide. Building on that success, we have developed a new cost-saving release system for use in water-based coating operations. This increases platinum catalyst efficiency for fast cure at low catalyst levels – increasing the line speed and reducing costly platinum requirements. At the same time, it also brings down the coat weight by 15-25 per cent, reduces the


LEADERS SPEAK

raw material costs & energy requirements. We are also offering the potential to use low-cost base papers. Today’s consumers seek products that are both environmentfriendly and efficient. The Advantage Series product line has the globally proven ability to enhance line speed, improve coating performance, and provide a buffer against unpredictable swings in platinum metal prices. In many high-volume release coating operations, it is possible to reduce platinum usage and cut silicone costs by as much as 15 per cent with Advantage Series. And lower platinum usage is a major reason why coaters worldwide are turning to these proven coatings, which also offer excellent anchorage to many different substrates and are compatible with a wide variety of adhesives. Moreover, these formulations are quick and easy to adjust. These properties of adaptibility and versatility also enhance the processing, release performance and costeffectiveness of the current product line.

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This enables manufacturers to pursue new market opportunities with more confidence. Sustainability focus… In today’s world, sustainability is one of the key factors for any manufacturer. It means working with the customers to develop materials and solutions that help address some of the most pressing needs of our society. Thus, acting responsibly in our own operations to protect our environment and people is the need of the hour. We are constantly partnering with communities to help foster a quality of life for today as well as future generations, besides ensuring sustainability in all our products. Importance of R&D… Eco-innovation blends Dow Corning’s passion for innovation with one of our corporate values – sustainable development. It is an approach that brings together our focus on meeting our customers’ needs for new

environmentally compatible products and processes with our commitment to responsible management of resources. We are using our eco-innovation model and principles to help conserve precious natural reserves, reduce waste and increase use of renewable energy resources. Strategies to tap the potential in India… In a growing economy like India, the quality and efficiency of a product is critical. We have robust processes and practices that ensure all customers’ needs. We are constantly working on introducing novel products and technologies, since India is one of our key markets for innovation. The market is growing at a tremendous speed, so one has to ensure that the products are customised. We have an application laboratory focussing on the local customer needs. The key strategy would be interacting and responding to the needs of the industry.


SECTOR WATCH

Courtesy: Rajoo Engineers Ltd

Plastics’ versatility allows it to be used in everything from car parts to zip lock bags. This flexibility is influencing blown film extrusion technology leading to a number of advancements and innovations. One of the latest developments is that of 5 layers for polyolefin-based lamination grade films instead of 3 layers. Blown film extrusion is further seeing improvements in barrier films, where 9 layers are being used instead of 5 or 7 layers. Beverley Lewis takes a closer look at the advances being made in the blown film industry. January 2011 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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SECTOR WATCH

B

lown film technology can be used in a variety of applications ranging from simple mono-layer films for grocery & shopping bags, to complex and enhanced multi-layer structures for food packaging. In addition, it can process a variety of polymer types, although the majority uses grades of PE, LDPE, LLDPE and HDPE. The blown film industry has also seen rapid advances in production technology resulting in significant improvements in quality and increased outputs. Furthermore, the evolution of equipment and technology for blown film extrusion is particularly notable in the areas of product uniformity & consistency and process control.

Trends in the industry Mostly, it is the packaging industry, which is influencing the developments taking place in blown film extrusion technology. Manufacturers are working with guage variation, design changes in the die system and automatic control systems to expand their capabilities. Flexible packaging is currently the fastest growing industry in India

and consumers are demanding better packaging. Says Uday Shah, Director, Star Technocrates Pvt Ltd, “Consumers want to know what it means when a package is sustainable. Consumers are increasingly interested in their personal impact on the environment and are demanding more from manufacturers. Also, the economy is a big driver of how consumers make their choices.” Current market trends show that flexible packaging composite film is gradually replacing packing cans and bottles, which were produced using PP film tape technology. Now, a new generation of PP using full blown film materials is being used in the extrusion process of PP film. Arvind Mehta, Chairman, Welset Plast Extrusions Pvt Ltd, states, “Other latest trends include standard machines with the latest technology, with higher output per hour that down gauge the polymer without affecting the property of the product. As there is a shortage of technical manpower, automation is now welcomed by entrepreneurs who have the resources to invest in it.” Raw material has also influenced the quality, properties and output of

Courtesy: Rajoo Engineers Ltd

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While consumers are also more educated about the products they buy, they are still seeking and positively responding to innovations in products, packaging, advertising and branding. Uday Shah

Director, Star Technocrates Pvt Ltd the film. Currently, polymer producers are also engaged in developing new materials, eg high molecular HDPE (HM - HDPE) and LLDPE, from LDPE some years ago. S N Kabra, Vice Chairman & Managing Director, Kabra Extrusiontechnik Ltd, observes, “In recent years, metallocine LLDPE (mLLDPE) has been introduced. This material used in blends improves clarity, has high tensile strength, and good sealability. Due to its better properties, such blend offers benefits of superior film, down gauging and economy in formulation cost of PP grades, barrier materials like EVOH, polyamide and PVDC.” According to Sunil Jain, President, Rajoo Engineers Ltd, “One of the latest developments are 5 layers for polyolefin-based lamination grade films instead of 3 layers with the objective of down gauging and reducing costs. In barrier films, new investments are now witnessed in 9 layers instead of 5 or 7 layers.“ In terms of machine design, the ability to increase film output per mm die diameter is an innovation, which is a combination of die design and cooling efficiency. For


SECTOR WATCH

There are several applications in packaging sector where blown film is preferred. Even in developed countries like Europe and America, blown film is being produced and used in massive quantities. SN Kabra

Vice Chairman & Managing Director, Kabra Extrusiontechnik Ltd inner bubble cooling (IBC) systems based lines, generally 1 kg of film is produced from 1 mm of diameter and the latest trend is to increase the same to 1.8 kg level to cater to increasing customer demands. Another challenge faced by the industry is that there are a wide range of polymers with different physical properties required by end-users for flexible packaging. The blown film industry faces constant fluctuation in prices of various raw materials. Fluctuations in prices vary the cost of the end film substantially, because the polymer contributes as high as 80 per cent in input costs. Fragmented ordering by blown film customers is also a bottleneck faced by manufacturers. According to Kabra, “Every order for blown film, in printed or unprinted form is important to a blown film manufacturer. However, small runs for a particular job may increase downtime of a blown film machine and may generate wastage. The scenario is, however, changing due to increased consumption of blown film for various applications.”

Additionally, the availability of skilled manpower in flexible packaging has still not been resolved. The training of manpower requires a large amount of time and resources. Since the demand is increasing, more manpower needs to be trained for new production facilities to meet the needs of customers.

Growing demands Customers are demanding changes in technology, which will drive innovation. “The consumer is also more educated and aware of what he wants. He seeks constant innovation, which we have to provide through our machines. We fully understand that unless we provide our customers with an extra edge, they are not likely to come back to us in the future. Furthermore, quality and support are by-products now, which one does not talk about; it is already part of the package,” feels Shah. Earlier, manufacturers used to provide packaging materials as per their respective product design and availability. However, things have changed. Customers have become more demanding and manufacturers are required to pay close attention to the designing of products, which can prove to be a tough task. The frequent change in polymer prices also poses problems. The plastics & polymers industry in India has been growing at a healthy rate. Despite this significant growth in demand of petrochemicals, the per capita consumption in India is still far below the world average. This means there are immense opportunities for growth and investment (including FDI), going forward. Moreover, to fill the needs for higher levels of processing machinery, the plastics sector will require a large number of injection and blown film extrusion machines. Besides, blown film offers environmentally sustainable solutions compared to other packaging materials. January 2011 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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SECTOR WATCH

Challenges faced

Lower thickness films reduce the weight of the pack, and thereby decrease overall consumption of plastics. Polymers available today are bio-degradable and produced from non-petroleum sources. Sunil Jain

President, Rajoo Engineers Ltd

Blown film can offer an environmentally sustainable solution, since the plastic waste is used to develop new materials such as in road construction. Arvind Mehta

Chairman, Welset Plast Extrusions Pvt Ltd

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Blown film producers are challenged by the continual search for high value-added products to add to their portfolios. Often, these products are in small market segments that do not have enough volume to justify a complete new system. Another issue faced by blown film producers is resolving the varying extrusion needs and proposing a system with performance standards at a level consistent with dedicated, purpose-built machinery. “This is forcing brand owners to reformulate, rebrand and reprice products to avoid competing strictly on price. It is also increasing the importance of the package as a differentiator,” says Shah.

Sustainable solutions Majority of plastics are recyclable. The important issue is collection of plastic waste and recycling. As such, environment-friendly & bio-degradable polymers have also been developed. Normal polymers can also be made bio-degradable or oxo-degradable by addition of some percentage of specialised masterbatches. “These masterbatches have also been developed by some indigenous masterbatch manufacturers. These materials are processed on similar machinery used for other commonly used polymers. Bio-degradable polymers, however, are not popular in India because of their high cost,” informs Kabra. Bio-degradable polymers with hydrolyzable chemical bonds are researched extensively for biomedical, pharmaceutical, agricultural and packaging applications. The chemical nature of the degradation products, rather than that of the polymer itself, often critically influences biocompatibility. Bio-degradable polymers must also meet other criteria to be qualified as biomaterialprocessable, sterilisable, capable of controlled stability or degradation

in response to biological conditions. According to Jain, “Lower thickness films can be used, thus reducing the weight of the pack, and thereby, decreasing overall consumption of plastics. Polymers available today are bio-degradable and produced from non-petroleum sources.” Mehta opines, “Blown film can offer an environmentally sustainable solution, since the plastic waste is used to develop new materials, such as in road construction.”

Future of blown film technology Last year the plastics industry grew by an average of 20 per cent. The packaging industry grew by 20 to 25 per cent. “The future is growth-oriented. Due to globalisation, every citizen wants plastic packaging products, as it adds to the hygiene, cleanliness and assurance of product. Hence, the future of blown film technology appears bright,” feels Mehta. Blown film also gives flexibility to the processor to enter into film production as well as provides a tool to develop customised solutions for different applications with lower wastage and investment levels. Says Jain, “Venturing into exotic film structures even going up to 9 layers involves lower investment as compared to similar products in cast film. The use of blown film technology in the packaging of products such as pan masala (mouth freshners), milk and edible oil is growing significantly. Due to its enormous benefits, it is likely to gain wide acceptance, going forward.” In addition, film produced by the blown process has more balanced physical properties, in terms of machines. “There are several applications in the packaging sector where blown film is preferred. Even in Europe and America, blown film is being used in massive quantities,” adds Kabra.


MARKET TRENDS

Plastics in automotives

Off the beaten driveway… The automotive plastics industry is innovating extensively towards post-manufacture serviceability and cost-competitiveness. Annabel Dsouza and Kymberlee Fernandes analyse how fuel efficiency and sustainability are joining the ranks with style, safety and performance to claim the industry spotlight.

T

he phenomenal growth of the Indian economy has been celebrated at the global stage. The automotive industry has made a significant contribution to this success with a CAGR of 11.5 per cent in the last five years. With Tata Nano taking the Indian automobile industry by storm, there is a strong emphasis on cost efficiency. The cost factor of automobiles is directly linked to its fuel economy, which in turn depends upon the overall weight of the vehicle. This has resulted in the trend to replace metal with engineering plastic components, thereby ensuring light-weight automobiles. 96

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Herman Althoff, Senior Vice President, Engineering Plastics Asia-Pacific, BASF, says, “Engineering plastics help to reduce weight, increase safety & comfort, reduce noise levels, increase design flexibility, offer the possibility of modularisation that helps in lean manufacturing and enhances the aesthetics of the vehicle. Leading OEMs globally have been using it for over two decades – the technology is tried & proven, and the risk of adaption is low.” Specialty plastics have gained centre stage in automotive manufacturing to a large extent. The amount of specialised plastics employed in the body, chassis and engine components indicate how advanced the automotive plastics market is. On an average, the use of polyamide per car in Europe is 20 kg while Korea is not far behind with 15 kg. However, in India, an average of less than 5 kg polyamide is used per car. This reveals the extensive potential that exists within the industry, which makes the Indian market


MARKET TRENDS

Engineering plastics reduce weight & noise levels, increase safety, comfort, design flexibility and offer the possibility of modularisation. Herman Althoff

Senior Vice President, Engineering Plastics Asia-Pacific, BASF particularly attractive for the automotive plastics sector. As India is geared to be the global hub for compact cars with an estimated 4.5 million passenger vehicles by 2015, the plastics industry anticipates tremendous scope for various automotive applications. P Balendran, Vice President, Corporate Affairs, General Motors-India, states, “The use of plastics as structural components in closures, roofs, hoods and front-end systems is an emerging trend. Adhesives are also finding applications in reduction of BIW spotwelds and foams are being used for acoustic and structural

performance enhancement. Now, there is an emerging practice to use bumper fascias, which are painted through moulded-in film application. Carbon and glass fibre composites matrix in plastics are also providing an option of adequate structural strength.”

Highway of innovations Plastics have been known to make appealing interiors. However, recent research in material science has led to the development of specialty polymers for widespread applications ranging from chassis to engines. Althoff asserts, “The air intake manifold in the Nano from Tata Motors uses BASF’s glass-fibre reinforced engineering plastics. This is a highly complex component manufactured by Tata Visteon. It comprises different moulded parts that are welded together. Several critical tests, such as the vibration test and burst pressure test, are required before the product can be commercialised. A simulation tool is necessary to ensure a high degree of accuracy and reduce the production cycle time.” Although automotive plastics from multinational brands offer better variation control, it is observed that local manufacturers have reliable expertise in terms of final finished plastic-moulded products. This addresses the issues of part availability and cost-competitiveness. With plastics usage in automotives increasing everyday, innovations in the

direction of reducing total part count as against steel components, is of great significance. Also, efforts are being directed towards large-scale process integration of injection moulding and thermoforming of plastic components. The automotive industry is the largest user of reaction injection-moulded (RIM) polyurethane parts. Without adding weight or bulk, RIM maximises the shock absorption of car fenders, bumpers and spoilers. Light-weight RIM polyurethanes give cars better gas mileage and allow for affordable, innovative designs. Metal alloys that were used for automobile exterior parts are replaced by RIM polyurethane as they were susceptible to dents, dings, stone chips and corrosion. Today, many interior components are made with RIM polyurethane, such as steering wheels, air ducts, floor mats and seat bottoms. Umamaheswaran Venkatakrishnan, Automotive Director-Products, Marketing and Technology, SABIC Innovative Plastics, observes, “An accelerating trend in automotive lighting is its migration into the vehicle interior in areas such as illuminated sill plates, centre consoles and door trim panels. Specialty resins, already used extensively in headlamps and other exterior lighting, are finding new applications as lighting becomes an important interior design element.”

The green gear Although plastics enhance automobile fuel economy, their potential for

Courtesy: SABIC Innovative Plastics

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MARKET TRENDS

As plastics and steel technology evolves, the balance of application will drift towards the material that is able to meet all the part functions at a lower cost and weight penalty. P Balendran

Vice President, Corporate Affairs, General Motors-India

recycling is not entirely employed. The most common automotive plastic types are polypropylene, polyethylene, polyurethane, ABS and PVC. PP accounts for approximately 40 per cent of all car plastics commonly found in bumpers, wheel arch liners and dashboards, while PE and PU are used in seat foam. All these polymers are easily recyclable. However, effective mechanisms need to be installed for plastics to emerge as a sustainable solution. Says Althoff, “Together with enterprises in the plastics manufacturing industry and their customers, BASF participates in various waste recovery activities, both in ecological and economic terms. Plastics provide savings in terms of fossil energy resources and CO2 emissions. In the automotive sector, plastics allow the construction of lighter vehicles, resulting in fuel savings.”. He adds, “To ascertain the sustainability of a product, BASF has developed the eco-efficiency analysis tool. This compares various products or process alternatives and considers the entire lifecycle, including production and disposal, looking at both the efficiency and environmental effects.”

‘Brake’ing barriers

Injection moulding offers greater design flexibility while reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the manufacturing process. Umamaheswaran Venkatakrishnan

Automotive Director - Products, Marketing and Technology, SABIC Innovative Plastics

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Automotive engineering plastic grades differ based on the environment in which the component is operating. Plastic components in the vicinity of the engine block need to have high temperature resistance and dimensional stability. Plastic sensors and connectors must qualify to retain their mechanical properties even after exposure to hydrolysis in hot and humid conditions as well as be resistant to chemical reactions. While meeting these requirements, it is a challenge to find adequate design space within the vehicle architecture to design plastic components based on the part function. Apart from manufacturing inflexibility, plastic components have a limitation on post-manufacture serviceability. In the recent past, steering wheels had posed challenges to experts in terms of design and function. Typical steering wheels, comprising a die-cast magnesium or

aluminium armature overmoulded with flexible urethane foam, have remained basically unchanged for years. Venkatakrishnan says, “Lack of package space for integration of electronic components and restrictions on new styling & aesthetics has been a major drawback in conventional steering wheel design. Using injection moulding to process advanced polymers is a fresh approach to this. Hollow rims reduce weight and provide space for electronics. Compared to die casting and finishing, injection moulding offers greater design flexibility, avoids secondary operations and streamlines production while reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the manufacturing process.”

