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Modern Food Processing

November 2011


EDITORIAL

Nothing endures like change

H

Editorial Advisory Board Dr A S Abhiraman

undreds of billion dollars worth rescue plans to tide over sovereign debt default, seeking alternative avenues to cope with volatile energy costs and rising demand for financial inclusion among several strata of society across the globe, irrespective of the stage of a particular country’s economic prosperity. These mega challenges confronting the world today are not just highly unprecedented but were also almost unthinkable barely a few years ago. More importantly, this reflects the reality of a fast-changing global phenomenon and a time of challenging opportunities to annul the risks effectively. Change is not something new for an organisation of any size or industry. In fact, the progressive ones make that significant difference by managing change in a sustainable manner. Some of the real-life scenarios include implementing new hardware and software, mergers and acquisitions, relocation of facilities, adopting processes to do more with less resource, etc. On a more sophisticated level, it can involve implementation of a strategic planning process, a specific quality management programme, process re-engineering, among others. A few months ago, we also embarked on a similar journey to ‘challenge and change’ ourselves, more precisely, our brands, for better. In this exciting and challenging soul-searching sojourn, we revisited & thoroughly analysed every practical aspect of our motto of providing informative empowerment to our audience and not merely publishing content. Although we have put our best efforts towards perfecting the products and practices further, we would also submit that the best practices for managing change are still elusive. The result is there for you to decipher in this new avatar of ‘Modern Food Processing’. From the brand new sections to focussed features, emphasis has been laid on ensuring more analytical, in-depth and contemporary first-hand information. Of course, all these are presented in a lucid and elegant way, thanks to an optimum combination of applying mind over matter as well as some of the latest publishing software available. Rather than blowing our own trumpet, we will prefer your valuable feedback on these initiatives. Suffice to say, it will help us in our constant endeavour to help our audience in terms of receiving superior value on a sustained basis. Let there be more info-empowerment towards better decision making in business. Happy learning!

Former Executive Director - Research, Hindustan Lever Ltd

Prof M Y Kamat Former Head, Food Engg & Technology Dept, UICT, Mumbai

Manas R Bastia manas@infomedia18.in

November 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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CONTENTS

IN CONVERSATION WITH

R EGU L A R SEC T ION S

Zoher Khorakiwala Chairman and Managing Director, Monginis Foods Pvt Ltd ....................................24

SPECIAL FOCUS Alcoholic Beverages 27

Editorial ........................................................................................ 9 News, Views & Analysis ............................................................. 14 Technology & Innovation ........................................................... 20 Technology Transfer .................................................................... 22 Projects ........................................................................................ 70 Event List.................................................................................... 72 Book Review ............................................................................... 77 Products....................................................................................... 78 List of Products........................................................................... 95 List of Advertisers ....................................................................... 96

AUTOMATION TRENDS Low-cost automation Small investment, big impact .......................................................... 56 IMFL industry ............................................................................... 28

ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Wine retailing ................................................................................. 30

Case study Controlling consumption for energy optimisation .......................... 58

Roundtable ...................................................................................... 36 Cover illustration: Chaitanya Dinesh Surpur

POLICIES & REGULATIONS RBI’s monetary policy Is raising interest rate a right tool to control inflation? ................... 60

FACILITY VISIT Buhler India Pvt Ltd Milling ‘healthier’ grains through TQM ................... 38

STRATEGY Contract farming Reinforcing supply chain management............................................. 64

INSIGHT & OUTLOOK

Food Packaging 41

TIPS & TRICKS Lubricant selection Criteria to choose the right lubes for machinery ............................. 66

EVENT PREVIEW Q Sweet & Snacktec India 2011 Prospecting for new business avenues ....................................... 74 Q India Packaging Show 2011 En route to advanced technology .............................................. 75

EVENT REPORT Fi India 2011 Adding the ingredient for success ................................................... 76 Eco-friendly packaging................................................................... 42 Tin packaging ................................................................................. 46

Highlights of Next Edition

Conveyor systems ............................................................................ 52

SPECIAL FOCUS: Dairy Processing

RFID solutions ............................................................................... 54

Details on page no. 50, 67-68, 72

INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: Chocolate & Confectionery

Note: ` stands for Indian rupee, $ stands for US dollar and £ stands for UK pound, unless mentioned otherwise November 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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November 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

FOOD ANALYSIS POLICY

New food safety act may increase investment in Maharashtra The Food Safety and Standards Act (FSSA), 2006, which came into force in August 2011, is expected to increase the investment in the food & beverage sector in Maharashtra, according to Satej D Patil, Minister of State for Home, Rural Development and Food & Drugs Administration (FDA). He said, “After implementation of the law, Maharashtra will witness more investments in food sector. Now, we are working on single-window clearances for licensing from the FDA department. The main intention is to give the license in specified time.” FSSA will ensure improved quality of food making it at par with international standards. The main feature of the Act is a shift from multi-level and multi-departmental control to integrated line of command. “The food safety legislation is strict and covers serious issues like adulteration. After implementation of the law, the whole country from Kashmir to Kanyakumari has come under a standard law,” said Patil. Replying to a specific query on the steps being taken for implementation of the law, he said, “We had meeting with food safety officers and other stakeholders & explained the law to them. We will take every step to ensure that the law is properly implemented.” Prasenjit Chakraborty

Pesticide testing centres need to be increased in India In the wake of increase in incidences of pesticide residues in food, experts are of the opinion that the country needs more testing facilities. Indiscriminate use of pesticide results in its accumulation in food, hence India needs to increase testing facilities, said Dr M Sreedhar, Senior Scientist, Acharya N G Ranga Agri University, Hyderabad. He added, “To handle sufficient samples, testing and certification body should be developed in a larger way so that more number of samples can be handled & people will become aware of the effect of pesticides on human. Under FSSA, pesticide monitoring centres will be extended to the district level.” Prasenjit Chakraborty

GOURMET RETAIL

EXPANSION

World’s hottest chilly now available at Godrej Nature’s Basket

GRSL to increase its pan-India presence

Godrej Nature’s Basket has recently added two new spices Bhut Jolokia (considered to be the hottest chilly in the world) and Los Chileros Chile Habennero (from Mexico) to its product portfolio. Bhut Jolokia, also known as ‘Ghost chilies’ peppers, are North-east originated chillies. “While Bhut Jolokia is available only in Mumbai, Mexican chillies will be available across India,” said Sreejith Mohan, Head – Category, Godrej Nature’s Basket. Speaking about the market potential of these chillies, he said, “Indian consumers are open to experiment with their cuisine and are on the look-out for food novelty, which are not easily available in the market. At Godrej Nature’s Basket, we bring exotic produce and consumers together. We do not expect these products to be sold in huge volumes, but definitely it has excited the food connoisseurs in Mumbai.” In recent times, the company has rolled a slew of products in different categories. “We are constantly on the look-out for new products. We carry exotic ingredients across the globe. We have recently launched a new range of fresh herbs, which are mints. These include apple mint, pear mint, orange mint, and a new range of small tomato. We are in the process of launching Italian lemon, a new variant of lemon,” informed Mohan. As a part of its expansion strategy, the company recently opened its first store in Hyderabad. With this, the company has 16 stores spread across 6 cities.

With a view to increase its presence in the country, Gokul Refoils & Solvent Ltd (GRSL) plans to set up two port-based refineries, ie 1,000 TPD refinery in Maharashtra along with the 600 TPD solvent extraction plant, and another 1,000 TPD refinery at the South-eastern coast of India. Praveen Khandelwal, Vice President - Corporate Strategy, GRSL, said, “At present, the company has a strong presence in the north-eastern and western states of India, so it wants to move further. Apart from the three plants in Gujarat, we already have a plant in Haldia in West Bengal. With the expansion plan in place, we will be going to other parts of the country as well.” Further, GRSL is also taking every possible step to spread awareness about its brands. “We have even rigorously started the branding exercise for our brands. Like a year before, we took the decision to popularise our Gokul brand and the fruits of it can be seen,” noted Khandelwal. Gokul, the flagship brand of the company, has recently received the award for ‘Fastest Growing Brand 2011’, at the Globoil India 2011. The products available under Gokul brand comprise mustard oil, refined oils and vanaspati. The company’s growth chart is soaring high each day and this can be observed from the fact that the company has also received three more prestigious awards, ie ‘Second highest processor of rapeseed oil-cake’, ‘Second highest exporter of rapeseed extraction’ and ‘Second highest exporter of castorseed extraction’ for 2010-11 from the Solvent Extractors’ Association of India (SEAI).

Rakesh Rao

Avani Jain

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Modern Food Processing | November 2011


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

INNOVATIONS

PACKAGING EXHIBITION

Nichrome designs high-speed packaging solution for snacks industry

In order to cater to the fast-growing snack market, the Pune-based Nichrome India Ltd, one of the leading packaging machinery manufacturers, has developed a high-speed packaging machinery. “Nichrome has designed and produced a new high-speed packaging system for snack foods like wafers, chips and kurkure-like products, namkeen (like farsaan, nuts and dry fruits). It can pack quantities up to 2,000 cc at the speed of 120 plus packs per minute. Developed in India, this technology is at par with the European technology and is

best suited for the Indian market for the variety of applications and right pricing,” informed Harish Joshi, Managing Director, Nichrome India Ltd. Meanwhile, Nichrome India, a pioneer of vertical form fill seal (VFFS) machines in India, is gearing up to launch three new technologies in the next two months to woo the Indian packaging sector. These new technologies are Multi-Lane VFFS PV 215 machine under licensing agreement with Prodo-Pak, USA; T 110 HFFS high speed machine in collaboration with TOTPACK, Spain, and Sprintplus continuous motion machine. “With such types of technologies, Nichrome is offering a win-win solution to its customers, where they can get the best European technology with ‘Madein-India’ pricing and that too powered by Nichrome’s efficient and excellent service back-up,” claimed Joshi. With the machine speed of 150/min, Sprintplus continuous motion machine is the value-added bagger for the snack food market. It comes with proprietary table draw off mechanism, special poker attachment for chips, high speed collar system to handle variety of packing films. Multi Lane VFFS PV 215 machine, with positive displacement pump, will be a 10 lane high speed (600 sachet/ min) for gels/lotions and edible oil kind of product.

India Converting Show to make a maiden entry India Converting Show, to be organised by Print-Packaging.com, will be held from November 23-26, 2011, as a separate exhibition for the first time, at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai. To be held concurrently with India Flexo Show and India Corrugated Show, it will focus exclusively on package printing and production. “We have separated the Converting Zone from PackPlus for this year in deference to the wishes of our exhibitors who would like to explore the Western markets with us. This is like a bit of home-coming for us, as we have not organised any exhibition at Mumbai since the tremendously successful maiden label event in 2002,” said Neetu Arora, Director, Print-Packaging.com. The exhibition will present an opportunity to the providers of machinery, materials and services across the entire value chain of the packaging industry right from designing, pre-press, printing, converting, finishing and decoration, package designing, paper & board converting, corrugated boxes, plastic conversion, flexible packaging, finishing, labels and tags. The visitors will comprise printers and converters of flexible packaging, cartons, corrugated packaging, holograms and labels. Mahua Roy

FOOD SAFET Y

Adoption of novel technologies for food analysis on the rise With the matrix of food supply chain becoming complex, demand for novel analysis technologies is expected to increase. According to some experts, in food analysis, Mass Spectrometry equipped with Quadrupole-Time of Flight (Q-TOF) provides accurate results on contaminants like pesticide and other unknown compounds. “There are other systems available, but are difficult to use in day-to-day analysis. At the same time, they require expertise for using them and need lot of maintenance. On the other

hand, Q-TOF is effective and could generate large amount of data,” said Sunil Kulkarni, Segment Manager, India Food Team, Agilent Technologies India. Currently, the food industry is facing a plethora of analytical challenges and every day new contaminants are being traced, that is why regulatory authorities are going for targeted as well as non-targeted scanning. “When you are looking for good data mining, Quadrupole Systems always have a limitation because they do not have a full scanning sensitivity. Q-TOF system

offers better full scan sensitivity. And at any point of time, one can go back and do a data mining to look for the presence of any unwanted compound. Government and food regulatory agencies are looking for non-targeted screening now,” explained Kulkarni. “Q-TOF is not new in the Indian market but its application in food area in India is new. Food exporters’ rejection will come down drastically if this technology is used,” he claimed. Prasenjit Chakraborty

November 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

DESSERT LAUNCH

RELAUNCH STRATEGY

McDonald’s India expands its dessert range

PepsiCo reintroduces Duke’s range in Mumbai

In keeping with the growth of frozen dessert market in the country, McDonald’s, a global leader in quick service restaurant sector, has launched a popular global iconic dessert – McFlurry, in India. It is a soft-dairy ice cream, made from low fat milk, swirled and blended with a choice of flavourful toppings. McFlurry will be launched

with two topping options, Mc Flurry Oro with bits of Oreo cookies blended into the soft serve or McFlurry Choco crunch with liquid chocolate made from imported cocoa and crunchy rice crispies. In the present times, when people are becoming extremely health- conscious, McFlurry promises to be low on fat with only three per cent fat content as against the other fatty desserts offered in India. It will be sold in a large size cup and is priced at approximately ` 69. Avani Jain

Seven years after stopping its sales, PepsiCo India has relaunched the Duke’s range of beverages in Mumbai. Duke’s will now be available in four flavours – Raspberry, Masala Soda, Ginger and Ice Cream Soda - in 200 ml retro style returnable glass bottles for ` 10 and a 500 ml PET bottle for ` 25. Sanjay Mishra, Executive Director-West Market Unit, PepsiCo Beverages, India, said, “We have a strong portfolio of winning brands and we believe, now is the time to identify region-specific opportunities and give them the right kind of focus. Consumers today also want something different, new and exciting. Therefore, we at PepsiCo are excited about bringing this iconic brand back to Mumbai in a cool and retro avatar to offer a piece of nostalgia to both its new and older fans. While Duke’s Masala Soda flavour will add an Indian twist to the carbonated drinks category, other flavours like Raspberry, Ice Cream Soda and Ginger flavours will offer a differentiated refreshment experience to the consumers.” While Duke’s Raspberry is already available in the market, other flavours will be available very soon across stores in

Mumbai and its suburbs. These beverages will be manufactured at the Duke’s facility in Mumbai. Speaking about the investment in new beverages, Mishra said, “We keep improving and investing in our manufacturing facilities including the Duke’s plant in Mumbai. As a company policy, we cannot comment on the investment numbers.” With the addition of this new range of refreshing beverages to its portfolio, PepsiCo is looking forward to further address pockets of opportunity and strengthen its regional presence. Backed by its robust distribution set-up, easy accessibility at the right price and smart belowthe-line support, the company is confident that Duke’s would be back as a household name in Mumbai. On expansion, Mishra said, “Currently, we are launching the brand in Mumbai and based on our learning here, we will take a decision on expansion.” PepsiCo India acquired Duke & Sons from the Pandole family in 1995. For almost the next decade, Duke’s products remained a key constituent of Pepsi’s portfolio in the Western market before it withdrew them in 2004 to focus on national brands.

the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) to mark its foundation. The international theme this year by FAO has been ‘Food prices: From crisis to security’, in view of the recent food inflation, which is a global phenomenon, not restricted to a particular country. FAO has urged food scientists and technologists around the world to develop strategies and solutions in order to achieve stability by means of R&D & more production. Present on the occasion were eminent dignitaries of the food science and technology industry. The chief

guest for the function was Dr Vidyut Naram, Joint Secretary, AFSTI Mumbai Chapter. President Dr Smita Lele, also Head, Department of Food Science & Technology, ICT, in her welcome address acquainted the audience with the annual efforts of AFSTI. AFSTI newsletter, first in a new avatar, was also released. As part of the Prof A Sreenivasan Memorial Lecture, Nitin Kathuria, Head - Edible Oil Buying, Marico, spoke about the realisation of food prices across the globe.

