Page 1

Also available in Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Taiwan, China & Hong Kong

Modern Food Processing

November 2012


EDITORIAL

A policy prescription ust about three years ago (in September 2009), as per a published report, the Ministry of Food Processing had set a target of 150 per cent growth in processed food exports over the next five years. This was based on the rising global demand for Indian food at that point of time and with an aim to garner about five per cent share of the processed food market worldwide. To be precise, India’s exports was projected to increase by atleast another ` 60,000 crore by 2014-15.

J

While the criticality of raising domestic production and productivity of agricultural products to meet the growing demographic demand for food cannot be overemphasised, it is also important to be fairly consistent in economic policies that impact this sector. In this light, the commerce ministry’s reportedly recent decision to move a Cabinet note seeking to allow unrestricted export of processed food seems a well-timed step in the right direction. This move would not only send a positive signal against some of the recent policy flip-flops, but it would also soothe the nerves of both the related business fraternities in the country and overseas investors. Equally important, it would be a good attempt in setting the record straight by clearly outlining the need of the hour for the food processing sector, which is over and above the interest of any individual ministry (agriculture, food and commerce – in this case). To offer a clear perspective here, some latest statistics will be of help. According to provisional figures released by the Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority of India (APEDA), export earnings from processed food, including fruits, vegetables, meat and poultry products, more than doubled to ` 38,950 crore in 2011-12 from ` 15,816 crore in the previous year. Moving forward, the growth scenario in exports looks even brighter, considering the rise in value additions and popularity of Indian processed food abroad.

Editorial Advisory Board Dr A S Abhiraman Former Executive Director - Research, Hindustan Lever Ltd

It is only topical to mention here that the processed food industry has attracted foreign investments in products such as casein and dried milk, which are being produced mainly for export. Ironically, exporters of these and dehydrated onions have reportedly suffered the most from the recent ban on exports. Although there is some relief from the fact that casein can now be exported against licence, and the ban on export of skimmed milk powder has been lifted in June this year, it will further help the export of processed food by doing away with such policy uncertainty. Sooner it sees action, the better.

Prof M Y Kamat Former Head, Food Engg & Technology Dept, UICT, Mumbai

Manas R Bastia manas@network18publishing.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

7


50

32 Cover illustration: Chaitanya Dinesh Surpur

Special Focus: Food Packaging Eco-friendly packaging....................................................... 32 Packaging technology ......................................................... 34 Antimicrobial packaging .................................................... 36 Flexible packaging .............................................................. 40 Interface - Harish P Joshi, Managing Director, Nichrome India Ltd............................................................ 42

Insight & Outlook: Chocolate & Confectionery Premium chocolates ............................................................ 50 Cocoa alternatives ............................................................... 52 Functional chocolate industry ............................................ 54 Interface - Vrinda Rambhia, Director - Business Development, Leonidas Fresh Belgian Chocolates, Premium Pralines Pvt Ltd ...... 56 Characterising margarine ................................................... 58

In Conversation With

Wine market ....................................................................... 60 Tarak Bhattacharya, Chief Operating Officer, Mad Over Donuts............................. 26

Automation Trends Automated packaging line: Right solution must for optimum impact ............................................................ 62

Energy Management Facility Visit: Essen Speciality Films Pvt Ltd

Biomass resources: A carbon neutral approach to empowerment ................................................................ 64

Offering a pack of innovative solutions ............................. 44

Policies & Regulations Cocoa imports: Need to curb dumping of low quality products .................................................................. 68

Regular Sections Editorial ............................................................................ 7 News, Views & Analysis .................................................. 12 Technology & Innovation ................................................ 20 Technology Transfer ........................................................ 22 Projects ............................................................................ 72 Tenders ............................................................................ 74 Event List ........................................................................ 76 Book Review .................................................................... 78 Products .......................................................................... 79 List of Products .............................................................. 87 List of Advertisers .......................................................... 88

Strategy Contract farming: Cultivating a culture of cost control.... 70

Tips & Tricks X-ray inspection: Effective guidelines to keep contaminants in check ........................................................ 71

Highlights of Next Edition Special Focus: Industrial Kitchens Insight & Outlook: Biotechnology in Food

Details on page no. 76

Note: ` stands for Indian rupee, $ stands for US dollar and ÂŁ stands for UK pound, unless mentioned otherwise November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

9


FOUNDER & EDITOR, NETWORK 18 Raghav Bahl PRESIDENT & EDITORIAL DIRECTOR, TV 18 Senthil Chengalvarayan SENIOR EDITOR Manas R Bastia ASSISTANT EDITOR Rakesh Rao EDITORIAL TEAM Prasenjit Chakraborty, Mahua Roy, Marcilin Madathil, Avinash Pandey, Rishab Kothari, Dharitri Dalvi, Avani Jain (Ahmedabad) ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR Varuna Naik DESIGN Mahendra Varpe CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER Mexy Xavier PHOTOGRAPHY Neha Mithbawkar, Joshua Navalkar BUSINESS CONTROLLERS Lovey Fernandes, Akshata Rane, Deepak Bhatia, Ashish Kukreti, Shwetha ME, Jayashree N, Israr Shaikh, Shefali Mahant

PRINTING EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Ananth R Iyer ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGER - PPC Shekhar Khot

PRODUCTION TEAM Surekha Karmarkar, Ravikumar Potdar, Ravi Salian, Sanjay Shelar

OVERSEAS CONTACT CHINA 1001 Tower 3, Donghai Plaza, 1486 Nanjing Road, West, Shanghai 200040, China Tel: +86-21 6289 – 5533 Ext. 368, Fax: +86-21 6247 – 4855 (Craig Shibinsky) Email: craig@ringier.com.hk Ringier Trade Media Ltd HONG KONG 9/F, Cheong Sun Tower, 118 Wing Lok Street, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong Tel: +852 2369 – 8788 Ext. 21, Fax: +852 2869 – 5919 (Octavia Au-Yeung) Email: octavia@ringier.com.hk Ringier Trade Media Ltd TAIWAN Room 3, Fl. 12, No. 303, Chung Ming S. Rd., Taichung, Taiwan Tel: +886-4 2329 – 7318 Ext. 16, Fax: +886-4 2310 – 7167 (Sydney La) Email: sydneylai@ringier.com.hk Ringier Trade Media Ltd SINGAPORE Tel: +65 9625 7863; Fax: +65 6841 5273 (Annie Chin) Email: annie@janianmedia.com Ringier Trade Media Ltd GERMANY, AUSTRIA, SWITZERLAND Tel: +41-44 734 0472, Fax: +41 44 734 0680 Email: info@islerannoncen.ch USA Tel: (513) 527-8800 Fax: (513) 527-8801 Email: dhight@gardnerweb.com USA Alfredo Domador, 6505 Blue Lagoon Drive, Suite 430 Miami, FL. 33126, USA Tel: (305) 448-6875 Fax: (305) 448-9942 Ringier Trade Media Ltd

GROUP CEO, NETWORK 18 B Sai Kumar CEO-NETWORK 18 PUBLISHING Sandeep Khosla EVP-HUMAN RESOURCES Sanjeev Kumar Singh ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT Sudhanva Jategaonkar ADVERTISING SALES Shashin Bhagat (Ahmedabad) shashin.bhagat@network18publishing.com

Mahadev B (Bengaluru) mahadev.b@network18publishing.com

Hari Hara Subramaniam (Chennai) hari.s@network18publishing.com

Balakrishnan.S (Coimbatore) balakrishnan.s@network18publishing.com

Surendra Kumar Agrawal (Delhi) surendra.a@network18publishing.com

Dominic Dsouza (Hyderabad) dominic.dsouza@network18publishing.com

Ameya Gokhale (Indore) ameya.gokhale@network18publishing.com

Sandeep Arora ( Jaipur) sandeep.arora@network18publishing.com

Abhik Ghosal (Kolkata) abhik.ghosal@network18publishing.com

Inder Dhingra (Ludhiana) inder.dhingra@network18publishing.com

Olwin Dsouza (Mumbai) olwin.dsouza@network18publishing.com

Rohit Dass (Pune) rohit.dass@network18publishing.com

Vipul Modha (Rajkot) vipul.modha@network18publishing.com

Chirag Pathak (Vadodara) chirag.pathak@network18publishing.com

MARKETING TEAM Ganesh Mahale, Prachi Mutha, Akshaya Jadhav

NEWSSTAND AND SUBSCRIPTIONS DISTRIBUTION HEAD Sunil Nair DEPUTY GENERAL MANAGER Manoj Palsay SENIOR MANAGER - SUBSCRIPTIONS Sheetal Kotawdekar CO-ORDINATORS Rahul Mankar, Anant Shirke, Sarita Quadros, Chaitali Parkar, Kamlesh Mathkar, Vaibhav Ghavale

SERVICES SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES For subscription queries, write to chaitali.parkar@network18publishing.com or call +91 22 30034631-34 or toll free 1800 200 1021 PERMISSIONS For subscription to copy or reuse material from Modern Food Processing, Write to spedit@network18publishing.com • Monthly Issue Price: ` 100 • Annual Subscription: ` 799

Views and opinions expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Network18 Media & Investments Ltd (Network18)*, its publisher and/or editors. We at Network18 do our best to verify the information published but do not take any responsibility for the absolute accuracy of the information. Network18 does not accept the responsibility for any investment or other decision taken by readers on the basis of information provided herein. Network18 does not take responsibility for returning unsolicited material sent without due postal stamps for return postage. No part of this magazine can be reproduced without the prior written permission of the publisher. Network18 reserves the right to use the information published herein in any manner whatsoever. Printed by Mohan Gajria and published by Lakshmi Narasimhan on behalf of Network18. Senior Editor: Manas R Bastia Printed at Infomedia 18 Ltd, Plot no.3, Sector 7, off Sion-Panvel Road, Nerul, Navi Mumbai 400 706, and published at Network18, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai - 400 028. Modern Food Processing is registered with the Registrar of Newspapers of India under No. MAHENG / 2008 / 25262. Network18 does not take any responsibility for loss or damage incurred or suffered by any subscriber of this magazine as a result of his/her accepting any invitation/offer published in this edition. *Ownership of this magazine stands transferred from Infomedia18 Ltd (Infomedia18) to Network18 Media & Investments Ltd (Network18) in pursuance of the scheme of arrangement between Network18 and Infomedia18 and their respective shareholders and creditors, as approved by the Hon’ble High Court of Delhi and the necessary approval of Ministry of Information and Broadcasting is being obtained.

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

11


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

CHOCOLATES MARKET REPORT

Leonidas plans new store formats in India

India leads the way in no preservatives claims

The 99-year old brand of Belgian chocolates, Leonidas is looking at various store formats, for instance kiosks, apart from store models. “We are targeting 35-40 stores pan India by 2017. As of now, we are concentrating more on the North, South and Western parts of India. Our immediate target cities are Delhi and Bengaluru,” said Darshit Shah, Managing Director, Leonidas Fresh

As per new research from Mintel, India holds first place in Asia-Pacific (APAC) for products carrying ‘no additives/ preservatives claims’ in the food and drink category – today accounting for 18 per cent of new product development in APAC in this category. Deepa Dsouza, Trend and Innovation Consultant – India, Mintel, said, “The increased consumer awareness and government interventions to make healthier products have forced food manufacturers to adopt ‘no additives/preservatives’ measure.”

Belgian Chocolates Premium Pralines Pvt Ltd. Apart from chocolates, the company will also offer customised gifting solution, from gift packs, to ribbons, to assortment of confectionery. Following the over whelming response to its first store in Mumbai, Leonidas recently inaugurated a second store in the city. Mahua Roy

EXPORTS

Keventer now exports sesame to Mexico LABELLING MARKET

Avery Dennison to add an emulsion coater in Pune Avery Dennison, one of the leading global players in pressure-sensitive labelling materials, will add an emulsion coater in early 2014 to its state-of-the-art facility in Pune to meet the needs of India’s growing label printing industry. “Our continued investments in the Pune plant reflect our commitment to help Indian manufacturers and their label suppliers grow and develop,” said Georges Gravanis, Vice President and General Manager, Avery Dennison’s Materials Group - Asia-Pacific.

As part of the expansion plan, Keventer Group, a `-1,800 crore Kolkata-based business conglomerate, has exported 1,000 metric tonne of sesame seeds to Dipasa Company, the largest end-user and importer of sesame in Mexico, with a unique approach to quality. The company is now set to take fresh orders. On an average, 8,000-10,000 metric tonne of sesame seeds are exported annually to countries such as the US, Europe, Mexico, Middle East and Taiwan. Adding Mexico to the export list has helped Keventer affirm its position as an important sesame exporter in the world. Keventer is also exploring the possibility to export sesame oil and is looking for sourcing opportunities for the same. “Maintaining our aggressive growth pattern, we wish to extend our export list in the area of sesame seeds. With this expansion, Keventer will be able to offer its customers a complete range of sesame seeds having a wide variety of applications,” said C J Chhabra, Senior Vice President-Exports, Keventer Agro Ltd. Keventer exports a variety of sesame seeds ranging from natural, hulled and crushing grade seeds. It mainly procures these seeds from Rajasthan and Gujarat. Avani Jain

FOOD PACKAGING

SYMPOSIUM

Michelman aims at tapping flexible packaging market

Safety Automation Symposium held in Pune

The burgeoning demand for flexible packaging is opening new opportunities for the US-based Michelman, a global developer of water-based barrier and functional coatings for flexible film packaging, paperboard, and corrugated cartons. “Flexible packaging industry in India is growing rapidly at about 25-30 per cent per annum. Michelman has always been a Manoj Deorukhkar strong force offering solutions to the flexible packaging industry and so, we do see this as a major growth market for us,” said Manoj Deorukhkar, India Country Manager, Michelman. In order to support the burgeoning Indian market, Michelman recently opened office in Mumbai. The company is also planning to set up a technical/application lab in near future to further support its customers.

Rockwell Automation organised the Safety Automation Symposium recently in Pune. Eminent speakers from India and abroad shared insights on various safety-related issues. V B Sant, Director General, National Safety Council, in his keynote address said, “By proactively integrating safety, where productivity and environmental considerations are foundational elements, manufacturers are better able to meet their long-term business goals of greater efficiency and optimised assets, while protecting both human and manufacturing capital.” Other prominent speakers like Chris Brogli, Business Development Manager, Rockwell Automation; Suresh Warade, Chief Executive Officer, Warade Automation Solutions Pvt Ltd; Niju Vijayan, Director-Industrial Automation & Process Control, South Asia & Middle East, Frost & Sullivan; and many others spoke on the occasion.

Rakesh Rao

Prasenjit Chakraborty

12

Modern Food Processing | November 2012


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

EDIBLE OILS

Advanced LifeSciences launches olive oil

BAKERY MARKET

Portuguese firm to launch cookies in India Danesita Phadnis Food Industries Ltd, a joint venture between Dan Cake Portugal, S.A and the Pune-based Phadnis Group, is gearing up to launch its cookies and Swiss rolls in India. The company is poised to start a state-of-the-art bakery production facility in Khopoli (near Mumbai) soon. Danesita plans to introduce butter cookies, Swiss rolls and other bakery products that will suit the tastes and needs of Indian & Asian customers. Dan Cake Portugal, S.A is a leading manufacturer of bakery products in Portugal, with over Euro 60 million turnover and 30 years of presence in the EU and other markets. Rakesh Rao

MARKET FORECAST

Advanced LifeSciences has launched Bellovia olive oil in three variants - extra virgin olive oil, olive oil and pomace olive oil. These olives are selected for their particular characteristics, such as taste, delicate perfume, low acidity level (maximum 0.4 per cent). This oil is best used ‘a crudo’ as a condiment for vegetables, meat, fish and other recipes that require a delicate dressing. According to Kamal Agarwal, Director, Advanced LifeSciences, “With growing stress, high work pressure and no time for exercise, it becomes necessary to make changes in our cooking oil. Keeping the vision of healthy India, we have brought the best olive oil brand Bellovia from Italy for our consumers.” RETAIL AWARDS

Glass packaging market to show steady growth

HyperCITY and Godrej Nature’s Basket bag awards

Global Industry Analysts, Inc released a comprehensive global report on glass packaging markets. According to the report, the global market for glass packaging is projected to reach $ 56.8 billion by 2018, driven by increasing demand from developing countries; increasing sales of cosmetic products; growing preference for eco-friendly packaging among consumers; rising consumption of packaged food and beverages especially in developing nations; and increasing importance of health awareness, safety and food issues. A V P S Chakravarthi, Chairman, Indian Institute of Packaging-Hyderabad, & Managing Director, Ecobliss India Pvt Ltd, noted, “Glass can be moulded into various shapes & sizes, and thus increase the usability quotient. Creative labelling, embossing and other decorative treatments can also enhance customer appeal.”

At the recently held India Retail Forum 2012, HyperCITY bagged the ‘Most Admired Hypermarket of the Year’ award. Mark Ashman, Chief Executive Officer, HyperCITY, said, “It feels great to receive this award, which symbolises the zest and perseverance of the entire HyperCITY family. This esteemed accomplishment has infused us with great enthusiasm to step up our efforts to sustain HyperCITY as India’s most admired retail chain.” Godrej Nature’s Basket (GNB) was acknowledged as the ‘Most Admired Retailer of the Year’ in the food & grocery category. GNB has received three more prestigious awards this year – CMO Asia, Asia Retail & the Coca Cola Golden Spoon award. Mohit Khattar, Managing Director, GNB, said, “This prestigious win encourages us to continue with our efforts to establish Godrej Nature’s Basket as India’s most admired retail chain.”

Avani Jain

Mahua Roy

BOOK LAUNCH

CONFERENCE

Book on functional foods launched

Ice Cream Congress to be held in Hyderabad

CRC Press recently launched a book titled ‘Innovation in Healthy and Functional Foods’ edited by some of the leading experts such as Dr R B Smarta, Founder & Managing Director, Interlink Marketing Consultancy Pvt Ltd; Dr Dilip Ghosh, Director, Nutriconnect, Sydney (Australia); Dr Shantanu Das, Product Development Manager for the Riddet Institute in Palmerston North, New Zealand; and Debasis Bagchi, Professor of Pharmacological & Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Houston, Texas. According to Dr Smarta, “This book provides an essential overview for key stakeholders, drawing links between areas of knowledge that are often isolated from each other. This form of knowledge integration is essential for practice, especially for policy makers and administrators in government, private or academic sector.”

After the success of last Indian Ice Cream Congress in New Delhi this March, Indian Ice Cream Manufacturers’ Association (IICMA) will be organising an international seminar, with a theme ‘Global trends in ice cream industry’, on December 19, 2012 in Hyderabad. Rajesh Gandhi, President, IICMA, said that during the last Indian Ice Cream Congress, we not only received speakers from different walks of allied industries but also had some interesting open debates with them. This resulted into greater awareness among IICMA members. Sudhir Shah, Secretary, IICMA, and Director, Scoops Ice-Creams, said, “Indian Ice Cream Congress at Hyderabad is expecting more than 250 delegates, participants and exhibitors.”

14

Modern Food Processing | November 2012


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

TAXATION ACQUISITION

Industry urges the government for Excise Duty exemption

Bosch Packaging Technology closes acquisition of Ampack Ammann

The food processing industry has urged the Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MoFPI) to work towards the exemption of Excise Duty on processed foods. Experts feel that over the last couple of years increasing input costs, energy and petroleum prices have raised the production cost for the food processing industry. “As this was not enough in 2011 Budget, Government of India has imposed 1 per cent excise on preserved fruit and vegetable products. The industry has protested for withdrawing this levy but it could

Bosch Packaging Technology has closed its acquisition of Ampack Ammann, a filling and packaging machine specialist. Ampack Ammann develops, manufactures, and sells filling and packaging machines for paste-like and liquid food. Employing some 250 associates, the company has generated average sales of some Euro 35 million over the past few years.

MARKET INTELLIGENCE

not happen. This year again, excise has been doubled to two per cent making it tremendously difficult for the fruits & vegetable processing industry to sustain and survive. Apart from this, for preservative products, packed by third party, an Excise Duty of two per cent based on MRP prices is charged,” said Kailash Sawalka, Director, Samridhi Bio-Energy Pvt Ltd, in a letter addressed to the MoFPI. The industry has, therefore, requested to withdraw the two per cent levy entirely to give a boost to food processing industry.

GREEN INITIATIVE

Global aseptic packaging forecast to grow 24 per cent in next five years

Canvironment Week 2012 held in South Africa

The ‘Global Aseptic Packaging’ report from Zenith International and Warrick Research Ltd estimates that by 2016, the world market for aseptic packaging will reach 153 billion litre, in 333 billion packs, with the majority of additional demand coming from South/South East Asia and China. Milk accounts for 39 per cent of aseptically packed products, with beverages responsible for 37 per cent, and other dairy or food products making up the remainder. Talking about India, Yatindra Sharma, Managing Director, KHS Machinery Pvt Ltd, said, “At present, aseptic beverage packaging market is growing rapidly for milk and juices in laminated paper cartons in order to ensure better flexibility and cost efficiency.” Avani Jain

Nampak and Collect-a-Can, the African partners for Hindustan Tin, initiated Canvironment Week 2012, concluded recently in South Africa. The focus of the event was on educating South Africans about the environmental benefits of recyclability of cans. Lifestyle and fashion accessories created by the students of National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad (India) for Canvironment Week India in 2011 were also displayed at a fashion show during the Green Expo at Sandton Convention Centre, Johannesburg. “As promised, we are back with the Canvironment Week 2012 with creative activities that involve the youth from different geographies to promote and communicate the benefits of the humble can. The activities in South Africa were executed successfully and we look forward for sharing similar success stories from our other international partners around the world,” said Atit Bhatia, President, Canvironment Week 2012.

INGREDIENTS

GIF T PACKS

Chr. Hansen launches ingredients for cheese and powder beverages

Innovative gifting options launched for festive season

Two new cheese cultures from Chr. Hansen called DCC265 and DCC275 have been launched recently. Consumer requirements dictate improved flavour with a creamy note instead of a sharp/acid flavour. At the same time, cheese producers are looking for better phage protection to ensure the quality of the final product. These cultures, available as frozen DVS cultures, consist of flavour enhancing strains and are designed to be used in rotation with the well-known DCC260 culture for improved robustness. “We are pleased to offer cheese producers a number of benefits spanning from improved robustness, better flavour and less bitterness in the final cheese,” said Jamila Bouanda, Marketing Manager, Cheese Cultures, Chr. Hansen.

With the festivities lining up in India, many companies have introduced innovative gifting solutions, thus offering an option to traditional Indian sweets. Wonderful Pistachios and Almonds have introduced a range of gift packs with an optimum combination of taste, health and variety. Processed to meet the highest quality standards of food aficionados, Wonderful Pistachios and Almonds offer some unique flavours customised to suit the needs of the Indian palate. Also, Monginis Food Pvt Ltd is offering a special range of products this Diwali with Ultimates Premium assorted cookies, Imperia Premium assorted cookies, Dry Fruit chocolate rocks and Inspiration Premium assorted pastries and much more. Also, leading international brand Galaxy from the palate of Mars Inc has introduced the all-new exclusive gift pack, Galaxy Shubh Avsar.

16

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

Mahua Roy


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

APPOINTMENT AWARD

Major management changes in the Corvaglia Group

Cognex wins 2012 Control Design Readers’ Choice Award

Thomas Marder, Chief Executive Officer and member of the Corvaglia Group’s Board of Directors, has left the company with effect from October 1, 2012, and operational control will thus be passing back to Romeo Corvaglia, Company Owner and Chairman of the Board. Franco Bischof will take over Thomas Marder’s position on the Board with immediate effect. Marder has provided the Corvaglia Group with advice and support as a member of the Board since 2009

Cognex Corporation, the world’s leading supplier of machine vision systems, has won the Control Design Readers’ Choice Award in the category of machine vision system by a margin of 43 per cent over the second place finisher. Control Design surveyed the machine builders and system integrators among its readership, and of the approximately 1,000 that responded, 52 per cent answered that Cognex machine vision systems delivered the best value compared to 9 per cent for the second place finisher.