The windscreen view With soaring oil prices, consumers are demanding fuel-efficient cars. Along with styling, safety and performance, the vehicles’ production cost can be stabilised through use of plastic components. As a large number of OEMs establish manufacturing plants in India, the regional market for automotive plastics is geared to compete with other Asian countries. The energy-efficiency of plastics will help curtail CO2 emissions, thereby enhancing its market value, particularly in developing economies. Nanotechnology is likely to play a crucial role in the research of quality plastic components. Balendran says, “Carbon and glass-fibre thermoset/thermoplastic composites will find more applications in the automotive industry in future. They provide the attributes of high strength with light-weight. As plastics and steel technology evolves in the future, the balance of application will drift towards the material that is able to meet all the part functions at a lower cost and weight penalty.” High-performance plastics application is a relatively new phenomenon in India. As knowledge and awareness within the industry increases, it is important that the Indian automotive plastics segment keeps pace with the constantly evolving global technology.


MATERIAL CORNER

Fluoropolymers

Dependable for demanding applications Fluoropolymers and fluorocarbon polymers are often preferred materials of construction for high performance under demanding application conditions. Fluoropolymers, in general, are known for their chemical, high temperature and flame resistance. Manufacturers across industries can maximise cost and performance benefits by selecting the apt material of construction. David A Seiler & Mandar Amrute

A

ny polymer containing fluorine in its molecular structure is known as fluoropolymer. Some examples are ECTFE, ETFE, FEP, PCTFE, PFA, PTFE, PVDF, PVDF copolymer and PVF. And any polymer containing only carbon and fluorine in the molecular structure is termed fluorocarbon. Two examples of fluorocarbon polymers include FEP and PTFE. PFA is often referred to as a fluorocarbon, but it contains an oxygen molecule in the polymer chain. However, all fluorocarbon polymers are fluoropolymers. Chemical structure of PVDF and PTFE are shown below for better understanding of fluoropolymers. PVDF – [C2F2-C2H2] n

PTFE – [C2F2-C2F2] n

Chemical structures look similar, but considering that each unit is one of 1,000-12,000, the property differences of each fluoropolymer can be substantial. These differences,

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if properly understood, would allow designers to choose a material of construction that could perform outstandingly in service for over 40 years in what otherwise could be considered a difficult or excessively expensive engineering solution.

Special performance advantages Fluoropolymers are known for their performance under demanding conditions. Some of the basic guidelines and characteristics of fluoropolymers such as ECTFE, ETFE, FEP, PFA, PTFE, PVDF and PVDF copolymer mentioned below can be considered while selecting the material of construction from fluoropolymer family. These characteristics are general and it is important to discuss with the concerned resin manufacturer for detailed information. Always true Excellent chemical resistance


MATERIAL CORNER

Table 1: Listing of soft and hard fluoropolymers Heavier Lighter and softer and harder fluoropolymers fluoropolymers PTFE ECTFE FEP ETFE PFA Kynar® PVDF Kynar Flex® PVDF

Cost of fluoropolymers Figure 1 represents the indicative cost comparison among the fluoropolymers that are melt-processible. PTFE is not considered, as it is not easily processed via standard melt processing methods.

Chemical resistance Chemical

failure

involves

failure

incurred due to the contact of polymeric material with chemical or due to presence of chemicals. Chemical failure can be divided into four categories: Stress cracking: Where the polymer is embrittled by being in contact with the chemical Swelling: Where the polymer absorbs enough of the chemical that it changes the dimensions of the component in such a way that it no longer performs its intended functions Permeation: Where the chemical passes through the polymer to either the atmosphere or to the substrate that the polymer is protecting Dissolving: Where the chemical plasticates the polymer leaving it as a soft residue independent of its original shape There are not many known substances that cannot be handled by at least one of the fluoropolymers up to 450ºF (with conditions – structural support & increased polymer component wall thickness may be needed; allowances for expansion and contraction need to be considered). For gaining knowledge about chemical resistance of particular chemicals in contact with a fluoropolymer, it is best to contact the manufacturer directly.

Selection based on chemical resistance One needs to define the following for a chemical resistance assessment: Concentration of chemicals – is it 100 per cent, 10 per cent or trace 1 per cent? Temperature range on high & low end, and whether the exposure is indoor or outdoor Is permeation a factor? What are the pressure expectations? Are there any other variables such as abrasion, impact, vacuum, etc? Duration of exposure – is it one week/year, intermittent,

Very high

Fluoropoymers price indication

Price Per Kg ($)

Resistant to sunlight degradation Low flame and smoke characteristics Resistant to fungus and bacteria build-up Mostly true depending on the resin(s) selected Low permeability to most gases and liquids High purity in virgin form Readily processible, formable and weldable Cold weather impact strength High abrasion resistance Regulatory approvals in place for food contact High thermal stability Sometimes true, but specific to selected resin(s) Excellent mechanical strength at elevated temperature Resistant to nuclear radiation Resistant to high intensity UV lamps Excellent impact strength (nearly unbreakable) Very low co-efficient of friction Low melting point for bonding with other materials Soluble for making liquid formulated coatings Foamable for lighter weight and other performance benefits

Low

MFA, PFA, PCTFE

FEP

ETFE & ECTEF

Fluoropolymers

PVDF & PVDF Copolymer

Figure 1: Indicative prices of fluoropolymer processible via melt processing Source: Arkema market benchmarking prices for fluoropolymers

continuous, etc? Softer fluoropolymers tend to resist stress cracking to any substance. They often, however, have a higher degree of permeation to small non-polar molecules like bromine and chlorine. These polymers are also virtually insoluble. Harder fluoropolymers have a few substances that can stress crack them, especially at elevated temperatures. These polymers, however, typically are more resistant to permeation associated with pressure below 275ºF (135ºC). There are some chemicals that can dissolve these polymers.

Flame and smoke testing All the fluoropolymers discussed here exhibit excellent fire retardant performance. Depending on the test requirements, they exhibit different orders of performance, but they typically meet all test limits. All the fluoropolymers are rated UL V-0 All the fluoropolymers pass the Factory Mutual FM94 test limits All the fluoropolymers meet versions of NFPA 262 for wire, cable and other electrical products

High purity applications All the fluoropolymers in their ‘natural’ form exhibit purity that is acceptable in the semiconductor and pharmaceutical January 2011 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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ASTM E-84 (NFPA 255, UL 723) ASTM E-84 was a test designed to fail all plastics that contribute any significant smoke or allow any flame travel during an intense fire situation. To this date, only specially formulated PVDF resins are listed as passing the 25/50 rating in this test. Special formulated density PVDF foams also have been tested to meet 25/50 ratings.

industries. Components made from these resins tested in Hot 18 mega ohm water can exhibit the following performance, if they are processed under recommended conditions without contamination (after two volumetric washes): Metallic extractibles: Less than 20 ppb of 62 different metallic species Anion extractibles and salts: Less than 50 ppb Total organic carbon (TOC): Less than 1 ppm Fluoropolymers and fluorocarbon polymers are preferred materials of construction where chemical resistance as well as high heat resistance is preferred. Some of the popular and most common applications of these polymers include: Industrial coatings, architecture coatings, and household coatings for utensils Injection moulded industrial components like pall rings, nozzles, joints, etc Chemical industry pumps and pump parts Pipes, metal lining, tubes, valves and joints Electrical insulation and cables sheathing Automotive fuel line barrier layer and components Polymer processing aid and additives Apart from this, there are many other applications of fluoropolymers. One must discuss desired properties with the concerned resin manufacturer as per one’s needs.

Conclusion In certain chemical handling applications, fluoropolymers have been found to be the material of choice for construction. Though it can be difficult and confusing to select the best-fit fluoropolymers, the right selection can result in superior cost and performance benefits to users. When choosing resins for these applications, engineers should consider chemical compatibility, mechanical strength, physical properties, thermal limits, regulatory or industry standard issues (purity, listing compliance, etc), fabrication ease, and cost of each component. With more than 27 years of experience in the field of PVDF, David Seiler is the Global Fluoropolymers Technical Advisor, and North America Fluoropolymers Business Managerat Arkema, Inc. Email: dave.seiler@arkema.com Mandar Amrute is working with Arkema India for Application & Business Development of KynarÂŽ PVDF in chemical processing industry. He has experience of more than four years in the field of polymers, masterbatches and additives. Email: mandar.amrute@arkema.com

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INJECTION ZONE

Powder injection moulding

Creating complex parts with precision Over the last two decades, there had been a steady progress in application of injection moulding process for production of complex metallic parts using expensive materials. If these have to be produced with conventional machining & metal finishing techniques, the costs of manufacturing and material wastage can be prohibitive. So, the injection moulding process offers an attractive alternative route to manufacturing. Y R Anand

I

njection moulding processes are gaining popularity today on account of the benefits offered by it such as high productivity rates, design flexibility, repeatability and the ability to process a wide range of materials, among others. The real advantage in metal injection moulded parts lies in the complexity and small size of the part. Some current examples are in medical, dental, firearms, aerospace, automotive applications. Tight tolerances can be usually maintained without secondary processes. The difficulty of production through other means may make it inefficient or even impossible to manufacture such parts otherwise. Increasing complexity of traditional manufacturing methods typically does not increase cost in a metal injection moulding (MIM) operation due to the wide range of features possible through injection moulding (internal and external threads, miniaturisation, branding, etc).

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MIM is actually a subset of powder injection moulding (PIM), as the production philosophy is the same. The advantages of powder injection moulding are as follows: Special material compounds and alloys can be obtained by mixing different materials. Products can be custom-made to suit the final requirements Complex geometries are possible Free form surfaces are possible Homogeneous density Thermoplastic processing ‘Net shape’ parts are achieved Shrinkage can be safely predicted and controlled Injection moulding is cost-effective compared to axial pressing or isostatic pressing models Short set-up times However, this process is not economical for simple-shaped components and those with low volumes. PIM becomes more cost-effective with higher batch sizes and higher


INJECTION ZONE

complexity of the part. In addition to the advantages mentioned earlier, it needs to be noted that densities of between 94 per cent and 97 per cent are normally achieved. Sometimes even up to 100 per cent density is possible with ceramic materials. In most cases, no finishing work is necessary. However, it is possible to carry out further processing steps on the part. All materials that are fine-grained and can be sintered are suitable (hard metals, stainless steel, ceramics) for this process. The parts, which are ideally suited, will normally have intricate geometry, various secondary operations and high volume.

Manufacturing process scheme The main steps in powder injection moulding process are as follows: Powder materials and binders Compounding methods and the necessary equipment The injection moulding process Debinding and sintering of the component parts Conventional approach for machining of components involves minimum material removal to achieve the function. These are generally suitable for heavy parts. The PIM approach involves maximum material reduction to achieve the function. A lot of this is achieved by using cores to reduce wall thickness and is ideal for light parts. It is very important to get away from the conventional way of thinking with regard to the design and construction of metal components. For example, in order to process a certain given part, the conventional method would be to bore holes and make slits in a block of metal, and the part would be finished (but it would be heavy). With powder injection moulding, however, wall thickness must be kept to a minimum, similar to plastic injection moulding, in order to save material and shorten the time required for producing the part (light parts, short cycle). A wide variety of materials can be used that include metals such as

iron, iron-nickel alloys, curable, noncorroding steel, stainless steel, nickel-free steel (PANACEA), hard metals, carbides, magnet materials – strontium-ferrite, gold, platinum, and ceramics such as aluminium-oxide, zirconium oxide, silicon nitride and porcelain.

Feedstock information Particle shape: The particle shape has a great influence on working properties during the entire injection moulding process. Spherical powder offers the best working properties for injection moulding. Spattered material has got a bad injection moulding behaviour and a big shrinkage. Sheet-like powder is regulated during injection moulding and thus causes highly anisotropic shrinkage. Particle distribution: Particle distribution strongly influences debinding and shrinkage. It is possible to work with all particle distributions provided that the powder is not too rough. Gas-atomised metal powder: The ideal metal powder is gas-atomised. It is a powder smaller than 22 microns. The single metal particles do not have satelites.

Water-atomised metal powder: This powder is full of fissures and a lot of binder is needed for plasticising. It is not easy to process. They have a low green strength level and high shrinkage. Ceramic powder: Ceramic powders are smaller than metal powders by a big order of magnitude. The constitution of the material is quite mono-modal. Ceramic powders are frequently regulated during injection moulding due to the shape of the particles. Binders: Polyethylene is the most commonly used binder material used in this process. But in several cases, wax may also be used. There are now several companies offering premixed powders with binder materials. This makes the initiation of PIM projects much easier than in the past. But, to have a full control on the process, it is always wiser to control the feedstock and do the mixing internally. This also gives complete control of the blend and the final metallurgy of the material. The aim of the mixing process is to achieve maximum homogeneity of the material, whereby powder agglomerates

Injection moulding The plastic compound is injected under high pressure into the mould installed in the clamping unit. The mould remains closed during the period in which the moulded part hardens.

Dosage In the plasticising unit, the powder/binder granulate is melted under temperature and is mixed again.

Opening the mould When the moulding has cooled down, the nozzle is moved backwards away from the mould (raised) by the injection unit’s movement. The clamping unit opens and the moulded part is ejected by the automatic ejector.

Removing the part Robotic handling units are used so that filigree parts can be removed without damaging the mould. This procedure is recommended for the injection moulding of powder materials, as the green compacts should not be subjected to any impacts or strikes, which can influence the quality of the shaped part.

Figure 1: Injection moulding sequence Courtesy: ARBURG GmbH + Co of Germany

January 2011 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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INJECTION ZONE

have to be destroyed. In order to keep shrinkage to a minimum, the binder ratio must also be kept to a minimum. Typical mixers are pre-mixers that include quick mixing action and sigma blade mixer. Mixing units include shear roller extruder and twin-screw extruder. Requirements for the feedstock are each particle must be coated with binder, all powder agglomerates must be separated, must be storable, and granulates should have mono-modal grain structure. The feedstock must be stored dry and under exclusion of light (under 40°C). Some feedstocks have hydrophilic characteristics. Drying is no longer possible because the water is chemically bonded. It is recommended to store daily requirements in vacuum-sealed containers and avoid mixing it with regranulated materials. But, due to the high price of the powder, this cannot always be avoided.

Injection moulding machine On the injection moulding machine, following process steps have to be kept in mind: Melting of the feedstock and dosage Injection moulding of the material (speed regulated) Holding pressure (pressure regulated) Cooling of the parts Demoulding The actual injection moulding principle is the same as for thermoplastics. However, part removal via robot is strongly recommended as parts are sensitive to hair cracks, which can make finished parts unusable. So this is not an option due to productivity, but essential due to the process. In the early days, machines normally had low clamping force due to small number of cavities. But as volumes climb, the number of cavities will go up, and hence the clamping forces are also going up. Attention has to be paid to screw metallurgy and geometry. The screws for MIM are made of PM-steel, with back flow valve, hard metal inserts and bimetallic cylinder. Special geometries are needed for powder injection moulding with 110

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

long compression zone (compared to thermoplastics). But at the same time, less compression is necessary because feedstocks are not as compressible as plastics. Additionally, there are special options on the injection unit offered by certain manufacturers that are highly recommended for precision powder moulding. These options include controlling the hydraulic pressure of oil during start and stop of the injection movement. Active braking of the screw results in greater reproducibility and fewer rejects. However, this feature for braking of the screw is not standard and is often not considered by most processors. It is important to have a high quality control system in order to maintain the close tolerances and high precision of the parts. A typical flow diagram (Figure1) with integrated handling sequence for injection moulding process is: start, close mould, nozzle contact, injection, holding pressure, cooling & dosage, decompression, nozzle retraction, opening mould, handling retraction, handling in x-axis, ejection and simultaneously taking of component, ejector retraction, handling advance, depositing component. Some of the systems are mentioned below: Handling system: The parts that come out of injection moulding (green body) are brittle and fragile. It should never be allowed to drop down from the mould. To achieve this, it is essential to use an automated parts handling system to remove them from the mould and place on a conveyor belt. Hot runner system: Since the material after mixing and preparation is extremely expensive, it is important to reduce the material wastage at every step of the process. So it is also possible and highly recommended to use full hot runner systems with every mould. The process will treat it like the usual filled engineering plastics. There are companies offering special hot runners for the processing of metal filled plastic materials.

Debinding: Following methods can be considered for debinding depending on the feedstock materials: Catalytic debinding Thermal debinding Liquid and thermal debinding Drying Sintering: Sintering is the last stage of the PIM process, with the exception of finishing work. It takes place in the sinter furnace at temperatures of up to 1800°C. Here the particles are bonded firmly together and the finished part made usable. The furnace atmosphere should be protective furnace gas or inert gas for metal materials in order to prevent reactions of oxygen with the metal powder. For most oxide ceramics, this is not necessary. Air is sufficient and ambient pressure is normally prevalent. Sintered parts are homogenous and shrink in an isotropic fashion (independent of direction). The process will take care of: Heat treatment slightly below the melting point Compression of the powder stand 15-25 per cent Shrinkage – adjustment to the features of the material

Summing up PIM is not an answer to produce all metal parts. But, if the right volume to complexity is chosen, the process can prove to be economical indeed. An important thing to remember before venturing into PIM is that essentially the process is metallurgical. Knowledge of the metallurgical properties of the material is essential while processing on a moulding machine. Y R Anand has a Master’s degree in Production Engineering from IIT, Kharagpur. He worked for over nine years in manufacturing industries in Mumbai. Since 1980, he has been a partner of UNIMARK. The company deals with selling and servicing machines in plastics processing, tooling industry, microelectronics and wire mesh welding industry. Email: anand@unimark.in


CASE STUDY

Capillary rheometers

Resolving extrusion bottlenecks Several conventional methods are deployed to measure the viscosities of polymer melts. However, most of them have limitations. This article highlights the use of high shear rate capillary rheometer as a tool for solving problems during extrusion such as melt fracture, poor finish due to excessive work input to the melt and too much die swell. Dr Anand S Tadas

T

raditional methods of measuring viscosities of polymer melts include melt flow indexing (MFI) and rotational rheometers. However, these units only give low shear rate information. The Rosand capillary rheometer can measure across a broad range of shear rates and is able to simulate the high shear rates seen during extrusion processes. A polymer’s extrusion characteristics can therefore be accurately evaluated, eliminating the need for many extrusion trials. Common problems experienced during extrusion include melt fracture/shark skinning, poor finish etc. All these can be identified with the capillary rheometer and eliminated by good formulation. Here are two case studies that elaborate the advantages of capillary rheometers.