Rakesh Rao

SEMINAR

AFSTI celebrates World Food Day

The unveiling of AFSTI newsletter by distinguished guests

The Mumbai Chapter of Association of Food Scientists and Technologists, India (AFSTI) celebrated World Food Day on October 15, 2011. World Food Day was proclaimed in 1979 by the conference of 16

Modern Food Processing | November 2011

Mahua Roy


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

APPOINTMENT

Sanjay Coutinho is the new CEO of Om Pizzas and Eats Om Pizzas and Eats, the franchisee for Papa John’s Pizza, Chili’s Grill & Bar restaurants and The Great Kabab Factory, has appointed Sanjay Coutinho as the CEO of the company. Coutinho, with more than 20 years experience in the Indian food and retail sector, was until recently the CEO of Barista Coffee. “He has rich experience having been involved with Domino’s Pizza in its initial days and then with Baskin Robbins. He brings with him a keen understanding of the Indian quick service restaurant market as it continues to grow exponentially,” said a company press release. Faisal Jawad, Chairman, Om Pizza & Eats, said, “Coutinho’s coming on board as a CEO is a key appointment as we seek to rapidly scale up Papa John’s Pizza and the Chili’s Grill & Bar restaurants business over the next two years during which we see the restaurant count increasing from 35 today to more than 100 restaurants across tier I and tier III cities in India. ” Coutinho said, “These are exciting times for the business and I am delighted to be on board and about leading the team as we seek to leverage the Papa John’s Pizza ‘Better ingredients better pizza’ and the Chilis Grill & Bar superior product offerings, as we scale up the business across India.” BOOK LAUNCH

Macmillan to release ‘Farm to Fork All About Food’ Macmillan will soon publish a book ‘Farm to Fork All About Food’ written by Praful C Vin, Founder & Partner, Insta Foods. “This is a first-of-its-kind comprehensive book written with a different perspective. It gives insight into the historical, technical, commercial, regulatory and marketing aspects of Praful C Vin the food we consume and the industry behind it,” explained Vin. This book covers all the aspects right from agriculture to regularity issues in the food industry. The price of this book will be around ` 300 and would be on the shelf by December 2011. People associated with food business, and professionals in marketing, technical, etc will immensely benefit from the information and the real-life examples provided. This book will also be of immense benefit to students who are pursuing courses in food technology, nutrition, catering, hospitality etc. Vin is a well-known food technologist with over 45 years of experience in the food industry. He has worked in the US and India with several multinational food companies. He has also worked in various committees of Bureau of Indian Standards and Central Government of India. Prasenjit Chakraborty

November 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

DIVERSIFICATION PLAN

Vadilal Industries launches frozen food products for the domestic market The Ahmedabad-based ice-cream producer, Vadilal Industries Ltd, which produce frozen food varieties for the export purpose, has now decided to cater to the domestic market as well. Driven by the aspirational Indians who are keen to indulge in ready-to-cook (RTC) vegetables and ready-to-eat (RTE) snacks, Vadilal has launched its Garden Fresh and Quick Treat range. The products have been test marketed in Mumbai and the company hopes that the 150 SKUs in the frozen foods category would enable it to bag ` 75 crore of its ` 350 crore turnover by 2014. According to Devanshu Gandhi, Managing Director, Vadilal Industries Ltd, “We started producing frozen food varieties in 1995 but it was mainly for export. Almost 90 per cent of it was exported. Later in 2000, we decided to serve the domestic market. For trial purpose, we started manufacturing green peas and sweet corn for the Indian market, but did not get good response but now the market has evolved.” In the recent years, with the coming of organised retails chains like Reliance Fresh, Spencer’s, Bharti Walmart, etc, frozen food/snacks market in the country

has taken a new flight. “In fact, these retail chains have special sections devoted to the frozen food category. Even consumer mindset has changed. Earlier, people always wanted only fresh vegetables and foods but now due to the growth of nuclear families & working class, people

are showing interest in this category. Now, they enter the shop with the mindset to buy for the entire week and this has also fuelled the growth of frozen food market in India,” noted Gandhi. Vadilal has tied up with retailers like Reliance Fresh, D-Mart, Food Bazaar and Star Bazaar to reach out to consumers.

The category currently generates ` 38 crore business for the company, mostly through exports to the US, Australia and Europe. “Till date, the frozen food market is not fully developed in India and a rising trend can only be seen in the metros and few other places. So, we will be selling these products only in the six metros and 10-15 A class cities of India,” said Gandhi. The product range includes frozen peas, American corn, mixed vegetables, cauliflower, french beans, green garlic, et al, while the fruit basket has custard apple pulp and host of mango varieties. The ready-to-eat snacks include five to six types of parathas, chapatis, Punjabi samosas, cutlets, naan, kulcha etc. Vadilal’s food processing plant at Dharampur, which is near Valsad, will be producing these varieties. Almost ` 50 crore has been invested in this project. Gandhi informed, “The company has roped in 60 farmers in Valsad for contract farming to ensure quality in its supply chain. Plans are afoot to introduce broccoli, lettuce and other exotic vegetables to its product basket.” Avani Jain

BAKERY SEGMENT

Britannia optimistic about cakes segment Britannia Industries Ltd, one of India’s most trusted food brands with a diverse portfolio of products in biscuits, bakery and dairy categories, has added an extra goodie to their packaged cakes, primarily aimed at children. Now with every pack of Britannia cakes, new designs of Colour Crazies freebies with vibrant sand colours will be offered. Anuradha Narasimhan According to the company, this free product was conceptualised to help parents foster an active, healthy imagination in their growing children. According to Anuradha Narasimhan, Category Director – Health and Wellness, Britannia Industries, “The packaged cakes category in India is quite underdeveloped and has a lot of potential.” The marketing communication or the packaged cakes of Britannia promote health, and not indulgence, which is primarily associated with cakes. This way the company has been successful is 18

Modern Food Processing | November 2011

sending out a definitive positioning for its product. “The packaged cakes do not have icing and cream, and thus our message to our audience was credible. We have assured the goodness of egg protein in our cakes,” said Narasimhan. Britannia entered the cake market in 1963 and has been one of the leading players in this category. However, in recent times there have been efforts towards repositioning the product strongly. “The concept of packaged cakes is still nascent in India. We have gone ahead and repositioned this category altogether,” said Narasimhan. Taking the business strategies further, Britannia plans the launch of vegetarian cakes. “With the launch of vegetarian cakes, originally planned for Mumbai and Delhi, we aim at getting the non-user category to get acquainted with Britannia cakes. Besides, we are also positioning it as a gifting option. We are looking forward to turn it into a planned purchase. Additionally, since the individual price point of the product is at ` 5, we are planning to position it as an alternative to confectionery,” she added. Mahua Roy


TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION

Alpha-cyclodextrins as emulsifiers stabilise oil-in-water emulsions WACKER will unveil a novel solution for the food and beverage industry, namely alpha-cyclodextrins as emulsifiers for stabilising oil-inwater emulsions, at Food Ingredients (Fi) Europe to be held in Paris from November 29-December 1, 2011. Oil-in-water emulsions are the order of the day in the food industry. Many food items, such as salad dressings, mayonnaise, dessert creams or margarine contain both water and oil phases, which only form a stable mixture when emulsifiers are added. Conventional emulsifiers include mono- and diglycerides of fatty acids, lecithins (found, for instance, in egg yolk), or proteins. However, animalbased proteins have some critical disadvantages – they are sensitive to heat and acids, do not have a long shelf-life, may contain cholesterol, and are potentially allergenic. A new approach to stabilising oil-in-water emulsions is to use alpha-cyclodextrin. The interior of the doughnut-shaped alpha-cyclodextrin molecule is lipophilic (ie fat loving), while its exterior is hydrophilic (water loving). Fatty acid groups can ‘slip’ into the interior of the alpha-cyclodextrin and form a surfactant structure, suitable as an emulsifier. This permanently stabilises the otherwise incompatible oil/water phase interfaces of the emulsion – even at high processing temperatures. Alpha-cyclodextrin can also adjust the emulsion’s viscosity, and therefore its mouthfeel, as required – from a fluidity similar to ketchup to a firm texture resembling sugar frosting. This makes it unnecessary to use additional hydrocolloids. WACKER produces its alpha-cyclodextrin – a natural degradation product of starch – from renewable raw materials, such as corn or potatoes, using bioengineering techniques.

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Modern Food Processing | November 2011

Isof ill VV-dependable vacuum filling system from Krones A simple way to fill wine, liquor or spirits is to use the filler Isofill VV introduced by Krones. The mechanically controlled filling system uses the principle of gravity – the product to be filled simply flows from the ring bowl into the bottle because of the difference in the height. The design for the filling system is adapted to the properties of the particular product. For example, the cross-sections of the filling valve are accordingly modified for optimum flow behaviour of thin or thick-bodied beverages. Not only this, the fill level is reached at exactly by vacuum correction with product return - in this way not a drop of the valuable beverage is lost. Depending on the product to be filled, the system can fill up to 60,000 bottles per hour. The ring bowl is filled with the product using the bottom filling process. The level of liquid is controlled here by means of probes. The filling process starts when the lift cylinder presses the bottle against the centering bell and the filling valve. The bottle thus raises the filling valve against the force of the external pressure spring to thereby open the feed from the ring container. The return air displaced from the bottle escapes through the vent tube into the ring container. Air from the bottle can no longer escape into the ring bowl once the level of liquid has reached the filling tube. The exact amount of surplus product is returned to the ring bowl by adjusting the vacuum. Only a pressed-on bottle is evacuated (no bottle no vacuum). The suction volume flow is kept to a minimum for gentle product handling. The filling valve closes as the lifting unit lowers the bottle away from the filling valve. Operation of the filling valve is controlled by mechanical means only. Every type of media – ie the product, cold or hot water, or steam – can be fed automatically through the easily accessible valve manifold arranged next to the filler.

Bühler Bindler introduces trendsetting moulding technology Bühler Bindler has created trendsetting developments to take the critical aspect out of product liability. The compact SeedMaster permits the simultaneous seeding of two different masses, eg white and dark chocolate masses. In this way, the type of mass can be replaced in quick succession without contamination. And with the compact SeedMaster shell and filling masses can also be pre-crystallised at the same time in one unit. The new generation of depositors from Bühler Bindler, like the VersiShot, is designed so that the mass hopper and the depositing tools can be completely changed-over – in less than one hour. One can, therefore, be sure that contamination is prevented when a recipe is changed, an aspect that is becoming ever more important in the processing of masses containing nuts. One can electronically simulate processes and test them for feasibility. With a one-shot simulation, for example, the ratio of shell thickness and filling quantity can be balanced out. Technological trends, such as seed precrystallisation, the dew point temperature reduction in the CoolCore process or the backing scrapers that work in opposite directions prevent the backing mass from flowing over the mould edge.


TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

TECHNOLOGY OFFERED As part of our endeavour to spread the technology culture, this section provides a means to promote and facilitate exchange of select technologies. We strive to bring together suppliers of such technologies with suitable users for negotiations and industrial collaboration.

Beverage maker An Indian firm is offering ‘three-in-one’ beverage maker, which is a portable kit that allows the user to simultaneously make three functional beverages as per requirement. Using this, the consumer can set up three different types of fermentation simultaneously at one particular temperature. Areas of application Beverage industry Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Chocolate manufacturing technology An Indian firm provides chocolate manufacturing and snack extrusion technology with machinery. The firm

supplies chocolate machines like chocolate conches, chocolate enrobers with cooling tunnel, one shot chocolate moulding machines, chocolate storage tanks, etc. Areas of application Chocolate manufacturing Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services and equipment supply

Food-paste moulding machine A Thailand-based firm offers a food-paste moulding machine that produces cylindrical-shaped food paste with both ends sealed. This machine enables faster production of food paste with consistent size and hygiene, which increases business potential in bigger markets both locally

and abroad. Areas of application It is useful in food processing industries where the food products of cylindrical shape are required Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Food processing machinery An Indian firm offers all machinery for processing fruits, vegetables, poultry, meat and fish. Manufactured in Europe, the machinery is easy-to-use and makes high quality food products. Areas of application Food processing, agro-based industries Forms of transfer Consultancy, Equipment Supply, Turnkey

TECHNOLOGY REQUESTED Coconut milk beverage An Indian entrepreneur is interested in acquiring the technology for producing & processing coconut milk beverage. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Consultancy

Extruder pilot plant An Indian company is seeking the extruder pilot plant for manufacturing processed cereal-based weaning food. Areas of application Infant food, supplementary food, weaning food

Forms of transfer Others

Food processing equipment An Indian company is seeking technology and equipment for processing of fruits, vegetables and other related products. Area of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Food preservation A Thailand-based food and fruit preserved trading firm is looking for

efficient technology to extend the shelflife and preserve food & fruit. Areas of application Food processing industr y, confectionery industry, pastry industry Forms of transfer Others

Xylitol technology A company based in Thailand is seeking the technology for producing gum by utilising maize waste. Areas of application Food industry Forms of transfer Others

Information courtesy: Dr Krishnan S Raghavan, In-Charge, Technology Transfer Services Group, United Nations - Asian and Pacific Centre for Transfer of Technology (APCTT), APCTT Building , C-2, Qutab Institutional Area, New Delhi 110 016, Tel: 011 - 2696 6509, Fax: 011 - 2685 6274, Email: krishnan@apctt.org, Website: www.apctt.org, For more information on technology offers and requests, please log on to www.technology4sme.net and register with your contact details. This is a free of cost platform provided by APCTT for facilitating interaction between buyers and seekers of technologies across the globe. After submitting technology offer or request to this website, you are requested to wait for at least two weeks for receiving a response from a prospective buyer / seeker through this website, before contacting APCTT for further assistance.

Share Your Technology Propositions

The mission of Modern Food Processing is to spread the technology culture. We offer you an opportunity to participate in this endeavour by publishing the best technology ideas. Technology developers/sellers are invited to furnish the techno-commercial details (with environmental benefits, if any) for publication in the Technology Transfer column of Modern Food Processing. R&D organisations, technical consultancy organisations and individuals assisting small and medium enterprises may send the relevant literature, indicating the scope & services and the areas of specification. Contact: Modern Food Processing, Infomedia 18 Limited, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028.Tel: 022-3024 5000, 3003 4672 O Fax: 022-3003 4499 O Email: spedit@infomedia18.in

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Modern Food Processing | November 2011


IN CONVERSATION WITH Zoher Khorakiwala

“In the bakery business, one has to agree that ‘freshness’ sells” …says Zoher Khorakiwala, Chairman & Managing Director, Monginis Foods Pvt Ltd. Presenting the Indian audience with the concept of ‘eggless’ cakes, Monginis has successfully maintained a loyal customer base. In a tête-à-tête with Mahua Roy, he talks about the innovations and opportunities for the bakery industry in India. For more than 50 years, Monginis has been a front-runner in cake retailing. What has been your success formula? Our main intention and business goal is to offer value-for-money products. This is the key to how we have expanded so far. We are present in most of the major cities in Maharashtra and Gujarat, besides being present in Kolkata and few cities in Odisha. We operate under the franchisee mode of business. This has helped us in better management of the business. Undoubtedly, a local person will have a better idea of the dynamics of customers with regard to taste, preferences, etc. He will know the audience better than us, operating out of our Mumbai Head Office. Also, since we are present in residential areas, the person behind the counter strikes a chord with the customers.

How do you get your product mix right?

Photo: Neha Mithbawkar

Catering to local tastes and preferences is our priority. We strongly believe that the local tastes need to be respected and catered to. Keeping in mind the inclinations of our customers, we introduce new flavours and varieties. Our local franchisees also have the liberty to tweak the product locally so as to serve our customers

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Modern Food Processing | November 2011


Zoher Khorakiwala

with special variants. For eg, in certain areas we formulate our savouries of a spicier flavour. In Kolkata, where the population is known to have a sweet tooth, we ensure our cakes are sweeter. Besides, we also have pricing flexibility to suit a particular geographical location. When we first launched the concept of eggless cakes using imported protein as an egg substitute, we never expected that this will account for such a large proportion of sales. In our outlets in Gujarat, majority of sales are attributed to the vegetarian variants. About 90 per cent of the products stocked at our Surat outlet are vegetarian. However, hardly 10 per cent products stocked at our Kolkata outlet are eggless! Thus, depending on the need of the hour, we customise our product basket.

What is your mantra for maintaining brand loyalty? Availability and visibility are the most important criteria to ensure success in the retail format. And to sustain this success, emphasis has to be laid on quality. We are present in major cities at strategic locations, in the main markets, stations, etc. Choosing an area where people converge, like a grocery or medical store, in a residential area, is the most apt location to set shop, and be assured of a high footfall. Customers buy savouries, breads and baked products such as cookies more frequently if the outlets are located closer to their homes. New stores help increase frequency of consumption.