PRODUCT LAUNCH

B&H Labeling introduces glue extrusion system B&H Labeling Systems introduced the new B&H Glue Extrusion System (GES) at Pack Expo. This patent-pending extrusion glue system is the world’s first fully automatic, recipe-driven hot melt applicator for roll-fed labelling. Compared to traditional glue wheel systems and spray glue systems, the new GES improves the accuracy of glue application and produces void-free glue patterns while eliminating vacuum drum re-padding.

and additionally took over the position of Corvaglia Group Chief Executive Officer from the summer of 2011. He has left the company due to differences of opinion about the group’s future direction. “Marder has made a significant contribution to the consolidation and ongoing development of Corvaglia Closures Eschlikon AG. We would like to thank Marder for his valuable contribution and wish him every success in his future career,” said Corvaglia, Owner, Corvaglia Group.

DAIRY PACKAGING

More school milk programmes to foster dairy industry development Tetra Pak celebrates World School Milk Day, with an increasing number of governments and international development organisations using school feeding programmes to develop the dairy industry and drive economic growth in addition to improving nutrition and educational outcomes. In Tetra Pak’s discussions with governments, development agencies and NGOs, more and more institutions now raise economic development potential as an important consideration when assessing the merit of introducing a school feeding programme. “In providing a guaranteed source of demand to local dairies, school feeding programmes encourage investment, expansion and economic growth in underdeveloped rural communities,” said Ulla Holm, Food for Development Office (FfDO), Tetra Pak. Tetra Pak and the FfDO supported several new school milk programmes worldwide in 2012. Among them are a nationwide programme in Turkey reaching more than seven million children; a programme in Mumbai for 450,000 children in 1,200 schools; programmes in Ukraine and Uzbekistan, each reaching out to more than 1,000 children. “Tetra Pak is committed to bring fresh, nutritious and safe food to children. Working with governments around the world, we are also helping to ensure that feeding programmes act as powerful catalysts to build local dairy industry capacity, creating new and lasting opportunities for prosperity across whole communities,” said Holm.

BREWING

RECOGNITION

BASF launches Crosspure for the Chinese market

Waters selects laboratory at University of North Texas for innovation programme

BASF launched its new filter aid Crosspure to the Chinese brewing industry, marking the beginning of a new way in filtration and stabilisation in the country having the world’s highest beer production. As per the company, Crosspure is more than just a replacement for the filter aid kieselguhr (diatomaceous earth). Brewers, nowadays, focus on beer taste, clarity and stability, which must come in a cost-effective, safe, healthy, and sustainable way. Crosspure exceeds the current standard practice, kieselguhr, on all of these points. It is a two-in-one solution for brewers allowing filtration and stabilisation of beer in one single step. It is a synthetic regenerative polymer designed specifically to replace kieselguhr in beer filtration. BASF has achieved this innovation by compounding polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) and polystyrene using patented technology. “This technology delivers a revolutionary change for the beer industry, and in turn, for what consumers will expect from this popular beverage,” commented Dr Zhang Jianjun, Senior Manager, BPP Business & Regional Application Technology Human Nutrition, BASF Greater China.

18

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

At a ceremony officiated by University of North Texas (UNT), Dr Provost Warren Burggren, welcomed UNT’s Metabolomics and Metabolic Signaling Pathway Research Laboratory into the Waters Centers of Innovation Program. The laboratory directed by Prof Vladimir Shulaev is known worldwide for research in the field of metabolomics, the study of all cellular metabolites produced by living organisms. His laboratory is part of UNT’s plant signaling cluster, a team of researchers who collaborate to improve the understanding of cellular communication in plants to find solutions related to energy, agriculture, nutrition and medicine.


TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION

Mettler-Toledo offers advanced conveyorised inspection systems Mettler-Toledo Instruments (Shanghai) Co Ltd has been producing a wide range of conveyorised metal detection systems from its Shanghai facility, specifically for Asian manufacturers. Mettler-Toledo’s Series 40, MB, 60 and 70 Conveyorised Metal Detection systems developed from the Group’s Western designs are produced locally in Asia, to its European quality standards. The Series 40 conveyor is suitable for use on metal detectors inspecting light packaged products at the end of the production line. It is available with fixed or variable speed drives as required by the manufacturers’ productivity needs. Developed for use in wet and harsh manufacturing environments, the Series MB is sealed to Ingress Protection

Rating (IP) 65 standard, preventing ingress of water and other chemicals that can damage the conveyor motor. Its modular polyethylene conveyor belt has also been engineered to withstand high-pressure, hightemperature cleaning regimes, ensuring a sterile environment while reducing maintenance. The Series 60 and Series 70 systems are ideally suited for the inspection of medium to large packaged dry products. The systems’ length and height can be designed according to the size of the pack for optimum inspection. All conveyor systems have a fullywelded construction with a casing design that eliminates dirt traps to meet brand owners’ hygiene requirements.

20

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

Silicone antifoams destabilise beer bubbles The chemical reactions of proteins and enzymes of barley grains & hops may give beers their distinct flavours. But as the world’s thirst for beer grows, large and small breweries are also looking to chemistry to help maintain peak productivity. “While carbon dioxide bubbles can create a distinguishing ‘head’ on a glass of beer, too much foam can create problems,” said Don Buchalski, Global Marketing Manager, XIAMETER brand, Dow Corning. He further added, “Boilovers during the brewing process can hinder production in what is a competitive industry. One solution could be to add silicone antifoams in the brewing process.” Silicone antifoams destabilise and collapse the bubbles, helping brewers to reduce loss and avoid having to stop production to clean up spills. The antifoams are removed along with the silica used for haze stabilisation in the filtration process before packaging.

Easy to deploy and maintain robots aid flexibility Synerlink, the integrator of the packaging machine manufacturer Arcil, has come out with end-of-line robotic solutions under the Aprium-Technology brand that feature Adept Quattro robots from Adept Technology. Used to gently stack cups of yoghurts and other food products at high speeds prior to multi-packing or case packing, the flexible Quattro robots are easy to deploy and maintain. Charles Antoine Freiher, Business Unit Manager, Aprium-Technology, said, “Compared to pneumatic stacking systems, robots have more flexibility to handle a wide variety of product sizes and stacking configurations with little downtime for changeovers. We selected Quattro because of its payload, speed and connectivity. The fact that Adept’s programming language is open and OMAC-compatible makes it easy to integrate and maintain Quattro.” The Quattro robot’s end-of-arm tooling used to handle the yoghurt cups is Adept’s proprietary SoftPIC gripping technology. These SoftPIC grippers are made of soft silicone that conforms to the shape of the product to provide a strong vacuum path, which enables the robots to handle the products gently and reliably at high speeds.

LINPAC Packaging unveils super-lightweight trays Europe’s leading multi-material packaging manufacturer, LINPAC Packaging launched superlightweight mono-material tray for meat and poultry. The novel Rfresh Elite range of rPET trays use a sealant on their flanges to create a secure seal with the lidding film, thus removing the industry standard laminated PE base film. The patent-pending trays are 100 per cent recyclable at the end of their service life. The new Rfresh Elite trays have been developed in conjunction with LINPAC Packaging’s lightweighting programme, which was established to reduce significantly the overall weight and carbon footprint of some trays, while ensuring excellent performance and functionality levels.


TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

TECHNOLOGY OFFERED As part of our endeavour to spread the technology culture, this section provides a means to promote and facilitate exchange of select technologies. We strive to bring together suppliers of such technologies with suitable users for negotiations and industrial collaboration.

Beverage maker An Indian firm is offering ‘three-in-one’ beverage maker, which is a portable kit that allows the user to simultaneously make three functional beverages as per requirement. Using this, the consumer can set up three different types of fermentation simultaneously at one particular temperature. Areas of application Beverage industry Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Chocolate manufacturing technology An Indian firm provides chocolate manufacturing and snack extrusion technolog y with machiner y. The firm supplies chocolate machines like chocolate conches, chocolate enrobers with cooling tunnel, one shot chocolate moulding machines, chocolate storage tanks, etc. The machines are manufactured using European technology. Areas of application Chocolate manufacturing Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services and equipment supply

Food-paste moulding machine A Thailand-based firm offers a food-paste moulding machine that produces cylindrical-shaped food paste with both ends sealed. This machine enables faster production of food paste with consistent size and hygiene, which increases business potential in bigger markets both locally and abroad.

22

Areas of application It is useful in food processing industry where the food products of cylindrical shape are required Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Food processing machinery An Indian firm offers all machinery for processing fruits, vegetables, poultry, meat and fish. Manufactured in Europe, the machinery is easy to use and makes high-quality food products. It also offers ice-making machines. Areas of application Food processing, agro-based industries Forms of transfer Consultancy, equipment supply, turnkey

Liquid glucose An Indian firm offers a novel bio-process technology for liquid glucose production. The company has made a significant progress in technical advancement of the process. Areas of application Only for food and confectionery Forms of transfer Consultancy, technology licensing

Sugarcane juice powder (dried) An Indian firm offers technology for making sugarcane juice powder using spray drying technique. It is a natural, healthy, safe and nutritious product from sugarcane. Areas of application Food & beverages sector Forms of transfer Consultancy, technology licensing

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

Technology for milk, fruit and cereal-based products An Indian firm offers technology for processing milk products, fruit & vegetable products and ready-to-eat & ready-to-cook food products Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Consultancy, subcontracting, joint venture, technical services, capacity building, technology licensing, equipment supply, turnkey, others

Technology for natural dyes/oleoresins An Indian firm provides assistance in the manufacture of oleoresins/natural colour extracts using latest technology. Areas of application Food colours/natural dyes Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services, turnkey

Vacuum sealer and gas injection machine A Thailand-based company is providing technology for preserving and extending shelf-life of food products. Proper packaging is critical for avoiding food spoilage. The vacuum sealing and gas injection technique prevents contaminating microbes to enter the container, thereby increasing the shelf-life of the product. Areas of application Fo o d processing and agro-based industries Forms of transfer Technology licensing


TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

TECHNOLOGY REQUESTED Coconut milk beverage An Indian entrepreneur is interested in acquiring the technology for producing & processing coconut milk beverage. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Consultancy

Corn processing An Indian company is looking for a complete proposal/project report to set up a dry milling corn processing plant in Andhra Pradesh. Targeted finished product is tinned corn, pop corn, corn flakes etc. It is also interested to import similar kind of plant & machinery to set up the same in India. Areas of application Corn processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Extruder pilot plant An Indian company is seeking the extruder pilot plant for manufacturing processed cereal-based weaning food. Areas of application Infant food, supplementary food, weaning food Forms of transfer Others

Food processing equipment An Indian company is seeking technology and equipment for processing of fruits, vegetables and other related products.

Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Food preservation

Rice husk ash to silica precipitates

A Thailand-based food and preserved fruit trading firm is looking for efficient technology to extend the shelf-life and preserve food and fruit. Areas of application Food processing, confectionery and pastry industries Forms of transfer Others

An Indian company is seeking the technology to convert rice husk ash into some useful matter like silica precipitate, as the rice husk is rich in silica content. Areas of application Agro-based mills, which burn rice husk for internal purposes Forms of transfer Others

Fruit drinks-doy pack

Spice grinding and processing plant

A firm from UAE is interested in acquiring the technology for manufacturing fruit juices and drinks using optimum formulation technology. The firm needs technology providers, consultants and price quotes for the project based on turnkey & know-how. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Juice and food processing A company based in the UAE proposes to establish a food processing plant that would help process fruit juices, jam/jelly, juice concentrates & pulp. Through this plant, the company also wishes to obtain valuable by-products like cattle feed, fertiliser and raw materials for plywood.

An Indian firm is seeking to set up a spice plant and requires turnkey project consultants for the same. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Virgin coconut oil production A Thai entrepreneur is interested in acquiring the technology for production of virgin coconut oil. He plans to set up a coconut oil production line with technical co-operation from technology providers. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Information courtesy: Dr Krishnan S Raghavan, In-Charge, Technology Transfer Services Group, Asian and Pacific Centre for Transfer of Technology (APCTT) of United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP), APCTT Building, C-2, Qutab Institutional Area, New Delhi - 110 016, Tel: 011-3097 3758 (Direct), 3097 3710 (Board), Fax: 011-2685 6274, E-mail: srinivasaraghavan@un.org, Web: www.apctt.org, For more information on technology offers and requests, please log on to www.technology4sme.net and register with your contact details. This is a free of cost platform provided by APCTT for facilitating interaction between buyers and seekers of technologies across the globe. After submitting technology offer or request to this website, you are requested to wait for at least two weeks for receiving a response from a prospective buyer / seeker through this website, before contacting APCTT for further assistance.

Share and Solicit Technology The mission of Modern Food Processing is to spread the technology culture. Here is an opportunity to be a part of this endeavour by sending your technology on offer or technology requirements. If you belong to any of these two categories, you are invited to furnish the techno-commercial details for publication. The write-up needs to be as per the format of this section with information about the particular technology offered or requested, its areas of application and forms of transfer. Contact us: Modern Food Processing, Network18 Media & Investments Ltd, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028.Tel: 022-3024 5000, 3003 4672 l Fax: 022-3003 4499 l Email: spedit@network18publishing.com

24

Modern Food Processing | November 2012


IN CONVERSATION WITH Tarak Bhattacharya

We initiated the concept of warming the donuts

Photo: Joshua Navalkar

…says Tarak Bhattacharya, Chief Operating Officer, Mad Over Donuts. He talks about the uniqueness of the brand and opportunities for the QSR industry in India over warm donuts & coffee with Mahua Roy.

26

Modern Food Processing | November 2012


Tarak Bhattacharya

How has been the growth story of Mad Over Donuts (MOD) in India? MOD began India operations in 2008, with its first store in New Delhi, and then came Mumbai. The last 12 months have seen phenomenal growth as we have almost trebled our number of stores to reach 42. Before coming to India, we carried out extensive research to understand the consumer psyche towards acceptance of a product like donut. In fact, we had looked at other Asian countries before shortlisting India. However, various factors led to India being our first choice to start operations.

What makes MOD so different? We were the first company to come up with a concept of gourmet donuts. MOD is known for its 100 per cent eggless, fresh gourmet donuts. We came up with the boutique concept where people can actually see the donut decoration. This brings in exclusivity and innovation. We have always focussed on the brand tagline ‘Love at First Bite!’ experience. We insist on calling our product as the superhero and invest a lot in perfecting it continually. Our store managers advised not to sell product if they themselves do not like it. Multiple product innovations keep happening at our R&D kitchen in Singapore. Our expert chefs have around 150 years of combined experience in this field. They are a brilliant mix of Indian and international chefs.

Which is the target segment you cater to? It is true that donuts are an impulse purchase, but we have come up with a lot of successful strategies to reach out to our target group. Our target consumers are donut lovers across all age groups. Time and again, we have strategised events and activities keeping in mind donut lovers in all age groups, be it students or executives, or in fact anyone young at heart.

What have been the customisations for the Indian market? India is a tough market to operate in. Every 50 km, except the currency, I guess, everything changes! Palate changes

are a tricky subject, and maintaining a perfect product, keeping in mind the various likings of every region, is a huge challenge. Our initial research showed that Indians prefer the chocolate flavour the most. As a result, maybe out of the 30 donuts that we have on display, 25 are chocolate-based. Secondly, there is another set of consumers, which do not have a sweet tooth. For them, we came up with the savoury donuts, which is an interesting concept of non-sweet donuts in exciting flavours. Also, we initiated the concept of warming the donuts before serving it to the consumers. Initially, we did not indulge in this. However, consumer feedback made us realise this habit of Indians and thus we planned to stick to it. It helped us create immense brand differentiation. Moreover, 100 per cent eggless concept is also what we started in India. It was difficult initially to get the product texture, taste and consistency right, with an eggless formulation. We performed around 400 trials in a span of three months to get the formulation right.

What is your typical week like? At least thrice a week, I visit our stores mandatorily. Studying consumer behaviour is interesting.

Apart from MOD, which other brands do you admire? Walmart, TESCO and Starbucks

Which is one business etiquette you always follow? Personal grooming and punctuality

opportunity areas to cash in on. Cafés, in fact, are doing really well in the highways.

What can be expected as new additions to the MOD menu? We recently experimented with the introduction of cup cakes to our current product portfolio. However, on a regular basis, we come up with the ‘donut festival’; recent examples of which include mango festival, nuts, fresh fruit festival, etc. During this period, whichever one gets consumer favouritism, becomes a permanent part of the menu. We believe that this is the best way of consumer trial. As a result, every fifth week, a new variety of donut is introduced.

What are the opportunity areas for the QSR industry? The QSR industry is here to stay. There is so much of activity in this space that this is the right time to enter the market and make the most of it. The disposable income of Indians is rising, and the consumers are travelling extensively and are open to experiment with innovations in the food & beverage industry. Malls, high streets and highways are

Is MOD going international? We are eyeing international locations towards the end of this fiscal. Being a Singaporean brand, our expansion will initially be focussed towards South East Asia.

What are the future expansion plans of MOD? At present, we are catering to donut lovers in Mumbai, Delhi, Bengaluru and Pune. We plan to expand soon to Hyderabad, Ahmedabad and Chennai in about six months. We are talking of 50 stores this fiscal, of which 26 are already open. We are targeting to reach a figure of 200 stores pan India in three years. In India, presently we are functioning as a hub and spoke model, with a mother kitchen and city-level distribution. In future, we plan to adopt the café model as well maybe in an 80:20 ratio where 20 per cent of our store formats are cafés. Email: mahua.roy@network18publishing.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

27


An invite that rewards as well... Dear Reader, ‘Modern Food Processing’ solicits original, well-written, application-oriented, unpublished articles that reflect your valuable experience and expertise in the food processing industry. You can send us Technical Articles, Case Studies and Product Write-ups. The length of the article should not exceed 1500 words, while that of a product write-up should not exceed 100 words. The articles should preferably reach us in soft copy (either E-mail or a CD). The text should be in MS Word format and images in 300 DPI resolution & JPG format. The final decision regarding the selection and publication of the articles shall rest solely with ‘Modern Food Processing’. Authors whose articles are published will be sent a complimentary copy of that particular edition. Published by Network18 Media & Investments Ltd, ‘Modern Food Processing’ one of the leading monthly magazines exclusively meant for producers and user fraternities of the food processing industry. Well supported by a national readership of over 80,000 and our strong network of 26 branch offices across India, this magazine reaches out to key decision makers among the Indian manufacturers of food processing products, machinery and allied sectors. Brought out in association with Hong Kong-based Ringier Trade Publishing Ltd (one of the world’s largest trade publishing houses with more than 200 special interest titles and offices in every major country), it ensures that advertisers are able to promote their products and services across the globe at no extra cost. So get going and rush your articles, write-ups, etc… Thanking you, Yours sincerely,

Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

Manas R Bastia Senior Editor Network18 Media & Investments Ltd ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W) Mumbai 400 028 India

D +91 22 3003 4669 T +91 22 3024 5000 F +91 22 3003 4499 E manas@network18publishing.com W www.network18publishing.com


MFP_Nov_2012_Noida_Tab-1_PG_29


MFP_Nov_2012_RAC_Tab-1_PG_30


SPECIAL FOCUS

FOOD PACKAGING ECO-FRIENDLY PACKAGING A dilemma to balance ecology with economics! .......................................................................................32 PACKAGING TECHNOLOGY Of convenience, compactness and comfort ...............................................................................................34 ANTIMICROBIAL PACKAGING A shield against growth of micro-organisms ............................................................................................36 FLEXIBLE PACKAGING Aiding flexibility with sustainability! ........................................................................................................40 INTERFACE - Harish P Joshi, Managing Director, Nichrome India Ltd “Flexible packaging has enabled the food industry to achieve different price points” .............................42

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

31


SPECIAL FOCUS Eco-friendly packaging

The unprecedented growth of processed food industry in India calls for eco-friendly packaging on a larger scale, though this concept is at a nascent stage in the country. Lack of awareness and cost factor are the prime reasons as to why eco-friendly packaging is not picking up in India. It is time to take necessary steps to promote eco-friendly packaging for averting environmental disaster in future. Illustration: Chaitanya Dinesh Surpur

Prasenjit Chakraborty

E

very industry creates wealth, but one industry that not only creates wealth but also preserves the wealth or value created by other industries is packaging. With growth of 15 to 20 per cent annually, Indian packaged food industry is about to touch $ 30 billion by 2015 from its present level of $ 15 billion (snack foods, ready-to-eat foods, healthy and functional foods). Packaging helps in preserving quality and augmenting shelf-life of products, be it milk, drugs and medicines, or processed fruits and vegetables.

The growth facilitator In the absence of proper supply chain in India, the role of packaging becomes more important. In a vast country like India, inadequate logistics system means an arduous journey for the processed food products. In this context, packaging plays an important role during the transit. “The supply chain and logistics facilities in India are still at a developing stage

32

and hence pose a challenge to many in the processed food industry. Processed food products require a longer shelf-life and need to be protected from diverse weather conditions across India as some regions experience extreme summers and some others have moderate or low temperatures,” points out Vimal Kedia, Managing Director, Manjushree Technopack Ltd. Another concern is the way products are marketed. Many-a-time, products are retailed in neighbouring small kirana stores, which neither have air-conditioning facilities nor safety norms to prevent contamination. It is in such a context that packaging comes to rescue. “Packaging when designed keeping in mind technical specifications helps processed food stay safe from contamination and preserves the integrity or goodness for longer shelflife. This should be the case under any climatic or environmental conditions. All standards of preserving or maintaining food products have better chances of being followed when appropriate packaging is provided,” says Kedia.

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

Food wastage is a growing concern and here packaging can play a significant role and subsequently uplift the food segment. “Food industry in India is reeling because of the high level of food spoilage. Food is a perishable product and majority of it produced in India is unprocessed and unpackaged. Packaging not only extends the shelf-life of the product but also increases the reach and penetration to the remotest of areas in our country. It also provides convenience, adds functionality and meets the demands of changing consumers in the country,” opines Zaheer Abbas, Market Manager, Food Label & Packaging Materials – India, Avery Dennison (India) Pvt Ltd. Echoing a similar sentiment, Rahul Shah, Director, Shako Flexipack Pvt Ltd, says, “About 40 per cent of food is wasted in the supply chain due to lack of infrastructure such as cold chains, warehousing, material handling, etc. If one can reduce this wastage, the availability and price of food products will become more reasonable. A large amount of foods is seasonal, and hence it is essential to process these foods and select the appropriate packaging to ensure the best possible shelf-life with today’s technologies and materials available. If foods and their inherent energy are to be preserved until consumption, they need to be processed. Hence, packaging plays a pivotal role in ensuring that the food processing industry in India grows at a much faster pace.” Nikhil Sipani, CEO, Reliable Packaging, believes, “It is not just about packaging but also widespread adoption of branding and development of consumer preferences to an extent that a consumer product is packaged in a manner that meets the criteria of safety, convenience and attractiveness, and ultimately gains marketshare. In the aggregate, packaging as a sectoral activity boosts consumption and economic growth.”