Case study 1: The problems of die swell and poor finish In this test, the polymer melt is subjected to a table of high shear rates giving equilibrium viscometry data at each step. Comparisons of flow curves and die swell results can be a valuable tool for determining extrusion differences

between samples. The die swell properties can be directly measured with a laser die swell unit. Figure 1 (a) indicates uni or biaxial dimensions of the extrudate at an adjustable height below the die. The die swell measured on the rheometer will therefore be an accurate indicator of the degree of die swell that could be expected during extrusion. The results in Fig 1 (b) show that Sample A has a lower shear viscosity than Sample B, which will allow the material to fill small mould apertures giving a better detail definition. The die swell results indicate that at high shear rates, Sample A displayed almost twice the die swell of Sample B, and therefore may produce a solution to the die swell problem that may be two-fold. Either the formulation is adjusted so that it displays properties similar to those of Sample B, or it is extruded at a lower shear rate to minimise the swell. Excessive die swell can cause a large number of part rejections, and hence, a considerable waste of polymer compound. Parts such as UPVC double-glazing frames, guttering and trunking need to be able to fit together tightly, and hence accurate dimensions are required. Polymers can vary from batch to batch in their molecular weight 4

Sample A Sample B

D1 mm

3 2 1 0 10

100

1,000

100,000

Shear rate/s-1

Figure 1(a): Die swell measurement apparatus

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Figure 1(b):Die swell results

100,000


CASE STUDY

Pressure (MPa)

and molecular weight distribution. These differences might not be obvious, if the quality control test used is MFI, which only tests at low Fig 2: Die swell during extrusion shear rates. The Rosand rheometers are able to simulate actual extrusion shear rates and measure the die swell by means of a laser micrometer. Figure 3 (a): A view of melt fracture/shark The polymer batches can then 30 be blended to 25 give acceptable 20 properties and 15 reduce waste. 10 The rheometers can be used in 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Shear rate/s conjunction with Figure 3 (b): Melt fracture as seen the lab and pilot on Malvern capillary rheometer scale extruders to formulate high quality polymer compound melts, and determine the acceptability of batches before they are used in production.

Case study 2: Melt fracture/shark skinning effect In this test, the polymer melt is subjected to a table of shear rates giving equilibrium viscometry data at each step. Figure 3 (a) depicts melt fracture/shark skinning effect. By plotting pressure vs shear rate Figure 3 (b), the onset and cessation of melt fracture can be seen. The melt fracture can be eliminated by the use of one or two routes. Either the extrusion shear rate can be altered so that it is outside the melt fracture region, or the formulation can be modified to change the melt fracture region. It is worth noting that melt fracture is dependent on shear stress rather than shear rate, so the correlation between rheometer and process may not be exact.

Conclusion The Rosand capillary rheometer can be used to help formulate polymer compounds that will not give melt fracture problems during extrusion; this can help to eliminate many pilot-scale trials. The rheometer only requires small sample volumes (c.50 ml) making it ideal for R&D testing. Dr Anand S Tadas is Product Specialist – Rheology with Malvern Aimil Instruments Pvt Ltd. Email: anand.tadas@malver.cccnaimil.com January 2011 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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TECHNOFOCUS

Compression injection moulding

Beyond the conventional Compression injection moulding attempts to combine the high productivity of conventional injection moulding and the stress-free moulding obtained by compression moulding. It is well-suited for articles with a high flow path/wall thickness ratio. Moreover, it enables to mould articles on a lower clamp tonnage than conventional injection moulding. Siddhartha Roy 1

Mould closes, but not fully

Screw moves forward

Figure1: Injection starts

2

Melt advance continues Cavity pressure builds up gradually

Screw moves forward Mould remains open

Figure 2: Injection continues

3

Melt advance stops Cavity is not fully filled

Screw switches to holding pressure Mould remains open

Figure 3: Injection stops

4

Mould closes fully Forward movement of moving half compresses melt gently

Screw completes RIP and then refills during cooling cycle Platen moves forward

Figure 4: Compression phase The above figures (1-4) depict compression injection moulding process

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H

istorically, moulding of plastics started with compression moulding. Majority of thermosets are still compression moulded, though most thermoplastics are injection moulded, as they are melt processible, making them suitable for the injection moulding process. The advantages of injection moulding are well-known – much faster cycle times, in seconds as compared to minutes in compression moulding. However, compression moulding has two distinct advantages even with thermoplastics, which include: Stress-free mouldings: The high pressures exerted on the melt and the fast cooling in injection moulding lock in a lot of stresses in the moulding. This is the driving force behind warpage and dimensional instability in injection-moulded products. Such built-in stresses may be unacceptable in certain products, especially if they are thin & flat and have to be moulded from high viscosity polymer systems. A classic case is the vinyl LP record. PVC has a high melt viscosity and compression moulding enabled the discs to be moulded without warpage, and with excellent retention of the microgroove fidelity needed for flawless sound reproduction (texture reproduction). The longer cycle times of compression moulding had to be lived with as it was nearly impossible to mould a good quality LP on injection moulding machines. Some 45 RPM singles were injection moulded, but the weight used to be more than their compression moulded counterparts.

Compact disks injection moulded from the less viscous polycarbonate have displaced the vinyl LP, but some music aficionados still swear by the rich analogue sounds of vinyl and some are still produced by compression moulding. Again in the PVC field, laboratory test sheets for tensile tests and other physical properties are compression moulded from roll milled stock. The test sheets have no residual stresses, that would interfere with the physical properties being tested. Dumbell and other test pieces are punched from the stress-free compression moulded sheet. Lower clamping tonnages: The clamping tonnages required for a moulded component being compression moulded is much lower than in injection moulding. In injection moulding, the clamp tonnage needed is actually determined by the peak filling pressure required to fill the last extremities of the mould cavity. This is usually a sharp spike and is much higher than the average filling pressure. However, the clamp tonnage of the machine has to be high enough to resist this peak pressure or the mould will open. A clamping tonnage of ~2,000 T is required to prevent the mould from opening up during injection. The platen size of such a large machine may be much more than required by the mould dimensions. In compression moulding, there is no end to fill peak, and much smaller dimensioned presses can be used to gently squeeze the heated polymer to fill the mould completely. The moulding force required to close the press platens would be much lower than in injection moulding. There could be significant


TECHNOFOCUS

savings in capital costs as the prices of injection moulding machines increase exponentially with clamp tonnage.

Compression injection moulding Compression injection moulding (CIM) is a technique, which synergises the advantages of injection moulding and compression moulding to offer a solution for difficult and costly-to-mould components using conventional techniques. The process sequence needs modifications right from the normal injection cycle. Nowadays, microprocessor controlled injection moulding machines are common, thus setting up the compression injection moulding sequence is easier than with electromechanically controlled machines of yore. However, precise control is needed to make CIM work, and setting up with a new mould needs precise adjustments. Machines with memory storage would be helpful to shorten setup times. Overflashing or underfilling is always risky if set conditions drift slightly. If part design permits, a variant of CIM can be used. The step-wise process is elaborated herein. (Figures 1-4)

CIM with auxiliary ram The main mould closes fully during injection. Precise clamping stroke adjustments during the cycle, which may be difficult with toggle machines are not needed. An auxiliary ram is required to be fitted concentric to the main clamping system. The action is similar to ejector pins but actually moves part of the mould. A hydraulic circuit is needed to build up sufficient pressure for the auxiliary ram. Compression injection moulding is a solution to tackle difficult-to-mould components. It is best suited for: Flow path/thickness ratios 100-150 or more (with high MFI resins) High melt viscosity engineering plastics Long fibre reinforced polymers. The lower injection pressure and squeezing action of compression phase preserves fibre length Foamed/foamed core mouldings with better surface finish 116

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Parts with thick bosses/ribs with virtually no sink marks. The compressing action compensated for in mould shrinkage, reducing sink marks Parts requiring fine texture registration. Thin wall injection moulding is a cutting-edge technology and is expensive. Injection pressures needed are several orders higher than in normal injection moulding. This calls for materials of construction that are much stronger than the steels used in conventional injection moulding machines. 5

Mould closes fully Auxiliary ram in retracted position

Screw moves forward

Figure 5: Injection starts 6 Auxiliary ram moves forward, compressing the melt

Screw moving forward

Figure 6: Injection continues 7 Auxiliary ram moves forward, compressing the melt

The consumer-fuelled trend of making laptops, handheld computers and mobile phones smaller and lighter has spawned a lot of thin wall mouldings from high strength engineering plastics, and high flow path/thickness ratios have now become common. Compression injection moulding could be adapted to produce such difficult-to-mould components. One common problem in thin wall mouldings like keypad covers is the numerous flow obstructions forced by the button cut-outs. There are numerous weld lines that are potential failure points. The auxiliary ram process could be effectively used so that the moving part of the mould mounted on the ram squeezes out the holes in the weld-free melt already injected. This is better than mechanically punching out the holes after the shell has cooled down. Stress points and stress whitening are common in post moulding blanking. The compression moulding process could also eliminate off-cuts of costly polymer generated in blanking. Added to this, the low level of moulding stresses guarantees a warpage- free component. This is important for mouldings, which have to be assembled with close tolerances. (Figures 5-8)

Conclusion

Screw switches to holding pressure

Figure 7: Injection stops, auxiliary ram movement starts 8 Auxiliary ram completes stroke, compressing the melt fully and filling & packing cavity

Figure 8: Auxiliary ram moves fully forward The above figures (5-8) depict compression injection moulding with auxiliary ram

Compression injection moulding process could be a workable solution to various moulding-related problems. The process is not wellknown in India, however, further developments in this area are possible and it is likely that more high-end appliance moulders would induct compression injection moulding in their work processes. Siddhartha Roy is well-versed in the processing of polyolefins, styrenics, polyamides and PC. A Chemical Engineer from IIT Kharagpur, he is a consultant at RoyPlasTech. Email: royplastech@rediffmail.com


MANAGEMENT MANTRAS

Money matters

Tackling root causes of cost Resolving cost-related issues in any organisation calls for an uncluttered understanding of the root cause of the cost and focus on that. This can happen, if there is a clarity on the sources and causes of cost. Read on for more insights... M Hariharan

T

he normal practice, if a company is not doing well, is to demand that every employee cut costs by 15 per cent. It is akin to telling each employee, ‘take 15 per cent less food’, or ‘restrict the number of words in a report to 85 per cent of the intended length’. What many of us call as cost control is nothing more than expense control. The expenses appearing in the profit and loss account are listed, percentage of the expenses on sales is calculated and aspirational targets to reduce the expenses are set. Expense appearing in the profit and loss accounts is the result of the management decisions taken. These decisions impact revenue, cost and investments. Addressing costs call for addressing the causes of cost, while reduction in expenses involves cutting them down, often without understanding the impacting factor of the cost. For example, material cost is considered as a percentage of sales and compared across periods. Then the attempt is made to reduce the material cost in isolation by forcing the purchase in-charge to look for alternative sources. Without any concern about the repercussions on the delayed material delivery, adverse impact on conversion cost & material losses and on the post-sales utilisation by the customer, the purchase in-charge ends up cutting the material purchase price. Material costs might have changed from the previous accounting period due to myriad reasons including change in material prices, product mix, input mix, material wastes and operating practices. 118

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If an increase happens, the blame is on factors beyond one’s influence and control (global meltdown); and in reverse situation, the credit goes to superior operating practices. Either way, companies sweep the reasons for variation under a singular major cause. There are four sources of causes for cost which are as follows: Economic factors: These include price level changes, government policies, social issues and other factors beyond one’s control and influence. Design factors: These include design of product, process, supply chain structure and organisation structure. They are normally within one’s influence and control. Operational factors: These revolve around the fulfillment of design and are influenced by the economic factors and design. These factors are normally within influence and control. Attitudinal factors: These involve the way people react to a situation and the culture of the organisation. These are also influenced by the design of organisation structure and may or may not be within influence. Now let us analyse these factors in detail.

Economic factors This is the often seen ‘pass-the-buck’ for any cost increase. For instance, reasons like ‘input prices have gone up’; ‘our suppliers are in a monopoly market’; ‘wages have gone up’, ‘government has changed the rules’; or ‘The green lobby is creating lot of problems’ are the most common. Hence, it is essential to isolate the economic factors first. Addressing


MANAGEMENT MANTRAS

these factors call for a more strategic focus than a simplistic operational focus. The following is an inclusive list of economic factors: Changes in price level: Prices are influenced by many factors, both macro and micro-economic. Macro-economic factors include demand-supply gaps, speculation of commodity prices, cost of living index going up leading to labour cost changes. The impact of these on the bottom line is to be isolated before comparing costs across periods. Otherwise, this will vitiate the sense of direction. Addressing these causes is to be at a strategic level of freezing the sources for longer duration. However, the flip side is when the prices fall. Micro-economic factors of an individual firm impacting the prices due to their monopoly position in the market, union level wage agreements, normal trend being followed within the company for salary increase (this drives the attitude) are again to be addressed at a strategic level. Developing alternative sources (design), relook at the practices within the organisation for salary hikes, relook at the agreements are some ways of influencing these causes. Costs going up due to this factor are normally not a worry, if it impacts all the players and the given product is a necessity for the customer. Companies palm off the cost impact to the customers. However, if it impacts only a particular firm, then it indicates that the company is in trouble. Design plays a crucial role here; if a modular design can be created to change the dependence on any one input, which thereby minimises the impact, or design a supply chain where the company is integrated with the upstream sources (holding the mining rights, and thereby minimising the price level changes). Government policies: Changes in tax structures, money market policies, restrictions and removal of restrictions on import play a significant role in adding to costs. For example, the design of supply chain is influenced by not only distances and nearness to sources, but also as

a result of speculation on introduction of GST. These again, in the ultimate analysis, will impact the whole industry and not only a specific firm. However, it will certainly impact differently, if various players are in different impact zones like a SEZ or FTZ. Even if competing within the domestic competition does not impact differently, if a firm competes globally or with global competition internally, then it has a huge impact on the cost structure. Triple bottom line (TBL) requirement: Global concern for measuring a firm’s performance based on people and profit makes the environment and society a non-negotiable necessary condition for survival of the business. Firms are expected to avoid exploitation and spend on creating carbon credits as they grow. It certainly impacts the costs internally for the firm. However, over a period of time, it hopefully, will impact all the firms. Whatever may be the situation, the impact of focussing on TBL will certainly impact the internal cost, mostly in an adverse way. But, it is often worth it.

Design factors Design can create or destroy. More than 90 per cent of the costs are committed by the time a firm goes for a detailed design (of the product, process and supply chain or organisation structure). Trying to reduce the cost after the damage is done is more like catching the bull by the tail. Once committed, a company should address the design issues to achieve significant cost impact. Design of the product: Product design plays a major role in the lifecycle cost of the product and the process. Any attempt to reduce the cost after the design is complete can have only a limited impact. For example, in the case of material costs, design has the greatest impact on the cost. Methodologies like target costing (in conjunction with value engineering and quality function deployment) can help the firm to design tomorrow’s cost through today’s design. Design of the process: Design of the product plays a significant role in the design of the process as well. Still process design independent of the product design impacts the operations cost significantly. Outdated technology, unreliable process due to faulty process design, inappropriate processes are capable of playing havoc with the cost structure. Design of the supply chain: If a customer wants online delivery directly, a company will need to keep stock nearer to the customer. This is essentially a supply chain design driving the cost structure. Creating supplier clusters, cross docking, milk run design, choice of the channel of distribution and sourcing, etc, all play a major role in the cost structure. Design of the organisation structure: For men may come and men may go; but I go on forever. (The Brook by Tennyson). Similarly, men may come and men may go, but the organisation structure goes on forever. Many firms still follow the pyramidal organisation structure created by DuPont Plc in the early 20th century. Organisations may be divided as functional or strategic business unit (SBU) or matrix or flat as it January 2011 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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is called for minimal levels of hierarchy. The structure drives the communication channel & the decision-making process, and ultimately the cost as well.

Operational factors This is the favourite ‘scapegoat’ for any cost increase. Bosses often are heard saying, ‘cut the cost everywhere; we need to tighten our belt’. Operations can only control cost and cannot reduce or manage cost beyond the boundaries of economic and design factors. Operations can fulfill and destroy, but cannot create. Design can create a far greater damage. But, operational inconsistencies, strains and penchant for creating waste all make a heady cocktail of cost increase. The three Ms – Muda, Mura and Muri – emerge out of operational inefficiencies. Wastes – Muda: Defects, overproduction, waiting, transportation, inventory, movement and extraprocessing, the seven wastes identified by Taichi Ohno, who propounded the Toyota Production System, are essentially triggered at the operational level. Though the structure of the supply chain, process and product do influence this, these seven wastes can emerge independent of the design. Lean thinking principle of aligning the process to the purpose (customer value), and thereby focussing on the six out of seven zeros (zero defect, zero lot size, zero lead time, zero breakdown, zero handling and zero setups) can minimise the Mudas. Inconsistency – Mura: Variability in processes, surges and inconsistencies force organisations to have capacity more than what is actually required. It becomes imperative to commit resources, men, machine and inventory to minimise the shock of the variability. Hence, the cost has a tendency to increase. Focussing on the seventh zero (zero surging), and thereby improving the process capability is critical for minimising Mura. Six Sigma focusses on this. Strain – Muri: Strenuous processes, postures, movements, strain on machines, men and other resources are 120

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the third ‘M’ of the infamous three Ms of Muda, Mura and Muri. Many of the quality initiatives focus primarily on the operational stability. The major role of operations is to ensure stability.