Cakes & pastries are perishable products. How do you ensure the freshness of these products? The backbone of any business is logistics. We receive orders from our retail shops in the night, a day in advance. The popular products are manufactured in anticipation anyway. The owner of the outlet has a fairly good idea about the customer dynamics and sales of particular bakery items. The production process is carried out through the night. The shops are supplied with the goods through company vans, by early morning. All our vans are insulated and carry insulated shippers. Some of the vans are refrigerated, which ply on the

UP CLOSE & PERSONAL Favourite motivational movie: 3 idiots. It taught me how unconventional thoughts and out-ofthe-box thinking can spell success. What inspires you: The smile on a child’s face when he/she looks at his/ her birthday cake at the Monginis counter and exclaims a wow! Favourite Monginis Dutch chocolate.

flavour:

long routes. We have a set of standardised guidelines for logistics handling. The staff is well-trained on these aspects and these guidelines are strictly followed. We also conduct surprise audits, just to ensure that the quality of the supply chain is maintained. In the bakery business, one has to agree that ‘freshness’ sells. We make efforts to maintain this freshness by taking proper care during transportation and even during storage & display of products in the shops. Our fresh cream cakes and pastries need to be maintained at a temperature between 0º C – 4º C, otherwise these products become sour. Monginis has been in business for more than 30 years and growing by leaps & bounds. This growth can be attributed to the ‘consistent quality’ it is delivering to its loyal patrons.

How do you keep track of changing demands of customers? Cakes, unlike chocolates, today fall in the category of a planned purchase. Due to the changing habits of consumers, globalisation & westernisation, as well as media-savvy generation, people symbolise cakes with happy occasions. This situation is not different even in tier II and tier III cities. Keeping this in mind, our innovative launches like ‘Inspiration’ range, 3D cakes are for those who wish to upgrade their consumption trend of cakes, but wish to stick with brand Monginis.

Health-consciousness is growing among consumers. How are bakery manufacturers gearing up for this? India is the diabetic capital of the world. But the population here favours indulgent food and sweet savouries. There lies a huge opportunity to cater to this section of society, which is looking for ‘healthy indulgence’. We have decided to expand our offerings on the health platform in a big way. We had earlier launched cookies for catering to the diabetic audience. And very soon we plan to launch diabeticfriendly pastry.

What is your future course of action? The target audience of Monginis is the middle-class. But we have been seeing a huge demand for aspirational products from this audience, who want ‘something different’. As a result, we have now gone up the value chain. Thus, we launched the ‘Inspiration’ range of cakes, at a slightly higher price. This way we have been successful in presenting our products in an exclusive look to our customers. Here lies an opportunity for us to achieve 20-25 per cent of our sales in terms of numbers. Monginis currently has around 500 outlets in India and the growth in terms of value has been around 15-22 per cent. In line with our future plans, we plan to have 1,000 cake shops in the country and be present in 40 cities nationally, in five years. Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

November 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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An invite that rewards as well...

Dear Reader, ‘Modern Food Processing’ solicits original, well-written, application-oriented, unpublished articles that reflect your valuable experience and expertise in the food processing industry. You can send us Technical Articles, Case Studies and Product Write-ups. The length of the article should not exceed 3000 words, while that of a product write-up should not exceed 200 words. The articles should preferably reach us in soft copy (either E-mail or a CD). The text should be in MS Word format and images in 300 DPI resolution & JPG format. The final decision regarding the selection and publication of the articles shall rest solely with ‘Modern Food Processing’. Authors whose articles are published will receive a complimentary copy of that particular issue and an honorarium cheque. Published by Infomedia 18 Limited , ‘Modern Food Processing’ is the leading monthly magazine exclusively meant for producers and user fraternities of the food processing industry. Well supported by a national readership of over 80,000 and our strong network of 26 branch offices across India, this magazine reaches out to key decision makers among the Indian manufacturers of food processing products, machinery and allied sectors. Brought out in association with Hong Kong-based Ringier Trade Publishing Ltd (one of the world’s largest trade publishing houses with more than 200 special interest titles and offices in every major country), it ensures that advertisers are able to promote their products and services across the globe at no extra cost. So get going and rush your articles, write-ups, etc… Thanking you, Yours sincerely,

Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

Manas Bastia Senior Editor

Infomedia 18 Limited ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W) Mumbai 400 028 India

T +91 22 3024 5000 D +91 22 3003 4669 F +91 22 3003 4499 W www.infomedia18.in E manas@infomedia18.in


SPECIAL FOCUS

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES IMFL INDUSTRY Made-in-India brands flying ‘high’ ........................................ 28 WINE RETAILING Uncorking new opportunities ................................................ 30 ROUNDTABLE Will Maharashtra Government’s move to raise legal drinking age hamper liquor business? ........................... 36

November 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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SPECIAL FOCUS IMFL industry

Mahua Roy

D

elighted to find your favourite ‘Made-inIndia’ butter at the local supermarket in the US? Smiled at finding your much-loved mango pickle on the shelf at a UK store? We Indians are quite attached to, and proud of the ‘Made-in-India’ scripture mentioned on a product. A global, aspirational touch is what turns around and revolutionises a product in today’s world of consumerism. Why should the IMFL industry stay behind in this race to achieve favouritism? In the financial year 200809, the industry grew at 12-15 per cent, of which value growth was 8-10 per cent and volume growth was 3-5 per cent, according to the Confederation of Indian Alcoholic Beverage Companies (CIABC). In the past decade, the Indian alcoholic beverages industry has evolved significantly. For instance, it has changed from being a sellers market to a buyers market. The Indian consumer earlier was targeted as a part of one large demographic island. Today, however, marketers have realised the dynamics of various consumer groups and have thereby devised strategies. “Brand proliferation and awareness brought about by the media, in turn complemented by easy access to wide variety of brands, have cumulatively affected the buying

Getting the strategic cocktail right by equally blending packaging, quality and awareness can enable the Indian-made Foreign Liquor (IMFL) industry achieve a greater ‘high’.

Illustration: Chaitanya Dinesh Surpur

behaviour of consumers, who are now clearly seeking value over price,” says

Segmentation of the IMFL industry (236 million cases - 2009)

60%

17% 15%

Whiskey

Brandy

Rum

8%

Others like gin, vodka, etc Source: HDFC Securities

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Modern Food Processing | November 2011

Nikhil Agarwal, Director & Sommelier, All Things Nice, who is an industry expert having a deep understanding of the wine and spirits industry globally.

Power-packed! For the IMFL industry to rise to global standards, the first step would be to upgrade packaging. “Adopting an international style of packaging will undoubtedly lead to a glamourised product. Aesthetics play an important role in determining the face value of a product,” says Vinay Mohan, Director, Mohan Meakin, which is the maker of the iconic Old Monk rum. Packaging helps in brand differentiation and also


IMFL industry

creates a brand identity. Due to the highvolume nature of the alcoholic beverage industry, the packaging must attract the consumers’ and be able to sell the brand. A gradual but noticeable shift is being witnessed in the use of the packaging material for alcoholic beverages. The non-alcoholic beverages industry has quite rapidly encouraged and embraced alternative packaging methods like tin and PET. The alcoholic beverages industry too is poised for the same. As per a research by the Freedonia Group, in terms of total units, PET has surpassed glass and now holds a 56 per cent share in the packaging of distilled liquor. This figure is expected to rise to 69 per cent by 2017. This represents a remarkable progress for a material that constituted only 23 per cent of the liquor market in 1997. “Glass represents class. However, keeping in mind sustainability aspects as well as cost savings, shifting to PET seems a viable option. The institutional buyers, like the defence, is totally in favour of the PET variant considering that it is light in weight, unbreakable, and involves easier logistics, besides the low-cost factor,” adds Mohan.

Maintaining quality The aesthetics and outer appearance, without doubt, influence the first purchase. But repurchases and brand loyalty can be ensured only if a certain level of quality is associated with the product. “The IMFL is in no way inferior to the global liquor brands, when it comes to access to technology. The liberal trade policies of the government have allowed

Visibility is the key to succeed in this industry. However, as the direct communication platform to audience is missing in the industry, innovative marketing and promotional strategies need to be adopted to strike a chord with the consumers. Vinay Mohan

Director, Mohan Meakin

advanced technology upgradations to be incorporated by renowned distilleries and breweries in the country,” states Mohan. From distillation to bottling, the IMFL industry maintains the highest level of quality to offer the best products to the 485 million people in the drinking age group. Another 150 million are likely to be added to this target population in the next five years. India is the thirdlargest market for alcoholic beverages in the world. There is a large untapped market for low-priced brands. According to a report by the International Wine & Spirit Research, filed in 2010, the market for liquor in India is forecast to grow to become the second-largest in the world by 2013, after China, pushing Russia to the third spot. With liquor consumption indexed to the country’s growth, a higher purchasing power boosted the market 16.1 per cent to 234.4 million cases in 2010. Today, there are 233 distilleries and 75 breweries in India. This shows the tremendous growth and acceptance of IMFL brands in India. Also, India is seeing an increasing trend of white spirits being adopted over brown spirits. Though key brands in the white spirits segment have been growing at a healthy rate of 20-30 per cent, their total size is small, compared to the overall liquor market. These statistics give a clear picture of the existing market. This audience is educated, globalised and quality-conscious. Presenting them with the superlative quality of IMFL will enrich the brand acceptance. After all, brands are not built by advertising or marketing promotions, but by the brand experience.

Awareness building One needs to understand that consumerism is quite prevalent in the emerging middle-class population of the country. Brand equity is seen when customers show preference for one particular product over another, when they are basically identical. The extent to which customers are willing to pay more for a particular brand is a measure of brand equity. “People today drink ‘brands’

People today drink ‘brands’ and not alcohol. Such is the loyalty, which spells good news for the marketer. It is, thus, strategically important for a company to establish its brand well, in spite of advertisement banning. Nikhil Agarwal

Director & Sommelier, All Things Nice

and not alcohol. Such is the loyalty, which spells good news for the marketer. It is, thus, strategically important for a company to establish its brand well, in spite of advertisement banning,” explains Agarwal. From conducting and sponsoring DJ nights to owning an entire cricket team, the liquor companies in India are experimenting with all possible initiatives to connect with their consumer. The government has also partially lifted the ban on surrogate advertisements like those of brand extensions to unrelated products like pure water, soda, apple juice and music CDs. The consumer dynamics and psyche is the same, be it an FMCG or alcoholic beverages industry. As seen in the highly competitive FMCG industry, the consumer today is demanding more information on products, and in the absence of a communication platform, the industry faces a major handicap. “Visibility is the key to succeed in this industry. However, as the direct communication platform to audience is missing in the industry, innovative marketing and promotional strategies need to be adopted to strike a chord with the consumers,” says Mohan. Marketers today need to relook at the industry with a different angle and break away from the traditional price-value proposition of pitching their product. Once value and quality is committed & delivered, the consumer will happily pay the right price; this will in turn considerably enhance profitability as well. IMFL companies that think global but still connect with their consumers at the local level will succeed. Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

November 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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SPECIAL FOCUS Wine retailing

Due to the advent of wine retailing through modern retail channels, thanks to liberal government policies, the wine industry has a lot to raise a toast to. Mahua Roy

N

ot long ago, the quintessential ‘wine shops’ in the country ironically, stored all spirits but wine! And the wine, which was stocked, was kept under nonideal conditions. There was a total lack of promotional activities to acquaint the consumers with this classic beverage. However, now with government policies permitting sale of wine through the emerging modern retail outlet (MRO), a complementary and synergistic relationship has been developed between the wine industry and retail chains. Strategies to boost the consumption of wine have taken innovative routes and once again, in this

category too, the consumer is spoilt for choice.

Sparkling era for wine Availability of wine on the shelves of modern retail stores increases its visibility and customer contact. This naturally adds up to better sales. Besides, ideal airconditioned storage ambience also ensures that the quality of wine remains intact. “Modern retail is not just about stocking and displaying products on the shelf. We ensure that a particular wine launch happens in such a way that the consumer notices, understands the product, and knows how to consume it. Modern retail also takes wine retailing a step further, by offering a 360º brand experience,”

says Mohit Khattar, Managing Director, Godrej Nature’s Basket. India is seeing a dramatic shift in numbers, when it comes to people consuming wine. “The media-driven generation of today understands the benefits of wine. It is no more viewed as a sophisticated drink, and is being embraced by a growing number of individuals. This is also complemented by the food revolution, which the country is witnessing. As a result of globalisation, international cuisine is being well accepted by Indians and so is the inclination towards wine,” elaborates Nikhil Agarwal, Director & Sommelier, All Things Nice. Industry experts note that at a conservative estimate, 25 per cent of the wine market in India will be through sales in the supermarkets, translating to 7,50,000 cases (one case consists of 12 bottles). This is a lucrative addition to the revenues for the emerging category of modern multi-brand food retail, even at this nascent stage.

Highly spirited efforts

Photo: Joshua Navalkar

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Modern Food Processing | November 2011

To suit the modern retail environment, the wine industry is customising products. The most evident and visible change is seen in the packaging of wine. Eyecatching, international style of design is positioning wine as a premium product, but pricing is affordable to allow expansion of target audience. According to Agarwal, “Packaging the wine in an exceptionally


Wine retailing

NOTHING TO ‘WHINE’ ABOUT! The forecasts of a recent International Wine & Spirit Research (IWSR) study indicates a growth of 100.44 per cent in the consumption of imported wine between 2009 and 2013, reaching more than 5 million bottles by the end of the period. Consumption of Indian wine, which grew by a massive 502.38 per cent between 2004 and 2008, is expected to continue to increase by 84.12 per cent between 2009 and 2013. The red wine proportion is set to increase by 112.66 per cent by 2013, accounting for more than three quarters of all the wine consumed in the country. Between 2009 and 2013, consumption of white and rose wines will also grow, though to a lesser degree, by 53.23 per cent and 30.77 per cent, respectively.

international, global style will ensure the first sale of wine. The second is guaranteed when the product stands by the quality and taste promise it has committed to. The relationship thus established will be sustained as a result of innovative promotions and branding efforts taken by wine producers and modern retail chains in tandem.” The wine industry is expanding its product basket increasingly. A lot of efforts are put into the understanding of the

Modern retail is not just about stocking and displaying products on the shelf. We ensure that a particular wine launch happens in such a way that the consumer notices, understands the product, and knows how to consume it. Modern retail also takes wine retailing a step further, by offering a 360º brand experience. Mohit Khattar

Managing Director, Godrej Nature’s Basket

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choices and preferences of the consumers, which was not so extensively done by the wine industry in India earlier. “Looking at the potential and strength of MRO, the wine industry is coming up with many varieties and offerings. They are also investing more on customer interface, taking advantage of an MRO environment. Quite a few Indian wine manufacturers have also started to stock selected imported wines to complement the whole offering,” says Ponnu Subramanian, Sr Vice President – Buying & Merchandising (Foods) & SCM, Spar India. At Spar Hypermarkets, wine sampling sessions are carried out, wherever it is legally allowed. A grand annual event ‘SPAR Wine Festival’ is held in December. To keep the excitement quotient up, this chain also extends grape stomping opportunities to the customers. Besides, ‘Savour France - French Wine & Cheese Festival’, has been held for past two years consecutively, in association with a French trade body. “Altogether, this makes wine shopping a pleasurable and easy engagement for customers,” says Subramanian enthusiastically. On a similar note, All Things Nice and Godrej Nature’s Basket came together to promote consumer awareness on wine through an informal and educational wine appreciation programme ‘to enable the consumer to discover the connoisseur in them’. Agarwal helped the attendees use ‘Le Nez Du Vin’ aroma kits to understand the different aromas. He also assisted in the understanding of appropriate wine and cheese pairing exercise. Besides such occasional events, modern retail chains ensure that their staff is well acquainted to equip the consumer with the right wine, once the consumer understands what he is looking for. “Our aim is to stock the finest varieties of wine, both Indian and international. Also, we stock wine not just for the sake of stocking, but in line with tastes and demands of our customers. Our staff is well educated and understands wine so that he can go ahead a step further and assist the customer with food pairing as well,” says Khattar.

Modern Food Processing | November 2011

Looking at the potential and strength of MRO, the wine industry is coming up with many varieties and offerings. They are also investing more on customer interface, taking advantage of an MRO environment. Quite a few Indian wine manufacturers have also started to stock selected imported wines to complement the whole offering. Ponnu Subramanian

Sr VP – Buying & Merchandising (Foods) & SCM, Spar India

A toast to the future! The wine industry is targeting the globalised, well-travelled and educated consumers. Modern retail chains are best suited to reach out to this group. “Wine is a relatively new category in India, but the growth rate is tremendous. Excellent storage conditions, wide range, international & differentiated packaging and the ability to interact, understand requirements, and make suggestions to the consumers, are making this channel an ideal choice for the wine industry,” feels Khattar. As a result, many Indian and international players are eyeing the market and announcing new wine launches. “MRO will give a whole new dimension to the ‘touch, feel, browse’ experience to the customers. This is not possible in the traditional retailing. Especially in the case of wine, where the consumer requires sufficient browsing, label reading, etc, before choosing their wine, an MRO environment becomes beneficial. Secondly, since the whole range is displayed with subgrouping, the customers can compare various wines before selection,” says Subramanian. MRO chains have a lot to say about the changes they are witnessing. “There was a time when consumers asked for red wine. Today, they go to specifics and ask for a Chiraz or a Merlot. This is definitely a good sign,” summarises Khattar. Thus, just like wine, the Indian consumer is maturing as well. Cheers! Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in


SPECIAL FOCUS Roundtable

Will Maharashtra Government’s move to raise legal drinking age hamper liquor business? Raising the ‘drinking age’ bar to 25 in Maharashtra has evoked mixed responses from the industry. Mahua Roy takes stock of the sentiment this new law has stirred among the stakeholders.