Eco-friendly packaging Like prevention of food wastage, it is imperative to promote eco-friendly packaging. This is because, in any segment, Indian market offers much higher volume


Eco-friendly packaging

Eco-friendly packaging in India is still at a nascent stage and has not picked up till now mainly because customers are overtly price-sensitive. Besides, eco-friendly packaging material provides few options for barriers and food packaging. Vimal Kedia Managing Director, Manjushree Technopack Ltd

when compared to any other country. Bigger volume means higher consumption. Hence, it is essential to promote ecofriendly packaging in India. Otherwise one challenge may lead to another that is much higher in magnitude. However, there are certain challenges associated with the implementation of eco-friendly packaging in India. Cost aspect seems to be one of the prime reasons in this direction. “In a country like India where the aim of any business is cost cutting and profit-making, the future of eco-friendly products seems bleak. People do not want to implement the changes; for instance usage of plastic bags is banned in Delhi but people hardly abide by the law,” laments Sipani. According to Kedia, eco-friendly packaging in India is still at a nascent stage and has not picked up till now mainly because customers are overtly price-sensitive. “This slow pace in growth is also because of lower level of awareness among people. Besides, eco-friendly packaging material provides few options for barriers and food packaging,” he points out. That is why companies prefer to use materials, which are available with ease and

Eco-friendly packaging and sustainability are gaining significance in India. Global warming is a universal problem and every country in every segment is playing a role to use, adopt and promote eco-friendly and sustainable packaging. Zaheer Abbas Market Manager, Food Label & Packaging Materials – India, Avery Dennison (India) Pvt Ltd

at economical prices. “So it will take some time before equal importance is given to eco-friendly packaging,” Kedia adds. It is a fact that the level of awareness about eco-friendly packaging at this point of time has not reached the desired level in India, but people are slowly recognising the importance of eco-friendly packaging. It means awareness is picking up. Says Abbas, “Eco-friendly packaging and sustainability are gaining significance in India. Global warming is a universal problem and every country in every segment is playing a role to use, adopt and promote eco-friendly and sustainable packaging. This is an area, which will gain more momentum and strength in India in the coming years.” With increasing focus on sustainability, the eco-friendly trend is bound to catch up soon in India. Today, the government is also taking proactive steps to address issues related with environment. “Both the government and food processing industry have realised that packages should be such that it can be recycled, optimised, traced back to manufacturer, and collected. Various steps have been taken to ensure that India reaches European levels of recycling in the next five years,” says Shah. He adds that consumers are also driving the eco-friendly message by accepting suitable packaging and new ideas to ensure that one reduces carbon footprint due to use of sustainable packaging. “Needless to say, packaging is of paramount importance for food sector to overcome the issues related to food shortage, inflation, nutritional value and shelf-life, as well as to grow by leaps and bounds in the coming years as population grows and agricultural land shrinks,” points out Shah.

Evolving packaging industry Emphasis on eco-friendly packaging is bound to reflect on the overall packaging industry in India. According to Sipani, initially packaging was done in glass bottles, then came the era of plastics but the current trend is that of paper. “The reason being, it is eco-friendly, bio-degradable and recyclable. Plastics takes almost thousands of years to be reused whereas paper can be reused easily. Moreover, paper can be

Both the government and food processing industry have realised that packages should be such that it can be recycled, optimised, traced back to manufacturer, and collected. Rahul Shah Director, Shako Flexipack Pvt Ltd

dumped easily and does not cause any harm to the environment,” he says. According to Abbas, packaging has seen a paradigm shift in India. The growth of the packaging industry in the last 10 years is an evidence of this. “Convenience, functionality and shelf-life are key growth drivers for the packaging sector in India. The use of paper and plastics, both are growing tremendously, and with low level of penetration of packaging, the journey is set to drive northwards in the years to come,” he says. As the consumers become more and more aware, they are demanding high quality in every respect concerning nutrition, information, shelf-life etc. “This has led the food industry to accept higher innovation in packaging. Recycling and environmental issues are also influencing the way packaging is used by the processed food industry. Government has already started work on creating a recycling system and also identifying the ideal source of packaging. Optimisation of packaging in terms of more and more rigid packaging getting replaced with flexible packaging is another change, which is happening,” explains Shah. He also adds that plastics dominates the packaging industry in India. With increase in paper and pulp prices, plastics has gained higher acceptance since one can down-gauge plastics to a greater extent without compromising the barrier required for the foods. There is no doubt that eco-friendly packaging is going to dominate the food packaging industry in the days to come. It will happen only when people will be fully aware of it. What is happening now with regard to eco-friendly packaging is just the tip of an iceberg. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@network18publishing.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

33


SPECIAL FOCUS Packaging technology

Prasenjit Chakraborty

P

ackaging industry around the world has undergone tremendous changes. And the changes resulted in addressing of important issues and offering several benefits such as convenience, comfort, safety etc to the end-consumers. When it comes to the food processing industry such changes in packaging are instrumental in ensuring better shelf-life of a product and maintaining its freshness. All these are the results of adoption of sophisticated technology. “There have been advancements in food packaging arena, especially processed foods. The upgradation of present machines coupled with better barrier material available for extended

Technology wave New technology, modern equipment and packaging formats have added immense value not only for the food producers, but also for the consumers and society at large. “Seasonal fruits and food can now be consumed throughout the year; it is the best example of changing packaging technology in our country. Packaged flour, rice, etc are examples of how packaging has driven growth, backed by convenience, functionality and extended shelf-life,” points out Zaheer Abbas, Market Manager – Food, Label & Packaging Materials – India, Avery Dennison (India) Pvt Ltd. Today, changing lifestyles, nuclear families and convenience play a crucial role in the consumption of food products. A clear example is of the re-sealable labelling option available for biscuit packs. “The consumption of

The packaging sector is undergoing a virtual metamorphosis mainly due to technological advancements. The food processing sector is immensely benefitting from the progress made by the packaging industry as the new-age packaging technologies address issues of product freshness, longer shelf-life, convenience, etc. Today, one can consume seasonal fruits throughout the year, which has become possible mainly due to modern technology in packaging.

shelf-life of products has contributed to the progress of food processing sector in India. The cold chains now available at modern retail outlets are also helping the dairy and processed food industry to extend shelf-life of products without preservatives,” says Vimal Kedia, Managing Director, Manjushree Technopack Ltd.

34

cookies, biscuits, wafers has increased on the move and hence these products are now available in smaller packs. From a brand manager’s perspective, the biscuit packs lose their branding as soon as they are opened and put in the containers. With innovations in labelling and packaging, we now have a re-sealable option, which keeps the brand intact till the time

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

the product is consumed and also provides convenience to customers for consumption at their own will and desired quantity,” points out Abbas. The major benefit of re-sealable labels is less wastage ensuring freshness of the product. Tamper evident labelling solutions in food packaging is also picking pace as brand managers want to ensure the quality of the product from the time of manufacturing to consumption. “Avery Dennison’s ‘Clear-on-clear’ labelling solution helps to enhance the shelf appeal and make a product stand out. Clear-on-clear provides transparency to the product and gives a premium look to the container ensuring valuable benefits for both the consumer as well as the brand owner,” claims Abbas. Rahul Shah, Director, Shako Flexipack Pvt Ltd, strongly believes that if one can increase the barrier properties of various packaging materials available, the quality and shelf-life will increase dramatically. “In India, other than tetra pack, there was not much acceptance of technologies such as Low Moisture Vapour Transmission Rate (MVTR), Low Oxygen Transmission Rate (OTR), modified atmospheric packaging, etc. However, food industry has now started demanding packaging to enhance shelf-life and hence already available technologies such as Polyvinylidene Chloride (PVDC), anti-fog, Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (EVOH), etc have found greater appeal today,” opines Shah. Globalisation of Indian food and culture is the core reason for increasing shelf-life of product. For example, Tetra Pak’s aseptic processes allow liquid food to retain colour, texture, natural taste and nutritional value for up to 12 months, without preservatives or refrigeration. “Aseptic packaging reduces waste, and makes distribution cost-efficient, besides converting your product into a consumer-ready format as well as making it possible for you to reach consumers in remote locations.


Packaging technology

Aseptic packaging reduces waste, and makes distribution cost-efficient, besides converting your product into a consumerready format as well as making it possible for you to reach consumers in remote locations. Nikhil Sipani CEO, Reliable Packaging

Aseptic packages and ambient transportation enable to capitalise on opportunities wherever they arise around the globe,” points out Nikhil Sipani, Chief Executive Officer, Reliable Packaging.

Rigid and flexible packaging trends New trends in flexible packaging basically include a variety of multilayer films as well as better printing technology, which enhances the product value on the shelf as well as prolongs the product shelf-life. “Also in trend are rigid packages that offer the barrier technology with nylon blends in PET. This is a suitable replacement to the costly multilayer co-extruded technology. We have witnessed that products such as ketchups, sauces, and beer are being introduced in this new packaging format of latest nylonbased PET resin technology. This can be easily processed on existing machines as well. The cost, however, is about 30 per cent higher than normal PET but lower than the multilayer products,” explains Kedia. The rigid and flexible categories are growing at a fast pace in the processed food industry. “Both the categories of packaging are enjoying a healthy double-digit growth. Due to low level of processing and packaging in India, they are set to grow tremendously,” opines Abbas. Few things that Avery Dennison has added to its product portfolio are air valves, steam valves, flow wrap, re-closure, re-sealable packaging, clear-on-clear labels, labels with PET liner to drive sustainability and efficiency in operations, PS Shrink, etc. Similarly, Shako Flexipack is constantly aiming at adding value to flexible packaging, which is its core business. The company also manufactures container-sealing products – induction heat seal wads – for rigid packaging industr y. “Thus, we keep tab on developments in both these categories of packaging,” says Shah. He believes that flexible packaging is likely to dominate the modern retail shelves for processed foods due to various reasons such as better value proposition, higher barrier properties, greater appeal on the shelf, innovative bag formats, cheaper and faster automation in Form Fill Seal Machine (FFS) technologies, etc. “Rigid packaging has its own inherent advantages, but in India flexibles seem to be leading the race,” he concludes. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@network18publishing.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

35


SPECIAL FOCUS Antimicrobial packaging

A shield against growth of

micro-organisms Antimicrobial packaging systems can inhibit the growth of pathogenic and spoilage micro-organisms, and contribute towards food safety improvement and shelf-life extension of packaged food. Many factors are involved in designing the antimicrobial packaging system; however, most of the parameters are closely related to the characteristics of antimicrobial agents, packaged foods and target micro-organisms. D Thyagarajan, A Karthiayani, C Prem Anandh, N Dhivya and V Mathavi

A

ntimicrobial packaging system enables to ward off spoilage and pathogenic micro-organisms that contaminate foodstuff. The antimicrobial function can be achieved by adding antimicrobial agents in the packaging system and/or using antimicrobial polymers that satisfy conventional packaging requirements. When the packaging system acquires antimicrobial activity, the packaging system (or material) limits or prevents microbial growth by extending the lag period and reducing the growth rate or decreases live counts of micro-organisms. The primary goals of an antimicrobial packaging system are safety assurance, quality maintenance, and shelf-life extension. Generally, antimicrobial functions show three types of mode – release, absorption, and immobilisation. Release type allows the migration of antimicrobial agents into foods or headspace inside packages, and inhibits the growth of micro-organisms. The antimicrobial agents can be either a solute or a gas. However, solute antimicrobial agents cannot migrate through air gaps or over the space between the package and the food product, while the gaseous antimicrobial agents can penetrate through any space.

Figure 1: Antimicrobial systems and their releasing profiles

Migration

Food

Inner layer

Package

Food

Outer layer

Package

Permeation

Immobilisation

(B) Two-layer system

(A) One-layer system Package

Headspace

Package

Headspace

(C) Headspace system

36

Matrix layer

Control layer

Equilibration

Barrier layer

Matrix layer

Barrier layer

Permeation & evaporation Evaporation

Constructing an antimicrobial packaging system Figure 1(A), (B), (C) and (D) explain the antimicrobial systems and their releasing profiles. Systems (A) and (B) release antimicrobial agents through diffusion, while systems (C) and (D) release volatile antimicrobial agents by evaporation. One-layer system: The antimicrobial agent is incorporated into the packaging material or chemically bound on the packaging material by immobilisation. Two-layer system: The antimicrobial agent (outer layer) is coated on the packaging material (inner layer), or the antimicrobial matrix layer (outer layer) is laminated with the control layer (inner layer) to control the release rate specifically. Headspace system: The volatile antimicrobial agent initially incorporated into the matrix layer releases into the headspace. Headspace antimicrobial agent is partitioned with the food product by equilibrium sorption/isotherm. Headspace system with control layer: The control layer specifically controls the permeation of the volatile antimicrobial agent and maintains specific headspace concentration.

Factors affecting antimicrobial packaging Equilibration

(D) Headspace system with control layer

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

Absorption mode of antimicrobial system removes essential factors of microbial growth from the food systems and inhibits the growth of micro-organisms. For example, the oxygen-absorbing system can prevent the growth of moulds inside packages. Immobilisation system does not release antimicrobial agents but suppresses the growth of micro-organisms at the contact surface. It may be less effective in the case of solid foods compared to the liquid foods because there is less possibility for contact between the antimicrobial package and the whole food products. Chemical antimicrobial agents are the most common substances used in the food industry. These include organic acids, fungicides, alcohols and antibiotics. Organic acids possess strong antimicrobial activity and have been used as food preservatives, food contact substances and food contact material sanitisers. Benomyl and imazalil have been incorporated in plastic films and demonstrated antifungal activity.

Many factors should be considered while designing antimicrobial packaging systems such as antimicrobial agent characteristics, incorporation methods, permeation and evaporation. Other


Antimicrobial packaging

Figure 2. Release of antimicrobial agents through free diffusion Package Cs

Food t>0

t=0

t >> 0

Cs m.i.c

Cs

considerations include specific activity, resistance of micro-organisms, controlled release, release mechanisms, chemical nature of foods and antimicrobials, storage and distribution conditions, film/container casting process conditions, physical & mechanical properties of antimicrobial packaging materials, organoleptic characteristics and toxicity of antimicrobials, and corresponding regulations. An antimicrobial agent has its own specific inhibition activity against each micro-organism. Therefore, the selection of antimicrobial agent is dependent on its activity against a target micro-organism. Due to the characteristics of food products such as pH, water activity, compositions and storage temperature, the growth of potential micro-organisms that can spoil food products is predictable. The antimicrobial agent has to be selected by the inhibition activity of the agent against the targeted potential micro-organisms in the environmental conditions of the packaged foods. The solubility of the antimicrobial agents in the food is a critical factor. If the antimicrobial agent is highly soluble in the food, the migration profile will follow the unconstrained free diffusion, while the very low solubility creates the monolithic system. Figure 2 represents the release of antimicrobial agents through free diffusion. The left side (grey coloured) is an antimicrobial packaging material and right

side (white) is a food. The dash line indicates antimicrobial agents. Unconstrained free diffusion model (A) shows the highly soluble antimicrobial agent positioned in the packaging material migrating into the food layer and the concentration of the antimicrobial agent inside the package decreases as migration continues. The concentration of the antimicrobial agent on the surface of the food (Cs) decreases as the concentration inside the package decreases and eventually reduces below them. Figure 3 represents the release of antimicrobial agents through monolithic system, which consists of not very soluble (or lower affinity) migrants to the food layer. In this system, the concentration of antimicrobial agent on the surface of food (Cs) is much lower than that of soluble migrants. The concentration is highly dependent on the solubility of the antimicrobial agent in the food. Until complete depletion of the antimicrobial agent in the package, the surface concentration (Cs) is maintained as a constant concentration (actually maximum solubility) maintaining constant antimicrobial activity, while the total amount of antimicrobial agent inside the package decreases.

Antimicrobial packaging films Film/container casting methods are important to maintain antimicrobial effectiveness. There are two casting

Figure 3: Release of antimicrobial agents through monolithic system t=0

t>0 Cs

Cs m.i.c

methods – one is extrusion and the other is solvent casting. In the case of extrusion, the critical variables related to residual antimicrobial activity are extrusion temperature and specific mechanical energy input. The extrusion temperature is related to the thermal degradation of the antimicrobial agent, and the specific mechanical energy indicates the severity of the process conditions that also induce the degradation of the agents. In the case of the wet casting method using solvent to cast films and containers such as cellulose films and collagen casing, the solubility and reactivity of the antimicrobial agents and polymers to the solvents are the critical factors. The solubility relates to the homogeneous distribution of the agents in the polymeric materials, and the reactivity connects to the activity loss of the reactive antimicrobial agents. Storage and distribution conditions are important factors to be considered while designing antimicrobial packaging system. The conditions include storage temperature and time. This time-temperature integration affects the microbial growth profile. To prevent microbial growth, a storage period at the favourable temperature range for microbial growth should be avoided or minimised during the whole period of storage and distribution. D Thyagarajan is the Dean, Faculty of Food Sciences, at College of Food and Dairy Technology (CFDT), a constituent unit of Tamil Nadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chennai. A Karthiayani is the Assistant Professor at CFDT. C Prem Anandh is a final year post-graduate student in M Tech Food Technology discipline at CFDT. N Dhivya is pursuing Master’s Degree in Food Technology at CFDT.

t >> 0 Cs

V Mathavi is a final year post-graduate student in M Tech Food Technology discipline at CFDT. For details, contact on: mankarthi@yahoo.com

38

Modern Food Processing | November 2012


SPECIAL FOCUS Flexible packaging

Rakesh Rao

R

ising income levels, growing organised retail segment and increasing demand for processed foods are driving the Indian packaging industry, which is witnessing 14-15 per cent annual growth. At present, rigid packaging (with about 80 per cent) rules the roost in the Indian packaging sector, while flexible packaging is still in the early stages of development.

Leader, Performance Plastics, The Dow Chemical Company – one of the leading global suppliers of raw materials to the packaging industry.

An eco-friendly solution The food processing industry, which is one of the largest end-users of packaging, is looking to reduce the carbon footprint, and is focussing its efforts on environmentally responsible, sustainable and minimal packaging. It is here that flexible packaging

According to Flexible Packaging Association (FPA), the lifecycle attributes of flexible packaging demonstrate many advantages across numerous packaging applications. Flexible packaging starts with less waste in the first place, thus greatly reducing landfill discards. Innovation and technology have enabled packaging manufacturers to use fewer natural resources in making flexible packaging. At the same time, improvements in production processes have reduced water

Aiding flexibility with

sustainability! Flexible packaging is gaining prominence in the food processing industry. While increase in consumption of on-the-move food products is one of the reasons for rise in demand for flexibles, it offers sustainable solutions to the packaging industry. However, experts believe flexible packaging is all set to garner bigger share as there is rise in demand for convenience food products. The demand for small-size packs is rising as food manufacturers want to reach wider consumer base through affordable products. “Yes, it is one of the growth factors in India as it addresses the accessibility and affordability issues. Also, small packs help consumers to consume food while on the move,” observes Mamtha Shankar, Global Product Sustainability

is believed to play a major role. Flexible packaging has the ability to preserve food and increase the shelf-life of products cost-effectively. This advantage is often over-looked. The unpreserved food starts decaying and releases methane, which is a greenhouse gas that is 23 times more potent than carbon dioxide. “About 1/3rd of food goes as waste; and if cost-effective flexible packaging solutions are used, then one can not just save the food from getting wasted but also reduce the environmental impact of decaying food,” observes Shankar.

TIPS TO SUSTAINABILITY Flexible packaging is considered as sustainable solution because: o Fewer natural resources are used to make flexible packaging o It gives less waste post-consumer, thus greatly reducing landfill discards o Improvements in production processes reduce water and energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, and volatile organic compounds o Light-weight flexible packaging results in less transportation-related energy and fossil fuel consumption and environmental pollution o Offers high fuel content; ideal for using in waste-to-energy projects Courtesy: Flexible Packaging Association

40

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

and energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions and volatile organic compounds. “Flexible packaging offers a sustainable solution since it consumes less amount of raw material, which in turn leads to lower carbon footprint & transportation cost, reduced amount of waste post-consumer, energy saving, and also potential to recycle it,” opines Shankar.

Collaborate for sustainability The value chain of flexible packaging is complex as many people are involved. Hence, to ensure environmental benefits of flexible packaging, converters and brand owners have to work closely with their raw material suppliers. “Our interactions are at brand owner level and we involve packaging converters when we are developing new products,” says Vipul Babu, Sales Director, Performance Plastics, Dow Chemical International Pvt Ltd. Greater involvement (during the development of the new packaging) of material suppliers in the concept stage


Flexible packaging

COFFEE BRICK PACKS CONSERVE RESOURCES Traditionally packaged in metal cans, technology advances have now created flexible structures such as the brick pack for coffee. Among many advantages, these innovative packages: o Contain 88 per cent less packaging by weight compared to metal cans o Reduce weight of waste to landfill by 72 per cent vs metal cans (taking recycling rates of cans into account) o Use 20 per cent less space in shipping than cans o Offer energy savings equivalent to 17,200,000+ gallons of gasoline per year in manufacturing and transportation (by changing all steel can coffee packaging to flexible brick packs) Courtesy: Flexible Packaging Association

can also help brand owners maximise suitability benefits. “Primarily, we

provide materials for packaging. But that is not the only role we play in flexible packaging. We believe in going beyond just selling materials. When it comes to designing new pack, saving on materials or increasing efficiency of packaging line or new design that can reduce waste, we offer solutions, which add value for the brand owners. So we work closely with our customers to offer them cost-effective, sustainable solutions,” says Babu.

Recycling waste Flexible packaging offers high fuel content for communities where wasteto-energy programmes are available, reducing dependency on other energy resources. “Flexible packaging can be recycled post-consumer. One can install waste-to-energy plant. There are working models available. They can capture about 98 per cent of recoverable energy from waste plastics. Flexible packaging can also be recycled, but the facilities have to be

set up,” asserts Shankar. Recycling has its set of challenges. Sorting of waste is one of the major challenges in recycling. “Rigids are easy to recycle because they carry more value for the users since the used package can be resold. But, in case of flexibles, there are no incentives for users to sell the waste. At present, collection of waste is one of the biggest and more critical challenges for any waste recycling project,” says Babu. In flexibles, per pack waste material is so low that incentive to collect is not there. So there is a need to devise a system by the civic bodies and government to improve the waste collection methods. “Industry can come forward with technology to process this waste and put it back into the system. India has technology to recover either material or energy from waste,” adds Babu. Shankar believes, “There is still a lot of investment required in waste-to-energy technology, but eventually it will pay off.” Email: rakesh.rao@network18publishing.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

41


SPECIAL FOCUS Interface - Harish P Joshi

the food product, easy usability, reusability, and cost-effectiveness of the package. We have seen emergence of rigid plastic packaging such as plastic thermoformed cups and containers, trays, besides bottles and jars. Flexible packaging has enabled the food industry to achieve different price points of ` 1, ` 2/5/10 in small portions. In bigger portions, we see packages with zipper, slider, crimping, stand-up characteristics, string handles, etc, on the rise. For fragile products such as cereals, pouch in box packaging is popular.

Kindly explain how the changing technology in the food packaging arena has uplifted the quality and shelflife of food products?

Courtesy: Nichrome India Ltd

The change in technology is happening on machinery and packing material fronts. Better electronics and automation in modern machines are guaranteeing seal integrity and leak-proof packages. Different formats such as re-openability through zippers, sliders, crimping are making packages reusable. The shelf-life of the product is mostly getting enhanced through improved processing techniques, food ingredients and better barrier

Flexible packaging has enabled the food industry to achieve different price points …says Harish P Joshi, Managing Director, Nichrome India Ltd. In an interaction with Prasenjit Chakraborty, he explains that better barrier properties of packing material has been one of the reasons for enhanced shelf-life of food products. What is the role of processed food in infusing the growth of packaging industry in India? The processed food industry in India could not get established at an industrial scale so far due to several factors, which include eating habits; low income, lack of adequate storage infrastructure and cold chain & transportation facilities. This often led to manual packing at the end of the line. Now as the pull from organised retail is higher, urban population with more money is on the rise resulting in

42

changing lifestyles; market size is getting bigger; and the time is right for food processing industry to come out of the cottage industry or batch processing operations into industrial-scale operations. This will certainly enhance the demand of packaging industry multifold.

properties of packing material. Moreover, packing processes such as aseptic filling, hot filling, modified gas flushing, vacuum packing etc are resulting in longer shelflife. This is not all. Cold chains throughout the storage, distribution and retail chain also enhance product shelf-life.