Attitudinal factors Afterall organisations are so-called as they are made up of people. People behave in the way their performance is measured. For example, selling price is not driven by the competition or customer or cost; it is driven by the month-end pressures of the salesman to achieve the target. Costs are incurred because there are budgets. The project completion time gets stretched to accommodate the padding that had been done during planning.

Design can create or destroy. A company should address design issues to achieve significant cost impact. Outdated performance measures: The purpose of a performance measure is to implement and validate strategy. Strategy has to be in sync with the changed environment. If there is a change in environment, it is believed to be temporary. This leads to a delay in formulating a strategy to meet the changing needs. It is necessary to adapt one’s performance measure to fulfill the strategy. Strategy is for the future, but delayed with reference to the changing environment; whereas performance measurement is for the past delaying to adapt to the strategy. There is an in-built anachronism among change in environment, strategy and performance measure. Short-term focus: Performance measures tend to focus on short-term achievement of targets. Even a CEO’s shelf-life is not more than three years. ‘Who cares what will happen to my successor; I need to cover my back (called as CYA syndrome)’

‘We follow the same attitude with our environment as well’ or ‘let me focus on reducing the purchase price; cycle time reduction is not my area of concern,’ called as not in my back yard (NIMBY) syndrome. All these attitudinal factors lead to locally optimising the cost but the overall cost may tend to increase. Fulfilling a budget through reprimand: Discretionary cost is a cost triggered at the discretion of the management, like research, sales promotion, training, CSR, etc. In these cases, a budget based on a percentage of sales target is given to the functional heads. If the budget is not exhausted, they may get a cut in the next year. We often find a high surge in these expenses in the last three months of the year.

Attaining sustainable cost advantage Profit is a mind relaxant. People tend to splurge when they do well, but get to stingy levels when they do badly. To consistently address cost, a cost-aware culture is critical. It is important to realise that cost is an effect and not a cause. Addressing the effect by taking one-off initiatives rarely deliver sustainable and significant cost advantage. It is essential to address the sources of the causes of costs. In many firms cost ownership is unclear. Sustainable cost advantage emerges out of tackling, taming, tracking and trapping the cost. This can be done only by scientifically addressing the causes. M Hariharan practises consultancy in the field of cost management, lean thinking, constraint management, management control system and business excellence as Founder Director, Savoir Faire Management Services. Savoir Faire develops cost information systems to support pricing, outsourcing and control decisions using the cost excellence (CE©) model. He is also a renowned trainer on the impact of customer focus, competitor actions and goal conflicts on the bottom-line of the business. Email: sfgroup@vsnl.com


PREVIEW

Advancing towards seamless

Material handling Mumbai | 17-19 Feb, 2011

Material handling industry in India is growing at a steady pace along with stable manufacturing intensification. The advancements in this industry are moving in line with its growth. But with the progress, there is a need to create awareness about innovative solutions and technologies available. In this regard, HiTech Material Handling Show promises to serve as a fertile ground for the entire industry to converge and display technology, innovation and futuristic material handling solutions.

Shibani Gharat

I

ndia is moving steadily on a smooth growth trajectory. This has shifted the focus from cost-cutting to expanding capacities in the market, which directly results into more factories and warehouses. In this era, material handling is an inevitable phenomenon for any manufacturing unit. Material handling equipment (MHE) may not directly contribute towards production of goods but they bring about efficiency in handling, transport and storage of goods. In fact, the MHE industry just about harmonises the entire process in a manufacturing set up by ensuring smooth and efficient distribution of goods. This makes these equipment one of the most vital ingredients of a manufacturing unit. “Any manufacturing unit, in any sector, requires equipment to handle materials in its factory. Different verticals need different solutions to cater to their MHE needs. Chemical industry, pharmaceutical, construction, electronics, energy, food & beverage, metalworking, metal-casting, plastics, aerospace manufacturing, automotive industries – all are dependent on the MHE industry,” avers Tushar Mehendale, MD, ElectroMech.

Technological advancements

Today, the MHE industry offers a plethora of products to various industry verticals as per the needs of a particular industry. There have been several advancements in the industry to cater to the customised requirements of various industry verticals. 122

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There are specialised equipment available for movement, storage, control and protection of materials, goods and products throughout the process of manufacturing, distribution, consumption and disposal. “Material handling, with each passing day, is becoming more complex and novel. It is rapidly evolving as well. The present market offers a variety of equipment and systems that help in moving materials in and out of a warehouse. The equipment is selected based on the type of products to be moved and the volume to be handled,” asserts Sudhanva Jategaonkar, Associate Vice President – B2B Publishing, Infomedia18.

Right equipment drives growth

A combination of appropriate and well-organised material handling is considered as key to determining the economies of operation. The correct selection would not only bring down the overall cost of operations, but also enhance the safety and comfort of operators, resulting in less fatigue and consequently more productivity. “Recently, we have seen the need for more robust equipment with high demand on uptime and capabilities. The equipment manufacturing industry has met these expectations with technologically advanced products, marking a shift towards more versatile and capable equipment. We, for example, have launched TRX series of cranes, which are higher capacity cranes with higher reach and have versatile functions with greater mobility,” notes

Rajesh Sharma, VP & Head – Marketing, Escorts Construction Equipment (ECEL). With the arrival of a variety of new, innovative and advanced products in the market, the problem of creating awareness among the users about the same also emerges. In order to create this awareness about innovative material handling solutions for the industry, Network18 Group is organising HiTech Material Handling Show in February 2011. The event aims to provide a conducive platform for showcasing bestin-class solutions that aid in attaining manufacturing efficiency. HiTech Material Handling Show will be held concurrently with HiTech Automation, under the umbrella show HiTech Manufacturing. Elaborating on the role of this show in creating awareness in the MHE industry, Jategaonkar avers, “There are various products that the MHE industry offers but the manufacturing industry is unaware of. Thus, there is a need to create awareness about these products. An ideal platform to achieve this is the futuristic show – HiTech Material Handling. At the show, latest manufacturing, distribution and supply chain solutions that will help the entire industry stay afloat will be showcased,”. From forklift trucks to automated logistics systems, HiTech Material Handling will showcase innovative and cost-effective solutions in racking and shelving, storage solutions, pallets and palletising equipment, third party logistics, transport and distribution, handling system design and warehousing.


EVENTS CALENDAR

National MUMBAI Concurrent Shows

Indore

Madhya Pradesh Jan 7-10, 2011 Maharaja Shivajirao School Grd, Chimanbaug

Chennai

Tamil Nadu Mar 11-13, 2011 Chennai Trade Centre

India’s premier industrial trade fair on products and technologies related to Machine Tools, Hydraulics & Pneumatics, Process Machinery & Equipment, Automation & Instrumentation, Packaging & Auxiliaries, IT Products, Electrical & Electronics, Material Handling and Safety Equipment. For details contact: Infomedia 18 Ltd, Ruby House, 1st Floor, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. Tel: 022-3003 4649/51 Fax: 022-3003 4499 Email: engexpo@infomedia18.in

PLASTIVISION INDIA 2011

This event is being designed to help exhibitors and visitors discover potential markets. It will be the 8th in the series of national exhibitions and seminars organised by AIPMA; January 20-24, 2011; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Sanjivini Kothare All India Plastics Manufacturers’ Association, Mumbai Tel: 022-2821 7324/7325 Fax: 022-2821 6390 Email:info@plastivision.org Website: www.aipma.net

India International Coatings Show 2011

This will serve as an interactive platform for raw materials suppliers, machinery manufacturers, safety/environment control advisors, end-user industries and software providers for the paints, pigments, inks and coatings industry in India, January 28-30, 2011; at Hotel Raj Hans, New Delhi For details contact: GN Tewari The Indian Paint Association, 123/529, Fazalganj Kanpur - 208 012 Tel: 051-2229 6867

Maharashtra Feb 17-19, 2011 Bombay Exhibition Centre

One of the largest advanced design and manufacturing events in India featuring Machine Tools, Hydraulics & Pneumatics, Process Machinery & Equipment, Automation & Instrumentation, Packaging & Auxiliaries, IT Products, Electrical & Electronics, Material Handling and Safety Equipment.

For details Infomedia 18 Ltd, Ruby House, 1st Floor, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. Tel: 022-3003 4650 Fax: 022 3003-4499 Email: hitech@infomedia18.in

Fax: 051-2221 8435 Email: Punjab@sancharnet.in

end-users; March 02-04, 2011; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai

Indian Medical Devices & Plastics Disposables Industry 2011

For details contact: Dr A Selvam FRP INSTITUTE Ekkattuthangal, Chennai - 600 097 Tel: 044-2225 0359/22251502 Fax: 044-2225 0349 Mob: 098414 26644 Email: info@icerpshow.com Website: www.icerpshow.com

For details contact: DL Pandya Classic Computer Services B-4, Mandir Apartment, Jodhpur Char Rasta Satellite Road Ahmedabad - 380 015 Tel: 079-2674 0611 Mob: 098254 57563 Email: mpds00@vsnl.com/ dlpandya@gmail.com Website: http://www.imdiconferences.com

PU TECH 2011

This conference will focus on the medical polymers processing and device manufacturing industry. It will highlight the technology research & market developments and regulations within this sector, February 1112, 2011; at the Ahmedabad Management Association Complex, Ahmedabad

International Conference & Exhibition on Reinforced Plastics

This bi-annual event of the Indian fibreglass reinforced plastics industry will provide an ideal opportunity for the global composites industry to focus its attention on India through interaction with raw materials processors, tools & accessories suppliers and

This exhibition & conference will bring together raw material producers, equipment suppliers and end-users under one roof to provide a comprehensive interaction of technology and industry; March 09-11, 2011; at the India Expo Centre, Greater Noida, New Delhi For details contact: Ramamurthy K Secretary General, IPuA Flat 7, III Floor Shakthi Mahal CIT Colony, Mylapore Chennai - 600004 Tel: 044-2499 5923 Fax: 044-2499 5923 Email: admin@pu-india.org Website: www.putechindia.com January 2011 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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EVENTS CALENDAR

International Arabplast

Plastec South 2011

This event will be a unique opportunity to the Middle East plastics & rubber industries. It will help exhibitors and visitors to discover the potential in the plastics markets around Middle East, Asia and Africa; January 8-11, 2011; at Dubai International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Dubai, UAE

This will be a platform for plastics industry professionals to explore the best products, technologies and services in the global plastics industry. It will focus on the primary processing machinery, CAD/CAM/CAE solutions, materials, mould components, handling/logistics, etc; March 16-17, 2011; at Orange County Convention Centre, Orlando, Florida, USA

For details contact: Jeen Joshua Al Fajer Information & Services Dubai, United Arab Emirates Tel: +971-50-8535820 Fax: +971-4-3403608 Email: alfajer@emirates.net.ae Website: www.arabplast.info

Interplastica 2010 This is an important trade fair for the plastics industry of Russia and its neighbouring countries, focussing on processing equipment, recycling lines and finished plastic goods; January 25-28, 2011; at Expocenter Krasnaya Presnya Fairground, Moscow, Russia For details contact: Messe Düsseldorf Moscow, Russia Tel: +7 495 605 11 00 Fax: +7 495 605 72 07 Email: info@messedi.ru Website: www.interplastica.de

Plastech West 2011 This international exhibition and conference will serve as a project acceleration resource with new technology, machinery and materials for increased efficiency and reduced costs & wastes; February 8-10, 2011; at Anaheim Convention Centre, Anaheim, California, USA For details contact: Canon Communications LLC Los Angeles, California, USA Tel: +1 (310) 445-4200 Fax: +1 (310) 445-4299 Email: info@cancom.com Website: www.canontradeshows.com/ expo/plastw11 128

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For details contact: UBM Canon 11444 W. Olympic Boulevard Los Angeles, California-90064-1549 Tel: 310/445-4200, Fax: 310/996-9499 Email: plsinfo@cancom.com Website: www.PLASTECsouth.com

Asia Masterbatch 2011 This programme will cover a number of issues like raw material, machinery, market trends and customer developments to provide an international forum for all companies involved in the Asian masterbatch business; March 28-30, 2011; Swissotel The Stamford, Singapore For details contact: Adele Brown Senior Conference Organiser Applied Market Research Bristol, United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0) 117 924 9442 Fax: +44(0)117 989 2128 Email: ab@amiplastics.com Website: www.amiplastics.com

European Coatings Show 2011 The European Coatings Show featuring adhesives, sealants and construction chemicals is one of the leading exhibitions for the international paints industry held every two years. The aim of this exhibition is to bring together all coating professionals under one roof; March 29-31, 2011; at Exhibition Centre, Nürnberg, Germany

For details contact: NürnbergMesse GmbH Messezentrum, Nürnberg, Germany Tel: +49 (0) 9 11. 86 06-0 Fax: +49 (0) 9 11. 86 06-82 28 Email: ariana.brandl@nuernbergmesse.de Website: www.european-coatingsshow.com

Bangla Plast 2011 This international fair seeks to explore the latest inventions & research for the plastics industry. It will suit entrepreneurs in the Indian subcontinent to consolidate and strengthen their business opportunities globally; April 20-23, 2011; at Bangabandhu International Conference Centre, Dhaka, Bangladesh For details contact: KMG Business Technology Ahmedabad Gujarat, India Tel: 079 26851511/079 3241 0602 Fax: +91 79 2685 1716 Email: info@kmgindia.com Website: www.kmgindia.com

Interplas 2011 This international event is aimed at showcasing the European polymer industry. It will feature the latest machinery & equipment for processing and converting polymers; September 27-29, 2011; NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom For details contact: Jenna Reid Plastics Multimedia Communications Ltd Unit 2, Chowley Oak Lane, Tattenhall, Cheshire, The United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0) 1829 770037 Fax: +44 (0) 1829 770047 Email: jenna@rapidnews.com Website: www.britishplasticsshow.com The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective organiser. In any case, it does not represent the views of Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities


R EP OR T

Engineering Expo provide an ideal ecosystem for companies to put forth their innovative offerings for prospective buyers and aid in taking the growth trajectory forward. The awe-inspiring and thought-provoking insights of the leaders resulted in garnering business worth ` 85 crore with a total visitor footfall of 20,397. What added to the cheer was the presence of SMEs as well as government organisations along with multinationals, which provided a conducive atmosphere for the manufacturing ecosystem to grow and flourish.

Engineering Expo: A success story The Engineering Expo provided exhibitors the opportunity to reach out to global giants who are visiting India to look out for prospective partners. Elaborating on

the role of Engineering Expo in generating business leads, Pankaj Kanherkar, Senior Territory Manager, Aventura Components, said, “Engineering Expo has offered Indian companies a good opportunity to promote their products, especially at a time when MNCs are visiting our country. The Expo offers scope for tremendous exchange of ideas. We not only get inputs from customers but also from other participating companies, which help us upgrade and improvise our products to meet the demands of our clients.” With the vast expanse of products & services on display, the event proved to be a one-stop-solutions-shop for exhibitors & visitors alike. Some of the leading companies that showcased their innovative solutions included Atlas Copco (India), Autotech CNC,

Boge Compressed Air System, Igus India, Misumi India, Nilkamal, Tussor Machine Tools India and S&T Engineers, among others. Thus, weaving an entire industrial ecosystem on a single centrestage, the Expo opened up multiple lucrative opportunities for the industries in this region and brought to the fore the criticality of networking and understanding customers’ needs in a better way.

India has emerged as one of the fastest growing economies, but its growth story will be incomplete if the bottom of the pyramid is not a part of this story. So, while we should cheer for what we have achieved, we must also strive to make India’s success story a holistic one and that will only happen when there is enough & more networking platforms being created, and technology transfer happens more often. Engineering Expo is one such platform, so utilise it to the fullest. Raja Kochar, MD – India, Eaton Corporation

Since last year, we have worked very closely with the Engineering Expo team in providing clean and green power for the show. This Expo provides opportunities where one can see a variety of engineering products & services and that too, under a green roof. Events like this not only offer new business opportunities but also give boost to the overall economy of the region. As we travel to other locations with the Expo, our own understanding of our customer requirement is enhanced and this provides valuable inputs to our R&D team. Sanjay Jain, AVP – Sales, Kirloskar Oil Engines

This is the first time we are taking part in Engineering Expo and I must congratulate the organisers and the team for putting up this extraordinary show. The manufacturing sector is the probable growth engine of the Indian economy and as its economy progresses, the sector will have a bigger role to play. But as the economy and the sector progresses, there is a need to collaborate more than ever. Engineering Expo is the place where you can collaborate with the right companies and find right partners & products. Guy Amoroso, MD, 123 Insight India

Exhibitions and trade shows have been used as an effective marketing medium to find new customers, improve business relationships with existing customers, introduce new products & services, and deliver many other meaningful & tangible business outcomes. Engineering Expo is one such event that has become a principal platform for product launches and business growth for several SMEs in this region. Over the years, the Expo has helped foster trade & commerce in the region and has helped the local industry’s interface with prospective investors. Sandeep Khosla, CEO - Publishing, Infomedia 18

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131


R EP OR T

Engineering Expo provide an ideal ecosystem for companies to put forth their innovative offerings for prospective buyers and aid in taking the growth trajectory forward. The awe-inspiring and thought-provoking insights of the leaders resulted in garnering business worth ` 85 crore with a total visitor footfall of 20,397. What added to the cheer was the presence of SMEs as well as government organisations along with multinationals, which provided a conducive atmosphere for the manufacturing ecosystem to grow and flourish.