Yash Jaiswal, Owner, Rainforest Restobar Chain

Siddharth Poojari, Director & Founder - Sukh Sagar Hotels, & Owner - Zaffran, City Bar

Rahul Joshi, Manager – F&B, InterContinental, Marine Drive

Harish Bijoor, Brand-expert & CEO, Harish Bijoor Consults Inc

This move of the government has been aimed at curbing the growing incidences of drunken driving. In my opinion, it is a harsh way of dealing with the situation. There is no data to back the government’s claim, which implies that drunken driving is attributed only to the youth in the age group between 21 and 25. A youngster who wishes to drink will do it anyway. This move will pave way for the black and grey market, thus inducing corruption. It has also led to an evident spurt in the growth of sports bars, which primarily serve beer. Also, the sports bar culture gels well with the youth who are now experimenting with social platforms apart from the regular coffee shops.

A very paradoxical situation has been put before the youth of Maharashtra. On one side, we encourage ‘responsible citizens’ to vote at the age of 18 years, and then what is the rationale behind the restriction of drinking age to 25? According to me, it is an impractical decision. As a result of this new regulation enforcement, our business has been affected to a certain extent, undoubtedly. Some of our restaurants cater to the young, working population who come to enjoy a drink after work, or to just unwind. Thus, at the end of the day it is a loss, which we are facing. However, to maintain our customer loyalty, we have not brought about significant changes in our pricing strategies.

This new law passed by the Maharashtra Government has a lot of credible history to it. Fatal, life threatening accidents, irresponsible actions; most of these have been attributed to drunken driving, primarily by youth. When it comes to the impact of this new legislation on 5-star establishments, there is not much visible effect. The primary clientele at a 5-star hotel is above the 25-year age bracket. With regard to the demographics of the patrons visiting us, about 20 per cent is below the age of 30, and most of them consume alcohol. It can be concluded logically that as a result of this new rule, beer and wine consumption has increased fairly, however it is not a noticeable rise.

I do believe that this latest move by the Government of Maharashtra is totally impractical. In fact, the drinking age-groups in big cities are nudging downwards rather than upwards. While under-age drinking is not appropriate, it is important to ensure that by upping the age limit, the craving for alcoholic drinks is not further accentuated. The government needs to focus its energies on striking hard on under-age drinking. The median age of this country is 25. About 54 per cent of the population is below the age of 25. The government needs to act harshly on youngsters in the age group of 14-17 who are getting into the alcohol market. That, in my opinion, is right and responsible governance.

EDITORIAL TAKE The lounge bar, eat-out category of hospitality witnesses huge patronage from the youth. With another curb on the already heavily taxed hospitality industry, this new law is not quite seen as a welcome move by many. The 5-star establishments have different business dynamics and are aimed at the affluent, mostly above the age of 25. As a result, this category has not been affected by this new norm.

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Modern Food Processing | November 2011


FACILITY VISIT Buhler India Pvt Ltd

MILLING ‘HEALTHIER’ GRAINS THROUGH TQM

Very few brands have been able to achieve the monopoly in a competitive segment, so much so, that they have turned into household names. Buhler India took sortexed rice to the general, everyday consumer who today associates it with trust and superiority. Mahua Roy

G

Not just sorting, it’s sortex-ing! Safety, health and quality are the three product attributes based on which the food industry is launching and marketing products. In sync with these aspirations, Buhler India has become the perfect partner. Creating a revolution in optical sorting and committing the three features successfully, SORTEX Z+ colour sorter determines the purity of input product with exceptional accuracy and that too, within a split second. On the basis of colour, shape, optical properties, defective items and foreign materials are identified

Courtesy: Buhler India

o through the fine print on the packaging of your rice and look for the word sortexed, chances are this rice has been processed in one of the 1,500 sortex installations in India. And aiding the rice producers in the sortexing arena is Buhler India Pvt Ltd. Occupying 7,000 sq m of production area at Attibele near Bengaluru, its manufacturing facility boasts of rice milling machines along with the control systems, aspiration equipment and accessories. It is also engaged in the production of cleaning section equipment, milling section machines, control systems and aspiration equipment required by the flour milling industry. The facility also caters to the requirements of countries in South Asia such as Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Nepal and extended territory such as Middle East & South Africa.

The company recently inaugurated a state-of-the-art coffee centre at this facility. The core unit of the lab is a RoastMaster20 coffee roaster with pneumatic feeding, destoning and discharging. Moreover, the lab is equipped with grinding, cup tasting facilities and an analytical section. It forms an ideal set-up for customer trials and R&D.

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Modern Food Processing | November 2011

and separated from the product stream. It can accurately sort a wide range of commodities. Buhler has E series of Sortex machine for wet products such as fruits and vegetables. “We have won the prestigious Queen’s Award for Industry and Export on several occasions. In 2004, we won the UK National Business Award, and thus, feel justified in claiming our position as the leading global supplier of optical sorting equipment,” says a proud Dipak Mane, President – Region South Asia, Buhler India. The professional relationship between Buhler and its customers is not restricted or limited to buying and selling of equipment. The experts at Buhler India help the customers choose, take elaborate trials, impart exhaustive training sessions and only then make the delivery to the convinced customer. Most Indians cannot imagine a daily diet without rice. Thus, this product has been the most ideal launch for


Buhler India Pvt Ltd

Buhler India. Although rice sorting is predominantly an agricultural activity, Buhler India has identified the immense scope of industrialisation in this field. In the Indian industrialised rice processing market, Buhler is a leading player with 25 per cent marketshare. In the field of rice milling machines, the company provides complete plant and equipment, having capacity of more than 3 tonne per hour (TPH) and above. It is also the supplier of the world’s largest rice processing plant, which is located in India. “At Buhler Sortex, we pride ourselves on the immense range of commodities for which we have supplied optical sorting solutions. No other supplier is able to offer this breadth of expertise. Besides core commodities such as rice, coffee, peanuts, wheat, beans, pulses and seeds, we also offer sorting solutions for other grains, snack foods, confectionery, breakfast cereals and even plastics,” adds Mane.

Towards a healthier India The roller flour mills are meeting the increased demand for hygienic and top quality flour from bakery, biscuit & cookie manufacturers. Buhler India enjoys a marketshare of about 65 per cent in the roller flour milling industry. With larger projects by the food industry in the pipeline, this technology is all set to experience a surge. Also, keeping in mind the ‘healthier’ grains popularised in recent times, like maize, oats, millets and barley, the engineers help in providing complete plant & equipment, including

engineering and commissioning services. “We recently launched top class roller grinding equipment of stainless steel construction ANTARIS for the flour milling industry, thus setting a new benchmark in the industry for hygiene and sanitation,” says Mane.

Total quality management Such commendable figures could be achieved due to the highly efficient practices followed at Buhler India. To succeed in a market like India, which is still an emerging economy, technology, price, delivery and performance standards are critical factors that determine whether food processing equipment can be sold in the Indian market. Aftersales service is also a key concern for Indian buyers. In response to this, Mane elaborates, “We are working towards the establishment of Just-In-Time ( JIT) manufacturing with lean production system. This production control system has been established based on many years of continuous improvements, with the objective of delivering the order placed by customers in the quickest and most efficient way. We follow the principles of Total Quality Management (TQM), which is an integrative philosophy of management, for continuously improving the quality of products and processes along with modern supply chain concepts to reduce inventory.” TQM functions on the premise that the quality of products and processes is the responsibility of everyone involved with the creation or consumption of the products or services offered by an organisation. In other words, TQM capitalises on the involvement of management, workforce, suppliers and even customers, in order to meet or exceed customer expectations. Courtesy: Buhler India

The RoastMaster 20 coffee roaster

Productivity enhancement “With regards to productivity enhancement programme, we have introduced the

We follow the principles of Total Quality Management (TQM), which is an integrative philosophy of management, for continuously improving the quality of products and processes along with modern supply chain concepts to reduce inventory. Dipak Mane

President – Region South Asia

‘One piece flow’ principle to reduce the lead times, which in turn increases the throughput of the plant,” explains Mane. One piece flow means production of the product moves from one stage to the next stage one piece at a time. One piece manufacturing also lets the producer stop the line quicker when a defect occurs. “As soon as the defect occurs, the workforce can stop production and fix the problem. The defect only occurs to that current unit. The next units are not affected by the defect because the manufacturer fixes the problem immediately. This leads to immense cost savings,” he adds.

An as’sort’ment of dynamic plans! “At present, we have a production facility of 7,000 sq m; we are doubling our production capacity to 13,000 sq m by 2012 and further expansion of 2,000 sq metre by 2015. This expansion in production is in line with our growth targets planned for the South Asian market for the next three to four years,” says Mane. Incessant innovations and provisions of upgrades/ add-ons to its products, especially those required for capacity expansions have been a key element in the Indian food processing industry, which is undergoing huge transformations. ‘India is primarily an agrarian economy’; Buhler has converted this textbook-line into strategic business plans. Tapping this potential favourably can make India a preferred sourcing destination for food products globally. Buhler India is equipping this vision. Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

November 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK

FOOD PACKAGING ECOďšşFRIENDLY PACKAGING Riding on the green wave .............................42 TIN PACKAGING Aligning design with quality .........................46 CONVEYOR SYSTEMS Upping the bottling line efficiency ...............52 RFID SOLUTIONS Food inventory tracking made easy ..............54

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Eco-friendly packaging

Riding on the

GREEN

wave

Unless widespread awareness on the benefits of ecofriendly packaging becomes the norm, the concept will be difficult to catch up in India. Eco-friendly packaging needs volume to sustain as it is expensive. Absence of clear-cut regulations has further compounded the problem.

Prasenjit Chakraborty

W

ith increased consumption of processed food, the demand for packaging has also grown manifold. Today, for processed food manufacturers, packaging is as important as their products (food). Since eco-friendliness has become a buzzword and many products, processes are going the eco-friendly way, it is imperative to look for ways and means in which packaging can become eco-friendly. Across the world, corporations have started making efforts towards finding ecofriendly solutions for packaging. “In this era of enhanced environmental awareness, eco-friendly packaging is a suitable way for brands to emotionally connect with the customer and build goodwill. It is a good means to communicate that the brand believes in responsible behaviour towards the environment and has its heart in the right place,” says Vimal Kedia, Managing Director, Manjushree Technopack Ltd. In fact, the more a society develops the better and refined its packaging 42

becomes, thus truly reflecting the progress its economy has made. It is, therefore, essential that the growth in packaging is balanced with the impact it makes on the eco-system around it, which is primarily the affect it has on its environment. “Contemporary consumer packaging is largely dominated by plastics followed by paper. Both these materials have a profound impact on the environment, while the former bring in challenges of its effective disposal & waste management, and the latter on deforestation & recyclability to conserve this scarce resource,” points out Skand Vikram Singh, Vice President Business Development & Marketing, Kris Flexipacks Pvt Ltd.

Progress of eco-friendly packaging in India Food wastage is colossal in India, which can be reduced by using proper packaging solutions. Moreover, the consumption of processed food is increasing in India. In view of this, it is prudent to take steps to promote eco-friendly packaging from the beginning. “Eco-friendly packaging as understood in the modern context is a nascent concept in India. However, if we were to look at traditional concept, then

Modern Food Processing | November 2011

even today in hinterland and numerous towns, we can see earthen utensils and pots in use for local processed foods. These traditional packages and earthen cups are fast disappearing with the onslaught of the more modern and colourful packaging based on plastics, foil and paper materials,” points out Singh. However, there are several issues resulting from the use of these modern packaging formats, and India is still in the stage of transiting to higher per capita consumption of packaging materials; the reason being general awareness of ecofriendly packaging is not matured. Echoing a similar sentiment, Kedia says, “India has not made any significant progress with eco-friendly packaging, primarily because there is no governing

A REALITY CHECK R The concept of eco-friendly packaging is at a nascent stage in India R Mass awareness is the cornerstone R Only volume can give a direction to the initiative R It is time to have a regulatory body R An attempt can be made to start with non-food packaging


Eco-friendly packaging

body to regulate production and encourage the use of eco-friendly packaging. Though the FMCG industry has shown keen interest in packing products in ecofriendly materials, ie packages that are biodegradable, it is still only at a dialogue level for some time now.” Today, the market has been increasingly witnessing carry bags and trash bags made of 100 per cent recycled plastics, which is a good move. However, there is little in terms of actual product packaging. “Unless a large population of the country is made aware of the need for green packaging, we will not see a big change in demand. And without such demand, investments and R&D efforts will be hard to come by,” points out Kedia.

Impediments on the way Cost is a serious issue for the promotion of eco-friendly packaging in India. It is indeed a barrier as the Indian market is price-sensitive. According to Kedia, it is like the chicken or egg scenario at play here. He says, “On one hand, the market is price-sensitive and on the other, for prices to come down there has to be volumes.” There have been significant developments in the area of recycled and biodegradable plastics, which command a slight premium over virgin plastics, as the technology and know-how is expensive. Here comes the role of awareness. Today, consumers in developed countries demand eco-friendly packaging from the retailers or FMCG companies. The scenario is quite contrary with respect to India. The lack of awareness is another stumbling

In this era of enhanced environmental awareness, eco-friendly packaging is a suitable way for brands to emotionally connect with the customer and build goodwill. It is a good means to communicate that the brand believes in responsible behaviour towards the environment and has its heart in the right place. Vimal Kedia Managing Director, Manjushree Technopack Ltd

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block in popularising/promoting ecofriendly packaging in India. Most of the people understand ecofriendly packaging as one of the formats of bio-degradable packaging. “If this is the case, then there are limited technology options available, which are viable and sustainable. Currently, all plastic packaging biodegradable solutions are actually compostable, which means that we cannot simply use and throw the packages as we have been doing now,” explains Singh. Again compostable packaging demands controlled conditions for the bio-degradable process to start and complete, which would eventually mean having a good waste management solution and the collective will power to make it succeed through public-private partnerships. Further, it is a fact that the current bio-degradable plastic packaging solutions are beyond the reach of common usage. Besides, there is a larger ethical question associated with it. “It is one of conscientiously reviewing the origin of bio-degradable plastics, which is from food source, when half the world is suffering as a result of hunger and malnutrition. In a country like ours, we need to look at alternatives of eco-friendly plastic packaging, which is not food-based and also not waterintensive,” exhorts Singh.

Initiatives taken Anticipating future demand for ecofriendly packaging, reputed companies in India are taking effective steps in this direction. For instance, Kris Flexipacks has introduced PETG Shrink Sleeves over the last two years to replace PVC-based ones. This is an endeavour along with the customers to have more eco-friendly label options. It is also developing several specialty films, which could replace rigid with flexi packs as well as down gauge laminates including mono-film structures for both bulk and processed foods. Similarly, Manjushree’s vision 2020 is to create earth-friendly and sustainable packaging solutions. Working backwards, it has kept aside a certain amount of its budget at the beginning of this financial year towards research and development on recycled PET and bio-degradable

Modern Food Processing | November 2011

Eco-friendly packaging as understood in the modern context is a nascent concept in India. However, if we were to look at traditional concept, then even today in hinterland and numerous towns, we can see earthen utensils and pots in use for local processed foods. Skand Vikram Singh

VP - Business Development & Marketing, Kris Flexipacks Pvt Ltd

additives. “We are in active dialogue with a UK-based company that makes biodegradable additives which, when mixed in a percentage with regular PET resins, will produce bottles that bio-degrade/ decompose in four to five years, subject to sunlight and oxygen,” reveals Kedia.

Taking the right direction A closer look tells that the packaging industry is little confused in the absence of any clear-cut guidelines. According to Kedia, the industry (and representatives) should work along with the government to form a regulatory body, which will govern rules and regulations with regard to promoting ecofriendly packaging. He suggests, “To start off with, it could be made mandatory to use eco-friendly packaging at least for all nonfood applications like motor oil lubricants, chemicals, etc.” This approach could encourage and even germinate into using eco-friendly packaging for food applications too. Singh emphasises on the practice of using lesser plastics per gram on packaged product. “The process has to develop through better solutions where multi-layer structures could start to move towards mono-layer structures or at least have lesser layers with progress of technology,” he opines. Finally, it is consumer demand, which is the only effective means of ensuring that marketers offer eco-friendly packaging. Legislation or regulatory body could only facilitate the entire process. So far, the demand for eco-friendly packaging from end- consumers in India is virtually non-existent. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@infomedia18.in


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Tin packaging

Aligning

DESIGN with QUALITY

India is way behind in terms of per capita consumption of tin packaging when compared with that of the developed world. In the recent past, beverage can segment registered a healthy growth in the country. It is imperative to encourage cannery for reducing wastage of food and giving a boost to tin packaging.