What important changes are seen in the area of processed food packaging in India?

How packaging industry will benefit from the new R&D centre of Nichrome in Pune?

The major factors involved in packaging of food products are the shelf-life, texture of

Nichrome has been providing packaging solutions to hundreds of food and non-

Modern Food Processing | November 2012


Harish P Joshi

food products. It offers all the three benchmarking form, fill, seal (FFS) technologies for flexible packaging – vertical form fill seal (VFFS), Horizontal form fill seal (HFFS) and multilane vertical form fill seal (multi VFFS). Right packaging solution depends on optimum combination of product, machine and packing material. Nichrome has set up several dedicated facilities in the R&D centre such as product lab, pouch test lab, pouch gallery/brand gallery, training centre and machine demo area. Our product lab is equipped with various instruments to measure product characteristics such as flowability, viscosity, bulk density, moisture, softening point etc. This helps in designing exact filling technology, packing material characteristics etc. The product lab stores different products for future reference. Such study is shared with customers before suggesting a solution. Our pouch gallery/brand gallery has various packaging formats under one roof and hence we can offer different packaging solutions. The packaging development engineers from our customers’ side interact with Nichrome’s engineering team and decide on the package formats & sizes. The training centre is a modern one for technical training of customers’ operators, technicians and production personnel. We also conduct our internal technical training programmes here. The centre has a capacity to house up to 50 persons. Our machine demo area is an exclusive area where we display all our leading technology machines for customers’ display and trials. This gives the customer an idea about the technology and actual operation of the machine, size of the equipment, etc.

Can you brief us on two latest packaging solutions provided by you to the food processing industry? Nichrome has introduced a Flexiblock package (500 gm, 1 kg, 2 kg) with reclosable label on the top for basmati rice industry. This is a compact reclosable pack with good aesthetics. It is well-received in the industry. It has also reduced transportation costs. We also introduced a high speed milk packing machine doubling the output to 10,000 pouches per hour. This is helping the dairy industry to scale up its operations.

What are your future plans for food packaging industry? We are focussing on technology expansion and value for money packaging solutions for Indian food and non-food industry. Being the oldest player with widest sales and services network, modern manufacturing and R&D facility, and professional customer-friendly organisation set-up, Nichrome has got several proposals of association from top industry names from different packaging verticals. Nichrome is in discussion with them. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@network18publishing.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

43


FACILITY VISIT Essen Speciality Films Pvt Ltd

Avani Jain

W

ith rapid changes in the way food products are manufactured, distributed, stored and retailed, reflecting an increase in consumer demand for improved quality and extended shelf-life for packaged foods, there is growing demand on performance of food packaging companies. Keeping this in mind, ESFPL delivers the most versatile and captivating options available in food and specialty packaging films. The company is a pioneer in the field of sheet extrusion in India. Within a short span, ESFPL has established excellent sheet manufacturing capacities and state-of-the-art production facility.

Overview of the manufacturing facility

Offering a pack of innovative solutions With the demand for food packaging increasing, the specialty films market is growing at a fast pace. The companies in this segment are continuously involved in innovations to cater to this demand. One such company is Essen Speciality Films Pvt Ltd (ESFPL), which specialises in sheet extrusion and supplies a wide range of products to the food packaging industry. It caters to the needs of major chain of stores, take-away food counters, etc, and has established marketing and logistics network in India. Lakshmi Ramakrishnan, Chief

Executive Officer, ESFPL, notes, “These days, polypropylene and polystyrene containers are increasingly used for packing of pre-cooked foods. This demand is bound to increase in future.”

Sheetline for processing

44

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

Manufacturing facility The company’s facility is situated on the outskirts of Rajkot, Gujarat, sprawling over an area of around 5,000 sq m. Ramakrishnan notes, “In 2004, we started operation with single machine and now we are fully equipped with five high output mono and multilayer sheetline, three cut to length line, 2,700 mm wide cast film line, 2,000 mm wide six colour rotogravure printing line, high speed lamination line, XPS foam sheetline and three thermoformer. Thus, everything is available under one roof.” She further adds, “We are a solutionoriented, creative company with a goal to offer products as per customers’ requirements. We focus on their endapplications and deliver quality products within the agreed timeframe. This has been our way of working since our inception. We process various polymers such as PP, PE, PET, PS for various sheet and other applications to the tune of 5,000 TPA.”


Essen Speciality Films Pvt Ltd

Essen is currently into manufacturing of home improvement products, different types of food containers, including foamed PS take-away food containers for various commercial applications. Each product manufactured at this place is developed from grass roots level. The company manufactures disposable plastic food containers, which are multi-compartment food containers and extremely light-weight, providing a rich appeal and available in various colours. These ESSCON containers are manufactured keeping in mind the stringent quality requirements for food industry in a variety of designs and materials to suit the product needs. The ESSFOAM disposable products are manufactured with a unique extrusion technology. They are used for fruits, cut vegetables, and meat packaging trays as well as for making all types of take-away food containers and plates & bowls for regular use. These containers are made from FDA approved food grade materials. The ESSTRON polypropylene sheet is also used for making rigid containers for food products.

Quality assurance and R&D initiatives The company is well-equipped with in-house laboratory to support its stringent quality procedures. To ensure consistent product quality, each and every product manufactured at ESFPL is checked at regular intervals by its qualified quality inspectors, as per product requirement to ensure quality at each stage of its production. Ramakrishnan says, “Since we export to European countries and other major retailers of the world, we are bound to have each and every system in place. We have a good tracking system as well. This is one of the unique features of our shop floor.”

The demand for specialty sheets and thermoforming products is growing by the day, especially in the food packaging segment. In the coming years, there will be more demand for disposable containers rather than pouches.

Lakshmi Ramakrishnan Chief Executive Officer

major ports such as Nava Sheva, Kandla, Pipavav and Mundra situated within a reachable distance of 250 km. This is an added advantage for all exports as well as raw material imports. Annually, ESFPL exports around 75-80 containers to various major destinations such as China, Malaysia, Russia, Sweden, Germany, Poland, Italy, North America and Australia through these ports.Ramakrishnan claims, “The one thing that makes us better than our competitors is the cost factor. Our products are economically priced than that of the competitors. Also, quality offered by us can be banked on.”

Future growth plans

The weight of disposable plates goes up to 4 to 5 gram per piece, but we have reduced the weight to 3 gram per piece. Ramakrishnan avers, “We are trying further to reduce this weight. Moreover, we believe that R&D is an ongoing process. So, we are taking steps every day for improving our product, its quality etc. This is for the simple fact that something has to be done on a daily basis to keep our products viable in the market.” ESFPL, being environmentconscious, takes every step to conserve natural resources and energy. Ramakrishnan says, “Energy audit is conducted at regular intervals. We have also installed power factor panel to reduce and maintain power consumption.”

Export scenario ESSFOAM disposable products being manufactured

The one thing that makes us better than our competitors is the cost factor. Our products are economically priced than that of the competitors. Also, quality offered by us can be banked on.

The mobility of goods is enhanced through road, air, and sea routes with

The company believes in establishing a place of work, which provides opportunity to people to become ambitious, passionate and feel the joy of creation. ESFPL wants to pursue dynamic activities in plastic polymer processing, protecting the environment in the best possible way. The company wants to attain unequivocal excellence in all aspects of company’s operations. This is reflected in all the activities of the company. The demand for specialty sheets and thermoforming products is growing by the day, especially in the food packaging segment. In the coming years, there will be more demand for disposable containers rather than pouches. So, the company is striving to develop new products in this segment. Ramakrishnan concludes, “In a short span of seven years, we have reached a turnover of around ` 57 crore and we have developed a lot of new products and we want to continue to do so.” Photo: Nikhil Patel Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

45


MFP_Nov_2012_Everest_Tab-2_47


MFP_Nov_2012_Gelco_Tab-2_48


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK

CHOCOLATE & CONFECTIONERY PREMIUM CHOCOLATES An assortment of sweet prospects............... ............................................................................................50 COCOA ALTERNATIVES Reformulating products in the natural way.............................................................................................52 FUNCTIONAL CHOCOLATE INDUSTRY On a healthy journey.................................. .............................................................................................54 INTERFACE - Vrinda Rambhia, Director - Business Development, Leonidas Fresh Belgian Chocolates, Premium Pralines Pvt Ltd “All Leonidas chocolates available in India are 100 per cent vegetarian”...............................................56 CHARACTERISING MARGARINE Defining properties to enable quality control............................ .............................................................58 WINE MARKET ‘Cheer’ful prospects adding a new sparkle............................ ..................................................................60

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

49


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Premium chocolates

Mahua Roy

thinning as well. A health juice might as well compete with a cereal brand, both atamonitor released a being positioned as a breakfast item. report recently citing that Similarly, the chocolate category competes the Indian confectionery with many categories, some of which are market witnessed the not even sweet! “Our chocolates have to launch of over 200 products compete firstly with compound in various categories, thus chocolate, which highly contain ranking it among the top vegetable fat versus the cocoa 20 in terms of global new butter. Second, is the Indian product launches. And sweets and cookies,” says according to the report, in Vimal Sharma, Director, Bliss 2010, new product launches Chocolates. were dominated by sugar The chocolate companies confectionery and chocolate are increasingly positioning category, which together their products as snacking accounted for around There is no price tag on indulgence. Premiumness is a options. “This intelligent move 80 per cent of the launches. measure of exclusivity and innovation more than pricing. is helping this category garner As per industry estimates, This is what is driving new product development across the a better marketshare, as it is the premium segment is confectionery industry, the world over. directly positioned against the considerably small at 10 per mammoth category of snacks cent of the overall ` 3,200and little eats,” says Harish crore chocolate market. But Bijoor, Chief Executive Officer, it is growing at about 25-30 Harish Bijoor Consults Inc. per cent per annum, faster Making chocolates a than the mass chocolate planned purchase market, which is growing at Chocolate is not a planned about 15 per cent per annum. purchase; it is rather an Playing with the price extravagance and an impulse points purchase. Hence, the focus Although the ‘premium’ should be on packaging and tag is associated with those pricing to entice the consumers. products whose average price Transforming it into a planned is ` 100 and above, most purchase was a challenge faced consumers today associate by the industry. But in the premiumness of a product recent times, Cadbury (now with its exclusivity. Quite Mondelez) has made attempts a few chocolates fall in this towards this, steered by the segment, including established Shubh Aarambh campaign. brands such as Lindt, Ferrero, This widespread campaign Godiva, Mars, Kraft etc successfully promoted the mostly those imported and distributed entire category as a gifting solution during in line with the prevalent snacking trend. in the country. However, few upcoming festivities. “Chocolates are fast replacing Also, a majority of the product launches Indian brands are recognising the need sweets as the preferred gift during festivities in the greater than ` 50 price range were gaps and positioning themselves effectively and celebrations. Companies are capitalising international brands. in the premium range. on this trend by introducing chocolate gift Competing with traditional Though affordability and disposable packs for festivals such as Diwali, Raksha sweets incomes are rising, there is still a section Bandhan etc. Even consumers are lapping No longer does a brand compete with of the society, which demands aspirational up the idea of chocolate gifts as it not only another brand in the same category. With products and yet, is reluctant towards serves the purpose of distributing sweets desires of consumers increasing, the lines blatant experimentation. This is leading to but also offers convenience in terms of between various product categories are the introduction of attractive price points packaging and shelf-life,” adds Bijoor. and various SKUs, which successfully satiate the needs of such consumers. According to Datamonitor, in 2010, 33 per cent of new product launches in this category were in the less than ` 25 price range. This is owing to a number of launches in small pack sizes

D

An assortment

sweet prospects of

50

Modern Food Processing | November 2012


Premium chocolates

One more way of promoting a planned purchase is by introducing innovation in the product range, more like, brand differentiation and positioning. Dark chocolates are riding high on the success of this line of thinking. “Chocolate will always be an impulse purchase. However, there is an increase in demand in India and all over the world where overall consumption of dark chocolates is on the rise. There is a growing appreciation for high quality chocolates that is richer in flavour and lower in sugar,” says Sharma. Growth of the confectionery market will be determined by consumer sophistication and alteration in socio-economic status of the market. To strengthen their place in the market, companies must study consumer psychology intensely. “Incessant innovations in product development, effective marketing strategy, and consideration of the key trends are driving growth in the confectionery category and will facilitate players to grab a bigger marketshare,” adds Bijoor.

Extrapolating the exclusivity Experimentation with store and distribution formats can spell wonders for this category. Overseas, food & beverage is one category, which has maximum number of store formats, each one more innovative and engaging more consumers than the other. It is time the Indian industry realises the importance of this and initiates improvisations on the store formats. “There lies great opportunity in having chocolate boutique outlets similar to Europe & Australasia where each boutique has its own unique signature range of products,” says Sharma. Besides, as gourmet chocolates become a new trend, chocolate outlets could follow the same trend as that pioneered by few bakeries – ‘Live Bakery’ concept. In this, the consumers can actually see the chocolate being made, thus increasing the creativity quotient for the brand.

Exploring new areas Especially in the urban areas, consumer tastes for chocolate are expected to

become more sophisticated, and upward demand is expected in terms of new flavour development. Besides, varieties such as filled chocolate and dark chocolate will see tremendous growth, say experts. “Opportunity is more along the lines of dark chocolates, which offer huge health benefits and the industry should focus their attention on couverture chocolates more to increase the marketshare,” adds Sharma. And of course, another key trend driving this sector will be healthy eating. This is already reflected in the growing popularity of dark chocolate due to its health benefits. “Chocolates we offer have higher quantity of cocoa or more specifically more anti-oxidants, which recent studies have found can reduce blood pressure, depression and fight off certain cancers,” explains Sharma. Organic, sugar-free chocolate or chocolate with low sugar content are expected to gain greater prominence and acceptance as well. Email: mahua.roy@network18publishing.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

51


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Cocoa alternatives

Mahua Roy

A

major cocoa shortage is expected to hit the world by 2020. As a result, this is leading to a price rise and affecting the entire chain of food industry, which depends on cocoa, especially chocolate manufacturers. “The 2010-11 season is thought to be exceptional, and the International Cocoa Organization (ICCO) secretariat & most observers estimate that the cocoa sector may have entered a period of structural supply deficit. As a result, cocoa prices have doubled in the past five years, from an average of $ 1,540 in

years as demand will outstrip supply. Our customers will thus increasingly search for alternative recipes; demand more compounds, and use raw materials to reformulate their products to replace cocoa-based ingredients,” adds Hans P Vriens, Chief Innovation Officer, Barry Callebaut.

Managing cocoa alternatives “Given that customers mostly deal with ‘fixed’ retail shelf prices for their products, they often feel the pressure of higher cocoa prices. This pressure is likely to increase as the cocoa price will continue to rise. This is why it is essential to work on offering cocoa

Reformulating products in the

natural

Health – the most lucrative and probably the most sought-after positioning for new product launches in the food & beverage categories – is enjoying its stardom status. The ingredient manufacturers have empowered the processed food industry by offering innovations. Chocolate industry can now combat global price rise of raw materials by adopting these changes. 2005 to $ 3,135 in 2010. This prospect is causing considerable and legitimate concern in the cocoa and chocolate industry,” says Dr Jean-Marc Anga, Executive Director, ICCO. In the light of volatile cocoa pricing and supply issues, many food manufacturers are looking for solutions, which will reduce the cocoa content of their products as a means of controlling recipe costs, thus saving the consumers from paying a higher price for their favourite products. “An important trend to note is increased cost-consciousness among consumers. We expect the cocoa price to only increase further in the next 5-7

52

alternatives to ensure that customers’ products become less dependent on cocoa. Because of our leadership in chocolate, we know best what cocoa alternatives go well with which chocolate and how to best industrialise such solutions,” adds Vriens. Ingredient companies are taking this seriously and incessantly working on solutions to tackle this challenge. In recent times, ingredient companies across the globe have launched successful products, which can be used as an alternative to cocoa. For example, Tate & Lyle, the global ingredients and food solutions provider, has launched a unique tailor-made cocoa replacement

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

solution using a high quality carob powder ingredient, CARCAO. This solution allows food manufacturers to make significant cost savings in the total recipe cost. With its familiar cocoa-like flavour and colouring, it can be used as a partial cocoa replacement. Similarly, Briess Malt & Ingredients Co has come up with CocoaPlus cocoa replacers to drastically reduce ingredient costs. It functions as a partial cocoa replacer at a 1:1 substitution rate. This range of all natural, whole grain specialty flours mimics the colour and functionality of cocoa as well as enhances its flavour. Comax Flavors launched a line of cocoa extenders and replacers, which can adapt to various types and percentages of cocoa.

Winning ‘natural’ly The chocolate industry is no stranger to flavour modification. It is adopting various measures to combat flavouring challenges. It is a universal fact that by simply putting a ‘100 per cent Natural’ on the label, one can win consumers’ trust, even though there is no standard definition provided for ‘natural ingredients’ anywhere in the world. The inherent conviction that people seem to have in the goodness of natural extracts is pushing ingredient manufacturers to concentrate heavily on this demand. “Consumers are demanding clean and simple labels, so R&D focus is primarily on discovering new & innovative molecules and technologies from plantderived sources. While we understand there will probably always be a need for low-cost, synthetic preservatives, the consumers and the manufacturers are becoming increasingly willing to use natural ingredients or products,” opines Wayne Morley, Head of Food Innovation, Leatherhead Food Research. Another problem faced by ingredient technologists is when the consumers demand indulgent properties. This requires the formulation of specialised ingredients, which come with an inherent aftertaste; mostly, natural extracts fall in this category. “In general, consumer


Cocoa alternatives

preference is driving development of an ever-increasing range of natural and ‘clean label’ products. However, consumers also want the food they eat to be indulgent, delicious and, if possible, novel & experiential. Flavour technology can play a key role in achieving this balance,” says Nandita Prabhu, Marketing Manager India - Flavours, Givaudan SA. As with all ingredient types, the focus of research in this area will also be towards finding and evaluating ‘natural’ or ‘clean label’ flavour masking agents. “New ingredients that come into the market will be those that develop fewer and lower levels of off-flavours. Also, developments in processing technologies should be directed towards reduction of offflavour production,” adds Morley.

Rising opportunities for soy lecithin Emulsifiers form an integral part of the chocolate manufacturing industry. The global emulsifier market was valued at around $ 1 billion in 2010. Lecithin has the highest share of around 30 per cent of the global emulsifiers market. Lecithin is an important part of chocolate because it reduces viscosity, replaces expensive ingredients such as cocoa butter, improves the flow properties of chocolate, and

Consumers are demanding clean and simple labels, so R&D focus is primarily on discovering new & innovative molecules and technologies from plant-derived sources. can improve the shelf-life of certain products. “Viscosity reduction, or making a coating thinner, is certainly possible by adding cocoa butter or other fats and oils, but it takes greater amounts to accomplish this and is therefore more costly. If 3-4 per cent additional cocoa butter is needed to thin down a coating, only 0.5 per cent of lecithin would be needed to get the same result,” adds Vriens. However, in recent times, soy lecithin has emerged as an alternative ingredient in this arena and this has opened up vast opportunities for soyabean crushing industry. Soy lecithin has many health benefits. It adds creaminess to recipes and is a source of choline, which helps dissolve fat and cholesterol, and can help regulate kidney, liver and gallbladder functions. Adani Wilmar, one of the largest soy producers in South Asia, has gained non-GMO soya lecithin certification, which it will use to provide the European food industry with 30 tonne of the emulsifier per day. Another leading player, Ruchi Soya too successfully penetrated into this market. RF Solutions was set up for introducing the Ruchithin soy lecithin in the European market. Email: mahua.roy@network18publishing.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

53


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Functional chocolate industry

Mahua Roy

E

uromonitor had estimated the global market for functional chocolate at $ 371.9 million in 2009, growing fantastically to $ 460.3 million in 2012. Barely a decade ago in 2002, it was worth only $ 141.5 million. It is interesting to note that the bulk of sales came from AsiaPacific region in 2009, totalling $ 175 million, followed by North America at $ 93.8 million. “Although chocolate is the ultimate comfort food, consumers are interested in healthier alternatives to standard chocolate. That is why many of our customers want to improve their products to deliver fewer calories while maintaining indulgence. Examples include products rich in flavanols to effectively fight the signs of ageing, maintain healthy blood flow and keep the skin radiant. Other healthier chocolate examples in Asia include probiotic chocolate. An increasing number of consumers choose products, which are free from allergens or with ‘cleaner labels’, such as glutenfree, lactose-free, and without artificial colours & aromas,” says Raphael Wermuth, External Communications Manager, Barry Callebaut AG. According to Mintel Research, of the new product launches in functional chocolate worldwide, the maximum claims were those around weight management, followed by cardiovascular claims, cognitive health claims and of course, digestive well-being claims.

Innovations in R&D Chocolates are now offering beauty benefits as well. Though the trend is very much in its infancy, it has attracted some attention from established names in the food industry. The ingredient manufacturers have empowered the processed food industry to prosper using the vast basket of offerings that they have created. “It is true that international companies are currently the leaders in

54

using functional ingredients. But now, even key local players are starting to build up the same image and communicate to the consumers about functional ingredients,” states Swatantra ChhabraKalra, CEO, Truly Natural. Ingredient companies run promotional drives of their own, popularising healthier ingredient formulations, while chocolate companies emphasise on the key star ingredients being incorporated into the product. This is enabling to keep today’s consumer aware and informed. Experts also forecast that the potential health benefits of chocolate will continue to be harnessed. “Consumers can expect to see more research and manufacturing

confectionery segment, including flax, sunflower and pumpkin seeds.

Smart communication It cannot be denied that the marketshare of functional products is extremely low. One of the primary reasons is the failure to identify the target group and mismanaging the communication. This is the reason why many innovative products have seen a short market shelf-life and were withdrawn soon enough. “The science behind functional chocolate is relatively new and there remains some confusion about how to position the product as many consumers still fail to comprehend the propositions being made by the brand or the deliverables from the

Traditionally banking upon its indulgent status, can chocolate deliver to its upcoming branding of ‘health’? Most companies are using the health and wellness pitch to promote chocolates, the successful returns of which can be gauged in times to come. activity into the potential health benefits of milk and dark chocolate, including exploration of naturally occurring cocoa compounds and positive effects on mood & blood pressure levels. Apart from that, nuts too will find widespread mention,” says Swatantra Chhabra-Kalra. Hailed as nutritional powerhouses they are being utilised more in new product launches. Moreover, in the nuts category, almonds are the top ingredients in new chocolate confectionery products around the globe, according to Mintel’s Global New Products Database. Snack bars, in fact, are increasingly advertising the nut ingredients. Seeds too are getting their due on the health front in the

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

functional ingredients. But, if health benefits are not the primary reason consumers buy, they are however becoming secondary reasons,” notes Swatantra Chhabra-Kalra. Also, it is interesting to note how other product categories are promoting functional chocolates. Energy drinks and cereal bars are successfully portraying the positives of probiotics, super fruits, omega – 3, guarana, etc. “As the consumers are already aware of these ingredients, it becomes easier to introduce them in chocolates. However, it would have been a difficult task to incorporate such specialised ingredients into chocolates first hand,” adds Wermuth. Email: mahua.roy@network18publishing.com


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Interface - Vrinda Rambhia

What are the demands of Indian consumers when it comes to premium confectionery? Milk chocolate is the only chocolate that Indian consumers consider as chocolate. We have a sweet tooth and as a result are normally hesitant to try out dark chocolates (generally referred to as bitter

Also, all Leonidas chocolates available in India are 100 per cent vegetarian.