Engineering Expo: A success story The Engineering Expo provided exhibitors the opportunity to reach out to global giants who are visiting India to look out for prospective partners. Elaborating on

the role of Engineering Expo in generating business leads, Pankaj Kanherkar, Senior Territory Manager, Aventura Components, said, “Engineering Expo has offered Indian companies a good opportunity to promote their products, especially at a time when MNCs are visiting our country. The Expo offers scope for tremendous exchange of ideas. We not only get inputs from customers but also from other participating companies, which help us upgrade and improvise our products to meet the demands of our clients.” With the vast expanse of products & services on display, the event proved to be a one-stop-solutions-shop for exhibitors & visitors alike. Some of the leading companies that showcased their innovative solutions included Atlas Copco (India), Autotech CNC,

Boge Compressed Air System, Igus India, Misumi India, Nilkamal, Tussor Machine Tools India and S&T Engineers, among others. Thus, weaving an entire industrial ecosystem on a single centrestage, the Expo opened up multiple lucrative opportunities for the industries in this region and brought to the fore the criticality of networking and understanding customers’ needs in a better way.

India has emerged as one of the fastest growing economies, but its growth story will be incomplete if the bottom of the pyramid is not a part of this story. So, while we should cheer for what we have achieved, we must also strive to make India’s success story a holistic one and that will only happen when there is enough & more networking platforms being created, and technology transfer happens more often. Engineering Expo is one such platform, so utilise it to the fullest. Raja Kochar, MD – India, Eaton Corporation

Since last year, we have worked very closely with the Engineering Expo team in providing clean and green power for the show. This Expo provides opportunities where one can see a variety of engineering products & services and that too, under a green roof. Events like this not only offer new business opportunities but also give boost to the overall economy of the region. As we travel to other locations with the Expo, our own understanding of our customer requirement is enhanced and this provides valuable inputs to our R&D team. Sanjay Jain, AVP – Sales, Kirloskar Oil Engines

This is the first time we are taking part in Engineering Expo and I must congratulate the organisers and the team for putting up this extraordinary show. The manufacturing sector is the probable growth engine of the Indian economy and as its economy progresses, the sector will have a bigger role to play. But as the economy and the sector progresses, there is a need to collaborate more than ever. Engineering Expo is the place where you can collaborate with the right companies and find right partners & products. Guy Amoroso, MD, 123 Insight India

Exhibitions and trade shows have been used as an effective marketing medium to find new customers, improve business relationships with existing customers, introduce new products & services, and deliver many other meaningful & tangible business outcomes. Engineering Expo is one such event that has become a principal platform for product launches and business growth for several SMEs in this region. Over the years, the Expo has helped foster trade & commerce in the region and has helped the local industry’s interface with prospective investors. Sandeep Khosla, CEO - Publishing, Infomedia 18

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

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Delighted visitors

Growth phase

Maulik Desai, MD, Unique Industrial Services

S Chandrasekhar, Senior Manager (Western Region), S&T Engineers

I was expecting Engineering Expo to be organised on a much smaller scale. But the Expo was so well-organised that it surpassed my expectations. I could easily find all the products I was looking for.

Santosh Patil Kulkarni, Manager, Ansys The Engineering Expo is good for the industry, especially the SMEs. I was able to get the products I needed. The good part is that there are electronics-related products available at the Expo.

Shireesh P Lawate, CEO, Parth Enterprises Engineering Expo has a wide range of engineering products on display. The organiser took steps to ensure that only quality visitors attended the show. To make it better, the Expo can be made more vertical-specific.

Animesh Kumar, AVP & Branch Head, Axis Bank My experience at Engineering Expo has been quite good. There were a number of engineering tools and forging products available at the exhibition. However, a better variety was needed. On the whole, the Expo was very informative.

D R Gadakh, Manager, New Aniket Packing Industries Engineering Expo was well-organised. The stalls were well-arranged and properly segregated.

8,123 are the total ads business le d te genera

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We are optimistic about the growth of our sector with increase in the number of start-ups. Various sectors like automobile, dies & moulds and component manufacturing are showing good performance. As a result, the demand for our machines will increase to match their requirements.

Sohrab Daver, Executive Director, Masibus Automation and Instrumentation We have set up an additional system integration unit in our Gandhinagar plant and already have a manufacturing plant in Goa. We are expanding and plan to set up plants all over the country to keep pace with the manufacturing industry. We expect our company to witness a 30-40 per cent compounded growth in the next five years.

A P Singhal, MD, Emtex Marketing We are growing by 100 per cent in terms of turnover. We are also consolidating our market position by investing in new products.

Amit Shah, Manager - Sales, East India Bearing Co Our engineering products are unique in the world. While others produce ball or spherical bearings, we have split roller bearing equipped for the mining or steel industry. Companies using our equipment can reduce upto 90 per cent of downtime, thereby significantly improving shop floor efficiency.

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R EP OR T

Alluring alliances @ Engineering Expo Pune 2010

Demand trends witnessed

Arun Vijay, Director - Marketing, Autotech CNC

The need of the hour in the manufacturing sector is to upgrade existing technology to stay ahead of competitors.

Engineering Expo has helped us find a good number of references. We are a Pune-based company and most of our visitors were our clients. I am sure that if we participate in Engineering Expo editions held in other cities, we will definitely get a good response.

Prashant Joshi, Business Head, Hi-Tech Group We have participated in Engineering Expo to reach out to emerging markets like Pune, Ahmedabad, Chennai, etc, which are usually not covered by other trade exhibitions.

Preeti Nagarkar, Managing Partner, Mapyn

Milan Supanekar, Owner, Welding Technologies India

Pawan Wadhwan, Manager (Business Development), Sipcon Instrument Industries Nowadays, customers have become more demanding. They want the best product at the lowest cost. Therefore, companies should focus more on providing the highest quality products & services to their customers, at the lowest possible cost.

Nimesh Karlya, Director, Jay Equipment System

Engineering Expo has provided us a platform to display our products to our target customers. It gives us the chance to interact with customers and visitors, who give us valuable inputs on how we can upgrade our products.

Customers always track the market for the latest technology, high-quality and low-cost products. Hence, it is important that companies work on their branding and offer good quality products, which will enhance the company’s overall productivity.

Hemang K Ghelani, Product Manager – Control Components, Omron Industrial Automation

Dinesh Chaudhary, Director, Energy Mission Engineers

Engineering Expo helps us reach out to our customers. We look at the Expo as a marketing tool or a promotional activity to create brand awareness.

Customers want NC and CNC machines. This means that automation is in demand. At the same time, customers have also been demanding bigger and special machines.

82% visitors y were happ with the nge product ra d displaye

66% of the vi sitors have visited the Expo in previo us editions

20,397 ited vis visitors ing er Engine e un Expo P

82% visitors were from Pune

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Engineering Expo Ahmedabad 2010

Taking the triumph forward Creating history, Engineering Expo Ahmedabad 2010 registered over 250 exhibitors and generated business of over ` 100 crore, the biggest ever since its launch in 2002. Taking the triumph forward and playing the role of an enabler, this year’s Engineering Expo Ahmedabad edition kept up with its promise of generating envious business deals and maximum returns on investment for exhibitors and visitors alike. A report… Purna Parmar

H

aving established their mettle in facilitating growth, trade shows have been proven to be success platforms for companies to form business alliances and transactions. This was evident from the grand success of the 9th edition of Engineering Expo Ahmedabad. Apart from being a good promotional vehicle for brands and products, trade

shows offer lucrative business prospects and a platform for business generation. Engineering Expo Ahmedabad 2010 proved to be one of the biggest shows in the history of Engineering Expo Ahmedabad, since its inception in 2002. It has managed to generate business amounting to over ` 300 crore in the past nine years; moreover, this year it managed to generate business transactions worth ` 100 crore. Talking about the returns the exhibitors get

from the expo, Shirish Vyas, Marketing Manager, Cranoist Material Handling Equipments, said, “About 15-20 per cent of our business is done at the Engineering Expo. But, we do not set any sales target for the expo, as these sales are just an incentive of the investments we make while participating in the expo. We spend a substantial amount of money on exhibitions and expos.” Meanwhile, Nurul Vora, Marketing Manager, Hydro Pneumatic

Engineering Expo - Ahmedabad basks in glory The four-day Engineering Expo at Ahmedabad was flagged off on December 10, 2010, with a traditional lamp-lighting ceremony followed by a ribbon cutting ceremony. Industry torchbearers BB Swain, IAS, Industries Commissioner, Government of Gujarat, and Pradyumna Vyas, Director, National Institute of Design, bestowed an auspicious momentum to the event. Both Vyas and Swain were overwhelmed with the strength displayed by the industry at the event. Serving as a perfect platform for profit, the Expo managed to converge the entire manufacturing and engineering industry of Gujarat under one roof. Manufacturing forms the core of the state’s industrial profile, according to Swain, with Gujarat contributing 40 per cent to the total engineering export of India. The manufacturing industry helps provide employment to over 18 lakh people in the state. , Governm mmissioner

Co S, Industries BB Swain, IA edabad g Expo Ahm Engineerin 134

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ent of Guja

rat inaugur

ating


MPP JAN _2011_TAB 4_ENG EXPO PG_143 MPP JAN _2011_TAB 4_ENG EXPO PG_143


MPP JAN _2011_TAB 4_ENG EXPO PG_144 MPP JAN _2011_TAB 4_ENG EXPO PG_144


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Equipments, explained, “The conversion rate at the Engineering Expo is over 50 per cent. We sold a machine on the first day of the exhibition and generated business of about ` 10 lakh by the end of the expo. Trade fairs easily gather all Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) customers and process-related customers under one roof, and this is what makes Engineering Expo unique.” Highlighting the glorifying success achieved by the Expo year after year, Sandeep Khosla, CEO - Publishing, Infomedia18, averred, “Engineering Expo Ahmedabad has managed to withstand the test of time, and for nine consecutive years, it has been a

vital platform for forging trade ties. Right from new product launches to substantial business transactions, the Engineering Expo Ahmedabad has established itself as a trendsetter of innovative offerings.” Similarly, Mehul Gajjar, CMD, Heena Equipment, informed, “Apart from meeting prospective clients, we see latest technology and machinery displayed by the industry. We sold four welding machines on the first day of the exhibition. We have launched a new product at the expo. It is a three-in-one machine that can do all types of welding and cutting work.” While Ahmedabad serves as a perfect trade centre for the industry, smaller

cities like Rajkot have now emerged as a manufacturing hub, especially for the machine tools industry. Tushar Shaparia, MD, Jamnagar Machine Tools, commented, “The machine tools industry is growing by 15-20 per cent. Rajkot is emerging as a manufacturing hub for machine tools industry, and this is mainly due to the presence of other machinery and related companies in Rajkot. Trade shows like the Engineering Expo play a vital role in our growth, as we get an opportunity to meet prospective clients and create a good brand presence in a big city like Ahmedabad. ” In all, Engineering Expo Ahmedabad managed to successfully take the legacy forward, proving to be the biggest ever expo in the history of Ahmedabad and the second biggest in the history of Engineering Expo. While the expo managed to serve as a lucrative business platform and the biggest product showcase vehicle, it also managed to give the best Return On Investment (ROI) to the exhibitors.

Creating a business environ Engineering Expo Ahmedabad managed to generate business worth ` 100 crore. It witnessed the participation of more than 250 exhibitors from various industry verticals and a visitor turnout of over 19,759. To facilitate the enterprising spirit of the industry and provide a platform, Gujarat government is coming up with two new conventional centres in Gandhi Nagar, both of which will be used for the next Vibrant Gujarat, slated to take place in January. Further, talking about how trade fairs help the industry grow, Shirish Vyas, Marketing Manager, Cranoist Material Handling Equipments, said, “Trade fairs like the Engineering Expo are helpful in displaying our products on a single platform where all our potential customers can come and have a first-hand experience of the product.” Similarly, Shrikesh Mehta, Bearing and Tool Centre, said, “A trade fair is one of the best opportunities a company can have to showcase its products for its customers. It is difficult for us to promote our products door-to-door, but in a trade fair, the customer comes to you, and thus it helps us create a good database of customers.”

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250+ exhibitors Innovative products

Market scenario

Madhur Mehrotra, Head – Chemical Division, Earth Water Group

Paresh Patel, Executive Marketing, Masibus Automation and Instrumentation

We mainly offer purification and filtration services for the water and waste water management industry. We have launched a new range of softeners in the Engineering Expo this year. This is a very convenient and easy to use product. It does not have much of time-consuming functions. These can be used in large homes, industries and even large institutions.

Gujarat, particularly Ahmedabad, is a new market for us and so it is a good opportunity for us to explore this market. Rajkot in particular is an emerging hub and has a large number of manufacturing companies, while Ahmedabad is a trade hub.

Ashish Vij, Executive – B D, Bry-Air We deal in air treatment systems and moisture control systems. The Indian manufacturing industry is moving up the growth curve, and we are very optimistic about this growth. Trade fairs like these help us display our products to the right audience, as the visitor profile of these trade fairs is focussed.

Manish Raval, VP-Sales, Mobienturbo Trade fairs are a platform where we can display our technology and explain customers about the design and technical aspects of the product. We have conducted several technical sessions in trade fairs, where we demonstrate the importance of design and other technical aspects of the product.

Mangesh Agarwal, GM, Cleaning and Filtration Systems India The Ahmedabad market for cleaning and filtration equipment is still at a nascent stage. At trade fairs we get to know the kind of technologies and products available in the market.

the 2010 edition was e biggest show in th ing er history of Engine be , Expo Ahmedabad tors, bi it number of exhi ed, pi visitors, area occu for d revenue generate ount am the company or d te ac of business trans

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Tushar Shaparia, MD, Jamnagar Machine Tools The machine tools industry is growing by 15-20 per cent per year. About 20 per cent of our business is generated through trade fairs.

Amit Gosai, Sales Engineer, S & T Engineers Ahmedabad is one of our target markets, we also plan to have a footprint in the surrounding areas like Rajkot, Baroda and Anand. We see a good potential in these markets as well.

Ashish Sengupta, GM, Atlas Copco The compressor market in India is not very competitive in nature. And as we are not in a price battle. Looking at the way the market is developing, compressors will become a necessity for all industries. Gujarat is one of the most developed states in India. Moreover, in Gujarat even smaller cities like Vapi are highly developed. So the scope of economic development is far better in Gujarat. We see huge geographical advantage in Gujarat, as the means of transportation is high.

More than 100,000 k g machinery were broug ht in by exhib itors at the Expo, whic h is again the highest in the history of Engineerin g Expo


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Business of over `100

crore

19,759+ Visitors

Creating a business environment

Enchanted visitors

Manish Chandrani, B E Elect, Kumarpal Kantilal and Co, Kirloskar Oils

Rajesh Panchal, MD, Ambica Engineering

Trade fairs are mainly seen as an opportunity to showcase products. We have been participating in the Engineering Expo for the last four years and have generated many leads, out of which 40 per cent of our leads get converted into business.

Shreepad Deshpande, Regional Manager – West, Kulkarni Power Tools We are first time exhibitors for this expo but the response has been very good for us, as we have sold two machines at the expo.

Pratik Bhatt, Sales & Service, Komet India

Generally, we see products only in company brochures, and it is difficult for us to understand the product and other features of the equipment. However, at the expo we had first hand experience of the products and also saw a demo of the machine. I have booked a welding machine here as well.

Deepak Shah, Manager, Spartex I am not from engineering background, but the kind of products displayed were interesting and I learnt a lot about manufacturing and CNC machines at the Expo.

Jaiprakash Gala, Sales Engineer, Mamta Engineering

The manufacturing industry is growing at a fast pace and Gujarat has been on the forefront. Over 8 per cent of our marketing budget is spent on trade exhibitions and shows, while 20 per cent of our business is generated from these exhibitions.

The expo was well-organised, especially the venue chosen was very good. It looks like an international event. The exhibitors from power tools industry were helpful, as they offered guidance regarding the applications. The equipment displayed could be used at home as well as in industrial shop floors.

Jagadish Patel, Sales Manager, Neutron Power Tools

Manish Sangla, Manager, Tasyani Traders

We have been participating in the Engineering Expo since last five years. Although we do not concentrate on making any actual sales, we manage to generate several business leads for our dealers spread across the state.

t 85 per cen und fo rs o it ib exh g Expo Engineerin d 2010 Ahmedaba other better than s trade show

The organisers have chosen a very good venue, and the expo was also grand. I got the tools I needed at the expo. I plan to come next year as well.

83 per cen were ha t exhibitors ppy wit h the quality of visito rs at the sho w

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REPORT

Frost & Sullivan 2010 India Excellence in Chemicals, Materials and Food Awards

Inspiring performance, imparting knowledge In a unique award ceremony held recently, Frost and Sullivan (F&S) recognised and rewarded the top performers in the fields of Chemicals, Materials and Food (CMF) with honours. Identifying the top players in each of the designated 27 categories, F&S India Excellence in Chemicals, Materials and Food Awards painted a consolidated picture of the industry.