Photo: Dileep Prakash

Prasenjit Chakraborty

T

he tin packaging market worldwide is making rapid strides because of its shelf appeal, design aspects, durability, eco-friendliness, handling and distribution ease, etc. Recently, Visiongain, the UK-based company has come out with a comprehensive report (2011-2021) on packaging market. According to the report, in 2011 the global expenditure on tin packaging is estimated at $ 31.79 billion, a figure that is expected to rise considerably as demand continues to grow in emerging markets. Having achieved a solid base in the developed markets, where consumption 46

of tin packaged products is high, packaging companies are now gaining a foothold in the lucrative emerging markets. Enhancements in consumer living standards and preferences, coupled with impulse purchases & convenience, have been the key factors propelling market expansion. The tin packaging market has been buoyed by the trend for ready-to-eat and economical food, with tin packaging manufacturers quick to meet increasingly sophisticated demands from the consumer. Increasingly, tin packaging market leaders are producing a plethora of products to meet these growing demands, such as single-serve, aesthetically pleasing, and convenient, re-sealable & sustainable packaging.

Modern Food Processing | November 2011

The US has been at the forefront in the area of tin packaging for over a decade. The report identifies Asia-Pacific, Eastern Europe and South America as key regional markets to look out for – owing to the robust growth path of their economies, which is stimulating domestic demand for packaged products. Throwing light on beverage can market in India, Graham Chipchase, Chief Executive, Rexam PLC, says, “We were first in India to set up our joint venture with Hindustan Tin Works in 2006 and have good knowledge of this exciting market. The investment is consistent with our emerging market strategy. The country has enjoyed considerable growth over the last decade, with rising incomes and a young


Tin packaging

From demand point of view, people consider tin as the best packaging material because of shelf appeal, printability, shelf-life, etc. If we look at the growth of metal packaging, it is the FMCG segment, which is driving the demand. Saket Bhatia

Senior Vice President - Marketing, Hindustan Tin Works Ltd

middle class, and this trend is expected to continue. Per capita consumption of beverages lags substantially behind the rest of the world, but the beverage packaging market is growing rapidly and one of the fastest growing packages is the beverage can.”

Domestic market In the Indian context, the tin packaging segment is at an embryonic stage. However, the affinity for tin packaging for food products, beverages (alcoholic and non-alcoholic) is increasing day by day. The tin packaging market is categorised broadly into food and non-food business. “Processed food, beverages, baby food products, cereal, nutritional powder, etc fall in the tin packed food category. From demand point of view, people consider ti as the best packaging material because of shelf appeal, printability, shelf-life, etc. If we look at the growth of metal packaging, it is the FMCG segment, which is driving the demand,” says Saket Bhatia, Senior Vice President - Marketing, Hindustan Tin Works Ltd. A closer look says that the growth parameter of metal packaging is linked to the growth trend of FMCG segment. According to Saket, metal packaging is growing year-on-year at 6 to 7 per cent in India. “Every packaging has its own place in the market but from technical point of view metal packaging is the best. For instance, suppose an identical quantity of nutritional powder is packed in three different types of packaging, which includes tin. If price of all the products are same, 48

then people will automatically pick up tin packaging. Because it looks good, is safe and has reusable value. For end-consumers reusability is an important factor. When it comes to preference, it is always rigid pack in metal,” explains Saket.

Of late, India has witnessed tremendous growth in beverage can area. This is evident from the joint investment of Rs 220 crore by the UK-based Rexam Plc and Hindustan Tin Works Ltd. The investment aims to expand its beverage can manufacturing facility to cater to the fast-growing Indian market. The company is introducing a new manufacturing line at the existing facility at Taloja, Navi Mumbai. With this, it will increase the total capacity to 850 million cans per year from the present 300 million cans. Production from the new line is slated to start from the last quarter of 2012. “If you look at the growth of beverage can market (in India) in the last four to five years, the demand has grown from 50 million to close to 700 million,” says Atit Bhatia, Senior Vice President, Hindustan Tin Works Ltd. The beverage can market in India is witnessing an annual growth of around 30 per cent.

But now 3 piece cans are being preferred in tin packaging. This is because, an aluminium 2 piece can is drawn with thin walls and is a weak can; it gets its strength from the internal pressure of the beverage due to carbonation. Though being the perfect solution for carbonated beverages, the thin walls of an aluminium can are not able to withstand retorting, which the food cans need to undergo. Hence, a 3 piece can that has strong walls with all the required barrier properties is the perfect solution for food packaging. “Food packaging also requires flexibility of design and shorter production runs, which the 3 piece can manufacturing process can offer,” says A Bhatia. Industry experts strongly feel that the promotion of cans help reduce wastage of food significantly, which the developed countries have done way back. Here is an instance that supports this stance. There is a huge wastage of orange in Nagpur alone, and this could be reduced drastically, if there are canneries. The government is promoting cannery in the mango belt of South India. If similar approach is taken for orange & other fruits, mushroom, etc, it would be a step in the right direction.

Trends in tin packaging

Packed with prospects

Current trends in the metal packaging industry are towards down gauging and providing the consumers value-added products like shaped cans. There is major growth in 2 piece beverage cans. Trends in the beverage segment – both carbonated and non-carbonated – are shifting focus from the traditional modes of packaging to new modern cans, which appeal to the consumers as they are stylish and attractive. “Few brand owners are taking the route of introducing shaped cans for brand differentiation. In a recent project with one of our esteemed customers, we have introduced shaped cans for special flavoured single-serve rasgullas,” says A Bhatia. However, though the industry in India is slowly aligning itself to global trends, metal packaging industry has a long way to go.

Since India is a potential market, competition is bound to grow over the years among various packaging materials. The preference will be governed by myriad factors like convenience, ecofriendliness and, of course, cost since the Indian market is price-sensitive. At present, countering the rising cost of raw materials is the biggest challenge for metal packaging sector. People associated with metal packaging are apprehensive that they might lose major share to other forms of packaging, if corrective steps are not taken immediately. More focus on R&D could address the issue to a large extent. Taking into account the advantages metal packaging offers, it seems metal would continue to play an important role in the packaging sector of India.

Beverage can segment

Modern Food Processing | November 2011

Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@infomedia18.in


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Conveyor systems

UPPING the bottling line The importance of line control, modulation and integration for conveyors in beverage and bottling plants could not be more significant than it is today. If personified as the human body, conveyors act as the arteries and veins of the production line, where the filler would be ‘heart’ of the system. The more jams and stoppages on these conveyors, the more it affects the filler, and the rest of the line.

EFFICIENCY

efficiency. An apt conveyor system design allows the bottlers to reduce downtime, rejects, maintenance cost in spares and high wear & tear parts. It also gives the bottlers the opportunity to truly automate their line, thereby minimising the number of operators. All this finally equates to a sizeable saving for the business, especially if the bottling line has an output of over 300 bottles per minute.

Factors determining line efficiency

A

common user of conveyors does not pay much attention to their purpose. It is merely just a system to move a product from one point to another. However, if utilised appropriately, it can be exploited to raise the bar of a manufacturing unit’s line efficiency to a higher level. Over the years, there has been a significant development in the art and science of conveying systems, & some multinationals have been investing millions of dollars in these systems for improved

There are three essential considerations for achieving good line efficiency, which include design, quality & make, and line control & modulation of the conveyor. The first 30 per cent would be attributed to the design of the conveyor layout. Conveyor design starts with a good lay out and there are two immediate benefits to be observed: R People-friendly design essentially takes care of man and material movement. This gives priority to reducing stress for operators and keeps safety a paramount property.

R Machine-friendly design layout supplements the performance of every machine by understanding the necessity of every machine. If either goes wrong, chances are, the production team will have repeated troubles in achieving the set line efficiency goal. It also reflects the depth and understanding of the conveyor supplier. Another 30 per cent would be attributed to the quality and make of the conveyor. Like in all machines, the components, quality of raw materials and finish of the conveyor determines the durability & life of the conveying system. Details such as selecting wear strips, materials for conveyor chains, rating of the motors and frequency drives, design of return rollers & guides – all have to be thought about. It is common for bottlers and suppliers alike to save cost and investment by choosing non-branded and inexpensive material. More likely than not, these materials do not last long. Cheap wear strips can last 10 times shorter than a good one, dramatically increase the friction of the conveyor chains, and thereby increase the load of the conveyor motor, which significantly

Courtesy: Clearpack India

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Conveyor systems

reduces its life span. That means one will be required to invest in replacing the wear strip, conveyor chain and motor frequently. All these troubles are the result of poor material choice. The remaining 40 per cent of the conveyor solution is attributed to the line control and modulation. This is the heart of the system, and hence top companies would pay millions of dollars on this to ensure that their line never stops. Line control and modulation is actually the programming that takes into account many different scenarios based upon inputs from the performance of the machine, sensors placed at key points throughout the line, and the behaviour of variable frequency drives and other devices based on these inputs.

Case in point Consider a scenario where a bottling line churns out 400 bottles per minute. Now imagine a case packer that has stopped because of a fallen bottle. The operator now needs to go to the machine and take care of the bottle & restart the system, which may take 30 seconds. But within that time, another 200 bottles get accumulated in the accumulation between the packer and the upstream machine. When the case packer starts, it now has to ensure that it can take into account the 200 bottles that have got accumulated, on top of the 400 bottles that come out of the filler every minute. Therefore, it now has a total of 600 bottles on hand. Usually, downstream machines have 20 per cent more capacity than the previous machine, so the maximum speed of the case packer would be, in this case, 480 bottles per minute. This means that it will take 2.5 minutes for the case packer to clear the 200 bottle accumulation on top of its current capacity. So how does a manufacturer’s conveyor fits into this? The conveyor has to make sure it can ramp up faster than the speed of the case packer to ensure it is not starved at a speed of 480 bottles per minute, while ensuring that there is no significant back-pressure building up on the machine from the force of the bottle accumulation at speeds of 400 bottles per minute. The conveyor also needs to convey to the upstream machines that it may have to slow down gently for preventing further accumulation of bottles.

Maintaining the smooth flow To conclude, conveyors in today’s production line cannot be taken for granted. Conveyors as a total system is as complex and equally rewarding as any other blow-moulder, filler, labeller, packer machine on any other line. If the conveyor acts as blood stream for the lines, then it is the duty of the bottler to ensure that it always flows smoothly. Using the correct design, materials and smart programming, this can be done seamlessly. Courtesy: Clearpack India Pvt Ltd For details, contact on email: info@clearpack.com

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK RFID solutions

Andrew Tay

D

riven by customer demands and industry regulators’ requirements, manufacturers & suppliers are constantly reviewing their food processing practices to ensure that their offerings meet industry and consumer requirements. To address these concerns throughout the supply chain, the food processing industry is increasingly turning to automated traceability systems, particularly the use of RFID. Essentially an automatic identification solution, RFID system allows data to be transmitted by a device, or tag, which can be directly applied to an individual product, pallet, or other type of shipping container. RFID tags may also be applied to mobile equipment to track its usage and location in a factory or warehouse. The tag transmits a signal, which is read by an RFID reader and converted into data providing product identification, location information, or pertinent product details such as price, date of purchase/ manufacture and supplier information. Capable of storing and remotely retrieving comprehensive product information, RFID can support the flow of information along the entire production and distribution chain, from the receipt of raw materials, right up to distribution of the finished product. This provides real-time visibility of information regarding the product and processing, including traceability & location of goods. During the delivery phase, RFID enables businesses to verify the sender’s data and trace raw materials’ sources. RFID can also monitor food safety standards during processing and trace the entire supply chain’s distribution, improving the efficiency of food inventory tracking & management to ensure that products are delivered, stored and consumed at the optimal time. Tags can be fitted with sensors, which are able to memorise climatic factors (temperature, pressure, humidity) of the environment they are in. 54

Food inventory

TRACKING

MADE EASY

In response to rising safety standards and the growing complexity of the food supply chain, food manufacturers are focussing on ensuring the safety and quality of their products. Radio-frequency Identification (RFID) acts as an effective tool in their quest for efficiency throughout supply chain operations.

Courtesy: Zebra Technologies

Applications and expected benefits for F&B industry Delivering some of the clearest benefits and fastest return on investment (ROI), asset tracking is one of the leading RFID applications. Beyond complying with evolving government regulations regarding food safety, businesses can harness accurate asset tracking and security capabilities with RFID & real-time location systems (RTLS). Businesses can realistically expect full ROI for RFID-based processes in 30 months, and sometimes as low as 18 months, according to a study conducted by Aberdeen Research. Asset tracking also translates into improved inventory management, which brings about increased cost savings from waste reduction and better risk management, especially when it comes to

Modern Food Processing | November 2011

product recalls. Recalls are a fact of life for the food industry, and RFID traceability can help minimise their impact. Recalls involve the whole supply chain from suppliers to the grocery chain and often cause huge disruptions. Whole-chain traceability with RFID narrows the scope of recalls and minimises the associated costs. Additionally, RFID traceability creates opportunities to protect corporate reputation while enhancing and assuring brand value by providing businesses with necessary information to effectively communicate to the general public when food safety issues arise.

Focus areas during implementation Before RFID can be fully deployed by the F&B industry, several factors need to be addressed:


RFID solutions

Standards: Electronic Product Code™ (EPC) global is leading the development of industry-driven standards for EPC to support the use of RFID globally – currently this standard has not been ratified in India. Collaborative trading networks: All partners in a supply chain must be fully enabled with the electronic communications for RFID to work effectively. They need to be capable of handling RFID information, such as the parent-child relationship of a pallet to a carton, to be relayed through the supply chain. Today, companies still have issues with barcode technology and serial shipment container codes because they do not have such infrastructure in place. Moreover, apart f rom investing in RFID technologies, trading partners should look into sharing the cost with suppliers for truly integrated deployment. Data synchronisation: All parties must agree to a common data format. This enables anyone in the supply chain to be able to identify a unique ID so that it can be read and associated to that original supplier. Once standards are ratified, Global Tracking Identification Numbers for both the product and the supplier come into play. Supply chain integration: To maximise effectiveness, RFID technology is best deployed as part of integrated Supply Chain Management (SCM). Trading partners that have already integrated barcode type technology with their SCM are in a good position to rapidly adopt RFID.

Efficiency at its best The demands placed on quality and documentation in the food and beverage sector have grown considerably. Continuous traceability and comprehensive analysis of all ingredients are required by customers & legislators alike. At the same time, the logistics systems must ensure prompt delivery of perishable goods while complying with all transport regulations. RFID enables complete documentation of every ingredient for every product – generated automatically without any additional process steps – and an optimised distribution of goods to consumers. RFID systems are capable of delivering business benefits and ensuring customer safety. RFID certainly has huge potential to support traceability and quality assurance in the food industry; and given the ability for RFID technology to increase efficiency throughout all supply chain operations, widespread adoption is only a matter of time. Andrew Tay is APAC President of Zebra Technologies Corp, and is mainly responsible for the market exploration and company management in the APAC market of Zebra Technologies Corp. For details contact, Janice Hon on email: jhon@zebra.com

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AUTOMATION TRENDS Low-cost automation

Rakesh Rao

I

ndian food industry mainly comprises small & medium enterprises (SMEs), which manufacture wide range of food and beverages using manually-operated, minimally-automated machinery. One may think that these companies are too small or under-resourced to automate. But this can be a myth if one adopts new methods to improve infrastructure efficiency, modify machinery to increase output, incorporate flexible solutions to handle new project, etc – all at a low cost. “Indian food processing sector is dominated by SMEs, which have limited resources. Low-cost automation (LCA) can be of immense help to them as it increases processing line efficiency and reduces the overall cost. LCA is not only cost-effective, but its overall impact on the line is also high. Since LCA is a simple device or solution, it is easy to comprehend by operators. Thus, it takes lesser time to train the user,” informs Didier Lacroix, Senior Vice President - Worldwide Sales & Marketing, Cognex Inc.

Low-cost automation has the potential to enhance productivity by improving manufacturing methods without going for costly machinery.