What makes Leonidas strictly quality conscious? A lot of people from India are traveling all over the world and are always looking out for the best quality of chocolates for themselves and their loved ones. An Indian consumer is always ready to try new products. With a wide range of products being available now from Leonidas, we try to give them an opportunity to enjoy, share and relish chocolates. Leonidas never compromises on the quality and

to obtain Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) certification in 1998. In 2001, it broke new ground again by gaining the ISO 9001 quality standard.

Chocolate is still considered an impulse purchase, how do you plan to address this issue? Chocolate is considered for an impulse purchase in India. However, it has also become a focussed purchase since the last few decades. Consumers still buy chocolates for gifting to a child, family, friends and business associates.

All Leonidas chocolates available in India are 100 per cent vegetarian ‌says Vrinda Rambhia, Director - Business Development, Leonidas Fresh Belgian Chocolates, Premium Pralines Pvt Ltd. Speaking to Mahua Roy about the evolution of this premium Belgian chocolate major, she elaborates on the glocalisation strategies adopted and developmental plans of Leonidas in India. taste of the ingredients, as Leonidas chocolates are made in our one & only manufacturing unit in Brussels and supplied to 1,400 stores all over the world. Hence, if you eat a Leonidas chocolate in New York, Paris, Australia or India, they look and taste the same. Courtesy: Leonidas Fresh Belgian Chocolates, Premium Pralines Pvt Ltd

chocolates in India) or white chocolates (perception of them not being chocolates at all because of the colour). The globetrotting Indians are now considering chocolates to being white, milk or dark. They are now aware that these are also chocolates and are adapting to new varieties and exotic flavours by further enhancing their palette. Localisation to meet the consumer needs is always important for a business to be successful. We do tremendous research to cater to the tastes of the consumers here.

56

What are the product categories that a chocolate has to compete with in India? Earlier, people used to gift traditional Indian sweets, cakes, dry fruits, but now they think of gifting different varieties of chocolates. Chocolates are the best gift for any occasion and are liked by all generations. All the chocolates are made from 100 per cent cocoa butter, both the shell and the filling. With customer satisfaction being the priority, Leonidas was the first Belgian company in this sector

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

Liberalisation of the Indian economy in the early 90s, modern retail, relaxation in FDI, etc are some factors that have helped the chocolate industry to grow in both verticals, ie impulse as well as focussed purchases. The per capita consumption of chocolates is steadily growing in both these categories. Consumer tastes are changing and showing acceptance of chocolates as a gift in competition to Indian sweets, which translates into the growth of focussed purchases’ market.

Chocolate is no more viewed as a children’s-only product. What are your strategies to please every consumer of any age bracket? Leonidas offers a wide variety of chocolates from dark, milk & white, with fillings of pralines, ganache,


Vrinda Rambhia

house creams, butter creams, fruit-centered to name a few. We also have marzipans, candied orange peels covered with dark chocolate, 100 per cent fruit pastes in various shapes of fruits, fresh slices of candied orange covered with dark chocolates, sugar-free chocolates, chocolate animals, lollipops, chocolate spread, hot chocolate pyramid in flavour of caramel, chocolate & cappuccino, sugar-coated almonds, chocolate-coated coffee beans, almonds & hazelnuts. There is always something for someone with such a huge variety.

What are the opportunity areas for the chocolate industry? Companies in India have done quite a remarkable feat to offer variety to the consumers. The chocolate industry is growing at a rate of around 12-14 per cent per year. As we Indians are travelling more extensively now, our palate is evolving tremendously. People are adapting to new tastes and exotic flavours. This is further reflected in the availability of the high-quality fresh produce to the consumers. With the change in lifestyle, the Indian consumer is becoming health-conscious. Research shows that dark or high cocoa content chocolates reduce cholesterol levels and as a result consumers prefer dark chocolates.

What are the marketing strategies Leonidas has adopted for Indian consumers? We have been marketing Leonidas through all kinds of activities such as print media, catalogues, brochures, radio, TV channels, etc. Especially for the Indian market, we are constantly making dynamic changes in our yearly catalogue, promoting different kinds of packaging and customisations that we offer.

What is your business strategy in India? Leonidas has over 1,400 outlets in over 40 countries. We are now a century-old chocolatier, which started franchising in the late 80s. The average life of a franchisee is over 14 years, which shows and proves our commitment to the growth strategy for all - our franchisees, consumers, new markets and us. We believe instead in firm growth rather than an aggressive strategy. We are definitely aggressive in offering quality products to the consumers across the world. In keeping with the global strategy, we assess and choose our partners wisely for a long-term growth. India is definitely a progressive market, but it has a long way to go in comparison to the matured Western markets. We are focussed and long-sighted for our growth in India. We have always exceeded our perceived growth in India year-on-year since our launch in 2008. The golden rule to success is to always stay focussed, innovative and passionate; and this is a winning strategy that sets you apart from others. Email: mahua.roy@network18publishing.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

57


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Characterising margarine

spread, and aesthetically, whether there is an unacceptably visible phase separation. Modern rheometers offer the opportunity for evaluating such properties at lower than ambient temperatures and simulate the actual deformation processes to which the spreads are subjected. Here we will look at two techniques namely particle size analysis and rheological studies for characterising margarine, with real examples and results.

dispersant is usually the oil from which the margarine was derived, eg sunflower oil, olive oil, etc. A small sample of margarine is placed (10-25 ml). Adding one drop of oil at a time, the material is carefully mixed until dilute. It is usual to have to transfer the material to another beaker and repeat the dilution. A background reading is taken of the dispersant oil and several drops of the diluted margarine added to

Defining properties to enable quality control Margarine is widely used as a spread or for baking and cooking. Particle size analysis and rheological studies of margarine prove highly useful for studying manufacturing conditions, storage conditions and end-use properties. Both techniques are rapid, easy to use and provide detailed measurement parameters in both research and quality control environments. Stuart Wakefield

T

he particle size and rheological properties of margarine & other edible oils used in dairy and other food emulsions are important factors in defining properties such as flavour release, mouthfeel and the emulsion stability. Large emulsion droplets can lead to poor flavour release, a greasy mouthfeel and poor stability due to creaming. Modern particle size techniques such as laser diffraction allow simple, rapid and detailed analysis of droplet size distribution. The ‘end use’ rheological properties of margarine spreads are important with regard to both ‘usability’, ie how easily they

Measuring particle size Margarine is an edible fat typically produced by hydrogenating various oils with a nickel catalyst and forming an emulsion. The emulsion particle size governs the stability of the emulsion and is a useful guide to the spreadability of margarine. The measurement of margarine emulsion size can be easily achieved with a particle size analyser. In an experiment, the measurements were carried out using a Malvern Mastersizer (a particle size analyser) using a small volume sample dispersion unit connected to a flow cell. It is first necessary to find a suitable dispersant for the margarine. This

Figure 1: Stress viscometry 250

the dispersion unit ready for measurement. Several measurements can then be taken of the sample to study repeatability and reproducibility. This method gives a good guide to whether the homogenising process has been correctly carried out and as such is an excellent quality control tool.

Rheological analysis Margarine spreads have fairly complex rheological properties, which are partly influenced by the need to be easily deformable at low temperatures, ie they need to be spread straight from the fridge. They are a combination of seed (eg sunflower) and/or vegetable oils

Figure 2: Creep analysis

Figure 3: Dynamic analysis

Sample 1

Sample 1

10 200

20 G” G’ G” (Kpa)

Viscosity (kPas)

Sample 3

150 Strain

15

100

10

Sample 2

58

G’

Sample 1 0 0.5

1.0

0.5

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

Sample 3

0.1

Sample 3

Shear stress (kPa)

G”

G”

5

0

G’

G’

Sample 2

50

0.0

1

Sample 2

0 0

100

200

300 Time (s)

400 500

600

0.01 0.02 0.05 0.1 0.2 0.5 1 2 Frequency (Hz)

5 10


Characterising margarine

(approximately 40 per cent), whey, water and various other additives, including dispersants and flavourings. Small variations in these constituents can result in large differences in the desired rheological properties. All experiments were performed on a Bohlin rheometer at 15ÂşC, which was thought to be representative of the temperature at which the spreads would be used. Some of the characteristics measured are as follows: Stress viscometry: Figure 1 shows the curves for the three spreads analysed using stress viscometry. In this experiment, a stress is applied to the material and the resulting shear rate is measured. The viscosity is calculated using the relationship: viscosity = shear stress/shear rate. It can be seen that the viscosities of the three spreads at low shear stresses are quite different. However, at stresses greater than about 1 kPa, the viscosities become asymptotic. High viscosities at low shear stresses mean that margarine would be

more difficult to spread than those with lower viscosities. Creep analysis: Figure 2 shows data for the samples using a creep experiment. In this experiment, a constant low stress is applied to the material and the deformation per unit time is monitored. The lower the degree of deformation, the less likely the material will show syneresis. Figure 2 shows that sample 1 is the least deformed during the timescale of the experiment and is therefore least likely to show syneresis. Considering the information from Figures 1 and 2, there obviously needs to be a builtin compromise between ease of spreading and lack of syneresis, since the former requires a relatively low viscosity while the latter requires a relatively high viscosity. Dynamic analysis: Figure 3 shows the viscoelastic response of the materials during an oscillation experiment. In the experiment, the material is subjected to a sinusoidally varying stress and the strain output and phase difference between the input & output signals are measured. From

this information, it is possible to calculate the viscoelastic functions, G’ and G�, which are the storage (elastic) and loss (viscous) moduli, respectively. The analysis gives an indication of the relative viscous and elastic behaviour of the materials over different timescales (ie inverse of the frequency low frequency equates to long timescale behaviour and vice versa). Again it can be seen that the behaviour of the three spreads are different where the cross-over from predominantly viscous behaviour occurs at a lower frequency for sample 1 and is the highest for sample 3. This reinforces the conclusion that sample 1 will be more difficult to spread than sample 3. Stuart Wakefield is the Regional Manager - Middle East & India at Malvern Instruments Ltd. He has over 25 years of experience in conducting research for determination of particle and material characterisation. Email: stuart.wakefield@malvern.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

59


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Wine market

Shushmul Maheshwari

T

he four-decade-old Indian wine industry is still at a nascent stage as compared to other markets of the world. To illustrate the fact, in 2008, the consumption of wines in China in volume terms was estimated at around 500-550 million litre as compared to just about 9.9 million litre in India. Even the comparatively smaller Asian countries such as Philippines, Taiwan and Thailand had higher wine consumption levels than India. However, the industry is taking a positive turn as more and more consumers net in each day. Industry sources predict that in the next ten years, the wine consumption in India could reach more than 10 million cases viz. the current consumption of just over 1 million cases produced locally and 0.15-0.2 million cases of imported wines. Taking a quick view of the industry landscape, most of the country’s wineries are located around the Pune-Nashik belt and Bengaluru. Compared to the world leaders, the Indian industry is small and largely propelled by domestic brands leveraging their affordable prices as compared to duty-marred, highlypriced imported products. Experts opine that while an average Indian wine bottle (750 ml) is priced somewhere around $ 8-12, an imported one of the same capacity shall cost in the range of $ 20-29. However, increasing disposable incomes, amplified wine marketing and influence of Western culture have given a new turn to the wine consumption pattern in Wine market in India (billion `), 2011 & 2014

27.8

13.7

2011

2014

Note: Market is at end-consumer price Source: Indian Wine Industry Analysis-RNCOS

60

‘Cheer’ful prospects adding a new sparkle

(1.5 million cases) in 2010. Citing the major consumption spots in the country, Maharashtra forays the league with Pune developing as the budding ground for wine market. Up to 80 per cent of wine is consumed in Mumbai (39 per cent), Delhi (23 per cent), Bengaluru (9 per cent) and Goa (9 per cent); the remaining 20 per cent is sold in the rest of India. Among the type of wines consumed, red wine consumption is pegged at 45 per cent followed by white wine with 40 per cent, sparkling wine 13 per cent and Rosé wine 2 per cent.

Cheering to the taste of wine

Cheering the senses of connoisseurs across the globe, India is emerging as the budding ground for wine market. The evolving food habits, largely influenced by the West, have led the trend of wine accompanying Indian cuisines. A cult enthusiasm is visible among young men and women, exhibiting significant tilt towards wine, which has become a more regular offering at launch parties, business receptions, wedding occasions and other events. India, indicating vast potential for future growth. The Indian wine market, which was estimated to be worth ` 13.7 billion in 2011, is expected to surge to around ` 27.8 billion by the end of 2014, growing at an astounding CAGR of around 27 per cent during 2011-2014. India has taken huge leaps in terms of wine production. The country currently has more than 73 functional wineries in contrast to just 6 wineries in 2000. The wine production has rapidly increased from 3.6 million litre (4,00,000 cases) in 2003 to approximately 13.5 million litre

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

The growing wine demand among Indians coupled with increasing availability has been rapidly boosting the market. A large number of Indians have embraced wine as a lifestyle beverage. Once the privilege of the educated elite, today, the potential lies among the growing middle-class who are eager to adapt to foreign tastes & cultures. The rise in consumption can also be attributed to the perception of health benefits associated with wine, as wine is lower in alcohol than spirits, in addition to the ‘lifestyle’ image. The effective marketing strategies adopted by wine marketers have proved rewarding for the industry. Opening up of exclusive wine clubs in Delhi, Mumbai, Pune etc; marketing of wines in retail super marts, malls; and promotional campaigning have helped in boosting the consumption while simultaneously building awareness among the masses.

Changing dynamics of foreign trade As evident from the consumption pattern, domestically produced wines dominate the market. For instance, in 2010, most wines consumed in India were locally produced, accounting for over 80 per cent of the total wine consumption in the country. Of the total import value for 2010-11, around 25 per cent of the wine in the country was imported from France, followed by Italy, Australia and Singapore. The Indian government has been adopting


Wine market

protectionist policies to boost the sales of indigenous wines. The heavy import duties and other inter-state taxes levied on the imported wines make them highly uncompetitive as compared to their Indian counterparts, thus dampening their sales. On the export front, various factors have affected the exports of Indian wine, including huge domestic potential, highly fragmented wine industry, and deficit of good quality wine. Moreover, the Indian wine producers have not been competent enough to develop a taste for the Indian wines in the international market. In a bid to trigger wine export, India has, of late, started taking steps to promote Indian brands. Rising domestic consumption led to a steep decline in exports, while on the other hand, boosted imports. The wine exports dipped from around ` 217 million in 2009-10 to ` 99 million in 2010-11.

Government regulations The state governments have formulated different regulations for wine trade in India. In Maharashtra, for instance, the Maharashtra State Industrial Corporation (MIDC) is the nodal agency for the development of wine production. It has established wine parks, with central grape crushing and bottling facilities in Nashik, Sangli, Solapur and Pune. The MIDC also gives land on lease in these parks for establishing wineries. Licences for the production of wines are easily available and issued by the state government. The Central Government has a scheme of giving a subsidy of 50 per cent of investment in building, plant and machinery, up to a maximum limit of ` 5 million. The Central Government also gives a subsidy of 50 per cent on VAT for five years, and the state governments have deferred excise duty for five years, which is usually 50 per cent of the declared manufacturing price. There is no label registration fee. Distribution and retailing of domestic and Bottled in Origin (BIO) wines are free, and are in private hands, subject to the distributor and retailer obtaining a license from the Excise Department. VAT is nil on domestic wines and 20 per cent on BIO wines.

In Delhi, almost all retail stores are owned by the state government, but the government has now allowed the establishment of retail stores by private parties. In case of BIO wines, every importer has to have a separate bond against an annual fee of ` 2,50,000. However, some private parties have obtained these bonds and they deal in BIO wines. There is 20 per cent VAT on domestic and BIO wines. Other states too are embarking on wellthoughtout strategies to build up revenues. For instance, a couple of years ago, some states, for instance Karnataka, segregated wine from hard liquor & beer and brought in the concept of wine tavern licenses. These cost much less than a regular bar license or a beer pub license, making it easier and affordable to serve wine.

Vintners’ take on Indian wine market Cheering the lifestyle changes in Indian consumers, the leading wine manufacturers are on their feet to grab their share in the growing wine market. UB Group’s Four Seasons Wines has been growing at 30-40 per cent year over year on a cumulative basis. Thriving on the trio of ‘education, awareness and accessibility’, the wine major has also partnered with outlets like casual dining restaurant chain Pizza Hut and coffee chains Cuppa Café and Café Oz to serve Four Seasons Wines in their outlets. Sula is thinking of expanding along similar lines. It is focussing on setting up company-owned wine bars across the country. Apart from major cities, Sula is looking to expand in smaller cities and towns also. Well-renowned Grover Vineyards is on the verge of bringing in fresh private equity investments to avail of the growth opportunities. Leading vintners foresee rapid transition in the distribution and marketing of wine in India, resulting in effective consumption trends and widespread acceptance.

Towards better prospects The evolving socio-cultural dimensions and initiatives by the regulatory bodies, wine traders and most importantly, growing

Wine consumption in major cities

20% 39%

9% 9% 23%

Mumbai Others

Delhi

Bengaluru

Goa

Note: Data as of April 2011 Source: Indian Wine Industry Analysis-RNCOS

consumer preference all tend to bring in bright prospects for the wine market in India. As industry veterans foresee, easy access to wine, especially through the fastgrowing coffee café market, could be a game changer in deciding the fate of Indian wine industry. Some critical challenges, however, need to be resolved to make the presence of India felt on world stage. According to the latest extensive study by RNCOS – ‘Indian Wine Industry Analysis’, simplified and transparent foreign trade norms are the need of the hour. Well laid-out marketing strategies are imperative for improvising the penetration of wine in the country. Expansion plans in tier II and III cities and similar approaches too will pave the way for prosperous future of wine industry in India. Shushmul Maheshwari is the Chief Executive of RNCOS E-Services Pvt Ltd, a market research & information analysis company with global presence. He has spent more than 15 years working in the senior management teams of both, Indian and multinational companies. He has gained expertise in research & analysis field and actively participated in various national and international conferences & discussions organised by business & trade-related associations. Email: shushmul@rncos.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

61


AUTOMATION TRENDS Automated packaging line

Right solution must for optimum impact Speed and flexibility are primary drivers for the adoption of automation in food packaging. But this is not enough for optimum results. Adherence to safety standards, choosing right technology to meet pre-planned objectives and operators’ training are equally important factors to be considered while going for modernisation of packaging line. Rakesh Rao

G

rowing importance of safety and sanitation has led to adoption of automated packaging solution in food industry. Ashok Gourish, General Manager, Bosch Packaging Technology, India, says, “Automation is highly important as it helps manufacturers grow their businesses in several ways. Automated packaging technology, such as robotics, vertical baggers and secondary packaging equipment, helps minimise direct costs, increase manufacturing output, and make products compatible for

The combination of declining TCO with increased output makes robotics ideal for manufacturers. Additionally, new user-friendly software interfaces allow companies to effectively and efficiently implement robotics in their plant Ashok Gourish General Manager, Bosch Packaging Technology, India

62

export markets such as Europe and North America that have high safety standards and regulations. In addition, automation allows for reproducibility and, therefore, increases quality.” With new advances in speed, flexibility and reliability that reduce the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) of automated packaging technology, cost-conscious manufacturers are increasingly boosting automation in their food packaging lines. Gourish emphasises, “As a result, they can grow their packaging line output while having higher flexibility in changeovers, ideal for the increasingly popular highmix/low-volume strategy. For overall liquid food applications, automation increases sanitation for packaging under sterile conditions. This is critical when it comes to product quality and safety.” Automation also helps in optimising packaging operations in the food & beverages (F&B) industry. Pradeep Karnik, Managing Director, OMRON India, opines, “Looking at the current scenario where everyone believes in complete customer satisfaction, I think adoption of automation for optimising packaging in F&B industry is crucial, considering the strict regulations and quality requirements.

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

Alongside with increase in demand, considering that higher speeds are a must for improving productivity, automation is a must.”

Adding flexibility and speed As food processors aim at reducing production cost by increasing the speed of processing, automated packaging line offers an apt solution. “We have seen growing interest in automation from Indian F&B processors, especially with robotics technologies with small footprints, such as our Delta robotic solutions for food and beverage lines. These robots are known for their high speeds, precise product handling and high flexibility,” observes Gourish. As observed by experts, Indian food processors are now more open with regard to adoption of the latest technology. “Yes, there has been a huge shift in adoption considering that there is huge loss from the production to final distribution as well as price pressure, effective control on this aspect is a key. In addition, the speeds of productivity are of essence,” agrees Karnik. As a result, automation players are offering solutions to meet this requirement of their customers. A case in point is OMRON’s new NJ series, which the


Automated packaging line

ACCURACY IS IMPERATIVE While speed of packaging line is important, accuracy cannot be overlooked. “This is the most essential factor. Higher the speed of the machine with perfect accuracy, lower the packaging cost per unit,” says Karnik. In the current economic climate, manufacturers are particularly focussed on reducing direct costs, or cost per unit, and enhancing their scale-up capabilities. To this end, Gourish believes, packaging technology with a high level of automation is highly beneficial in three specific ways: o Automation boosts flexibility, allowing manufacturers to adapt their packaging line quickly and easily to meet the needs of the day – to ramp production up or down. Additionally, format changes can be completed without tools, reducing operating costs and allowing for quick changeovers that reflect the growing need to adapt to retailer and consumer demands. o Automation facilitates the redeployment of staff, which allows brands to utilise their employees’ skills in more high-value ways. A reduction in the need for human interaction with the packaging line also enables brands to achieve higher standards of safety and hygiene – satisfying increasingly strict regulators by reducing potential sources of contamination. This helps prevent costly product recalls. o Automated products and services allow manufacturers to standardise their packaging solutions across multiple locations. This allows brands to achieve across-the-board consistency, regardless of where their products are being processed. Though it is no easy task to maintain consistent product quality on various manufacturing lines within one plant or at different facilities, automated solutions help ensure product quality across an entire business.

company claims to increase speed and productivity. He adds, “OMRON’s robust solution offering for F&B industry is based on wide range of application-specific portfolio starting from sensors, PLC, drives, servo, HMI and also includes automation solutions for plant and human safety. We at OMRON have been providing end-toend automation and sensing solutions to global F&B companies with whose results we have helped overcome the challenges faced in various countries.”

Cost or benefit? There is a perception that automation is expensive, but experts believe, the reality is different. For example, Gourish says, where robots are appropriate, they often offer payback times of only 12-18 months. Technological advancements with Delta robots are allowing manufacturers to make large savings in operating costs, maintenance and repairs.“The combination of declining TCO with increased output makes robotics ideal for manufacturers. Additionally, new user-friendly software interfaces allow companies to effectively and efficiently implement robotics in their plant,” he adds. Automation not only helps manufacturers reduce packaging costs, but also offers many other benefits that cannot be directly measured, such as the consistent production of high- quality products. Automation allows manufacturers to constantly deliver the same quality that will be recognised by their customers and contribute to their loyalty. Gourish opines, “Brand loyalty is the key for manufacturers to stay competitive in the market, preventing marketshare loss. Additionally, automation allows staff to fulfill highly skilled tasks and contribute to the company’s growth.” Perception towards modernisation is changing in India as food processors aim to explore overseas markets. Karnik says, “In my opinion, the scenario is fast changing. Customers are becoming more aware about TCO rather than the onetime capital expenditure. This is also our prime approach at OMRON. We provide value through the complete lifecycle.