T

he F&S award function was organised on December 6, 2010 to give due recognition to deserving performers from diverse sectors. These lumainaries belonged to industries such as food ingredients, specialty chemicals, bioplastics, high-performance fibres, protective equipment, etc. The event recognised and acclaimed their contribution towards ameliorating India’s economic position. On this occasion, F&S recognised 27 exemplary organisations that have showcased unparalleled innovation. “In the CMF markets, we are seeing rapid innovations and new players. There was a definite need to identify these innovations and bring them forth on a common forum. This will not only help organisations that are driving these innovations but also others in the competition to find out what they need to do to thrive in the market. Further, from a consumer’s perspective,

Award recipients lead the way...

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this also enables to identify the best and the most progressive of the lot. At F&S, we regularly collaborate with companies in accelerating their growth and help them identify strategic partners,” said Mamta Wadhwa, Senior Director - CMF, South Asia and Middle East, F&S.

The selection process The Voice of Customer Award Series involved a multi-tier process wherein excellence in the industry was gauged through ratings provided by end-user companies. The jury’s awards were based on the premise of nominations from industry experts belonging to various sectors of the CMF industry.

Parameters of excellence The awards recognised the distinction of products & services with respect to customer value, competence, features & functionality, customer focus, etc, alongwith a host of other crucial factors such as leadership, strategy, growth, innovation, integration and reliability. The nominees and award recipients were identified through a diligent process, taking into consideration perspectives from customers, experts and thought leaders within the industry, along with F&S’s expertise. “The award recipients were identified through a thorough research process. Keeping in mind the industry feedback, F&S would like this forum to be a regular feature and at the same time become a benchmark for the industry to look up to in the future,” added Wadhwa.


REPORT

LANXESS Rubber Day

Driving safety and sustainability A hundred years ago, chemist Fritz Hofmann invented the first-ever synthetic rubber. As a part of the 100th anniversary celebrations of this revolutionary invention, LANXESS launched the first ‘World Rubber Day’ in Germany in 2009. LANXESS held its first Rubber Day in India on December 3, 2010, in New Delhi. A report...

Dr Joerg Strassburger, MD and Country Representative, LANXESS India

Dr Axel C Heitmann, Chairman, Board of Management, LANXESS AG

O

n September 12, 2009, LANXESS hosted the first ‘World Rubber Day’ in Cologne, Germany. By staging a scientific colloquium with high-ranking speakers, the world’s leading producer of synthetic rubber celebrated the invention of synthetic rubber by chemist Fritz Hofmann exactly 100 years ago. The first LANXESS Rubber Day in India held on December 3, 2010, at Hotel Imperial, New Delhi, was one among a series of international Rubber Days, as India is one of the important global growth markets. It was a one-day conference, which highlighted the growth trends in the rubber industry in India. The focus areas included emerging trends, policy issues, contributions to Indian growth, and other issues connected with the regional market. Furthermore, innovations & future developments in the area of synthetic rubber and its potential in India were considered. The event was well-received with around 200 delegates.

Opening ceremony

A panel discussion on road safety

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The event unfolded with the welcome speech of Dr Joerg Strassburger, Managing Director and Country Representative, LANXESS India, followed by an optimistic and forward looking speech by Dr Axel C Heitmann, Chairman, Board of Management, LANXESS AG. Dr Heitmann stressed on the contribution of synthetic rubber to India’s economic progress. He said, “Today, we are the world leader in synthetic rubber, which

include high-performance rubber, rubber chemicals and technical rubber products that make possible the manufacturing of safer, energy-saving green tyres. We also have countless innovative rubber products that keep the industries of the world moving forward, and continue to develop new applications & markets for this versatile, flexible and innovative material. Our goal is to deliver true value for our customers well into the future. And the future does, indeed, look bright here in India, as the prospects for the tyre industry in India are truly phenomenal.”

Rubber: Safety enabler The topics for panel discussion included – ‘Dynamic India: Thoughts on strengthening infrastructure’; ‘Synthetic rubber as an enabler for safety, performance and efficiency; ‘The role of synthetic rubber in automotive innovation’ and ‘Innovative industry solutions for a sustainable future’. The most significant area of discussion was the impact of highperformance tyres on road safety and environmental protection. Everyone agreed on the fact that in view of increased urbanisation, expanding infrastructure and automotive consumption, tyres will play an important role in the Indian automotive market. Backed by innovation-driven technology, commitment to quality and the right infrastructure to meet the present market needs, LANXESS is all set to enhance its contribution to the tyre market in India.


REPORT

AutoPlas 2010

Expanding avenues for collaboration The success of AutoPlas 2010 conference & exhibition is symbolic of the achievements within the Indian plastics and automotive industries. The event provided the right platform for getting new insights on the technology and business aspects of the automotive plastics sector.

A

Yogesh Behl, Mayor, Pimpri Chinchwad Municipal Corporation lighting the inaugural lamp, while the others dignitaries look on

Applauding innovations

s the Indian automotive industry surges ahead with a CAGR of 11.5 per cent, the plastics industry is gearing up to exercise all opportunities within the automobile segment. AutoPlas 2010, held from November 26-28, at the Autocluster Exhibition Centre, Chinchwad, Pune, was a step in this direction with participation from various stakeholders in the plastics as well as the automotive sectors. The first of its kind in India, AutoPlas 2010 served as a platform for suppliers of plastics and polymers (tier I & tier II) to showcase their capabilities to automotive OEMs. AutoPlas 2010 was organised by Plexium, the conferences & fairs organiser for the plastics industry. The event was supported by leading industry brands like Auto Monitor, Modern Plastics & Polymers, Plastemart, Indiamart, etc. An indoor exhibition space of 1,000 sq m saw a wide range of exhibits for automotive segment, including dies & moulds, injection moulded & blow moulded components, colour masterbatch granules, long fibre components, etc.

Global participation

A confluence of ideas and applications

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The exhibition witnessed participation from the entire spectrum of plastics industry ranging from raw materials manufacturers to product design prototyping service providers. With Polymotive from Germany being the official guide, AutoPlas also witnessed representation from countries like Malaysia, China, North America, Canada and Austria. The visitors at the exhibition expressed delight at products showcased. Sanjay Khedgikar, Founder

and Team Member, Plexium, said, “Many of the exhibitors have requested us to make this a yearly event, but we are thinking of making it a biennial event.� Such a positive response to AutoPlas 2010 has encouraged Plexium to plan the next edition of AutoPlas in 2012. Influential visitors at AutoPlas 2010 included Tata Motors, Mahindra & Mahindra, General Motors, Fiat, Skoda Auto, Force Motors, Volkswagen, Bajaj Auto, Piaggio, Mercedes-Benz, JCB etc.

The conference The AutoPlas 2010 conference complemented the exhibition with interesting technical presentations from leading industry experts, which included latest applications of new age polymer technology in automobile products. Mark Bennick, RTP Company, US, spoke about the growing importance of long fibre composites, which are rapidly replacing engineering materials in automobile manufacturing. It is also replacing metals in several structural and semi-structural applications. Dr Simon Ting and Mandar Amrute, Arkema presented bio-based high performance Polyamide 11 and its novel usage in fuel lines & air-brake systems. Another interesting presentation was from Dr Godara from Belgium where he explained the use of steel reinforcement to increase safety features in car bumpers.

On an optimistic note As India gears up to be the global hub for compact cars with 4.5 million cars estimated by 2015, AutoPlas hailed optimism for the automotive plastics sector.


PRODUCT UPDATE

Laser distance measurement sensor

Plastic brightner/shiner

SBS Precision Systems offers 'AR200' laser measurement sensor. It is an acuity’s value distance measuring sensor. Using laser triangulation measurement principles with high speed CMOS detection arrays, the 'AR200' sensor delivers high accuracy in a very compact model. This model includes both serial and analog outputs for simple integration. Measuring 54 x 20 x 70 mm the 'AR200' sensor head fits anywhere. With integrated digital, analog and discrete output signals, this sensor requires no external controller or signal conditioner. It may be simply plugged into PC or PLC and has a sharp resolution. Its specifications begin at 1.8 microns. This sensor is equipped with RS232, 0-10 V analog, 4-20 mA current loop and NPN & PNP discrete outputs for alarm triggers. The 'AR200' can be used for measuring steel strip thickness, measuring defects on sheets, positioning silicon wafers etc.

Plast Fine Polymers offers plastic brightners/ shiners/whitener for natural transparent, coloured and milkywhite end-products. This is used for adding clarity and gloss finish to natural transparent polymers. It gives a shining and bright finish to end-products. This brightner/whitener removes yellowness and dullness from the end products and makes it super milky-white. This product is used in virgin, second, dull, natural or milky-white sutli, ropes, twine, reprocess granules, HDPE-LDPE-PVC pipes & profiles, box strap, PET jars, spoon, container, carry bags, liners, sheet, yarns and other end products. One of the main advantages of this product is that it saves excess use of white pigments and titanium dioxide for opaque end products.

SBS Precision Systems (India) Pvt Ltd Kolkata - West Bengal Tel: 033-3292 0078, Fax: 033-2400 3097 Email: rajesh@sbsindia.in

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Plast Fine Polymers Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-6524 2332 Mob: 098255 87152 Email: plastfine@indiatimes.com


PRODUCT UPDATE

Multi-mould temperature controller Yann Bang Electrical Machinery Co offers YMW multi-mould temperature controller. This controller is available with a chiller and a mould temperature controller. The key feature of this controller is that there is no need to wait or switch either the chiller or the mould temperature controller to cool down or heat up to the required temperature. The benefits are that it consumes less energy, takes less space and it also saves on cost. The 'YMW' series multi-mould temperature controller is equipped with the latest European, American and Japanese compressors & pumps. Due to its high-efficient transmission function, the temperature controller saves up to 25 per cent energy. The advantage of this controller is that it saves time to preheat or cool down the mould’s temperature. Yann Bang Electrical Machinery Co Ltd Taichung - Taiwan Tel: +886-4-2271 6999 Fax: +886-4-2271 1988 Email: yb@yannbang.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Photoelectric sensor Lubi Electronics offers 'EQ-34W' dual output adjustable range reflective photoelectric sensor. This sensor is a specialised sensor for detecting two different levels or surface for up to 2 m sensing range. The sensor contains two individual outputs for two sensing distances: far (main) and near (sub). The detectability of the sensor is stable even if the lens is contaminated by dirt, dust, mist or smoke under an unclear environment. It has IP67 protection so it can be used in places splashed with water. The main benefit of the sensor is non-contact type detection of the object with two different level outputs which is suitable for packaging, pharma and food processing industries. Typical application of the sensor includes detection of level (upper & lower) in hopper, etc. Lubi Electronics Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2220 5471 Fax: 079-2220 0660 Email: info@lubielectronics.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Temperature controllers Adinath Controls offers controllers of the new Platinum series that are suitable for a wide range of applications including heat/ cool control capability. Easy configuration and simple operating methods are merged with standard characteristics of more complex devices like auto tune, auto/man, three standard outputs, and IP65 front panel protection option include; serial communications, analog control or retransmission output, transmitter power supply, start-up and timer special function, auxiliary current transformer input, two front bezel colours, and DIN rail mounting. Adinath Controls Pvt Ltd Gandhinagar - Gujarat Tel: 02764-286 573 Fax: 02764-286 574 Email: info@adinathcontrols.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Extruder screws and barrel Shree Valinath Engineering offers extruder screws and barrel. Single or twins - parallel or conical, barrels- plain bore or grooved feed, for all Indian and Europeans reputed plastics processing plants like PVC pipes, profiles, mono and multilayer films, filaments, sheet, lamination, compounding and others in the range from 18 mm to 180 mm diameter. Geometry of the screw is designed according to the processing demands and is made up to exact specifications. Screws and plastics formulations have to be tuned perfectly, to avoid premature wear and excessive energy consumption, in order to maximise its efficiency and lifetime. These screws and barrel are made from highly wear resistant nitriding steel. Nitride hardness maintain at 67-70 HRC with high-level of polishing having close clearance and exacting machining tolerances for screw and barrel. Shree Valinath Engineering Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2019 6852, Fax: 079-2766 1962 Email: prashant_in@hotmail.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Euro gearbox United Transmission offers Euro gearbox. It comes in aluminium alloy housing which is totally dust-proof and oil-tight. Its silver-grey shade protects housing from oxidation and is asesthetically appealing. The greater, longer cooling fins in all six faces having maximum surface area exposes to atmosphere for improved efficiency and more capability of heat dissipation which is ideal for more hot ambient temperature conditions like India. Extra fins also make the gearbox body more sturdy and strong. Due to robust and compact construction, easy interchangeability of input flanges with standard fasteners, matching surface are perpendicular machined suitable to serve in all operating conditions of almost every industries by means of right selection. The permissible overhung and shock loads achieved by perfect alignment of accurately bored bearing housing for ball and taper roller bearing for worm and worm shaft. Single piece case carburised, grounded alloy steel worm shaft ensure a positive oil film and the perfectly hobbed centrifugally casted phosphorous bronze worm wheel assures superior efficiency and low noise. United Transmission Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2546 5715, Mob: 09825325367 Email: unitedhyd@vsnl.net

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Round cable nail clip Novoflex Marketing offers round cable nail clip, used for securing wire bundles or cables to walls, ceilings, desks or any other structure. The saddle design provides maximum stability to wire bundles. To apply, put the cable under the clip and the nail is hammered into the wall/wooden panel to secure wire bundles. It is available in natural white colour, in different sizes. The standard operating temperature is -25 to +85oC.

combinations, each with one safety zone and two warning zones, can be set. The key feature of this scanner is that it is easier and faster to replace a damaged sensor. No re-programming is required as the configuration which is stored in the I/O block can be detached from the sensor block. Omron Automation Pvt Ltd Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-4072 6400, Fax: 080-4146 6403 Email: in_enquiry@ap.omron.com

Novoflex Marketing Pvt Ltd Kolkata - West Bengal Mob: 099031 63634 Fax: 033-2229 7814 Email: sales@novoflex.co.in

Process chillers Artic Aircon offers process chillers that are compact and easy to install. All modular cooling block systems of Eskimo are compact, completely assembled and individually tested which can be used in a broad variety of technical applications. This is applied in the field of machine tool construction, laser technology, plastic processing, printing machines, surface technology, food industry, etc. The use of various CFC-free refrigerants requires additional optimisation of the housing geometry. These compact, powder-coated housings are exclusively equipped with technically advance components from renowned manufacturers. Artic Aircon Pvt Ltd Hyderabad - Andhra Pradesh Tel: 040-2726 1661 Fax: 040-2726 3012 Email: artic245@yahoo.com

Safety laser scanner Omron Automation offers user-friendly and versatile OS32C safety laser scanner, which is able to solve many safety applications. Its low profile allows installation in small spaces making it ideal for collision avoidance of automated guided vehicles (AGVs). For complex AGV applications, up to 70 January 2011 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Portable chillers Nu-Vu Conair offers portable chillers. It has 50째F leaving water capacity ranging from 1.2 to 28.8 tonne and its range of leaving water temperature consists of 20-65째F. The compressor' range is from 1.5-15 Hp and has dual refrigeration circuits of 20 Hp and higher. Its normal flow to process is 6-138 gpm. The chiller has a high ambient option that provides consistent cooling up to 120째F ambient-5 to 15 hp single refrigeration circuits. The options include dual pumps, PLC control, condenser fan vfd, and a shell and tube condenser. Nu-Vu Conair Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-3298 5993, 2584 1181 Fax: 09377483203/04/05 Email: nuvu@conairgroup.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Dual-spindle, Y-axis turning centres Haas Automation India offers dual spindle Y-axis turning centres. The 'DS-30' series machine has a maximum cutting capacity of 18" x 23", and is equipped with a 12station hybrid BOT/VDI turret. The 'Super Speed DS-30SSY' has a maximum cutting capacity of 16" x 23", and is equipped with a 24-station hybrid BOT/VDI turret. In both the machines, the A2-6 main spindle features an 8.3" hydraulic chuck, and is powered by a 30 hp vector drive system that provides 275 ft-lb of torque. The A2-5 secondary spindle also has an 8.3" hydraulic chuck, and is powered by a 20 hp vector drive system that provides 150 ft-lb of cutting torque. Both machines provide a maximum swing of 31.75" over the front apron, with a 20.75" swing over the cross slide. Standard equipment includes high-torque live tooling with C-axis, rigid tapping, spindle orientation, a 15" colour LCD monitor, and a USB port. Haas Automation India Pvt Ltd Navi Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-6609 8830 Email: indiasales@haascnc.com The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

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Accumeter Additive masterbatches Additives Air bubble film plant Air bubble sheet plant Air chiller Air chiller for IBC Air compressor Air dryers Air receivers Air treatment Air-conditioner parts Air-cooled chillers Air-cooled die face pelletiser Air-cooled sealers Aluminium extrusion Ammonia liquid chillers Auto dosing and mixing system Auto vacuum loader Automatic material handling systems Automation Automation system Auxiliary equipment Awards - 2010 India Excellence Award Bag-making machines Bed knives Bi-axial plants Bimetallic cylinder Bimetallic high-output extruder Bimetallic screw Biodegradable masterbatches Black masterbatches Blenders Blending unit Blow moulding machine control Blow moulding machines Blow moulding-extrusion Blower series Blown film plant Bobbin winder Bottom sealing and cutting machine Brass connectors, terminals & blocks Brine chillers Bulk milk cooler Butterfly valve Capillary rheometer Cast film line Castings Central material conveying system Centralised conveying system Centre seal pouch making machine Chillers Chillers for batching plant Clean room applications CNC CNC horizontal machining centres CNC milling machines CNC turning centres CNC vertical machining centres CNC VMC Co-extrusion die Co-extrusion moulding Co-extrusions blown film plant Colour additives Colour marking machines Colour masterbatches Colour/fluorescent masterbatches Colouring extrusion plant Combined auto loader Compact chiller Complex multipart assembly Compounding extrusion Compounding extrusion plant Compounding mixers Compounds Compressed air loader Conical twin screw extruders Connectors Containers Cooling tower Cordage machinery Core cutter machine Counters & power supplies Crusher Cups Dairy machinery Dehumidification system Dehumidified air dryer Dehumidified dryers Die face cutters Differential scanning calorimetry Digital panel meter