Advantages of LCA To stay competitive in the market, companies have to provide high-quality products consistently. “With products being exported to Western Europe and North American countries from India, manufacturers have to produce the

WHY GO FOR LCA? Food manufacturers can adopt LCA as it offers the following benefits: R Improves efficiency with low investment R Requires minimum training for the user compared to high-cost automation R In-house experts can operate, maintain and modify LCA R Easy-to-incorporate in the existing manufacturing facility, with minimum disruption of production time

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best for their overseas as well as Indian consumers; and to remain competitive they need to opt for LCA,” observes Sunil Khanna, Vice President - Strategic Relations, Emerson Electric Company. Any new product is designed keeping in mind safety and risk-analysis requirements of the industry. Traditionally, automation solutions were designed for high-risk, hazardous applications in industries such as oil & gas, power, etc. These products have to meet the rigorous safety and quality standards & hence, are high priced since huge investments

Modern Food Processing | November 2011

are required for design, manufacturing, certifications, etc of such products. “The food sector may not require such high-end, high-cost automation solutions right now as the level of hazards is much lower compared to oil & gas and power industries. Hence, automation vendor needs to scale down those systems & products (designed for hazardous applications) to be used in food industry. Automation manufacturers need to think about products that can address the concerns of food processors. There is definitely a big market for LCA


Low-cost automation

products,” says Khanna. Currently, the big automation players are addressing the concerns of larger industries like oil & gas, power, etc. But, there are some successful manufacturers in India who are focussing on LCA products.

Getting ready to adopt In lower-end process industries such as food, programmable logic controllers (PLCs) are best suited as they provide sequential logic control for round-the-clock operations, which are common in these industries. “PLCs are good solutions for the food industry as primarily the inputs are discrete. It is more of machine control rather than continuous process control. Manufacturers should look at PLC-based solutions, which can do recipe management. They should be able to manufacture multiple products, with the same plant and structure, but little bit of modification. So, food manufacturers should look at flexible automation by which they can change the recipe of the plant with a click of button for a new product range,” says Khanna. Pharmaceuticals industry has been using recipe management to improve manufacturing efficiency of the plant. Food manufacturers can take a cue from some of the success stories in pharmaceutical industry in recipe management and adopt it in their facility. For example, if a chips manufacturer, which produces five to six varieties of chips, wants to introduce a new variety, he can do that with just few changes in the recipe control program. However, what concerns the food manufacturers is that control systems (logics, software, etc) are primarily built by automation manufacturers, and cannot be changed. Tomorrow, if they want to change/modify the software, they would have to call the high-cost engineers from the automation companies to do it. They are also apprehensive about going for annual maintenance contract, which are expensive. “If these concerns are addressed by automation solution providers, then the demand for LCA will grow manifold. So food manufacturers have to adopt flexible automation, in terms of usability and flexibility of the frontend software, which can be modified by food processor itself rather than calling the expert engineer,” opines Khanna. With rising consumer awareness, every manufacturer has to ensure that quality products are reaching the market at the right time. “It is here that LCA plays a critical role. LCA ensures that right-quality products reach the consumers and that too at a reduced running cost for the food manufacturer. There is a huge requirement for LCA, especially during the inspection process, where food industry is facing several challenges,” opines Lacroix. According to Khanna, future of LCA is bright, provided automation manufacturers interact with food processors on a regular basis to offer customised solutions to this industry. Email: rakesh.rao@infomedia18.in

November 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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ENERGY MANAGEMENT Case Study

Higher automation, modifying the plant layout, shifting to higher KV line, etc, are some of the measures adopted by Hindustan Tin Works Ltd (HTWL) to optimise energy consumption in its plant and remain competitive in the market.

Prasenjit Chakraborty

F

ood production and packaging industries are energy-intensive. As utility costs continue to rise, such industries have no

PRACTICAL TIPS With the aim to reduce fuel consumption and optimise energy utilisation, HTWL adopted the following steps: R Upgrading equipment and technology of the can manufacturing R More emphasis on automation R Lesser use of generator R Shifting to 33 KV line from the existing 11 KV line R Modifying the plant layout to address the distribution loss R Transition from LPG to PNG

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choice but to address the issues related to energy management in order to stay competitive. It has been seen that decreasing the overall loads by even 1-2 per cent can significantly reduce energy costs for companies in these sectors. There are three ways to address the issue – energy efficiency, demand control and demand response. Participating in energy-efficient practices and demand response programmes can lower costs further. For a modest investment, one can realise sizeable returns. In India, energy efficiency is increasingly seen as a viable option that is cost-competitive, supplemental and environmentally sound. However, an integrated and co-ordinated approach for technological improvements, policy measures & institutional development are essential to improve energy efficiency in various sectors of the economy. The first step towards building this approach is to understand the concept, identify

Modern Food Processing | November 2011

the issues and challenges involved, and thereafter arrive at solutions. When it comes to food production and packaging industries, efficient energy management is must. This is not a must only from environment point of view, but also to remain competitive and keep the firm’s current marketshare intact. Take the example of tin packaging segment. Addressing the issue of rising raw material costs remains a major challenge for the segment today. “If raw material costs continue to grow, tin packaging segment might lose its share. People might shift to other forms of packaging,” says an expert, who is closely monitoring the situation. Hence, tin packaging manufacturers have taken several steps to remain competitive in the market. Efficient energy management is one of them. Rising raw material costs have a cascading effect on the final product. If energy is optimally used, the cost will be less, which will ultimately


Case study

benefit tin manufacturers, end-consumers.

their

customers

and

Setting an example The Delhi-based HTWL is all set to change its energy monitoring systems at its factory near Murthal in Haryana. In this direction, it is planning to upgrade equipment and the existing technology. “We have applied for natural gas pipeline; the facility will soon be available in our area. We will be converting from Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) to Pipe Natural Gas (PNG). This will benefit us in the sense that we do not need higher calorific value that one gets in LPG,” says V Padmanabhan, Vice President - Operations, Hindustan Tin Works Ltd. With this, incremental energy requirement is reduced. “With PNG, we hope to reduce our energy cost. This is because we will be using low-cost energy product,” he adds. The next step for HTWL is to shift to 33 KV line from the existing 11 KV line. Once implemented, its line losses could be minimised. It means that the use of generator will be reduced drastically, hence result in cost savings. Lesser use of generator means minimum wastage of power. “If anyone needs just one line, it calls for use of generator. Similarly even for five lines, one needs to start generator,” quips Padmanabhan. With 33 KV line, the quality of power will improve, and at the same time, there will be less interruptions in power supply. On consumption side, HTWL has specific plans, as it is increasing the automation level. Besides, it is modifying the plant layout so that distribution losses are reduced. “If a machine is located far away from the point of power supply, then there will be some amount of power losses referred to as distribution loss. Our new plant layout takes care of distribution losses,” he says. Moreover, with higher automation, the movement of cans inside the factory during operation is also reduced. So, consumption of energy will be less. Padmanabhan strongly believes that transition from LPG to PNG will save 20-25 per cent cost of gas. Similarly, the shift to 33 KV line may save up to 10-15 per cent on power consumption. For this, cabling is already completed. “We had conducted energy audit in 2009 and followed the suggestions that came out from the audit. Recently, experts from a reputed IT company (for energy management) came to study our system. They have given us quotation and we are evaluating it. Once everything is done, we will switch over from paper-based system to electronic system,” he proudly says. Against the backdrop of shortfall of power throughout the country, such measures for optimum use of energy will help the company to a great extent. It can save cost and serve its customers better. This is a right step in the right direction at the right time. Other companies can emulate this to reap huge benefits. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@infomedia18.in

November 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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POLICIES & REGULATIONS RBI’s monetary policy

Is raising interest rate a right tool to control inflation? The phenomenon of frequent price rise; and the slowing down of industrial growth are taking a toll on India’s economic prospects. The rise in interest rates by the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) is adding to the woes, as it has affected almost every industry. A look at its impact with special reference to the food sector… Avani Jain

W

ith the inflation level moving closer to the double-digit mark, the RBI is left with no other option but to tighten its monetary stance. It is assumed that until and unless the inflation scenario sees a significant downward progress, RBI would continue with this move. This rising interest rate has impacted all the industries and the food industry is not an exception. Elaborating on the impact of rising

60

interest rates on the food industry, Krinal Shah, Equity Research Analyst, Edelweiss Financial Advisory Ltd, opines, “The interest rate is hiked due to food inflation (having 14.34 per cent weightage in total wholesale price index or WPI), which jumped above 20 per cent in December 2009, and compelled the RBI to look at interest rates to tame the elevated price levels. T h e

Modern Food Processing | November 2011

current interest rate cycle started in March 2010, wherein RBI raised key policy rate, repo rate by 25 basis points (BPS) at 5 per cent.” Shah further explains, “At present, the reason for high food inflation is the shift in consumers’ preference to protein-based items such as fruits, vegetables, milk, fish, egg, etc, which can be attributed to the rise in their income level on account of increase in minimum support prices and wage revisions. This has led to increased demand for various food products as compared to supply. Moreover,


RBI’s monetary policy

The interest rate is hiked due to food inflation, which jumped above 20 per cent in December 2009, and compelled the RBI to look at interest rates to tame the elevated price levels. The current interest rate cycle started in March 2010, wherein RBI raised key policy rate, repo rate by 25 basis points at 5 per cent. Krinal Shah

Equity Research Analyst, Edelweiss Financial Advisory Ltd

rising oil and commodity prices at global level have also continued to pose a challenge for the Central bank to manage overall inflation, despite several revisions in the interest rates.”

Challenges posed The rise in interest rate posed several challenges for the companies in general. Shah points out, “It has led to high cost of borrowings that in turn adds to the cost to the companies. The companies have to pay more for the debt as well as for the working capital requirement and the additional cost has to be passed on to the end-users to sustain their margin, if cushion is not available. In addition, the overall high price levels restrain the demand and companies have to rework on their strategies to boost the demand. So the margin pressure would be there followed by profitability and growth. The Capex plans also have been impeded due to the same; consequently delaying industrial as well as economic growth, if such environment lasts for a longer duration.” She adds further, “If we talk about the food industry, in particular, then food inflation will remain a major concern as higher raw material costs Rates (%) Repo Reverse Repo WPI

Current 8.25 7.25 9.78

(milk, edible oil, etc) are compelling regular price hikes in order to retain profit margins. However, demand is expected to be buoyant and companies need to focus on sustainability of their margins.”

Feeling the impact The elevated price levels across the commodity basket have resulted in increased input cost, which ultimately boosts the price of final products. Shah opines, “The credit demand for new projects has also remained subdued for the current year so far as the companies have put the projects on halt considering the rising costs. Though any significant risk to export activities is not visible at this point of time, it is likely to be dampened by the global uncertainties and weak growth prospects of both developed and emerging economies. In this present scenario, when domestic funds have become costlier, corporates have started to opt for external borrowings; even the RBI recently relaxed External Commercial Borrowing (ECB) norms to promote and support the financial needs of the corporates. However, it may be affected by increased risk aversion by global investors due to the uncertain global economy.” While business analysts feel that the rise in interest rate will adversely affect the food companies, Devanshu Gandhi, Managing Director, Vadilal Industries Ltd, & Co- Chairman - West Zone, All India Food Producers’ Association, says, “The increase in interest rate will not have much impact on the food industry as food is an impulsive product and the buying decision is not planned in advance. This rise in interest rate will only affect the consumer durables segment, where the buying decision is taken well in advance.” He further adds, “Commodity price

Feb-10 4.75 3.25 9.65

% Change 3.50 4.00 0.13

Changes in BPS 350 400 13

This data is as on October 22, 2011

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Modern Food Processing | November 2011

might be affected to some extent but since monsoon have been good this time, I do not think that even that will happen. As such, food industry will not be impacted by this rise in interest rate.” However, Gandhi agrees with Shah that the exports might be impacted by such a rise in interest rate.

Fighting the food inflation Food prices at domestic f ront and commodity prices at global level are the major drivers of inflation in the country. As international factors are out of the purview of Indian Government, it is trying to control food inflation through incessant hike in interest rate; but it is unable to do so. Shah notes, “Food inflation, barring a few instances, has refused to come below nine per cent since June 2009. And the trigger point that should be addressed is the supply side issues where limited efforts are initiated. I think the government should address the issues related to procurement, storage facility and supply chain management.” Further, as incomes have risen in India, the demand for food has become more diversified. More people can afford fruit, vegetables and milk than before and the share of cereals in people’s diets have reduced. Estimates suggest that demand for milk and milk products is growing between three to five times than the demand for cereals. Taking cue from market signals, the government needs to initiate the right strategy to accelerate the production of milk and horticulture products. Shah concludes, “ With no alternatives left with the Central bank, as the supply side management calls for a medium to long-term strategy, it is expected to continue with its hawkish stance until inflation shows sustained signs of moderation. I think it will take time for the overall inflation to settle in, depending upon global price trend; and hence another 50-75 BPS hike in key interest rates by the Central bank cannot be ruled out for the prevailing year before it takes a reverse turn.” Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in


STRATEGY Contract farming

REINFORCING supply chain management Contract farming, a concept that was not so popular until a few years ago, is now proving to be a smart strategy for food processors to ensure effective supply chain management. Through this kind of agreement, processors can ensure production of desired goods without having to enter into production themselves, thereby obviating the necessity of owning a large chunk of land and managing huge labour force. Avani Jain

I

n the last decade, food processors in the country witnessed considerable growth in terms of production capacities. This brought along many problems and one of them was related to procurement of quality raw materials for processing. A substantial number of farmers in India belong to the small and marginal category and this added to the problem. The processing firms faced several challenges pertaining to supply chain such as high cost, lack of adequate availability, and poor quality & timeliness, among others. However, with the rise in exports and entry of many domestic & multinational food processors after the opening up of the Indian economy, contract farming that was not so popular earlier has become one of the preferred modes for raw material production and procurement, thus strengthening the food supply chain. Devanshu Gandhi, Managing Director, Vadilal Industries Ltd, & CoChairman - West Zone, All India Food Producers’ Association, says, “Earlier, whenever we received big orders from customers and asked farmers to get good quality of products in bulk for us, immediately the price would shoot up. This was one of the major bottlenecks faced by us, but now contract farming has resolved these problems.”

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Strategising the concept Contract farming is essentially defined as an agreement between a farmer and a company for production & supply of agricultural/horticultural produce at a predetermined price. The basis of the relationship between the parties is a commitment on the part of the farmer to provide a specific commodity in quantity and quality standards determined by the purchaser & an undertaking by the sponsor to support the farmer’s production activities as well as purchase the commodity. At present, many companies in India have adopted the contract farming strategy to ensure effective supply chain management. K S Narayanan, Managing Director, McCain Foods India, observes, “As the Indian subsidiary of McCain Foods Canada, we adhere to the highest benchmarks for producing world-class quality of frozen French fries and specialty potato-based products in India. However, for a perfect product, we need the right kind of potato varieties and sizes that are low in sugar, high on solids, suitable for making commercial quality French fries. Thus, we decided to focus our agronomy programme in the potato growing areas in North Gujarat.” He further adds, “We often met the farmers to introduce them to the best agronomy practices. So be it modern planting techniques, water-efficient irrigation systems, objective methods

Modern Food Processing | November 2011

of fertiliser and pesticide applications, McCain agronomists would work closely with farmers, which translated into tangible improvements both in terms of crop quality and yield. The results were quite apparent. Potato yields were up from 16 T/ha (national average) to about 25-35 T/ha.” Further, it is seen that the companies in India are mainly embracing contract farming to support their export demands where they have to ensure products with certain specifications. Gandhi states, “We resorted to contract farming mainly for the exported frozen food products category because the international customers require products that are consistent in colour, size etc. Further, they are concerned about the quantity of fertiliser used. This is because, often, even after washing the vegetables and fruits, some residue is left behind, which is not acceptable in several countries. So, in order to meet export quality requirements and standards, we initiated contract farming for okra and other leafy vegetables. As for the domestic market, we produce only sweet corn through contract farming because consumers demand a particular variety. Therefore, we provide a specific seed variety to the farmers to produce that variety for us.”