Looking at the current scenario where everyone believes in complete customer satisfaction, I think adoption of automation for optimising packaging in F&B industry is crucial, considering the strict regulations and quality requirements. Pradeep Karnik Managing Director, OMRON India

To win in this competitive market, it is important to check product quality at each stage of the process. OMRON extends solutions and provides tighter integration of field sensing devices with supervisory control and monitoring, thus helping to reduce downtime, which ultimately improves overall productivity and efficiency of the plant.”

Make the right choice Automation is changing the way today’s food processing units operate. But adopting right automation strategy is the key to maximise benefits from it. Gourish suggests, “When evaluating solutions for automation, we advise that manufacturers choose a solution that is easy to use and has user-intuitive operating systems, as well as ensures ease of maintenance. However, a certain experience with automation is needed and that is where packaging machine suppliers can help. We support our customers locally with our global expertise so they can benefit from our experience with automation. Not only is it important to make sure that the supplier helps select the appropriate solution for your products, but also has a service/training programme to get your team up to speed on the new technology.” All in all, right technology, accurate planning and adequate training are must to ensure the optimum utilisation of packaging line. Karnik rightly sums up, “Look for the need in terms of the speed and productivity; do not compromise on the regulation aspect; look at the TCO and lastly, train your people.” Email: rakesh.rao@network18publishing.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

63


Courtesy: Jain Irrigation Systems Ltd

ENERGY MANAGEMENT Biomass resources

A carbon neutral approach to empowerment Biomass has been touted as one of the most promising sources for meeting energy requirements of India. Food processors having access to vast amount of agro-waste are looking to harness valuable biomass resources. Companies are experimenting with various technologies and their success will have profound implications on biomass energy projects of future. Rakesh Rao

E

nergy generation using biomass is gaining traction in the Indian food processing industry. Vast amount of easily available agro-waste and rising energy cost are compelling factors driving food processors to use biomass as a source of energy. “India is world’s largest producer of food next to China. The food processing industry is one of the largest in India – it ranks fifth in terms of production, consumption, export and expected growth. The waste management methods commonly followed include anaerobic fermentation and biogas generation, land fill dumping, composting and vermi-composting, surface dumping in open landfills and discharge into water bodies. Out of these, anaerobic fermentation and biogas generation are the best methods since these are environment-friendly, produce green and clean energy, and above all,

64

are sustainable,” says Abhishek Satyam, Assistant Manager - Bioenergy Division, Jain Irrigation Systems Ltd ( JISL) – which has set up biomethanation plant to utilise organic waste and produce biogas that can be used as fuel in gasbased engines.

Biomass gasification Most of biomass has been utilised for energy purpose, mainly by direct

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

combustion (which converts solid biomass into heat). Awesh Jain, General Manager, Ruchi Soya Industries Ltd, says, “In India, we have over 400 Million Metric Tonne (MMT) of biomass, which is either burnt in the fields causing carbon emissions without any useful energy conversion or burnt in highly inefficient traditional burning system with overall thermal efficiency of 8-10 per cent.” In recent years, gasification, which

EMPOWERING SOLUTIONS Though agro-waste offers viable solutions to address energy woes of the country, adoption of MRU technology is still at a nascent stage. According to Satyam, this challenge can be, however, tackled as follows: o Make implementation of MRU projects mandatory for all food processing industries and attractive subsidies should be granted o Policy should be clearly laid down with tools of implementation o Low interest rate funds should be made available to encourage small- and medium-scale industries to indulge in such a project o Technology and information should be made more accessible so that more units can implement MRU projects


http://eshop.network18publishing.com

You Pay ``2199/Get 39% off on cover Price `` 3600/-

You Pay ` `899/Get 25% off on cover Price `` 1200/-


` 899/-

` 2199/-

`

favouring Network18 Media & Investment Ltd payable at Mumbai.

Terms & Conditions: Your Subscription will start from the next available issue. Network18 Media & Investments Ltd. will take utmost care to dispatch the copies safely. Network18 Media & Investments Ltd. does not take the responsibility of any postal delays and damaged copies dispatched. For more information contact Network18 Media & Investments Ltd. subscription department. Above rates are valid in India only.

Subscription Department, Network18 Media & Investments Ltd, A Wing, Ruby House, JK Sawant Marg, Dadar (West), Mumbai 400 028. customercare@network18publishing.com


Biomass resources

converts solid biomass into fuel gas containing CO and H2 or so-called synthesis gas, has been considered as a promising alternative owing to a number of advantages. Biomass gasification is a process of converting biomass to a combustible gas under controlled conditions in a reactor called gasifier. Even though biomass gasification provides the benefits of a well-proven technology that can produce power at small scale using locally available resources, the total amount of power production from biomass gasification in India is relatively low. Energy Alternatives India (EAI) estimates that the total installed capacity of biomass gasificationbased power production in India to be about 140 MW, out of a total of about 2,600 MW of biomass-based power. Of the total, bagasse-based power generation has the lion’s share (about 1,400 MW), followed by combustion-based biomass power production (about 875 MW).

Taking a new route Indian food processing companies have realised the importance of biomass as a potential energy source and are ready to experiment with new technologies. Take the example of Ruchi Soya Industries, one of the leading edible oil manufacturers in India. In order to harness biomass potential, Ruchi Soya Industries and Thermax Ltd have signed an agreement in July 2012 for setting up 1 MW fluidised bed gasification plant. The facility, which will be supplied by Thermax, is planned for installation at Ruchi Soya’s plant in

The waste management methods commonly followed include anaerobic fermentation and biogas generation, land fill dumping etc. Out of these, anaerobic fermentation and biogas generation are the best methods since these are environment-friendly. Abhishek Satyam Assistant Manager - Bioenergy Division, Jain Irrigation Systems Ltd

Washim, Maharashtra. Thermax acquired the gasification technology from two Netherlands-based entities – the Energy Research Centre (ECN) and Dahlman. This will be one of the first biomass gasification projects built near a large soya plantation using ECN’s Milena technology. Jain adds, “The technology of indirect gasification of biomass has been developed by ECN with couple of pilot plants established in Europe. Probably, this is going to be the first full flagged industrial project, where tri-generation is going to be tried out.” The company will convert the waste of soya harvest into energy, which will be then used to process soyabeans. According to Jain, by setting up this plant, the company wants to achieve: o Approximate 40 per cent energy conversion o Enhance farmer’s income by 5-10 per cent by providing ready market for non-feed grade woody biomass at their doorstep o To provide electricity to the farmers in rural areas, so that there is valuable savings in foreign exchange by way of reducing uses of diesel in irrigation He stresses that by setting up the plant, successful demonstration and subsequent replication, Ruchi Soya is aiming to achieve a larger goal of becoming a carbon neutral company. The proposed gasification system has higher conversion efficiency than existing gasification systems. Jain says, “Conventional biomass energy conversion technology (boiler-turbine combination) has its own limitations of lower efficiency, higher start-up time and minimum size of the plant. Whereas fluidised bed gasification system will provide flexibility of frequent and quick start-up higher conversion efficiencies.”

Barriers for biomass power According to Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI), majority of the food processing units have not taken up Methane Recovery and Utilisation (MRU) projects because either there is no potential, as the units are small scale and quantum of raw material

Conventional biomass energy conver sion technology has limitations of lower efficiency, higher start-up time and minimum size of the plant. Whereas fluidised bed gasification system will provide flexibility of frequent and quick start-up higher conversion efficiencies. Awesh Jain General Manager, Ruchi Soya Industries Ltd

generated is inadequate throughout the year, or there is lack of technical knowhow & access to information. Continuous supply of biomass (to run power plant) is also a serious constraint faced by food processors. However, captive plantations, especially if the biomass-to-energy plant is located near the plantation itself, can offer a sustainable solution.

Still a long way to go For India to emerge as one of the leading economic super powers, the country needs to find sustainable solutions to meet its growing energy requirements. Biomass gasification-based decentralised standalone power plant is one of the ways to mitigate the problem. In addition, to achieve their sustainability goals, Indian companies are looking at renewables to meet the energy requirements. The outcome of this strategy will depend on the successes experienced in the present biomass projects, which can set examples for establishing many more waste-toenergy projects in future. Jain concludes, “Yes, successful completion of Ruchi Soya’s fluidised bed gasification plant will lead to repetition of similar initiatives at our factories (located in the area, where biomass is easily available). We have sizable installation of wind mills in various parts of India and, in the next 3 to 5 years, we will concentrate on biomass and solar power generation plant installations. We want to shift energy consumed from non-renewable resources to renewable resources to reduce carbon footprints.” Email: rakesh.rao@network18publishing.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

67


POLICIES & REGULATIONS Cocoa imports

Need to

curb dumping of

With rising demand for chocolates in India, the country’s cocoa imports are growing. However, dumping of low quality cocoa products from different countries and unfair trade practices followed by exporters are impacting the Indian industry and consumers to a large extent. Hence, there is a need to encourage cocoa cultivation in India and formulate stringent government policies that will keep a tight rein on trade malpractices and import of poor quality cocoa to India. Firoz H Naqvi

C

ocoa, referred to as food of the gods, and used to make exotic products such as chocolates, biscuits, breakfast cereals and a host of other products including beverages and energy drinks, is facing a downturn in India. Dumping by foul means by unscrupulous Chinese operators, and cross-border operations from Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia are resulting in manipulative and unfair trade practices by pushing low grade and poor quality products on unsuspecting Indians. In addition, they are also manipulating their own export agencies to provide them with incentives in terms of cash support as well as misdeclarations about the quality and origins of their products, and wrongly enjoying massive duty concessions to gain windfall profits. Lacklustre monitoring and misplaced policies of Indian government add to the miseries of Indian consumers and industry. On one hand, WHOspecified CODEX specifications are overlooked while allowing low grade and contaminated imports of such products into India. On the other, government provides a discount of 50-65 per cent by means of import duty concessions on such products. The foreign traders and exporters lure Indian consumers by misusing the ASEAN-India Free Trade Agreement, a treaty between India and Association of Southeast Asian Nations

68

(ASEAN) meant to boost exports from India, by obtaining false origin certificates stating that goods are of ASEAN origin while in fact those goods are from Africa or other non-ASEAN origins, without adding the required value to such goods, and by restrictive trade practices forbidden by such treaties as well as WTO. Malaysia-based operators unduly influence Indian consumers and sell cheap cocoa by-products on one hand and exploit the duty concessions on the other. They are exporting 95 per cent of total cocoa produced even though not much of cocoa fruit is available in Malaysia – 99 per cent of all cocoa fruit is imported from Africa for crushing. These operators pay absolutely no import duty, and add no significant values either. For instance, if cocoa beans are available from Africa at $ 2,500/mt, they make an all-inclusive processing margin (labour, overheads, costs and profits) of a mere $ 250.

allegedly manipulate data and their certifying agencies for obtaining such major concessions. Moreover, the import duty on cocoa beans is zero per cent in Malaysia, while the same is 30 per cent in India. So the local processors have no standing competition with the cocoa coming from Malaysia as they enjoy 50-65 per cent advantage over domestic industry, forcing some of the big processors to turn importers of products instead. Paradoxically, India has only 10-15 per cent duty on cocoa products imports from ASEAN countries and Malaysian importers have found this to their advantage, thereby exporting low-quality cocoa products with only 10-15 per cent import duty to India and making huge profit margins. This has not only resulted in losses for local processors but also is harmful for Indian consumers.

The loopholes Quality issues According to the Indian processors, the quality of imported cocoa from Malaysia is poor and due to the treaty with India they are able to send it to India with no additional cost, while geographically Malaysia is not far from Southern coasts of India. According to them, it takes less time and logistics cost, if they import cocoa from Malaysia to South India. But, cocoa by-products take the same amount of time if brought from other parts of India. Although such low value does not merit any concession, such exporters

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

Adding to the woes of Indian processors are similar operators from Indonesia, except with one twist – they grow the cocoa fruits. But, these fruits are of lower quality than those grown in India. However, the Indonesian exporters have successfully lobbied with their government to levy up to 15 per cent export tax on cocoa fruits. This makes exports of cocoa fruits outside Indonesia impossible. The exporters have got an exemption to export taxes on cocoa powder and products, while, like Malaysia, invoking the AIFTA treaty for


Cocoa imports

concessional imports of 50-65 per cent into India of their products. One of the cocoa processors in India, on condition of anonymity, has admitted to importing cheap cocoa products. This modus operandi is similar to the rest of consumer goods market in India that import cheap Chinese products and sell them, passing them off as domestic products. The lack of will of governments, whether Indian, Malaysian, Singaporean or Indonesian, to implement wellmeaning free trade treaties in letter and spirit, gives rise to malpractices as discussed earlier, and destroys markets and industries in no time; while providing windfall profits to companies that use such loopholes and devious means to amass wealth at the cost of unsuspecting nations. India’s processing capacity of 86,000 tonne of cocoa beans face a threat from countries such as Malaysia, Indonesia and Singapore. According to a Malaysian exporter, Malaysia produces

only around 5,000 tonne of beans locally and rest of the 3,90,000 tonne beans are imported from Africa. The total output of Malaysian cocoa products is about 4,00,000 tonne, ie approximately 1 per cent local fruit and 99 per cent imported beans from African countries. Indonesia, on the other hand, does not sell its cocoa fruits to the world, but instead enjoys benefits for concessional exports from its domestic industry.

Stringent measures imperative India not only produces a significant percentage of cocoa beans, about 8,00010,000 tonne but also imports them from Africa with 30 per cent duty. The Government of India should provide a level-playing field to the Indian industry and discourage such undue reliance on imports at the cost of the Indian economy. Due to this, farmers across the country are also switching crops. Less cocoa beans in India will mean a tougher future for local processors.

Unquestionably, the current situation of the cocoa industry in India is not rosy. With the farmers shifting their focus to other plantations, the production will definitely fall. Besides, with import of cheap cocoa, the Indian cocoa is losing its face and values because of the cost difference due to acceptance of poor quality products, and in addition granting them large duty concessions. So, now is the right time for the government to increase cocoa production for meeting the rising demand from the ` 15-billion chocolate industry and to cut dependency on imports of low-quality cheap cocoa. This will not only help India in saving foreign exchange but also provide guaranteed buyers for farmers, brighter future for processors and good quality products for consumers. Firoz H Naqvi is Honorary Secretary of Agro & Food Processing Equipment & Technology Providers Association of India (AFTPAI). Email: firoz@aftpai.org

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

69


STRATEGY Contract farming

Avani Jain

I

n the last decade, the food processors in the country have scaled new heights in terms of production capacities. This has brought along many problems and one such issue is the procurement of quality raw materials at appropriate prices. These days, increasing costs of production due to several factors have become an area of concern for food processors and they are looking at all the possible options to bring down costs. The first step in this direction is addressing the issue of increasing raw material prices and one of the ways that can help processors is the concept of contract farming. David Vanka, Senior Manager Exports (Oleochem Division), Ruchi Soya Industries Ltd, notes, “In the recent years, contract farming has evolved as a viable way for timely procurement of raw materials for processing at appropriate prices. It is more profitable than buying your own land and employing farmers to work on them, as it would be a costly affair for the company. Through contract farming, companies can ensure steady supplies of raw materials; be free from fear of price risk fluctuations; and reap other benefits such as non-investment in big resources such as land, product risk-sharing etc. Contract farming is fruitful for the farmers as they get training & expertise to increase their yield, and a fixed price despite the fluctuations in market price.”

Money matters At present, many companies in India have adopted contract farming as an effective strategy to control costs. Elaborating on why his company opted for contract farming, Chandubhai Virani, Managing Director, Balaji Wafers Pvt Ltd, states, “In order to get a perfect product, we need the right kind of potato varieties, sizes and colour. Thus, we have entered into contract farming. In this type of agreement, we specify the quality of potatoes we need and also provide

70

farmers with the latest technologies so that the end result can be achieved in a proper manner. However, the rate is predecided in consultation with the farmers and this is not subject to change despite the fluctuation in the market prices.” Talking about the benefits offered by contract farming, Devanshu Gandhi, Managing Director, Vadilal Industries Ltd, says, “Earlier, whenever we received big orders from customers and asked farmers to get good quality of products in bulk for us, immediately the price would shoot up. This was one of the major

The continuous rise in prices of raw materials and several other factors that pose challenges to the food processing industry have led to the development of contract farming as a possible solution to resolve cost issues and other problems such as low quality of raw materials. The concept of contract farming can aid food processors in controlling costs to a large extent. Read on to know how... bottlenecks faced by us; but now contract farming has resolved these problems.” No doubt, the concept of contract farming has helped the farmers in controlling costs to a large extent, yet it is not free from challenges since the farmers are always skeptical about the prices. Gandhi avers, “We consider the farmer’s sentiment when it comes to pricing. If the prices are increasing and going beyond certain limits, then even we increase the price that we offer to the farmers.” In fact, in order to be fair to the farmers and maintain transparency, companies discuss the price of the produce every year

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

before planting. The price discussion is always a mutually agreed decision between the farmers and the company, and is also dependent on the prevailing market prices. This sustained investment, both in monetary terms as well as the time spent, result in a win-win partnership for farmers and the company.

Win-win situation Contract farming is extremely beneficial for a company because it need not invest in real estate; dissemination of modern technology and best practices is easily possible; and there is more control on production and quality of output. In case the price of output is pre-fixed, the company escapes cost variations. As for the benefits offered to farmers, the contractual agreements can provide them with access to production services and credit as well as knowledge of new skills & technology. Especially the small farmers can reap benefits, as this concept offers them the economy of scale, provides access to technological options in terms of inputs, machinery, processing & quality assurance facilities & infrastructure, besides assured market, credit support and better returns at greatly reduced risk. Some contract farming ventures give farmers the opportunity to diversify into new crops and markets. “Further, contract farming increases the yield of the particular farm. The farmers are assured that due to the agreement, the company will buy the produce at the pre-decided price and they will get timely supply of quality seeds. As for the processor or buyer, he is also assured that he will get the product at the agreed price even if there are variations in the market,” notes Gandhi. Thus, contract farming as a strategy adopted by food processors is gaining prominence in India due to increasing raw material prices. Therefore, the future of contract farming is bright and it serves as an excellent option for the processors as well as farmers for controlling their costs. Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com


X-ray inspection TIPS & TRICKS

Effective guidelines to keep contaminants in check With each passing year, X-ray inspection is increasingly being used in the food industry. Many well-known brands are using X-ray inspection systems to detect foreign bodies and reject contaminated product from the production line. Using right X-ray inspection systems can give manufacturers the tools they need to maintain quality control and product integrity at every stage of production.

U

sing X-ray machines for the inspection of food and pharmaceutical products has become popular due to increasingly stringent food safety and quality standards & successful eradication of foreign bodies through this technology. One of the main purposes of X-ray technology in the food industry is to inspect products or packages for the presence of foreign bodies or contaminants such as glass, ceramics, metal, stone or bone. For different applications, specialised, efficient and advanced X-ray systems are used. Hence, it is important to take a holistic view of X-ray technology for product inspection in the food and beverages (F&B) industry. Here are some useful information about the X-ray inspection technology and its application in food industry:

1

There are no legal requirements to use X-ray inspection. However, guidelines such as HACCP, Global Food Safety Initiative, and the FDA’s Good Manufacturing Practice, as well as ad hoc standards set by individual retailers put the responsibility on product manufacturers to establish reliable product inspection programmes.

2

Contrary to myths that say X-rays are dangerous, these inspection systems are safe by design. They generate X-rays only when the unit is switched on. During that period, the risk of being exposed to radiation can

be controlled by keeping an appropriate distance from the X-ray generator and through shielding around the X-ray beam. Typically, the entire assembly is encased in a stainless steel X-ray cabinet with a highly visible lamp stack that signals if the system is operating and therefore emitting radiation.

3

Scientific evidence has shown that X-rays do not harm food in any way. The World Health Organisation (WHO) even confirmed that food radiation levels up to 10,000 Sv (Sievert) do not affect food safety or nutritional value. This means that food could be subject to radiation doses around ten million times stronger than those used in X-ray inspection without any harmful effects.

4

Manufacturers do not just use X-ray inspection to detect contaminants. X-ray systems can also perform a wide range of in-line quality checks such as measuring the mass of a product, counting components, identifying missing or broken products, monitoring fill levels, inspecting the integrity of a product seal or closure, as well as checking for damaged products and packaging.

5

Ac c o rd i n g to the needs of manufacturers, there are two types of X-ray tube: a glass tube to produce a low contrast image and a beryllium tube with softer X-ray energy for higher contrast images.

6

A glass tube is the most common type because its penetration abilities suit a wide variety of applications. When the product to be inspected is of low density and small in depth – which is typically less than 30 millimetre – a beryllium tube can be used instead of glass. This lower-energy tube creates softer X-rays, which give better contrast and detection levels on mediumdensity contaminants such as glass, mineral stone or bone.

7

The geometry of the X-ray beam is another adaptation that can be made. Most X-ray systems use a vertical beam from the generator to scan a product as it passes through the X-ray system. Horizontal systems use a side-mounted X-ray generator to scan products passing on the conveyor belt, and are used for vertically-oriented packs that are taller than they are wide.

8

Also, multiple X-ray beams can be applied rather than a single beam to optimise the probability of detection. Two X-ray beams from a single generator, also known as split beam, increase the probability of detection of foreign bodies as two images are created from different angles simultaneously. This is particularly useful for packaging such as metal cans where it is difficult to detect a contaminant close to the can wall due to the angle of the image.