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Digital temperature controller Dilatometry Dispersion kneaders Doctoring rewinder machine Door trims Dosing & mixing system Double shaft gearbox Downstream extrusion equipment Drill tap centres Drives Dryers Drying & dehumidifying Dual channel with modbus Dual-spindle, Y-axis turning centres Dyestuffs Dynamic controller Electric injection moulding machine gearboxes Electric solutions Encoders Equipment for plastic processing Ethyl vinyl acetate Euro gearbox Evolved gas analysis Exhibition - Engineering Expo Exhibition - Hi Tech Manufacturing Show Exhibition - Plastivision India 2011 Exhibition - Pu Tech 2011 Extruder and extrusion production line Extruder machine Extruder screws and barrel Extruders Extrusion coating lamination plant Extrusion dies Extrusion machinery Extrusion pipes Extrusion plant Extrusion-blown film Extrusion-film & sheets Extrusion-laminating & coating Feeding & conveying system Ferrous/non-ferrous casting Filler compounds Filler/compounds/masterbatches Film extrusion lines Flame retardant masterbatches Flame retardants Foam moulding Foam sheet production line Forged components Fully automatic strapping plant Gas & water assisted moulding technology Gas injection Gear motor Gearbox Geared & flexible couplings Geared box Geared motor Gearless extruders Gears Granulating & recycling system Granulators Granule colour mixer Gravimetric blender Grinder Grinding machines HDPE pipe plant Head & tail lamps Health & diagnostics Heart valve frames Heater cooler mixer Heating & cooling Helical bevel geared motors/reducers Helical inline geared motors/reducers Helical speed reducer Helical worm geared motors/reducers High cavitations High density polypropylene High-speed heater cooler mixersand spares High-speed mixer HM/HDPE/LDPE/LLDPE Home improvement products Hopper dryer Hopper loader Horizontal machining centre Hot air dryer Hot runner system Hydraulic press IML technique Induction sealing machine Industrial control & sensing devices Industrial coolers Injection moulding machines

o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o

Injection moulds Ink adhesion Inline shaft mounted helical geared motors/reducers Inspection-cum-siltter rewinding machine Invertor/variable frequency drives Jambo bag dumping station Knobs & switches Lab extruder Lab mixer Label adhesion Lamination/coating machine Laser distance measurement sensor Lathes Level controllers Linear low density polypropylene Liquifiers Loader Low density polypropylene Machined components Marine air-conditioning Masterbatch feeder Masterbatch mixer Masterbatches Material dryers Material storage Measuring & monitoring relay Medical air compressors Medical food Medical moulds Melt pump Milky polymers Milling centres Milling machines Mixer unit series & feeding system Monofilament extrusion machinery Monolayer blown film lines Mono-layer blown-film plant Motion controls Mould changing systems Mould temperature controller Moulding Moulding automation Moulds Multicomponent moulds Multilayer blown film lines Multilayer blown film plant Multi-mould temperature controller Multiple cylinders injection moulding machine Multi-station Nano mould coating Natural polymers Neat resin New liquid loss in weight feeder Novelties Oil chillers Oil coolers Palletising machines Panel coolers Paper chemicals Paperless recorder Parallel & right angle axes gearboxes Parallel shaft helical gearbox Pelletiser PET blow moulding machine PET box strapping plant PET mastermatches PET perform didicated machine PET recycling plant PET-dehumidified dryers Photoelectric sensor Photoelectric sensors Pipe extrusion line for PVC/PPR/PE Pipe making Pipe shredder Pivot system Planetary gearboxes Plastic auxiliary Plastic brightener Plastic brightner/shiner Plastic compounds Plastic conveyor belt Plastic granulator Plastic injection moulding machine Plastic mould steel Plastic raw materials Plastic tinopol Plastic whitener Plastics extruders Plate heat exchanger PLC Plug valve Plunger type manual

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PRODUCT INDEX

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Pg No

Accumeter...................................... 115 Additive masterbatches ...........24, 76, 129 Additives............................................ 147 Air bubble film plant .......................... 155 Air bubble sheet plant ...................... 8, 51 Air chiller............................................. 23 Air chiller for IBC ................................. 31 Air compressor................................... 149 Air dryers............................................ FIC Air receivers....................................... 149 Air treatment........................................ 14 Air-conditioner parts ........................... FGF Air-cooled chillers ................................ 13 Air-cooled die face pelletiser............... 163 Air-cooled sealers ................................ 77 Aluminium extrusion ........................... 151 Ammonia liquid chillers ...................... 178 Auto dosing and mixing system............. 93 Auto vacuum loader............................. 93 Automatic material handling systems ... 163 Automation........................................ 148 Automation system ............................... 65 Auxiliary equipment .............................. 82 Awards - 2010 India Excellence Award ... 56 Bag-making machines...................... 82 Bed knives ........................................... 67 Bi-axial plants .................................... 156 Bimetallic cylinder ........................ 42, 150 Bimetallic high-output extruder...... 42, 150 Bimetallic screw ........................... 42, 150 Biodegradable masterbatches ............... 24 Black masterbatches..................... 24, 147 Blenders ....................................... 99, FIC Blending unit ..................................... FGF Blow moulding machine control............ 21 Blow moulding machines..........49, 71, 83 Blow moulding-extrusion..................... 155 Blower series........................................ 65 Blown film plant................................. 177 Bobbin winder ................................... 145 Bottom sealing and cutting machine.... 177 Brass connectors, terminals & blocks ... 157 Brine chillers ........................................ 13 Bulk milk cooler ................................. 178 Butterfly valve..................................... 178 Capillary rheometer ....................... 173 Cast film line ...........................8, 51, 155

Product

Pg No

Castings .............................................. 95 Central material conveying system......... 93 Centralised conveying system................ 78 Centre seal pouch making machine .... 177 Chillers.............................................. 149 Chillers for batching plant .................... 13 Clean room applications ...................... 39 CNC .................................................. BIC CNC horizontal machining centres........ 95 CNC milling machines ......................... 95 CNC turning centres ............................ 82 CNC vertical machining centres...... 63, 95 CNC VMC .......................................... 82 Co-extrusion die .................................... 8 Co-extrusion moulding ....................... 155 Co-extrusions blown film plant................ 8 Colour additives................................. 147 Colour marking machines .................. 117 Colour masterbatches ............24, 35, 147 Colour/fluorescent masterbatches........ 129 Colouring extrusion plant ................... 156 Combined auto loader ....................... 167 Compact chiller ............................. 15, 23 Complex multipart assembly ................. 10 Compounding extrusion...................... 156 Compounding extrusion plant ............. 156 Compounding mixers ......................... 156 Compounds....................................... 147 Compressed air loader....................... 115 Conical twin screw extruders ............... 163 Connectors ........................................ FGF Containers......................................... 121 Cooling tower................................ 14, 31 Cordage machinery............................ 145 Core cutter machine .......................... 175 Counters & power supplies ..................... 7 Crusher ............................................... 93 Cups ................................................. 121 Dairy machinery ............................ 178 Dehumidification system ....................... 77 Dehumidified air dryer........... 15, 23, FGF Dehumidified dryers ...................... FIC, 93 Die face cutters.................................... 53 Differential scanning calorimetry............ 43 Digital panel meter .............................. 12 Digital temperature controller................ 41 Dilatometry .......................................... 43

Product

Dispersion kneaders ............................. 53 Doctoring rewinder machine ............... 175 Door trims ......................................... FGF Dosing & mixing system........................ 65 Double shaft gearbox ................... 22, 105 Downstream extrusion equipment ........ 155 Drill tap centres ................................... 95 Drives.................................................. 41 Dryers ........................................ FIC, 115 Drying & dehumidifying ........................ 65 Dual channel with modbus ................... 41 Dual-spindle, Y-axis turning centres ..... 156 Dyestuffs.............................................. 17 Dynamic controller ............................... 41 Electric injection moulding machine gearboxes .......................................... 9 Electric solutions .................................. 75 Encoders ............................................... 7 Equipment for plastic processing ........... 18 Ethyl vinyl acetate............................... 139 Euro gearbox ..................................... 152 Evolved gas analysis............................. 43 Exhibition - Engineering Expo.................... .........................................107, 125, 143 Exhibition - Hi Tech Manufacturing Show...87 Exhibition - Plastivision India 2011...... 158 Exhibition - Pu Tech 2011................... 154 Extruder and extrusion production line... 97 Extruder machine ........................... 54, 73 Extruder screws and barrel.................. 151 Extruders...................................... 76, 155 Extrusion coating lamination plant..... 8, 51 Extrusion dies..................................... 155 Extrusion machinery........................ 27, 83 Extrusion pipes................................... 155 Extrusion plant ........................... 145, 156 Extrusion-blown film ........................... 155 Extrusion-film & sheets........................ 155 Extrusion-laminating & coating............ 155 Feeding & conveying system ............ 65 Ferrous/non-ferrous casting ................ 151 Filler compounds................................ 147 Filler/compounds/masterbatches ......... 129 Film extrusion lines ............................... 81 Flame retardant masterbatches ............. 24 Flame retardants ................................ 147 Foam moulding ................................. 155

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

Pg No


PRODUCT INDEX Product

Pg No

Foam sheet production line .......... 42, 150 Forged components............................ 151 Fully automatic strapping plant ............. 51 Gas & water assisted moulding technology ..................... 104 Gas injection ..................................... 104 Gear motor ................................... 16, 20 Gearbox......................... 16, 20, 22, 105 Geared & flexible couplings.................. 20 Geared box ......................................... 47 Geared motor................................ 16, 47 Gearless extruders.............................. 113 Gears....................................20, 22, 105 Granulating & recycling system ............. 65 Granulators ............. 15, 23, 78, 167, FIC Granule colour mixer ......................... 167 Gravimetric blender ............................. 15 Grinder ....................................... 23, 167 Grinding machines............................. 141 HDPE pipe plant ................................ 8 Head & tail lamps.............................. FGF Health & diagnostics .......................... 121 Heart valve frames ...... 36, 101, 123, 124 Heater cooler mixer............................ 163 Heating & cooling................................ 65 Helical bevel geared motors/reducers ... 16 Helical inline geared motors/reducers ... 16 Helical speed reducer................... 22, 105 Helical worm geared motors/reducers ... 16 High cavitations ................................... 39 High density polypropylene ................ 139 High-speed heater cooler mixers and spares ........................................ 155 High-speed mixer........................... 54, 73 HM/HDPE/LDPE/LLDPE ........................ 51 Home improvement products ................ 82 Hopper dryer .........................23, 93, 167 Hopper loader ............................... 15, 23 Horizontal machining centre ................ BIC Hot air dryer................................15, FGF Hot runner system ................................ 65 Hydraulic press .................................. 163 IML technique .................................. 39 Induction sealing machine .................... 77 Industrial control & sensing devices ......... 7 Industrial coolers.................................. 14 Injection moulding machines.......11, 29, 49, 71, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 85, 148, 152, 171, FGF, COC Injection moulds................................... 83 Ink adhesion ........................................ 77

Product

Pg No

Inline shaft mounted helical geared motors/reducers ................................... 16 Inspection-cum-siltter rewinding machine ............................. 175 Invertor/variable frequency drives ............ 7 Jambo bag dumping station .......... 163 Knobs & switches ........................... FGF Lab extruder .................................. 163 Lab mixer .................................. 155, 163 Label adhesion .................................... 77 Lamination/coating machine ............... 175 Laser distance measurement sensor..... 146 Lathes................................................. BIC Level controllers ..................................... 7 Linear low density polypropylene ......... 139 Liquifiers .............................................. 13 Loader................................................ FIC Low density polypropylene .................. 139 Machined components ................... 151 Marine air-conditioning ........................ 31 Masterbatch feeder .............................. 93 Masterbatch mixer.............................. 163 Masterbatches............... 24, 45, 111, 147 Material dryers..................................... 99 Material storage................................... 15 Measuring & monitoring relay................. 7 Medical air compressors..................... 149 Medical food ....................................... 45 Medical moulds ................................... 39 Melt pump................................ 146, BGF Milky polymers ..................................... 79 Milling centres ..................................... bic Milling machines.................................. 95 Mixer unit series & feeding system......... 97 Monofilament extrusion machinery ...... 145 Monolayer blown film lines ...................BC Mono-layer blown-film plant ................... 8 Motion controls...................................... 7 Mould changing systems..................... 153 Mould temperature controller.......... 15, 23 Moulding............................................. 39 Moulding automation ........................... 10 Moulds.......................................... 54, 73 Multicomponent moulds ....................... 39 Multilayer blown film lines ....................BC Multilayer blown film plant................ 8, 51 Multi-mould temperature controller ..... 148 Multiple cylinders injection moulding machine .................. 82 Multi-station......................................... 83 Nano mould coating...................... 157

Product

Pg No

Natural polymers ................................. 79 Neat resin ........................................... 17 New liquid loss in weight feeder ......... 151 Novelties ........................................... 121 Oil chillers ....................................... 13 Oil coolers ........................................ 149 Palletising machines......................... 53 Panel coolers ..................................... 149 Paper chemicals ................................... 17 Paperless recorder................................ 12 Parallel & right angle axes gearboxes ...... 9 Parallel shaft helical gearbox .............. 105 Pelletiser ............................................. 67 PET blow moulding machine................. 33 PET box strapping plant........................ 51 PET mastermatches .............................. 24 PET perform didicated machine............. 61 PET recycling plant ................................. 8 PET-dehumidified dryers......................... fic Photoelectric sensor............................ 149 Photoelectric sensors .............................. 7 Pipe extrusion line for PVC/PPR/PE ........ 85 Pipe making ........................................ 83 Pipe shredder..................................... 115 Pivot system ....................................... 175 Planetary gearboxes ..................... 22, 105 Plastic auxiliary .................................. 167 Plastic brightener.................................. 79 Plastic brightner/shiner ....................... 146 Plastic compounds ............................. 147 Plastic conveyor belt............................. 54 Plastic granulator ............................... 167 Plastic injection moulding machine........ 80 Plastic mould steel ............................... 59 Plastic raw materials............................. 78 Plastic tinopol ...................................... 79 Plastic whitener .................................... 79 Plastics extruders ................................ 145 Plate heat exchanger .......................... 178 PLC ..................................................... 41 Plug valve.......................................... 178 Plunger type manual ..........................BGF Ply yarn twisters.................................. 145 Pneumatic valve ................................. 178 Polymer conveyer belt........................... 23 Polypropylene ................................... 139 Polystyrene ........................................ 139 Polyvinyl chloride................................ 139 Portable chillers.................................. 155 Power generation ................................. 82 PP glass-filled compounds .................... 24

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011


PRODUCT INDEX Product

Pg No

PP mineral-filled compounds................. 24 PP TQ plant......................................... 51 PP/HDPE rafffia tape lines .................... 51 PP/HDPE/PET box strapping plant ........... 8 PP/HDPE/PET monofilament plant ........... 8 PP/HDPE-semi-automatic strapping plant51 PP/TQ film plant .................................... 8 PPRP powder ....................................... 79 Precision moulding ................................fgf Process chillers................................... 153 Process controllers................................ 12 Process tanks ..................................... 178 Product assemblies ............................. 151 Profile controller................................... 41 Programmable logic controllers............... 7 Programmable terminals ......................... 7 Proximity sensors .................................... 7 Pulveriser .................................54, 73, 76 Pulverising systems ............................. 156 Punch machine .................................. 175 PVC compounds ................................ 111 PVC pipe threading machine .......... 77, 79 PVC suction hose plant ........................ 33 PVC-braided hose plant ....................... 33 Quick connectors ............................. 19 Quick die change system ................... 153 Quick mould change system......... 19, 153 Raffia tape lines................................. 8 Rail tankers........................................ 178 Reclosable packing products and solutions ......................... 78 Recycle/reclaim machine system.... 42, 150 Refrigerant pumps .............................. 178 RFID...................................................... 7 Rheology instruments.......................... 173 Robot system ....................................... 23 Robotics ..................................... 157, FIC Rock-n-roll machine ....................... 54, 73 Roll wrapping machine ....................... 175 Rope making machinery ..................... 145 Rotary cutters ....................................... 67 Rotational moulding machines ............ 156 Rotational moulds .............................. 156 Rotogravure printing machine ............. 175 Rotomoulding machine....................... 156 Round cable nail clip ......................... 153 Round table carrousels ......................... 54 Rubber & plastic processing machinery.. 53 Safety laser scanner....................... 156 Safety light curtains ................................ 7 Screen belt ........................................ 165 Screen packs ..................................... 165 Screw compressor ...................... 149, 178