Overcoming the challenges Contract farming is not free from certain limitations and challenges. Gandhi notes, “The biggest challenge is pertaining to


Contract farming

providing quality seeds to farmers and ensuring that the seeds are used for the production and not sold by the farmers as it happens in many cases. Moreover, it is necessary to enlighten the farmers about proper cultivation, sowing methods, etc.” He further adds, “On farmer’s side also, there are certain problems. Farmers are highly skeptical about the processors, ie whether the companies will buy their product or not and will they have to bear losses when the price shoots up.” In order to deal with such challenges, companies are taking several measures. “Firstly, we select the land, taking into account the climate and soil. We also monitor the various processes at the farm level. Further, if the prices are increasing beyond certain limits, then we too increase the price offered to farmers. We do take care to provide this kind of flexibility to farmers,” claims Gandhi. To this, Narayanan adds, “In order to be fair to the farmers and maintain transparency, McCain discusses price aspects of the produce every year before planting. It is a mutually agreed decision between the farmers and McCain, & is also dependent on prevailing market prices. This sustained investment, both in monetary terms as well as the time spent, resulted in a winwin partnership for farmers and the company. Through the efforts taken by McCain, the farmers are finally realising that they are producing more in the same patch of land with appropriate input cost in terms of controlled use of chemicals/ fertilisers and water. ”

A win-win situation Contract farming is extremely beneficial for companies involved in it, as they stand to gain by way of stable and steady supplies, doing away with price risk fluctuations, noninvestment in big resources like land, product risk-sharing, etc. Indeed with effective management, contract farming can be a means to develop markets and bring about the transfer of technical skills in a way that is profitable for both the companies and the farmers. In terms of benefits for the farmers, the contractual agreements can provide them with access to production services and credit as well as knowledge of new skills & technology. Some contract farming ventures give farmers the opportunity to diversify into new crops and new markets. “Further, contract farming increases the yield of the particular farm. Due to the agreement, the farmers are assured that the company will buy the produce and they will get timely supply of quality seeds. As for the processor or buyer, he is also assured that he will get the product at the agreed price even if there are variations in the market. So the export commitments of the company will also be fulfilled on time,” notes Gandhi. Thus, contract farming as a strategy adopted by food processors is gaining prominence in India due to steady progress in the economy, rising food demand, organised retail boom and an increasing shift towards branded food consumption. Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in

November 2011 | Modern Food Processing

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TIPS & TRICKS Lubricant selection

Criteria to choose the right lubes for machinery Recalls of food and beverage products due to contamination concerns have risen significantly over the last decade. This calls for utmost precaution in every process undertaken by food processors, which includes lubrication of food machinery. Here are some do’s and don’ts for getting the lubes right…

I

n today’s increasingly competitive global economy, food and beverage processors are under more pressure than ever to ensure the safety of their products, protect their brand reputation, enhance their company’s productivity and expand profit margins in the face of tightening economic times. In this direction, food and beverage processors need to focus on food safety and hygienic processing environment. To achieve this, lubrication plays an important role. Hence, the right selection of lubricant is of utmost importance. Based on the toxicologists’ analysis, a lubricant can be categorised as H1, H2 or H3. And each category of lubricant is applied in different areas of operations. Here are some handy tips for preventing food contamination on account of lubricants.

Food process units should use H1 lubricants, which are formulated with base oil; and approved for applications in machinery that could potentially have ‘incidental contact’ with the food or beverage being manufactured.

H2-approved lubricants can be used on machinery in a food and beverage processing facility where there is no possibility that the lubricant or lubricated part will come in direct contact with food. H2 lubricant can also be used for forklift trucks, transportation equipment, and gearboxes, compressors & hydraulics that do not come into contact with the food/beverage products or components. 66

H3 lubricants are soluble oils that are used for rust prevention on trolleys and similar equipment, but must be removed before food comes into contact with the equipment.

It is essential to use lubricants from certified agencies.

The benefits of using right kind of lubricants are immense. In case of incidental contact with such lubricants during processing, chances of recalling the product is minimised Hence, this helps maintain brand image in the market.

Modern Food Processing | November 2011

Lubricants enhance equipment performance and help achieve full capacity utilisation.

It is important for plant managers and maintenance professionals to itemise each piece of equipment and accurately assess the risk of food contamination potentially caused by the lubricant for every application.

Selection of right kind of lubricant helps food processors fulfil customers’ expectations and hygienic processing environment.


new busIness opportunItIes invites you to

CUT HERE

InvItatIon

PUNE

18 - 21 Nov 2011 Auto Cluster Exhibition Centre 10 am - 7 pm


Engineering Expo organised by Infomedia18 is one of the engineering industry’s biggest events in country. The 2010-11 edition of Engineering Expo saw business transactions worth over Rs. 161 crores. Launched in Ahmedabad in the year 2002, the event today boasts of a fabulous visitor turnout. The Expo is a preferred destination for SME’s and manufacturing & engineering companies to transact, network, tie-up and exchange ideas for the growth of the industry.

Exhibitor Profile Auto & Auto Components | Light & Medium Engineering | Chemicals & Allied Products | Electrical & Electronics | Hydraulics & Pneumatics | IT Products & Services | Automation & Instrumentation | Material Handling Eqpt | Packaging Machinery | Wires & Cables | Machine Tools & Acc. | Pipes & Fitting | Plastics & Polymers | Safety & Security | Process Machinery & Eqpt | Testing & Measuring Instruments Brought to you

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PROJECTS

New projects and expansion activities are the barometers of industrial growth. These also present business opportunities to service providers like consultants, contractors, plant & equipment suppliers and others down the value chain. This feature will keep you updated with vital information regarding new projects and capacity expansions being planned by companies in the food & beverages industry.

Cattle feed unit

Modi Naturals Ltd Project type New facility Project news Modi Naturals is currently implementing a cattle feed manufacturing project at Pilibhit in Uttar Pradesh with a cost of ` 10 million. Project location Pilibhit, Uttar Pradesh Project cost ` 10 million Implementation stage In progress Contact details: Modi Naturals Ltd Bisalpur Road, Pilibhit 262 001 Tel: 05882-257 131 Fax: 05882-256 741 Email: corporate@modinaturals.com --------------------------------------------Floating fish feed

Abis Exports (India) Pvt Ltd Project type New facility Project news Abis Exports is planning a 1,200 tpd capacity floating fish feed (soya-based) manufacturing unit in Chhattisgarh. Project location Rajnandgaon, Chhattisgarh Project cost Not known Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Abis Exports (India) Pvt Ltd Baldeo Bag, Rajnandgaon, Madhya Pradesh Tel: 07744–227683, Fax: 07744–276175 Email: mail@ibgroup.co.in --------------------------------------------Grain-based distillery

Tilaknagar Industries Ltd Project type New facility

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Modern Food Processing | November 2011

Project news Tilaknagar Industries is in process of setting up a grain-based distillery unit with a capacity of 100 klpd at Shrirampur (Ahmednagar district), Maharashtra. This multi-feed grain-based facility will enable the company to manufacture more premium quality of brands along with better adaptability to safeguard itself against the variations in prices of molasses. Project location Ahmednagar, Maharashtra Project cost Not known Implementation stage In progress Contact details: Tilaknagar Industries Ltd Industrial Assurance Building Churchgate, Mumbai 400 020 Tel: 022-2283 1718, Fax: 022-2204 6904 Email: tilliquour@bom8.vsnl.net.in --------------------------------------------Mango pulp processing

KKP Marketing India Ltd Project type New facility Project news KKP Marketing India is planning a mango pulp-processing unit in Kutch district of Gujarat at a cost of ` 200 million. Project location Kutch, Gujarat Project cost ` 200 million Implementation stage Planning Contact details: KKP Marketing India Ltd Balaram complex, Nr. ICICI Bank Station Road, Bhuj – Kutch 370 001 Tel: 02832-224411 Email: info@kkpmarketing.in

Naan and tortillas processing unit

Honeytop Speciality Food (India) Pvt Ltd Project type New facility Project news Honeytop Speciality Foods (India) is planning naan and tortillas processing unit in Uttar Pradesh. Project location Uttar Pradesh Project cost Not known Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Honeytop Speciality Foods (India) Pvt Ltd Samarth Cooperative Industrial Estate Plot no-245, A/1, Mukhed Road Pimpalgaon, Basawant Taluka Niphad, Nashik 422 003 Mob: 080556 06999 Email: sandesh.joshi@honeytopindia.com --------------------------------------------Pulse Processing

Adani Wilmar Ltd Project type New facility Project news Adani Wilmar is planning a pulse processing unit in Mundra SEZ, Gujarat. Project location Mundra SEZ, Gujarat Project cost Not known Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Adani Wilmar Ltd Fortune House Near Navrangpura Railway Crossing Ahmedabad 380 009 Tel: 079-2555 5650 Fax: 079-255 55621 Email: fortune@adaniwilmar.in


EVENT LIST

NATIONAL PUNE

CHENNAI

INDORE

AURANGABAD

Maharashtra, Nov 18-21, 2011, Auto Cluster Exhibition Centre

Tamil Nadu, Dec 8-11, 2011, Chennai Trade Centre

Madhya Pradesh, Jan 6-9, 2012, Poddar Plaza, Nr Gandhi Hall

Maharashtra, Feb 17-20, 2012, Garware Stadium

India’s premier industrial trade fair on products and technologies related to Machine Tools, Hydraulics & Pneumatics, Process Machinery & Equipment, Automation Instrumentation, Packaging & Auxiliaries, IT Products, Electrical & Electronics, Material Handling and Safety Equipment.

For details Infomedia 18 Ltd

Ruby House, 1st Floor, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. • Tel: 022 3003 4651 • Fax: 022 3003 4499 • Email: engexpo@infomedia18.in

Meet the Vendor on Safety Equipments Technology A focussed event on fire safety devices used in industries such as chemical, pharma, foods, breweries, etc; November 9, 2011; at Rang Sharda Hotel, Bandra, Mumbai For details contact: V P Ramachandran, Secretary Process Plant and Machinery Association of India Masjid (E), Mumbai 400 009 Tel: 022-2348 0405 Fax: 022-2348 0426 Mob: 98192 07269 Email: ppmai@vsnl.net

Annapoorna - World of Food India 2011 An international exhibition for the food and beverage industry; November 16-18, 2011; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai

For details contact: FICCI, Tansen Marg, New Delhi 110 001 Tel: 011-2373 8760-70; Fax: 011-3091 0411 Email: ficciexhibition@ficci.com

India Converting Show 2011 Exhibition is aimed at package converters; November 23-26, 2011; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai

An enological and bottling equipment exhibition; November 22-26, 2011; at Fiera Milano City, Milan, Italy For details contact: Ente Mostre Enologiche (EME) Via San Vittore al Teatro 3 20123 Milano, Italy Tel: +39 02 7222281, Fax: +39 02 866226 Email: info@simei.it

DDTE 2011 The Dubai Drink Technology Expo

India Packaging Show 2011 The show is aimed at manufacturers of machinery, materials and services for packaging industry; December 07-10, 2011; at NSIC Exhibition Centre, Okhla Industrial Estate, Delhi For details contact: Print-Packaging.com Pvt Ltd International Infotech Park, Vashi, Navi Mumbai 400 705 Tel: 022-2781 2093, Fax: 022-2781 2578 Email: info@indiapackagingshow.com

Food & Bev Tech 2012 For details contact: Print-Packaging.com Pvt Ltd International Infotech Park Vashi, Navi Mumbai 400 705 Tel: 022-2781 2093, Fax: 022-2781 2578 Email: info@indiapackagingshow.com

Sweet & SnackTec India 2011 An event for sweet & snack processing industry to be held along with Dairy Universe India; December 06-08, 2011; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai

INTERNATIONAL

SIMEI 2011

For details contact: Koelnmesse YA Tradefair Pvt Ltd 501/502, Kemp Plaza, Off. Link Road Malad (W), Mumbai 400 064 Tel: 022-4210 7801-11, Fax: 022-4003 4433 Email: info@koelnmesse-india.com

(DDTE) will showcase latest processing & packaging systems, light machinery, equipment and technology for beverages; November 29-December 01, 2011; at Dubai, UAE For details contact: Index (Conferences and Exhibitions Organisation Est) P O Box 13636, Dubai, The UAE Tel: +971 4 3624717, Fax: +971 4 3624718 Email: index@emirates.net.ae

International exhibition & conference for the food and beverage processing industry; April 25-27, 2012; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Saurabh Rajurkar, CII (WR) 105, Kakad Chambers, 132, Dr A B Road Worli, Mumbai 400 018 Tel: 022-2493 1790 Fax: 022-2493 9463 Email: saurabh.rajurkar@cii.in

SIFSE 2011 The Shanghai International Fisheries & Seafood Expo (SIFSE) for fish processing industry; December 08-10, 2011; at Shanghai Everbright Convention & Exhibition Center, China For details contact: Shanghai Gehua Exhibition Service Rm.1206-1208, Xin’an Building Shanghai, 200233, China Tel: +86-21-54451166 Fax: +86-21-54451968 Email: info@gehuaexpo.com

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective organiser. In any case, it does not represent the views of Modern Food Processing

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EVENT PREVIEW Sweet & SnackTec India 2011

PROSPECTING for new business

AVENUES

With several advancements happening in the food world in the area of technology, new products, etc, Sweet & SnackTec India 2011 is all set to provide a unique opportunity for the sweet and snack industries to have a glimpse of the latest trends in processing & packaging technologies.

I

n the recent past sweet, snack and dairy segments in India have made significant progress. Taking this into account, Koelnmesse YA Tradefair Pvt Ltd is organising Sweet & SnackTec 2011, along with Dairy Universe 2011, from December 6-8, 2011, at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Goregaon, Mumbai. Dairy Universe India focusses on dairy processing, packaging & distribution technology, equipment & supplies. Similarly, Sweet & SnackTec India is focussing on sweet & snack processing and packaging technology, equipment & supplies.

serious effort to develop the relevant technology to manufacture, package sweets and snacks on a larger scale, besides developing good distribution solutions. Sweet & SnackTec India plays an important role in this effort by being an ideal platform for the industry to discuss the latest trends and challenges being encountered.

A technology forum

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE SHOW R 150 exhibitors from 13 countries R Sprawling over an area of 6,000 sq mt R Seminar related to ice cream manufacturing

It’s snack time! Sweet & SnackTec India will cover all aspects of sweet, snack and confectionery industry like processing technologies, packaging solutions, ingredients, distribution, refrigeration, quality management, etc. Factors like sheer size of the population, changing food habits, preference for convenience foods, increase in disposable income, etc, offer a huge potential to transform the sweets and snacks market in India into a vibrant industry. What is needed is a 74

processing to packaging to distribution. On the second day of the event, Indian Dairy Association (West Zone) will organise an one-day seminar on ‘Ice cream for all seasons’ concurrent with this fair, which will focus on the issues related to ice cream manufacturing, packaging and distribution.

On a milky way Dairy Universe India is jointly organised by Koelnmesse YA Tradefair, Indian Dairy Association (West Zone) and German Agricultural Society (DLG). This edition is receiving good participation from both India and abroad. Exhibitors who have already confirmed their participation covers the entire technological process right from

Modern Food Processing | November 2011

This event is expected to witness around 150 exhibitors from around 13 countries (Austria, Belgium, China, Denmark, France, Germany, India, Italy, Poland, Russia, Spain, Turkey and the US). They will display products and services that cater to the requirements of dairy, sweets and snacks industries. The exhibition will cover an area of 6,000 sq mt. “An extensive visitor promotion campaign is already on to make sure the presence of large number of quality business visitors at this event. We would like to take this opportunity to invite all the stakeholders of dairy, sweets and snacks industry to be part of this event,” says Ashwani Pande, Managing Director, Koelnmesse YA Tradefair Pvt Ltd. Email: spedit@infomedia18.in


India Packaging Show 2011 EVENT PREVIEW

En route to advanced technology Packaging sector is expected to attain dazzling growth in India due to increasing consumerism and rising purchasing power. Tracking these changes and their impact on the sector will be the forthcoming India Packaging Show 2011.

A

ccording to recent study by the Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry of India (Assocham), India’s packaging industry is expected to surge to ` 22,950 crore by 2015 from ` 14,000 crore currently, since the consumers are moving towards green packaging practices amid surging environmental concerns. The study has estimated that the industry will grow at 20 per cent annually. The large growing middle class, liberalisation and organised retail sector are the catalysts to growth in packaging. More than 80 per cent of the total packaging in India constitutes rigid packaging, while the remaining comprises flexible packaging. In this background, Print-Packaging. com Pvt Ltd will be organising India Packaging Show from December 710, 2011, at NSIC Exhibition Centre, Okhla Industrial Estate in New Delhi. The exhibition will bring together the Packaging Zone, Processing Zone and Supply Chain Zone together in one show. The Converting Zone will not be a part of the India Packaging Show 2011 as it will move to Mumbai to be held separately in November. “The separation of the converting segment from end-user packaging for a year is

SHOW HIGHLIGHTS

R To bring together Packaging Zone, Processing Zone and Supply Chain Zone under one roof R Food Technology Show, to be held in collaboration with the AIFPA R PackAge Conference to focus on latest trends R Conference focussing on benefits of automation in packaging & food handling to be held in association with AIA

being done in deference to the exhibitor feedback and will help us renew our focus on the distinct visitor segment that we target for our exhibitors with varying clientele. This should help us give more value to both our exhibitors and visitors not only in this show but also in the future when the segment goes back into the fold of PackPlus,” says Neetu Arora, Director, PrintPackaging.com.