Reference: Mettler-Toledo Safeline X-ray Email: rakesh.rao@network18publishing.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

71


PROJECTS

New projects and expansion activities are the barometers of industrial growth. These also present business opportunities to service providers like consultants, contractors, plant & equipment suppliers and others down the value chain. This feature will keep you updated with vital information regarding new projects and capacity expansions being planned by companies in the food & beverages industry. Agro processing

Agro processing unit

Dairy

Adani Wilmar Ltd

Adani Wilmar Ltd

Gopaljee Dairy Foods

Project type New facility Project news Adani Wilmar Ltd is planning to set up a new agro-processing plant at Chhindwara in Madhya Pradesh. The project involves manufacturing of deoiled cake. Project location Chhindwara, Madhya Pradesh Project cost Not known Implementation stage Planning

Project type New facility Project news Adani Wilmar Ltd is planning to set up a new plant at Nagpur in Maharashtra to manufacture soya seed/cake. Project location Nagpur, Maharashtra Project cost Not known Implementation stage Planning

Project type New facility Project news Gopaljee Dairy Foods is setting up a milk unit at Javeri village in Meerut district of Uttar Pradesh. The work for the project is going on. Project location Meerut, Uttar Pradesh Project cost ` 26 crore Implementation stage Ongoing

Contact details: Adani Wilmar Ltd Fortune House Near Navrangpura Railway Crossing Ahmedabad 380009, Gujarat Tel: 079-25555650, Fax: 079-25555621 Email: fortune@adaniwilmar.in ---------------------------------------Agro processing

Mehsana District Co-operative Milk Producers Union Ltd Project type New facility Project news Mehsana District Co-Operative Milk Producers Union Ltd is planning to set up a new agro processing plant at Mehsana in Gujarat. The project involves manufacturing of cattle feed. Project location Mehsana, Gujarat Project cost Not known Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Mehsana District Co-operative Milk Producers Union Ltd Mehsana 384002, Gujarat Tel: 02762-253201, Fax: 02762-253422 Email: sagar@mehsanaunion.coop

72

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

Contact details: Adani Wilmar Ltd Fortune House Near Navrangpura Railway Crossing Ahmedabad 380009, Gujarat Tel: 079-25555650 Fax: 079-25555621 Email: fortune@adaniwilmar.in ---------------------------------------Bakery product Shakti Bhog Foods Project type New facility Project news Shakti Bhog Foods is setting up biscuits and cookies unit with capacity of 56,000 tpa at Salempur. Equipment and machinery are sourced from India and abroad. Work is underway. Project location Hardwar, Uttarakhand Project cost ` 82 crore Implementation stage Ongoing Contact details: Shakti Bhog Foods Ltd 24, SSI Industrial Area G T Karnal Road Delhi 110033 Tel: 011-27694037/60 Fax: 011-27695030 Email: cmd@shaktibhog.com

Contact details: Gopaljee Dairy Foods Pvt Ltd H-112, Sector 63 Noida, Gautam Budh Nagar Uttar Pradesh Tel: 0120-4768000 Fax: 0120-4768015 Email: info@gopaljeedairy.com ---------------------------------------Dairy

KCL Milk Products India Pvt Ltd Project type New facility Project news KCL Milk Products India Pvt Ltd is planning to set up a new plant at Kolhapur in Maharashtra to manufacture milk products. Project location Kolhapur, Maharashtra Project cost Not known Implementation stage Planning Contact details: KCL Milk Products India (P) Ltd Plot No 135, Sector 24 Faridabad 121005 Haryana Tel: 0129-4018883 Email: murginns@kcl.co.in


PROJECTS

Dairy

Milk powder & ice cream powder

Refined vegetable oils

Hardayal Milk Products Pvt Ltd

DS Milk Product Ltd

NK Proteins Ltd

Project type New facility Project news Hardayal Milk Products Pvt Ltd is planning to set up a new plant at Firozabad in Uttar Pradesh for production of milk. Project location Firozabad, Uttar Pradesh Project cost Not available Implementation stage Planning

Project type New facility Project news DS Milk Product Ltd is planning to set up a new plant at Sikar, Rajasthan, to manufacture milk powder, ice cream powder and condensed milk. Project location Sikar, Rajasthan Project cost Not known Implementation stage Planning

Project type New facility Project news NK Proteins Ltd is planning to set up a new plant for manufacturing refined vegetable oils at Mehsana in Gujarat. Project location Mehsana, Gujarat Project cost Not known Implementation stage Planning

Contact details: Hardayal Milk Products Pvt Ltd F-801, Vikram Tower 16, Rajendra Place, New Delhi 110008 Tel: 011-25759004 Fax: 011-25759005 Email: info@hardayalgroup.com ---------------------------------------Edible oil

Contact details: DS Milk Product Ltd B-27/A, Sector-3 Gautam Budh Nagar, Noida Uttar Pradesh Tel: 0120-4032200, 3083333 Fax: 0120-2522592 Email: ds@dsgroup.com ---------------------------------------Pasteurised milk

Adani Wilmar Ltd Project type New facility Project news Adani Wilmar Ltd is planning to set up a new plant for solvent extraction soyabean oil, sunflower oil, mustard oil, groundnut oil, cottonseed oil, rice bran oil at Alwar in Rajasthan. Project location Alwar, Rajasthan Project cost Not known Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Adani Wilmar Ltd Fortune House Near Navrangpura Railway Crossing Ahmedabad 380009 Gujarat Tel: 079-25555650 Fax: 079-25555621 Email: fortune@adaniwilmar.in

Govind Milk & Milk Products Pvt Ltd Project type New facility Project news Govind Milk & Milk Products Pvt Ltd is planning to set up a new plant to manufacture pasteurised milk. The plant is to come up at Satara in Maharashtra. Project location Satara, Maharashtra Project cost Not known Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Govind Milk & Milk Products Pvt Ltd Ganeshsheri, Pandharpur Road Kolki, Phaltan, Dist Satara 415523 Maharashtra Tel: 02166-221302/222538 Fax: 02166-226025 Email: contact@govindmilk.com

Contact details: NK Proteins Ltd Thor, Kadi Mehsana 382721 Gujarat Tel: 079-66309999 Fax: 079-66309913 Email: info@nkproteins.com ---------------------------------------Sugar

GM Sugar & Energy Pvt Ltd Project type New facility Project news GM Sugar & Energy plans to set up sugar unit with capacity of 2,500 tonne cane crushed per day (tccpd) at Kirigere in Karnataka. Project location Kirigere, Karnataka Project cost Not known Implementation stage Planning Contact details: GM Sugar & Energy Pvt Ltd 22, Pamadi Towers, 2nd Floor 1st Main Road Gandhinagar Bengaluru 560009 Karnataka Tel: 080-2203171/22256511 Fax: 080-2203172 Email: gemlabs@gmail.com

Information courtesy: Tendersinfo.com 1, Arch Gold, Next to MTNL Exchange, Poisar, S V Road, Kandivali (W), Mumbai - 400 067, Maharashtra, India Tel: 022 28666134 • Fax: 022 28013817 • Email: parmeet.d@tendersinfo.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

73


TENDERS

Latest Popular Tenders brought to you by www.tendersinfo.com Fruit grading machine

Hot drinks and water fountains

Org

: Szatmari Flavours Producer Processing and Merchants Ltd TRN : 12555418 Desc : Supply of measuring equipment, fruit grading machine BOD : November 12, 2012 Loc : Hungary BT : ICB _______________________________________________

Org : Establishment of French Sang TRN : 12742748 Desc : Supply and maintenance of hot drinks and water fountains BOD : November 15, 2012 Loc : France BT : ICB _______________________________________________

Equipment

Org : National Agri-food Biotechnology Institute TRN : 12760340 Desc : Supply of walk in cold room BOD : November 15, 2012 Loc : Mohali, Punjab BT : Domestic _______________________________________________

Org : University College Cork (UCC) TRN : 12488939 Desc : Supply of process equipment for production of food bioactive substances under conditions of GMP that can be tested in clinical and dietary intervention trials BOD : November 14, 2012 Loc : Ireland BT : ICB _______________________________________________

Coffee machines Org : Uddevalla Municipality TRN : 12538382 Desc : Supply of coffee machines with ethical accessories BOD : November 14, 2012 Loc : Sweden BT : ICB _______________________________________________

Tea/coffee vending machines Org : Government of Delhi TRN : 12777256 Desc : Supply of tea/coffee vending machines BOD : November 15, 2012 Loc : Delhi BT : Domestic _______________________________________________

Chapatti-making machine Org TRN Desc BOD Loc BT

: : : : : :

Directorate of Prison and Correctional Service 12759996 Supply of chapatti-making machine November 15, 2012 Bhubaneswar, Odisha Domestic

Walk in cold room

Vending machines Org : Helse Bergen Hf TRN : 12487786 Desc : Supply of water vending machines, coffee vending machines, mineral water machines and machine-dependent coffee products BOD : November 16, 2012 Loc : Norway BT : ICB _______________________________________________

Coffee machines Org

: Oslo Municipality/Development and Skills Service TRN : 12652553 Desc : Supply of coffee machines BOD : November 19, 2012 Loc : Norway BT : ICB _______________________________________________

Vending machines Org : King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals TRN : 12671796 Desc : Supply of vending machines for hot drinks and soft drinks BOD : November 19, 2012 Loc : Saudi Arabia BT : ICB

Org: Organisation’s name, TRN: Tendersinfo Ref No, Desc: Description, BOD: Bid Opening Date, Loc: Location, BT: Bidding Type Information courtesy: Tendersinfo.com 1, Arch Gold, Next to MTNL Exchange, Poisar, S V Road, Kandivali (W), Mumbai - 400 067, Maharashtra, India Tel: 022 28666134 • Fax: 022 28013817 • Email: parmeet.d@tendersinfo.com

74

Modern Food Processing | November 2012


EVENT LIST

NATIONAL CHENNAI

LUDHIANA

INDORE

Tamil Nadu, Nov 22-25, 2012

Punjab, Dec 21-24, 2012

Madhya Pradesh, Jan 11-14, 2013

AURANGABAD

RUDRAPUR

HYDERABAD

Maharashtra, Feb 1-4, 2013

Uttarakhand, Feb 23-26, 2013

Andhra Pradesh, May 31- June 3, 2013

India’s premier industrial trade fair on products and technologies related to Machine Tools, Hydraulics & Pneumatics, Process Machinery & Equipment, Automation Instrumentation, Packaging & Auxiliaries, IT Products, Electrical & Electronics, Material Handling and Safety Equipment.

For details Network18 Media & Investments Ltd

Ruby House, 1st Floor, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. • Tel: 022 3003 4651 • Fax: 022 3003 4499 • Email: engexpo@network18publishing.com

International PackTech India and drink technology India International PackTech India, along with drink technology India (dti), will showcase latest trends in packaging, processing, beverage and liquid food industries; November 06-08, 2012; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Messe Düsseldorf India Pvt Ltd Centre Point Building, 7th floor Santacruz (W), Mumbai 400 054 Tel: 022-66789933 Email: messeduesseldorf@md-india.com

Poultry India International exhibition cum tradeshow dedicated to the poultry processing business and technology; November 28-30, 2012; at Hyderabad International Trade Exposition Centre (HITEX), Hyderabad For details contact: Indian Poultry Equipment Manufacturers’ Association D No 11-7-188, Huda Complex Saroornagar, Hyderabad Tel: 040-2414 2413 Email: info@poultryindia.co.in

Bakery Business Trade Show Event showcasing innovations in the bakery industry from technologies to ingredients; November 28–30, 2012; at World Trade Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Chetan Salvi Hospitality First

76

19, 1st Floor, Above Ajanta Auto Garage Next To Four Seasons Hotel 18 - E Moses Road, Worli, Mumbai Tel: 022-2495 5376, Fax: 022-2495 5356 Email: chetan@hospitalityfirst.in

ANTEC Mumbai Society of Plastics Engineers (SPE) is organising its Annual Technical Conference (ANTEC) for plastics industry covering latest trends in processing technologies, end-user applications and polymers; December 06-07, 2012; at the Renaissance Mumbai Convention Centre Hotel, Mumbai

food & beverage technologies, from processing, packaging, research, quality assurance, hygiene, among others; December 07-10, 2012; at India Expo Centre and Mart, Greater Noida For details contact: Print Packaging.Com Pvt Ltd F 101, Tower No 7, International Infotech Park Vashi Railway Station, Navi Mumbai Tel: 022-2781 2619 Email: info@packplus.in

Indian Ice-Cream Congress 2012 Conference focussing on latest trends in ice cream market in India; December 13, 2012; in Hyderabad For details contact: Samrat Upadhyay, Secretary General Indian Ice-Cream Manufacturers’ Association A/801, 8th Floor, Time Square Building, C G Road, Near Lal Bunglow Char Rasta Navrangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009 Mob: 076988 69800 Email: info@iicma.in

AIFPA Food Show For details contact: Vijay Boolani, Technical Program Chair 303, Prabhadevi Indl. Estate, 402, Veer Savarkar Marg, Mumbai 400025 Tel: 022-24302790/2826 Email: vboolani@4spe.org

International Rice Pro-tech Expo Specialised tradeshow concentrating on technologies related to rice processing (like sorting, milling, grading, cleaning, packaging); December 07-09, 2012; at Science College Ground, Raipur For details contact: Business Empire Exhibitions D-56, First Floor, Rose Garden Market Opp. Aurbindo School, Near Bus Stand Patiala, Punjab Tel: 0175-2302254, Fax: 0175-5003994 Email: businessempire07@gmail.com

Food Technology Show Concurrent with Packplus 2012, this holistic show will feature the latest in

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

Exhibition showcasing a comprehensive range of food & beverage processing equipment; December 13–15, 2012; at IARI, PUSA, New Delhi For details contact: All India Food Processors Association 206, Aurobindo Place Market Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 Tel: 011-26510860, Fax: 011-26510860 Email: aifpa@vsnl.net

Bakery Tech-Hyderabad Trade fair showcasing latest developments in the bakery industry; February 8-10, 2013; HITEX Exhibition Centre, Hyderabad For details contact: Business Live No. 9- G, R R Flats, Bharathi Nagar 1st Street, Off North Usman Road Opposite BBC Plaza T. Nagar, Chennai Tel: 044-28344851, Fax: 044-28344852 Email: info@thehospitalityindia.com


EVENT LIST

INTERNATIONAL Dubai Drink Technology Expo Specialised event featuring the latest in technologies & trends for the beverage industry; December 04-06, 2012; at Dubai International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Dubai, the UAE For details contact: INDEX Conferences & Exhibitions Organisation Dubai Health Care City Block B Office 203, 2nd Floor Dubai, the UAE Tel: +971-4-3624717/149 Fax:+(971)-(4)-3624718 Email: drinkexpo@index.ae

Guangzhou China International Food and Beverage Exhibition The premier exhibition showcasing technologies for the food processing & services industry; December 10–12, 2012; at China Import & Export Fair Pazhou Complex, Guangzhou, China For details contact: Guangdong Foxing Exhibition Services Co Rm 512 Yingshi Mansion, No. 16 Dadao Rd Guangzhou, Guangdong, China Tel: +86-20-85939300 Fax: +86-20-6108 9459 Email: contact@chinaexhibition.com

Aseptipak Asia 2012 Conference on aseptic processing, filling and processing that brings together technology providers and potential users; December 11-12, 2012; at Westin Grande Sukhumvit, Bangkok, Thailand For details contact: Ron Schotland Schotland Business Research 16 Duncan Lane Skillman, NJ 08558-2323 USA Tel: +1.609.466.9191 Email: ronschotland@yahoo.com

opportunities in Bangladesh; January 23-26, 2013; at Bangabandhu International Conference Centre, Dhaka, Bangladesh For details contact: Chan Chao International Co Ltd 3-F, No. 185, Kangchien Road Nei Hu District, Taipei, Taiwan Tel: +(886)-(2)-26596000 Fax: +(886)-(2)-26597000 Email: mis@chanchao.com.tw

China Drinktec International tradeshow on the beverages industry; March 04-06, 2013; at China Import & Export Fair Pazhou Complex, Guangzhou, China

ISM Cologne One of the leading events in the niche area of confectionery processing; January 27-30, 2013; Cologne Exhibition Centre, Germany For details contact: Koelnmesse GmbH Messeplatz 1 Koeln, Deutschland, Germany Tel: +(49)-(221)-8212313 Fax: +(49)-(221)-8212105 Email: ism@visitor.koelnmesse.de

For details contact: Adsale Exhibition Services Ltd 6th Floor, 321 Java Road North Point Hong Kong, China Tel: +(852)-(2)-8118897 Fax: +(852)-(2)-5165024 Email: exhibition@adsale.com.hk

Foodex Japan Tradeshow and conference for the food processing industry, with a special emphasis on organic foods; March 05-08, 2013; at Makuhari Messe - International Convention Complex, Chiba, Japan

Gulfood Exhibition One of the biggest tradeshows for the food industry showcasing latest equipment for processing & packaging; February 25-28, 2013; at Dubai International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Dubai, UAE For details contact: Dubai World Trade Centre PO Box No: 9292, Dubai, The UAE Tel: +(971)-(4)-3321000 Fax: +(971)-(4)-3322866 Email: info@dwtc.com

Tradeshow dedicated to latest technologies in natural food processing as well as packaging and kitchen equipment; March 28–31, 2013; at Changwon Exhibition Convention Center, Changwon, Korea

Tradeshow and conference on food & beverage ingredients; February 25-28, 2013; at Dubai International Convention & Exhibition Centre, The UAE For details contact: Dubai World Trade Centre

For details contact: Japan Management Association 3-1-22 Shiba Koen, Minato-ku Tokyo, Japan Tel: +(81)-(3)-34340998 Fax: +(81)-(3)-34348076 Email: foodexinternational@convention.jma

Global Natural Food & Machinery Industry Exhibition

Ingredients Middle East

Bangladesh IPF-Foodtech Tradeshow and conference for the food processing industry to explore

P.O. Box. No: 9292 Dubai, The UAE Tel: +(971)-(4)-3321000 Fax: +(971)-(4)-3322866 Email: gulfood@dwtc.com

For details contact: Messe Korea Inc. No 43, Apec-ro, Haeundea-gu Busan, Korea Tel: +(82)-(51)-7407707 Fax: +82-51-7407708 Email: messe7707@naver.com

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective organiser. In any case, it does not represent the views of Modern Food Processing

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

77


BOOK REVIEW

Food allergy: Adverse reactions to foods and food additives Edited by: Dean D Metcalfe, Hugh A Sampson and Ronald A Simon Price: ` 17,400

Advances in food science have brought before the industry various new developments in terms of ingredients and functional foods. Most of these products incorporate natural ingredients. However, the human body has natural tendencies to reject a few substances as per natural mechanism. Applying a scientific approach, this book covers both pediatric and adult adverse reactions to foods and food additives. It has established itself as one of the most comprehensive references for those studying food allergy or suspected allergy. The revised and updated edition comprises new chapters devoted to food biotechnology and genetic engineering, seafood toxins, future approaches to therapy and hidden food allergens. The special sections of this book include reactions to food antigens, diagnoses, reactions to food additives and few contemporary topics such as psychological conditions and also prevention of food allergy. This is an essential guide book for allergists, immunologists, pediatricians, nutritionists, food technologists and food scientists.

Chemical analysis of food: Techniques and applications This book contains original research work and contributions from over 20 renowned international experts in this field. It reviews new technology and challenges in food analysis from multiple perspectives. It is a review of novel technologies being used in food analysis, an in-depth analysis of several specific approaches, and an examination of the most innovative applications and future trends. The book is structured in two parts: the first describes the role of the latest developments in analytical and bio-analytical techniques and the second compiles the most innovative applications and issues in food analysis. The techniques discussed range from the non-invasive and nondestructive, such as infrared spectroscopy and ultrasound, to emerging areas such as nanotechnology, biosensors and electronic noses and tongues. A few interesting topics discussed include food traceability, proteomics in food, radionuclides and flavours & odours. Broad coverage of many important techniques makes this reference useful for a range of food scientists as well as students of this subject.

Authored by: Yolanda Pico Price: ` 10,785

Reviewer: Rini Ravindran, Lecturer, Department of Biochemistry and Food Science & Quality Control, Ramnarain Ruia College, Mumbai

Available at: Wisdom Book Distributors, Hornby Building, 1st floor, 174, D N Road, Mumbai 400 001 Tel: 022-2207 4484/6631 8958, Telefax: 022-2203 4058, Email: thadam@vsnl.com

78

Modern Food Processing | November 2012


PRODUCTS This section provides information about the national and international products available in the market

Calorimeter Calorimeter is suitable for measuring reflected colour and colour difference in a wide range of application in food industry. It has 8 mm measuring area and can meet various measurements, from all kinds of ingredients, foods, raw materials and finished products. It has a redesigned data processor, which features a large back light display for numerical or graphic display of measurement data and a built-in thermal high speed printer. The data memory now can store up to 100 target colours and 2,000 measurements. Several new colour spaces and pass/fail formulas as well as indices for whiteness and yellowness, Tomato Index, Citrus Index enhance the usage into various fields of applications. The new user indices function allows the input of six different user- or application-specific equations using CIELAB, XYZ, Yxy values. The communication languages can be set for English, German, French, Italian, Spanish and Japanese. Jay Instruments & Systems Pvt Ltd Mumbai – Maharashtra Tel: 022 - 23526207, Fax: 022-23526210 Email: marketing@jayinst.com Website: www.jayinst.com

Closure feeding system Fully automatic, hygienic and sanitationfriendly closure feeding system is used for crowns, PP caps, aluminium caps, etc. The system is suitable for high-speed bottle filler machines up to 600 BPM in industries such as beverages, breweries, distilleries, pharmaceuticals, dairy, etc. It ensures the flow of closure in gentle and controlled manner into the crowner/capper hopper, which nullifies the damage and bending of closures remarkably. The system is self-mounted, as the dies do not require any foundation, and can be moved anywhere in the bottling hall. Alien Fabricon (India) Ahmedabad - Gujarat Fax: 079-25855892/890; Email: sanimesh@alienfabricon.co.in Website: www.bottlingplantconveyor.com

Looking For A Specific Product? Searching and sourcing products were never so easy. Just type MFP (space) Product Name and send it to 51818

eg. MFP Fryer and send it to 51818

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

79


PRODUCTS

Network gas chromatograph Chromatograph provides superior performance for all applications. Key to its performance is the use of advanced electronic pneumatic control (EPC) modules and high performance GC oven temperature control. Each EPC unit is optimised for its intended use with a specific inlet and detector option. State-of-the-art detector electronics and the full-range digital data path enable peaks to be quantified over the entire concentration range of the detector in a single run. Agilent Technologies India Pvt Ltd New Delhi Tel: 011- 46237106 Email: agilent@agilent.com Website: www.agilent.co.in

Food waste disposal system Kitchen garbage/food waste disposal system is used for at-source disposal of all kinds of biodegradable food waste generated in hotel kitchens and food processing industries. Various models to suit each point of food preparation area/vegetable preparation area/non-veg preparation/butchery area/tableware wash/landing table/dining area/wet and dry garbage room applications are available. The system crushes all food wastes into a slurry form that pass through the drainage. It protects hotels/ foodprocessing industries from contamination of bacteria, insects, files and rodents, foul odour, etc. Sree Devi Enviro Pvt Ltd Chennai - Tamil Nadu Tel: 044 -24512850 Email: bioclean_sde@yahoo.com

Ripening chamber The gas emission ripening system and ethylene generator system is available along with necessary controls for monitoring ripening parameters. The bananas ripened through these systems ensures even ripening, controlled output as per the demand, uniform golden yellow colour, longer shelf life and improved marketability of bananas. Blue Star Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-66654000 Email: suneel@bluestarindia.com, Website: www.bluestarindia.com

80

Modern Food Processing | November 2012


PRODUCTS

Electronic rotary contact coder Electronic rotary contact coder (ERCC) is suitable for coding for food and beverages, pharma, agro, fertiliser, dairy industries. It operates on a microprocessor based system and is easy to learn, and less complex to operate. This ERCC continuous coder is for manufacturers/packers of packaged goods to print B.No, date of manufacture, expiry date, price and other statutory information on packages, containers, labels, cartons, pouches etc. It gives bigger printing area up to 50 mm and has 4-6 lines of printing on various goods. This machine is mounted on your parental machine and it works in co-ordination with your mother packing machine. The speed of this machine is co-ordinated with the parental machine and coding up to 4 line with the stereo set is done. A specially formulated fast drying universal coding ink is used for marking on the BOPP surfaces (biscuits wrappers). It runs by signal system of proximity switch and in-built timer operation. Pic-Code Systems Vadodara - Gujarat Tel: 0265 - 2290936, Mob: 09825039844, 09825139823 Fax: 0265-2291104 Email: arora@piccode.com, sales@piccode.com Website: www.piccode.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

81


PRODUCTS

Wafer biscuit oven The SW series fully-automatic wafer biscuit oven is compact in terms of space requirement with horizontal banking plates of 350 mm x 500 mm size. This oven is used for making flat wafers in large scale. It is available with 48 and 60 baking plates mounted lengthwise. The SW series machines are also available for production of hollow wafers, logos and deep patterns. These are made of robust steel frame with a chain path and continuous line chain that carries the tong carriages and baking plates. The conveyor of the oven with baking plates moves on running wheels. Gemni International Secunderabad - Andhra Pradesh Tel: 040-27896990, Mob: 09849746350 Email: info@gemni.com Website: www.gemni.com

Chapatti plate An extensive range of chapatti plate, which is ideal to prepare baked as well as puffed hot chapatti is available with the 18 swg thick SS sheet with recessed design. The plate is known for its various distinctive features, such as longer service life, corrosion resistance and optimum quality. This has a plate of 12 mm thick of polished mild steel/stainless steel plate for gridle plate and 16 mm thick plate for dosa plate welded to 16 swg thick SS trims, and 18 swg thick SS sheet with recessed design. Jas Enterprises Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2743454, Mob: 09427417384 Email: info@jasenterprise.com Website: www.jasenterprise.com