168

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011

Product

Pg No

Seal pouch making machine................. 76 Sealers ................................................ 77 Secon & dull polymers.......................... 79 Segment element for twin extruder 42, 150 Segmented barrels ............................ 155 Separate vacuum conveyor ................. 167 Serving automotive............................... 82 Servo energy saving machine................ 61 Shaft-mounted speed reducers ...... 22, 105 Shaft-type slitter rewinder machine ...... 175 Sheet making plant ............................ 155 Shuttle roto moulding machines .......... 156 Shuttle series plant ............................. 156 Side sealing and cutting machine........ 177 Simultaneous thermal analysis............... 43 Single screw and barrel with grooved sleeves .............................................. 155 Single-bag feeding systems ................. 163 Single-mill pulveriser ...................... 54, 73 Single-screw and barrel ..................... 155 Single-screw extruder gearboxes.............. 9 Single-screw extruders ........................ 163 Single-shaft extruder gearbox........ 22, 105 Single-shaft shredders........................... 53 Slitter rewinder machine ..................... 175 Solid granulators................................ 156 Spares ................................................. 67 Special-purpose machines .................... 95 Spiral-cum-helical gearbox ................... 20 Spoons .............................................. 121 Sprockets..................................... 22, 105 Stack moulds ....................................... 39 Stage traverse robot ............................. 86 Strand pelletiser ......................... 151, 163 Styrene acytonitrile ............................. 139 Surface treatment ................................. 77 Swing-type robot .................................. 86 Switching relays...................................... 7 Synthetic string plant ............................. 8 System solution .................................... 65 Tanks & silos .................................. 178 T-die for sheet and film ........................ 80 Technical moulds ................................. 39 Temperature controllers ..... 7, 12, 41, 150 Temperature freezer.............................. 31 Temperature measuring equipment...... 148 Testing & measuring instruments.......... 148 Thermo gravimetric analysis.................. 43 Thermoforming & PS foam ....................bc Thermoplastic alloys ............................. 17 Thermoplastic compounds .................... 17 Three-arm bi-axial roto moulding machine ......................... 54, 73 Three-side seal pouch making machine177

Product

Pg No

Timers ................................................... 7 Tool room machines............................. 82 TPE/TPU compounds............................ 24 TPU masterbatches............................... 35 Turned components ............................ 151 Twin-mill pulveriser ......................... 54, 73 Twin-roll mill ...................................... 163 Twin-screw co-rotating extruders ... 36, 101, 123, 124 Twin-screw elements .... 36, 101, 123, 124 Twin-screw extruder gearboxes ................ 9 Twin-screw extruders .... 36, 101, 123, 124 Twin-screw feeders ............................. 151 UHMWPE products ........................... 97 Ultrasonic flowmeter............................. 12 Underwater pelletiser.......................... 163 Universal controller .............................. 41 Universal masterbatches ....................... 24 Unwinder system ................................ 175 Used injection moulding machines ........ 82 UV & PU masterbatches ....................... 24 Vacuum forming machine ................ BC Vacuum loader ..........................167, FGF Vacuum pumps .................................. 149 Vacuum receiver ................................ 115 Variable displacement pump energy-saving machine ............... 61 Vertical batch mixer............................ 167 Vertical colour mixer........................... 167 Vertical machining centre..................... BIC Vibratory screening systems................. 156 Vibro screens ................................. 54, 73 Virgin polymers .................................... 79 Vision sensors ........................................ 7 Waste plastics recycling reprocessing 97 Water heaters ...................................... 65 Water/brine/hydraulic oil/chilling plant .. 31 Water-cooled chillers............................ 13 Web aligner unit ................................ 175 Weigh belt feeder............................... 151 White goods ....................................... 82 White master batches ...........24, 129, 147 Wire & cables ...................................... 45 Wire mesh filters ................................ 165 Wire-EDM ........................................... 63 Wood & plastic products ..................... 97 Worm gear .......................................... 20 Worm reducer gearbox................. 22, 105 Worm reducers ............................ 22, 105 Yarn machinery .............................. 145


ADVERTISERS’ LIST Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Aawadkrupa Industries

145

Blend Colours Pvt Ltd

Pg No 24

T: +91-40-2436 1499 E: info@blendcolours.com W: www.blendcolours.com

T: +91-278-2443959 E: info@akiropes.ocm W: www.akiropes.com ACS Auxiliaries India Pvt Ltd

115

T: +91-20-40147575 E: acsindia@corpemail.com W: www.aecinternet.com Aeromec Marketing Co. Pvt Ltd

117

T: +91-250-2454915 E: hvt@aeromec.in W: www.aeromec.in All India Plastics Mfrs Association

158

T: +91-22-28271678 E: marketing@plastivision.org W: www.plastivision.org Allied Solution I Pvt Ltd

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

49, 71

T: +91-22-42210100 E: cmehta@alliedsolutions.com W: www.alliedsolutions.com Alok Masterbatches Ltd T: +91-11-41612244 E: sales@alokindustries.com W: www.alokmasterbatches.com Artic Automational Co., Ltd.

86

Ash Win Engineers

156

147

Beckhoff Automation Pvt. Ltd.

21

T: +91-20-40004800 E: info@beckhoff.co.in W: www.beckhoff.co.in Bharat Fritz Werner Ltd T: +91-80-28395745 E: bfwmarketing@bfw.co.in W: www.bfwindia.com

Chi Chang Machinery Enterprise Co., Ltd. 155

Frost & Sullivan

T: +886-6-261-2121 E: johnny@extrusion.com.tw W: www.extrusion.com.tw Chilton Refrigeration

31

T: +91-484-2544571 E: chilton@sify.com W: www.chiltonindia.com DMT International

139

Dongguan Alfa Automation Machinery Limited 157

20

T: +91-2692-236469 E: infogear@elecon.com W: www.elecon.com

95

113

77

107, 125, 143

Fu Chun Shin Machinery Manufacture Co., Ltd. 148 T: +886-6-595-0688 E: fcs2025@fcs.com.tw W: www.fcs.com.tw Ganesh Corporation

165

T: +91-79-22163775 E: info@ganeshwiremesh.com W: www.ganeshwiremesh.com Gem Equipments Ltd

Glaves Corporation

14

67

Haas Automation India Pvt Ltd

23

Forwell Precision Machinery Co., Ltd.

153

BIC

T: +91-20-32935433 E: sales@haasindia.com W: www.HaasCNC.com 151

T: +91-79-25840105 E: info@heattrans.com W: www.heattrans.com Hitech Manufacturing Show

T: +91-79-25890081 E: salesfmi@milacron.com W: www.milacronindia.com

W: www.forwell.com

T: +91-22-40013419 E: anishc@frost.com W: www@frost.com

Heattrans Equipments Pvt.Ltd.

Ferromatik Milacron India Ltd

T: +886-4-834-5196 E: forwell@forwell.com

56

T: +91-141-2460324 E: sales@glaves.biz W: www.glaves.biz

Enercon Industries Corporations

Engineering Expo

149

T: +91-422-3267800 E: sales@gemindia.com W: www.gemindia.com

T: +86-769-8318-0326 E: info@alfarobot.com W: www.alfarobot.com

T: +91-09920401226 E: engexpo@infomedia18.in W: www.engg-expo.com

T: +86-371-6799-3077 E: sale@meltpump.com W: www.battepump.com

Freeze Tech Equipments Pvt Ltd T: +91-44-42152387 E: info@freezetechequip.com W: www.freezetechequip.com

T: +91-09600344430 E: info@enerconasiapacific.com W: www.enerconaciapacific.com 146

149

T: +43-1-331-430 E: maria.jandrasits@bohler-international.com W: www.bohler-international.com

T: +91-20-22922029 E: epmd@electronicaapmd.com

T: +91-40- 23550551/2/3/4 E: info@aviadditives.com W: www.aviadditives.com Batte Melt Pump Co., Ltd

59

Electronica Plastic Machiners Ltd

T: +91-79-22811879 E: info@ashwinengineersindia.com W: www.ashwinengineersindia.com Avi Additives Pvt Ltd

Bohler International Gmbh

Elecon Engineering Company Limited

T: +886-3-559-0901 E: sales2@artic-auto.com.tw W: www.artic-auto.com.tw

Frank Technologies

Pg No

T: +91-422-2646490 E: sales@frankcompressors.com W: www.frankcompressors.com

T: +91-22-25896148 E: dmtindenting@gmail.com W: www.dmtinternational.net 35

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

87

T: +91-09820373804 E: hitech@infomedia18.in Husky Injection Molding Systems P Ltd COC T: +91-22-25706316 E: snair@husky.ca W: www.husky.ca Ice Asia Pvt Ltd

151

T: +91-22-24443703 E: ice@ice-asia.com W: www.ice-asia.com Our consistent advertisers

172

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011


ADVERTISERS’ LIST Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

IDMC Limited

178

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details Matsui Technologies India Ltd.

Pg No 18

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details Ocean Extrusions

8

T: +91-2692-225399

T: +91-120-4243862

T: +91-79-22902200

E: idmc@idmc.coop W: www.idmc.coop

E: sales@matsuiindia.com

E: oceanextrusions@gmail.com W: www.oceanextrusions.com

Indian Polyurethane Association

W: www.matsuiindia.com 154

Maxim Enterprises

82

Omron Automation Pvt. Ltd.

T: +91-44-24995923

T: +91-09350190601

T: +91-80-40726400

E: admin@pu-india.org W: www.pu-india.org

E: mxmcor@gmail.com

E: srirams@ap.omron.com W: www.omron-ap.com

Ingeco Gears Pvt. Ltd.

Mifa Systems 105

41

Panchal Machinery

T: +91-79-26870825 E: info@mifasystems.com

T: +91-79-25620953

E: info@ingecogears.com W: www.ingecogears.com

W: www.mifasystems.com

E: info@panchalmachinery.in W: www.panchalmachinery.in

Mold-Masters Technologies Pvt. Ltd.

Co.,Ltd.

97

T: +86-512-5857-8000

83

27

51

T: +91-79-22891670 E: sales@konarkplastomech.com FGF

T: +91-44-26812000 E: handigolg@larsentoubro.com W: www.larsentoubro.com 17

T: +91-22-39183596 W: www.malvernaimil.com

10

T: +91-79-26561312 E: info@neejtech.com 11

T: +91-9909974224 163

W: www.neoplastindia.com

83

43

T: +91-44-42965111 W: www.netzsch.com

173

T: +91-79-25841181 E: nuvu@conairgroup.com W: www.conairgroup.com

79

W: www.plastfine.com Power Build Ltd

16

W: www.pbl.co.in Prasad Koch Technik Pvt. Ltd.

54

T: +91-79-25830112 E: plastics@prasadgroup.com W: www.prasadgroup.com Premium Transmission Ltd

47

Procon Technologies Pvt Ltd

12

Progressive Polypack Industries

121

T: +91-8110-414784 E: progressivepackindustries@yahoo.co.in W: www.progressivepolypack.com

E: yasotha.palanisamy@netzsch.com Nu-Vu Conair Pvt. Ltd

Plast Fine Polymers

T: +91-79-27492566 E: info@procon.co.in W: www.procon.co.in

E: info@neoplastindia.com Netzsch Technologies India Pvt Ltd

W: www.pal-plas.com

T: +91-20-27488886 W: www.premiumtransmission.com

E: contact@niigataindia.com

T: +91-79-25830602 82

81

T: +91-2692-231070 E: infopbl@elecon.com

E: info@neejtech.com

Neoplast Engg Pvt Ltd

T: +91-20-66544999 E: mail@magplasticasia.com W: www.magplasticasia.com Malvern Aimil

T: +91-79-26561312

Neejtech India (Niigata)

T: +91-129-4159729 E: magnumpolymers@gmail.com Magplastic Asia Pvt Ltd

39

W: www.neejtech.com

T: +91-2717-308000 E: info@loxim.com W: www.loxim.com Magnum Polymers

E: nanjinglixun@vip.163.com

Neejtech India (Hekuma)

Plas Alliance Ltd

T: +91-79-65242332 E: plastfine@gmail.com

W: www.neejtech.com

W: www.konarkplastomech.com

Loxim Industries Limited

T: +86-25-5277-9188

Neejtech India (Braunform)

E: paraseng@hotmail.com W: www.auxiliaryequipments.com

T: +886-5-2217-005 E: plas@pal-plas.com

E: info@naroto.com

W: www.nanjnglixun.com

W: www.kolsite.com

L & T Plastics Machinery Ltd

T: +91-79-25840374

Nanjing Lixun Extruder Spare Parts Plant150

T: +91-22-26734822 E: nishant@kolsitegroup.com Konark Plastomech Pvt Ltd

73

W: www.naroto.com

W: www.jonwai.com.tw

167

T: +91-79-25894285

E: mmiplinfo@moldmasters.com N.A. Corporation

T: +886-2-2595-4867 E: jonwai.mc@msa.hinet.net Kabra Extrusion Technik Ltd

Paras Engineers

T: +91-422-4502171 W: www.moldmasters.com

E: ceo@lianguan.cn W: www.lg-machine.com Jon Wai Machinery Works Co., Ltd.

75

7

22

T: +91-2717-251551

Jiangsu Lianguan Science & Tech. Devel.

Pg No

15

Rajhans Plastic Machinery Pvt Ltd

BGF

T: +91-79-25830003 E: exports@rajhansindia.com W: www.rajhansindia.com Our consistent advertisers

174

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011


ADVERTISERS’ LIST Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Rajoo Engineers Ltd

BC

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details Shri Ram Polytech

Pg No 45

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details Tech Plaastic Industrie

T: +91-28272 52701/2

T: +91-09717005342

T: +91-44-24829325

E: kcdoshi@rajoo.com

E: priti.nainwalchandola@shrirampolytech.com

E: npd@techplaastic.com

W: www.shrirampolytech.com

W: http://www.techplaastic.com

W: www.rajoo.com Reynold India Pvt Ltd

13

T: +91-120-4664000

Shuenn Jaan Machinery Co., Ltd.

79

Toshiba Machine (India) Pvt. Ltd.

E: v.bali@reynoldindia.com

T: +886-6-233-9590

T: +91-11-43291111

W: www.reynoldindia.com

E: dearday@ms15.hinet.net

E: dineshelija@toshiba-machine.co.in

W: www.soongiant.com.tw

W: www.toshiba-machine.co.jp

S&T Engineers

63

Shyam Plastic Industries

T: +91-422-2590810 E: stycm@stengineers.com W: www.stengineers.com Sacmi Engineering India Pvt Ltd

171

T: +91-2717-250397

Unimark (Maguire)

T: +91-79-25841459

T: +91-22-25506712

E: info@shyamplastic.in

E: infomum@unimark.in

W: www.shyamplastic.in

W: www.unimark.in

Siddhi Vinayak Industries

E: sales@negribossi.in

33

141

T: +91-22-9821336272

T: +91-22-25506712

SCJ Plastics Limited

E: info@svi-plasticgrinding.in

E: infomum@unimark.in

T: +91-11-25439950

W: www.svi-plasticgrinding.in

W: www.unimark.in

E: vblall@scjgroup.net

Sonal Automation Industries

111

W: www.scjgroup.net Shanghai Alpha Machinery Co., Ltd.

42

T: +86-21-6695-4579 E: overseasell@alpha-mach.com

80

Vikrant Special Machines Pvt Ltd

T: +91-120-2540126

T: +91-33-25513070

E: sonalelectronics@gmail.com

E: vikrantspecial@rediffmail.com

W: www.sonalindustrialelectronics.com

W: www.vikrantspecial.com

W: www.alpha-mach.com

Spark Technologies

Shanghai Zhaohui Pressure Apparatus

T: +91-9444069967

T: +91-79-40200300

E: ravindran_k@sify.com

E: hitesh.shah@windsormachines.com

W: www.cinpres.com

W: www.windsormachine.com

Co.,Ltd

148

T: +86-21-6775-5188 E: info@zhyqsensor.com

Sri Sai Plasto Tech

W: www.zhyqsensor.com Shine Well Machinery Co., Ltd.

152

T: +886-6-356-3470 E: shinewell@shinewell.com.tw Shini Plastics Technologies I Pvt Ltd

65

61

Windsor Machines Limited

Wittmann Battenfld India Pvt. Ltd.

T: +91-44-42994365

T: +91-44-42077009

E: sspt_plastics@live.in

E: info@wittman-group.in

W: www.srisaiplastotech.com

W: www.wittmann-group.com

Star Technocrates Pvt Ltd

W: www.shinewell.com.tw

104

177

157

29

99

Unimark (Staubli Faverges Sca)

W: www.negribossi.com

Pg No

Xtreme Machines

19

77

85

FIC

53

T: +91-79-65121345

T: +91-11-25110656

T: +91-250-3021166

E: sales@startechno.in

E: monty@xtrememachines.in

E: jnbhat@shiniindia.com

W: www.startechno.in

W: www.xtrememachines.in

Steer Engineering Pvt Ltd 36, 101, 123, 124

Yann Bang Electrical Machinery Co.,Ltd. 93

T: +91-80-23723309

T: +886-4-2271-6999

E: info@steerworld.com

E: yb@yannbang.com

W: www.steerworld.com

W: www.yannbang.com

W: www.shini.com Shree Ganesh Converting Machinery

175

T: +91-79-32447499 E: shreeganeshmfgr@gmail.com W: www.shreeganeshconverting.com Shree Radhekrishna Extrusions Pvt L

155

Swadesh Essfil Pvt Ltd

129

Zambello Riduttori Group

T: +91-79-25842509

T: +91-09898915555

T: +39-0331-307-616

E: mail@radhekrishnaexports.com

E: info@essfil.in

E: info@zambello.it

W: www.essfil.in

W: www.zambello.it

W: www.radhekrishnaexports.com

9

Our consistent advertisers

176

Modern Plastics & Polymers | January 2011


Reg No: MH / MR / WEST / 234 // 2009 – 2011 RNI No: MAHENG / 2008 / 25265 WPP Licence No: MR / Tech / WPP – 357 / West / 2009- 2011 Licence to Post Without Pre-Payment at Mumbai Patrika Channel Sorting Office, Mummai GPO., Mumbai 400 001. Date Of Posting 1st & 2nd Of Every Month / English & Monthly. Date Of Publication: 28th December 2010.

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Modern Plastics & Polymers - January 2011