Incinerator The fully-automatic incinerator is used for incinerating solid, sludge, liquid, gas and chemical waste. It comes with SOT burners, which cover less space, and the complete incineration process is smokeless due to the multi-chamber design. Waste material is incinerated by a main SOT burner in the primary chamber under controlled combustion conditions. The gases generated along with volatile materials are completely burnt in the secondary chamber through SOT after fire burner. Steam-O-Tech Engineers (I) Pvt Ltd Dist Thane - Maharashtra Tel: 0250-2455288 Email: steamotech@gmail.com, Website: www.steamotech.com

82

Modern Food Processing | November 2012


PRODUCTS

Planetary mixer The planetary mixer is a modern heavy-duty mixer designed specially for uniform mixing by planetary movement of beater (agitator). Detachable cylindrical bowl with flat/hemispherical bottom of suitable dimension and batter/dough hook/wire whip cagetype blade is constructed out of SS-316/304/MS material. The bowl is jacketed for heating or cooling. Mixer is designed to operate under vacuum to avoid air entrapment in the product during mixing. The planetary mixer is used in mixing of liquid-liquid, liquid-solid, solid-solid blending, such as wet mass, ointments, creams, toothpastes, lotions, cosmetics, pesticides and insecticide formulations, adhesives, colours & pigments, food and confectioneries, ceramics, rubber compounds, resins, etc. Paresh Engineering Co Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-28501794 Email: pecmarol@vsnl.com, Website: www.pareshenggco.com

Weigh filler These single- and multi-head weigh fillers are economical machines that weigh the product accurately and then deliver them to the pans. Readymade pouch is used to collect the product. Separate sealing machine is used to seal the filled pouch. Technical specifications include: single/double and multinumber of heads, linear vibratory type feeding method, weighing range 50 gm to 2 kg, speed (fills/min) 8-14, depending on the weight and type of product, weighing accuracy 0.1-2 per cent depending on the weight and type of product, and power supply of 230/110 V AC, 50/60 Hz, single-phase 300 V A per head. Sensograph Packaging Technology Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-41420002, Mob: 09920232025 Email: mgt@sensograph.in, Website: www.packagingmachinery4u.com

Twist wrapping machine The model 6IST double-twist wrapping machine is used for wrapping chews, toffees and hard candy & eclair products. It is available with a number of standard features, such as Teflon liner in the feeder bowl to prevent product damage, no sweet no wrapper sensor, paper breakage sensors, paper jamming sensor, total product wrapped counter and VFD speed control. A M P Rose (P) Ltd Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-28473611 Email: sales@amprose.co.in, Website: www.amprose.co.in

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

83


PRODUCTS

Rotary gear pump The model FTS high-precision fuel pressuring internal rotary gear pump comes with investment casting body and matches the most demanding application in boiler, burner, hydraulics, fuel pressing and injection. This pump is ideally suitable for handling liquids like LDO, FO, LSHS and HSD. It is provided with built-in pressure relief valve and external bypassing arrangement and is of flange mount type. It is available in capacities ranging from 150 lph to 2,500 lph with maximum operating pressure up to 35 kg/cm and temperature up to 200°C. It is used in food processing industry. Fluid Tech Systems Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-22900100, Mob: 09825604142 Email: mail@rotofluidpumps.com Website: www.rotofluidpumps.com

PET label shrink films The PET label shrink films are used for shrink labels and sleeves. These films provide good shrink profile and good ink adhesion to print converters and brand owners. Technical specifications include

84

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

thickness of 45 and 50 mic, shrinkage MD: ~5 per cent,TD: 60 per cent and 75 per cent, width up to 1200 mm, etc. Allen Plastic Industries Co Ltd Kaoshiung City - Taiwan Tel: +886-7-7425708 Email: morida@ms19.hinet.net Website: www.allenpack.com

Sugar pulverisers These are fine powdering and coarse powdering machines for sugar. The sugar pulverisers and impact mills, both are designed to grind sugar as per customers’ requirements. One does coarse grinding with high capacity and another fine material but comparatively less quantity. These are made with accuracy and precision with perfect selection of type of grinding elements. Different capacity machines are manufactured as per customers’ requirements. Able Manufacturers Hyderabad - Andhra Pradesh Tel: 040-65974111, Mob: 09849271975 Email: ablemfrs@hotmail.com Website: www.processmachines.com


PRODUCTS

Fruit miller An efficient range of fruit millers, which is apt for crushing and grinding fruits, tomatoes, pineapples, chillies, etc, is available. The miller has in-built rotators, which operates the crushing process with great ease. These products require low maintenance and are offered in different capacities. The miller is used to crush fruits and vegetables. Capacity ranges from 300 kg/hr to 3,000 kg/hr. Suan Scientif ic Instruments & Equipments Kolkata - West Bengal Tel: 033-25342047, Mob: 09903872341 Email: suanscientific_call@yahoo.co.in Website: www.suanscientific.com

Digital temperature scanner This Digiscan (model 3116-M) is a microprocessor-based digital temperature scanner. It is used to scan, monitor and control up to maximum of 16 inputs. It is provided with bright 7-segment LED displays to give distant visibility of temperature reading and channel number. The temperature is monitored with grouped relay outputs associated with individual LED indication. The setting can be adjusted over full span for each channel. It is provided with memory lock switch at the rear to avoid unauthorised tampering with the set-points. The alarm/trip indicators are provided with LED lamps for each channel separately. Digicont Kota - Rajasthan Tel: 0744-2427519 Email: digicont@kappa.net.in Website: www.digicont.co.in

DC tachogenerator The DC tachogenerator is available in different sizes and specifications. This import substitute system is equivalent to BD 2510 make GEC, UK; single and double shaft mounted tacho REO 444, make Radio Energie, France; GMP/TDP series make Hubner, West Germany; K10 a 2 make MEZ , Chekoslavia, HU 1052 make Siemens, Germany and indigenous Model E-4001 make Excella, India. It is used in automation for obtaining accurate feedback information. Excella Electronics Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-21029911, Mob: 09324950559 Email: sales@excellaelectronics.com Website: www.excellaelectronics.com

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

85


PRODUCTS

Suction pad for chocolate Suction pad has an extremely thin and supple sealing lip that provides an optimal seal for both smooth, glazed chocolate bonbons and structured surfaces. The high nominal flow of the suction pad ensures that the required operating vacuum is quickly formed and leaks that occur when moving highly-structured chocolates are optimally compensated. It is manufactured from FDA-compliant silicone and authorised for direct contact with food. It complies with applicable hygiene regulations because it can be replaced without causing contamination. A mounting aid that is integrated in the shaft enables to mount or remove the suction pad without touching the sealing lip. The SPG can also be steam sterilised and cleaned using industry-standard cleaning agents. A one-piece insertable connection element with a 1/8� thread and integrated seal is used to connect it to the handling or robot system. Schmalz India Pvt Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-40725500, Fax: 020-40725588 Email: schmalz@schmalz.co.in

Vibratory sieve shaker The new one-touch vibratory sieve shaker has touch-screen programmable controller that allows selection of vibration level, time and pauses. It stores up to 99 testing profiles for easy repeat of standard tests. The sieve shaker is a combination of proven separation technology with the latest in electronic control for fast and accurate separation. Vibratory sieve shakers’ touch-screen programmable controller allows selection of vibration level, time and pauses. It stores up to 99 testing profiles for repeat of standard tests. Cole-Parmer India Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-67162222 Email: vinita.singh@coleparmer.in Website: www.coleparmer.in

Bag closer stitching machine This portable bag closer stitching machine comes with technologically advanced imported transmission techniques for timing belt and timing pulley. Unlike V-belt, the timing belt does not slip or stretch, giving 100 per cent power transfer. The auto oil pump lubrication system supplies oil to

86

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

all parts for smooth operation. The machine is coated with special paints, which help to slow down the chemical corrosion process thereby giving longer life. It comes with two 1/10 hp dust-proof speed motors at 8,000 rpm having a continuous rating, a fuse holder with fuse, power light and shock indicator lamp. Nikko Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-23864641 Email: nikko@vsnl.com Website: www.vacunair.com

Vacuum sealer The model WVM-405 mini-type nonnozzle vacuum sealer is made in stainless construction. This vacuum sealer keeps fish and game longer without freezer burn. It stores clothing scent-free. The commercial-grade vacuum sealer comes with an extra large Teflon bar for sealing bags up to 400 mm. Double piston vacuum pump can preserve foods 5-6 times longer than traditional methods. It is equipped with a cooling fan to cool down the pump. Wu-Hsing Electronics Co Ltd Taichung - Taiwan Tel: +886-4-22711498 Email: sealer@wuhsing.com.tw Website: www.wuhsing.com

Packaging machine The Transwrap 1650 packaging machine is accepted in food and non-food packaging industry. This machine is suited for a variety of packaging needs, styles and budgets. The array of packaging options include package styles like pillow bags and side gusseted bags along with many other options pertaining to heat sealing, polyethylene welding systems, anti-static devices, chain packages and hole punch devices. All these options can be activated through simple setting procedures via an intuitive human machine interface. Bosch India Ltd Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-22999780 Email: boschpackaging@in.bosch.com Website: www.boschindia.com The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of

Modern Food Processing


LIST OF PRODUCTS

Sl. No.

Product

Pg. No.

Acoustic enclosure ..................................... 47 Agitator .................................................. 19, FIC Air audit blower .............................................. 39 Analog timer ................................................... 48 Analytical instrument ................................ 15, 21 Animal feed technology .................................BC Bag closer stitching machine ...................... 86 Batch disperser ................................................ 19 Bowls ............................................................... 69 Box strapping machine.................................... 59 Brewing ..........................................................BC Calorimeter ...........................................19,79 Chapatti plate.................................................. 82 Chiller ....................................................... 79, 82 Chocolate/cocoa .............................................BC Cleaning section equipment...........................BC Closure feeding system ................................... 79 Cold form C&Z purlins ................................. 17 Colour masterbatches ...................................... 51 Column and chemistry .................................... 15 Colour sorting ................................................BC Compressor ..................................................... 39 Condenser ....................................................... 79 Consumables ..................................................... 6 Continous sealer .............................................. 59 Conventional phase failure relay ..................... 48 Conveyor belt ............................................ 10, 29 Conveying system............................................ 79 Counters .......................................................... 48 Counters and power supplies ....................... BIC Cream separator packing collar ....................... 81 Cutter/slicer..................................................... 79 DC tachogenerator .................................... 85 Dehumidifier ................................................... 57 Dehydration equipment .................................. 79 Diagnostics ........................................................ 6 Digital temperature scanner ............................ 85 Disperser ......................................................... 19 Doors ............................................................... 80 Dry ink coding machine ................................. 59 Dry vacuum pump .......................................... 83 Dry vane pump ............................................... 47 Dry-break coupling ......................................... 39 Dust control door............................................ 80 Ejector....................................................... 39 Electronic rotary contact coder ....................... 81 Empower ......................................................... 15 Encoder ........................................................ BIC Equipment......................................................... 6 Evaporator .............................................. 79, FIC Exhibition - Packplus 2012 ............................ 46 Extruded product ...........................................BC Flexible transparent PVC strip door ........... 80 Floor automation system ................................... 5 Flour milling ..................................................BC Flow wrap.......................................................... 3 Food processing line ....................................... 79 Food processing machinery ............................. 37 Food waste disposal system............................. 80 Fruit miller ...................................................... 85 Fruit/vegetable processing ............................... 79 Fuelling system................................................ 39 Gantry automation system............................ 5 Gear pump ...................................................... 84 Glass tumbler .................................................. 69 Gold plated slip ring ....................................... 85 Grain handling ...............................................BC Grinding and dispersion ................................BC Hand machine ........................................... 59

Sl. No.

Product

Pg. No.

Heat exchanger .............................................FIC Heat resistant door.......................................... 80 Heating bath ................................................... 19 Heavy industrial steel building........................ 17 High capacity bag palletiser ............................ 35 High pressure homogeniser ...................... 19, 41 High speed servo drive.................................... 81 Hot plate ......................................................... 19 HPLC ............................................................. 15 Incinerator ................................................ 80 Industrial control and sensing device ........... BIC Industrial door................................................. 80 Industrial pump ............................................... 89 Informatic ........................................................ 15 Inline disperser ................................................ 19 Instrumentation ............................................... 55 Job opportunity .......................................... 79 Kamlok and drylok coupling....................... 89 Kneading machine........................................... 19 Laboratory reactor ..................................... 19 Laboratory software......................................... 19 Large diameter welded pipe ............................ 85 Level controller ............................................ BIC Liquor bottle ................................................... 69 Loading arm .............................................. 39, 89 Magelis STU HMI panels .......................... 13 Magnetic stirrer ............................................... 19 Measuring and monitoring relay.................. BIC Media and entertainment company ................ 75 Mills ................................................................ 19 Mixing machine .............................................. 79 Monoblock high vacuum pump ...................... 83 Multi-axis motion controller........................... 81 Multi-level car park......................................... 17 Natural herbal sweetener .............................. 8 Network gas chromatograph ........................... 80 Nozzle ............................................................. 89 Nylon can scrubber brush set .......................... 81 Oil cooler .................................................. 82 Oil milling ......................................................BC Oil seal high vacuum pump ............................ 83 Overhead stirrer .............................................. 19 Packaging machine .................................... 86 Packaging solution and oil packaging solution ....23 Palletising robots ............................................. 35 Pallets .............................................................. 83 Panel cooler ..................................................... 82 Panel meter ..................................................... 48 Pasta-making machine ...................................BC Peeling ............................................................. 79 PET label shrink film ..................................... 84 Phase failure relay ........................................... 48 Photo electric sensor .................................... BIC Pilot plant........................................................ 19 Piston pump .................................................... 41 Planetary mixer ............................................... 83 Plastic masterbatches....................................... 43 Plastic pellet ...................................................BC Plastic sheet ..................................................... 90 Plate heat exchanger gasket ............................ 81 Pollution control equipment .........................FIC Poly carbonate sheet........................................ 17 Poly styrene product........................................ 90 Portable induction sealer ................................. 59 Power plant PHE gasket ................................ 79 Pre-engineered steel building.......................... 17 Pre-fab shelter ................................................. 17 Priming valve................................................... 39 Proximity sensor ........................................... BIC

Sl. No.

Product

Pg. No.

Pump ........................................39, 47,80, 83, 84 PVC strip door................................................ 80 Receptacles ................................................ 89 Relays .............................................................. 48 Residential steel............................................... 17 Rice milling equipment ..................................BC Ripening chamber ........................................... 80 Robotic automation........................................... 5 Roof vent ......................................................... 17 Roofing and cladding sheet ............................ 17 Roots blower ............................................. 47, 80 Roots vacuum pump ....................................... 83 Rotary evaporator ............................................ 19 Rotary gear pump............................................ 84 Rotary pump ................................................... 83 SS pipeline gasket ...................................... 81 Safety access equipment .................................. 39 Safety door ...................................................... 80 Safety LIG ................................................... BIC Seamless pipe .................................................. 85 Shrink film packaging machine ...................... 35 Sight flow meter.............................................. 89 Silent operation ............................................... 81 Single stage monoblock vacuum pump........... 83 Single stage vacuum pump.............................. 83 Software ........................................................... 6 Spray dryer ....................................................FIC Stainless steel pipe........................................... 85 Storage tank equipment .................................. 39 Stretch film packaging machine...................... 35 Stretch wrapping machine .............................. 35 Structural floor decking sheet ......................... 17 Suction pad for chocolate ............................... 86 Sugar herb ......................................................... 8 Sugar pulveriser ............................................... 84 Switching relay ............................................. BIC Swivel .............................................................. 89 Tank truck equipment ............................... 39 Temperature controller .......................... 48, BIC Temperature indicator..................................... 48 Terra25 ............................................................ 25 Terra40 ............................................................ 25 Thermal process .............................................BC Timers .......................................................... BIC TPU masterbatches ......................................... 51 Transmission and PTOS ................................ 39 Tray sealer ................................................. 30; 53 Tube ................................................................ 85 Twin lobe roots blower ................................... 80 Twist wrapping machine................................. 83 Two stage vacuum pump .......................... 80, 83 ‘U’ tube ...................................................... 85 UPLC .............................................................. 15 USS univent .................................................... 17 Vacuum booster pump ............................... 47 Vacuum pump ................................................. 83 Vacuum pump and system .............................. 39 Vacuum sealer ................................................. 86 Vacuum system ............................................... 47 Vibratory sieve shaker ..................................... 86 Vision sensor ................................................ BIC Volumetric and gravimetric filling machine ..... 4 Wafer biscuit oven ..................................... 82 Water jetting ................................................... 39 Water ring vacuum pump ............................... 80 Weigh filler ..................................................... 83 Welded pipe .................................................... 85

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover

Looking For A Specific Product? Searching and sourcing products were never so easy. Just type MFP (space) Product Name and send it to 51818

eg. MFP Fryer and send it to 51818 November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

87


LIST OF ADVERTISERS

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Aakanksha Technologies

37

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Essen Speciality Films Pvt. Ltd

90

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Joyam Engineers & Consultants Pvt Ltd

T: +91-09810193422

T: +91-2827- 252021

T: +91-79-26569533

E: aakankshatechnologies@rediffmail.com

E: sales@essenspeciality.com

E: joyam@joyamvactech.com

W: www.pigo.biz

W: www.essenspeciality.com

Alok Masterbatches Ltd

51

T: +91-11-45457777

E: sales@alokindustries.com

E: info@everestblowers.com

W: www.alokmasterbatches.com

W: www.everestblowers.com

Ani Engineers

84

T: +91-2752-241479 E: anivarya@sancharnet.in

47

Bertron Equipments Pvt Ltd

41

Malvern Aimil Instruments Pvt Ltd

21

T: +91-22-39183596 E: soloni.gosalia@malvernaimil.com W: www.malvern.com/industry

Mech-Air Industries

Fluid Energy Controls Inc

89

E: info@freshnpure.net

E: sales@fecindia.com

W: www.freshnpure.net

Network18

Freeze Tech Equipments Pvt Ltd

8

T: +91-265-2280017

T: +91-44-42083536

W: www.fecindia.com

W: www.anivaryapumps.com

83

W: www.joyamvactech.com

Everest Blower Systems

T: +91-]11-41612244

Pg No

75 W: www.network18online.com

82

T: +91-44-42152387

T: +91-20-24338642

E: info@freezetechequip.com

E: bertronequipment@gmail.com

Nichrome India Ltd

W: www.freezetechequip.com

23

T: +91-20-6601101

Beumer Group Gmbh & Co. KG

35

T: +49-2521-240

39

E: marketing@nichrome.com

T: +91-79-40089312

W: www.nichrome.com

E: info.ahm@gardnerdenver.com

E: vt@beumer.com

Noida Fabcon Machines Pvt Ltd

W: www.gardnerdenver.com

W: www.beumer.com

25

T: +91-832-669-2004

E: nishantb@fabcon-india.com

48

W: www.fabcon-india.com

T: +91-79-22200902

Omron Automation Pvt. Ltd.

E: info@gelco-world.com

E: Amol.Matkar@in.bosch.com

Giantwell Machinery Co., Ltd.

Bry Air (Asia) Pvt Ltd

57

T: +91-11-23906777

E: in_enquiry@ap.omron.com

79

T: +886-4-852-0178

W: www.omron-ap.com

P P I Pumps Pvt Ltd

E: paul@giantwell.com.tw

E: bryairmarketing@pahwa.com

E: sales@ppipumps.com

Gudel India Pvt Ltd BC

5

T: +91-20-25459531

W: www.ppipumps.com

Plast World

80

T: +91-80-22890000

E: info@in.gudel.com

T: +91-9376128372

E: mallikarjuna.s@buhlergroup.com

W: www.gudel.com

E: plastworld1@rediffmail.com

W: www.buhlergroup.com

Clearpack India Pvt Ltd

IKA India Private Limited 3

19

E: process@ika.in

E: alok@in.clearpack.com

W: www.ika.in

E: delhi@prayagmb.com W: www.prayagmb.com

55

Print Packaging.Com Pvt Ltd

T: +91-22-23526207

T: +91-22-27812093

T: +91-09837045392

E: yogesh.wandrekar@jayinst.com

E: info@packplus.in

E: asian_glassware@yahoo.com

W: www.jayinst.com

W: www.packplus.in

Durgesh Block & China Glass Works Ltd

69

Our consistent advertisers

88

Modern Food Processing | November 2012

43

T: +91-11-47262000

Jay Instruments & Systems Pvt Ltd

W: www.clearpack.com

W: www.stripdoor.co.in

Prayag Polytech Pvt Ltd

T: +91-80-26253900

T: +91-22-61134224

80

T: +91-79-25832273

W: www.giantwell.com.tw

W: www.bryair.com

BIC

T: +91-80-40726400

W: www.gelco-world.com

W: www.boschpackaging.com

29

T: +91-120-4225550

Gelco Electronics Pvt Ltd

Bosch Limited

Buhler (India) Pvt Ltd

Gardner Denver Engineered Pro. (I) Ltd

46

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover


LIST OF ADVERTISERS

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Progressive Engineers

85

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Sintex Industries Ltd

Pg No

83

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Ultraplast Chainbelts Pvt. Ltd

T: +91-22-27838611

T: +91-2764-253500

T: +91-129-4113187

E: info@progressiveengineers.net

E: pallets@sintex.co.in

E: info@ultraplast.in

W: www.progressiveengineers.net

W: www.sintex-plastics.com

W: www.ultraplastindia.com

Rac Equipment India (P) Ltd

30; 53

Spheretech Packaging

4

United Steel & Structurals Pvt. Ltd

T: +91-09311198333

T: +91-22-25005773

T: +91-44-42321801

E: racglobal@gmail.com

E: sales@spheretech.biz

E: admin@unitedstructurals.com

Raj Process Eqpts & Systems(P) Ltd FIC

W: www.spheretech.in

W: www.unitedstructurals.com

T: +91-20-40710010

Summit Nutraceuticals Pvt. Ltd.

E: sales@rajprocessequipment.com

E: summitnutra@gmail.com

79

17

81

E: info@vspackit.com

13

Suraj Limited

85

W: www.vspackit.com

T: +91-124-3940400

T: +91-79-27540720

Venus Trading Co.

E: babita.rawat@schneider-electric.com

E: suraj@surajgroup.com

T: +91-2692-261142

W: www.schneider-electric.co.in

W: www.surajgroup.com

Sevana Trades & Services P Ltd

10

T: +91-129-2254165

W: www.rajprocessequipment.com

Schneider Electric India Pvt Ltd

V S International

Pg No

59

E: vtcphegasket@yahoo.com

Thermo Fisher Scientific SID Div.

6

Waters (India) Private Limited

T: +91-484-4217100

T: +91-22-67429494

T: +91-80-28371900

E: sts@sevana.com

E: pradeep.kumar@thermofisher.com

E: waters_india@waters.com

W: www.sevana.com

W: www.thermofisher.com

W: www.waters.com

Our consistent advertisers

81

15

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover

November 2012 | Modern Food Processing

89


Registration No: MH / MR / WEST / 232 / 2012-2014; RNI No: MAHENG / 2008 / 25262; Licence to Post at Mumbai Patrika Channel Sorting Office, Mumbai GPO., Mumbai 400 001 Date of Mailing 3rd & 4th of Every Month Issue. Date Of Publication: 1st of Every Month

92

Modern Food Processing - November 2012  

'MODERN FOOD PROCESSING’ is the leading monthly business magazine in India exclusively for the food processing industry. It covers the lates...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you