The food show Meanwhile, the focus at India Packaging Show 2011 will also be on the Food Technology Show that is being held in collaboration with the All India Food Processors’ Association (AIFPA). Rising consumer demand, a fast growing food retail sector, new technology, and greater investment by domestic and international companies in the food packaging market have all been attributed as factors to India’s growth. The show aims to bring together the worldwide manufacturers and providers of machinery, materials & services for food, pharma and packaging industry from India & neighbouring countries.

PackAge 2011 The annually held PackAge Conference, to be held concurrently with India Packaging Show, will be spread over three consecutive days. The seminar on the first day will focus on trends in packaging, including topics like anti-counterfeit, plastics waste management, global trends in sustainable packaging and compliance. The conference on the second day, focussing on benefits of automation in packaging & food handling, will be held in association with Automation Industry Association (AIA). In addition, on the third day AIFPA, along with PrintPackaging.com, will organise a conference on food processing technology.

Well-packaged show Demand for packaging in India is expected to rise in the coming years due to the increase in sales of packaged goods. The growth will be aided by the advent of novel technologies and launch of several new products such as food & beverages, home care, personal care, etc. And India Packaging Show, along with a host of concurrent events, will offer an opportunity for buyers & sellers to interact and trade. Email: spedit@infomedia18.in

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EVENT REPORT Fi India 2011

ADDING the INGREDIENT for

SUCCESS

The recently held food ingredient show, Fi India 2011, provided a competitive edge to the players associated with the food industry. The Nutraceuticals Pavilion was one of the major attractions at the event.

Satej Patil lighting the inaugural lamp at Fi India 2011

Prasenjit Chakraborty

A

gainst the backdrop of rapid growth in the food industry in India, Food Ingredients India (Fi India) 2011, organised by UBM India, has emerged as an important show for the food sector. This was evident at the Fi India 2011 exhibition held from October 34, 2011, at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Goregaon, Mumbai. The two-day event was inaugurated by Satej Patil, Minister of State for Home, Rural Development and Food & Drug Administration, Government of 76

Maharashtra. In his inaugural address, Patil said, “The recently amended Food Safety Act brings into focus again, how food ingredients industry would play a vital role in establishing safety standards. The Government of Maharashtra would do its utmost to provide a levelplaying field for companies in this sector and would also create a conducive business environment for attracting foreign investments.” India’s food ingredients market is expanding at a 9 per cent growth rate year-on-year, well above the 5-6 per cent global average. Sanjeev Khaira, Managing Director, UBM India, said,

Modern Food Processing | November 2011

“The factors aiding this growth include changing lifestyle and eating habits, increased per capita income and growing nutritional awareness, which have led to the demand for healthy, nutritious, and cost-effective convenience foods.” The event witnessed over 120 exhibitors, nearly 4,500 industry visitors, including those from the US, Singapore, UAE, Australia, Malaysia, Bangladesh, Dubai, Taiwan, Korea, Italy, Belgium and France.

Knowledge sharing forums and other attractions With four, half-day seminars covering the most critical issues in the Indian F&B industry, the exhibition provided valuable strategic and practical guidance on the fast-changing regulatory requirements, both in India and the world over. The conferences aimed at guiding the food and beverage processing business in India to reach the next level with sessions covering innovations in bakery, dairy, ingredients, health & wellness. The highlight of this year’s exhibition was Nutraceuticals Pavilion, which constituted functional food ingredients and nutraceutical products. The nutraceutical sector is fast gaining acceptance globally for its ability to address demand generated by the burgeoning wellness industry. Fi India 2011 featured two specialised pavilions on China and the nutraceutical sector at the exhibition. Bipin Sinha, Project Director, Fi India, said, “The exhibition is getting bigger and stronger with each passing year. In addition to local participants, we also saw significant number of global participants in this edition. Now, global players are coming to India to explore new business possibilities.” He strongly believes that through this exhibition, they have offered a tremendous value to the whole chain of food manufacturers in India. When asked to comment on the future plans, Sinha replied that they would add more pavilions to the next edition of Fi India. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@infomedia18.in


BOOK REVIEW

Microbiological analysis of food and water Editors: N F Lightfoot and E A Maier Price: ` 8,280

This book presents a complete set of guidelines on how to start and implement a quality control & assurance system in a microbiological laboratory. Perspectives on future development and the potential of the rapid methods in food diagnostics are discussed resourcefully. It has been written with the express objective of using simple but accurate diction so as to cater to the requirements of students as well as professionals in the field of microbiology. To facilitate reading, specialised features (like statistical treatments) have been added as an annex to the book. This book gives a detailed overview of new trend analysis in order to prevent emerging risks in the management and monitoring of microbial load. Overall, this book is a ‘must have’ for students as well as microbiology professionals.

Nonthermal processing technologies for food This book offers a comprehensive review of nonthermal processing technologies that are commercial, emerging or over the horizon. In addition to the broad coverage, leading experts in each technology serve as chapter authors to provide depth of coverage. Technologies covered include physical processes such as high pressure processing (HPP), electromagnetic processes such as pulsed electric field (PEF), irradiation, and UV treatment. Additional techniques such as ozone and chlorine dioxide gas phase treatment; and combination processes are also covered efficiently. Of special interest are the deliberations that focus on the ‘pathway to commercialisation’ for emerging technologies. The book also features appropriate examples and case studies. On the whole, it provides systematic knowledge with numerous examples of process design to serve as a reference book. Researchers, professors and students would find the book a valuable text on the subject.

Editors: Howard Q Zhang, Gustavo V Barbosa-Cánovas, V M Balasubramaniam, C Patrick Dunne, Daniel F Farkas and James T C Yuan Price: ` 14,000

Reviewed by: Rini Ravindran, Lecturer, Department of Biochemistry & Food Science and Quality Control, Ramnarain Ruia College, Mumbai

Available at: Wisdom Book Distributors, Hornby Building, 1st floor, 174, D N Road, Mumbai 400 001 Tel: 022-2207 4484/6631 8958, Telefax: 022-2203 4058, Email: thadam@vsnl.com

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PRODUCTS

Chocolate suction pad

Industrial inkjet printers

Schmalz India offers the SPG suction pad. It has an extremely thin and supple sealing lip that provides an optimal seal for both smooth, glazed chocolate bonbons and structured surfaces. The tapered suction pad geometry ensures that round and square chocolates are completely enclosed and securely held under maximum dynamic pressure. Even chocolates with fillings are moved at high process speeds without being broken. The bell shape securely encloses the chocolate while low vacuum values of -100 mbar prevent the fluid that is underneath the chocolate shell from leaking. The high nominal flow of the suction pad ensures that the required operating vacuum is quickly formed and the leaks that occur when moving highly-structured chocolates are optimally compensated. Manufactured from FDA-compliant silicone, the SPG is authorised for direct contact with food. It complies with applicable hygiene regulations because it can be replaced without causing contamination. A mounting aid that is integrated in the shaft enables one to mount or remove the suction pad without touching the sealing lip. This can also be steam sterilised and cleaned using industry-standard cleaning agents.

Jay Instruments & Systems offers most rugged and cost-effective small character industrial inkjet printers (model Z4500) manufactured by Zanasi, Italy. These injket printers are used for marking on packages to identify any sort of industrial product contained in consumers’ packages as well as in traded packages. The injket printers can mark on almost every kind of surfaces, positioning the print head in all moving directions. These can perform high-degree of IP protection for use in all arduous industrial environments. The inkjet printers are suitable for multiple shifts per day with no interruption for greater productivity, advanced hydraulic system for quick and easy startup. They are also suitable for production lines with long stops. Basic printing characteristics are: up to 4 line of printing; character height from 0.8 mm to 12 mm; store 150 messages with names; 255 characters per message; in-built logo creating software; and 50 logo storage. Features include: support negative printing; support tower printing (text rotation of 900); support DIN printing for cable sector; and maximum throw diameter up to 90 mm.

Schmalz India Pvt Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-4072 5500, Fax: 020-4072 5588 Email: schmalz@pn3.vsnl.net.in

Jay Instruments & Systems Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2352 6207/08, Fax: 022-2352 6210, Mob: 09004279992 Email: marketing@jayinst.com

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PRODUCTS

Spectrometers Jay Instruments & Systems offers the new advanced spectrometers (model CM5) from Konica Minolta, Japan. These are all-in-one versatile standalone top-port instruments with innovative easy operation. The innovative operation of the CM-5 makes colour measurement simple for everyone. Calibration is automatically performed immediately after power is switched on each time. Despite its simple operation, the CM-5 is equipped with a full range of advanced functions for standalone operation. Measurements of both reflectance and transmittance are possible with this instrument. For the chemical and pharmaceutical industries, the CM-5 includes the ability to take measurements according to several standard indices: Gardner, Hazen/APHA, Iodine Color Number, European Pharmacopoeia, and US Pharmacopeia using builtin calibration curves colour space results, such as L*a*b*, L*C*h, Hunter Lab, Yxy, XYZ, Munsell, whiteness and yellowness index. Jay Instruments & Systems Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2352 6207/08, Fax: 022-2352 6210, Mob: 09004279992 Email: marketing@jayinst.com

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PRODUCTS

Lined carton machines

Bulk cooler modules

Rollatainers offers fullyautomatic lined carton machines (model RT-12) that are specially designed filling machines to handle liquids, powder, granules for both food and non-food products. These machines are available with 14 stations and all operations are driven mechanically. An easily accessible magazine holds approximately 150 cartons ensuring 12 minutes of running time. The machines are ergonomically designed to reduce fatigue for the operator. Features include: easy & quick changeover for carton size with same cross-section preset exchange parts, centralised lubrication & main drive with safety clutch, etc. The lined carton machines have fill accuracy of Âą1 per cent for 1 litre/gm. A number of safety switches supervise faulty operation and prevents break-down. These machines are designed to ensure hygienic filling and easy access for cleaning and servicing.

IDMC offers complete bulk milk collection centre modules comprising automated milk receiving and weighing, milk testing, analysing and payment system, bulk milk cooler, DG sets, solar/electrical hot water system, CTP and purification system. The open and closed direct expansion bulk milk cooler modules are available up to 5 kl capacity with accessories. Bulk coolers up to 16 kl capacity in standard version and other configuration like vertical silos, mobile units, etc, can be designed and manufactured on request. These coolers conform to ISO 5708 standards for 2/3/4 milking and fitted with air-cooler condensing units working on R22, R134A and R407c refrigerant. The company also offers automated CIP, refrigeration chiller packages for specialised applications, waste heat recovery system, and milk analysis module.

Rollatainers Ltd Faridabad - Haryana Tel: 0129-409 8800, Mob: 098115 66112 Email: info@rolapak.com

IDMC Ltd Vithal Udyognagar - Gujarat Tel: 02692-236 375, 229 917, Fax: 02692-234 397, 236 164Email: idmc@idmc.coop

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PRODUCTS

Air-cooled chillers Batliboi manufactures and offers air-cooled chillers that have capacity ranging from 7.5 TR to 80 TR in air and watercooled options. These chillers are factory built and factory tested with minimum work at site. They are suitable for outdoor installation either on rooftop or at ground level. The aircooled chillers come with high efficiency semi-hermetic compressors and multi-step capacity control for partial load operation. These units are painted for corrosion resistance. High efficiency liquid coolers have copper tubes with aluminium twisted star inserts. Liberally sized condensers in air-cooled version for operating under high ambient temperature are also provided. The air-cooled chillers have low noise level even in air-cooled version by using more fans of small diameter instead of few bigger diameter noisy fans. Microprocessorbased controllers are available as optional. The air-cooled chillers are tested and certified for compliance with ISO:9001 standards. Batliboi Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-6637 8200, Fax: 022-2264 4430 Email: deepak.dua@batliboi.com

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PRODUCTS

Screening machines Allgaier Werke offers tumbler and vibration screening machines according to GMP and FDA-regulations for applications in pharmacy, food and fine chemicals. These specialised machines are used for the treatment of valuable powders, pellets and granules. The hygienic design includes solutions for WIP-cleaning devices and ATEX certification. Tumbler screening machines are high-performance screening machines for fractionating, protective screening and dedusting. The three-dimensional tumbling movement creates exceptional fine cuts for the bulk solids. Modular design allows the production of additional fractions through additional screening desks in one machine. For simple applications vibration screening machines (type VTS or Vibrall) are economic alternatives (claims the company). Allgaier Werke GmbH Uhingen - Germany Tel: +49-7161-301353, Fax: +49-7161-34268 Email: siebtechnik@allgaier.de

Volumetric cup feeders Simple Packolutions offers volumetric cup feeders for packaging homogenous granular products, like avla, supari, whole spices, foodgrains, etc. These feeders are provided with auto strip cutting system and do not require compress air for machine operations. All contact parts are in SS-304/316 and are available with complete powder coated base frame structure. The cup feeders are equipped with castor wheel for ease of cleaning beneath the machine and for relocating. Auto-detect type photo-cell ensures no change of gear for change in pouch length. These are also available with stamp type contact coding system and nitrogen gas flushing attachment for enhance product shelf life. The volumetric cup feeders have an output capacity of 15 PPM to 100 PPM, depending upon the product, weight per pouch and pouch size. Simple Packolutions Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Mob: 099690 00116, 098206 43731 Email: packolutions@gmail.com 82

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PRODUCTS

Chain die-forming machines AMP-Rose India offers high output chain die design specifically suited to fill products where high filling ratios are required up to 35 per cent. The linear forming geometry of a chain die set has established a clear advantage over the rotating uniplast technology when considering filled product or softer toffees. Model SFB 1500 can achieve outputs up to 1,500 kg/hour at rope speeds up to 120 M/min. Its robust simple design guarantees exceptional long-life for the machine and die set. Due to the zero relative motion between the die plungers and the pressure chain, die wear in this area is all but eliminated ensuring longer die life, quieter operation and a longer dwell time for the compression cycle. AMP-Rose India Pvt Ltd Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-2847 3611 Fax: 080-2847 3615 Email: sales@amprose.co.in

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PRODUCTS

Homogenisers Goma Engineering offers high-pressure homogenisers that are available in capacities ranging from 20 LPH to 20000 LPH. The lubrication and air cooling system of these homogenisers ensures optimum temperature for continuous duties. The homogenisers are equipped with hydraulically-operated two-stage homogenising head, specially designed homogenising valves, plunger made of special steel with wear resistant coating, special surface treatment, specially

designed ball/poppet valves of stellite/ceramic for viscous products, etc. The one-piece forged cylinder block is ultrasonically tested for long life. These homogenisers come with plunger cooling system with low water consumption, easily replaceable plunger seals, SS316 imported diaphragm type glycerin filled pressure gauge. The machinery is designed according to 3A standard & CE marked. Goma Engineering Pvt Ltd Thane - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2173 1801-02, 4161 4161 Fax: 022-2173 1803, 4161 4162 Email: goma@vsnl.com

Mixing & seasoning machines Kinn Shang Hoo Iron Works offers universal mixing and seasoning machines (model KUP60) that are used for stirring rice, noodles, vegetables; for drying peanuts, sesames, coffee beans; mixing salt, sauce, rice, meat; for massaging meat; and for stirring and drying Row-Su (fish, pork, and chicken). These machines have automatic shot off system for gas (in case fire blows of ) and one pushbottom knob to completely stop the machines, including the gas and electricity. The mixing and seasoning machines also have automatic controllable temperature and automatic re-starting initiate fire system. These machines also have easy loading and discharging facility. Kinn Shang Hoo Iron Works Kaohsiung - Taiwan Tel: +886-7-551 5397, Fax: +886-7-521 4538 Email: Ksh6671@ms27.hinet.net 84

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Product Inquiry Card

5

EASY STEPS TO GET PRODUCT INFO

Product Sourcing Just Got Simpler

1 See the index page in this issue. Every product carries a number. 2 Choose products of your choice from the list. 3 Write their serial numbers (as per the index page) of your chosen product/s one-by-one in the boxes. 4 Fill in your complete contact details. 5 Send it to us at the address printed overleaf.

-1 TIPIN THE BDOUXCETS

UR O L FIL TH PR OF YO D WI ER/S EN S ND MB NU OICE A CH

-2 TIP SE ENSUILRLEIN Name:___________________________________________________Designation:_________________________________________ Company:_______________________________________________________________________________________________

F A PLE T YOU ETAILS THA THE D RED ALL REQUI

Address:_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Tel:________________________________________Mob:_______________________________Fax:_________________________ Email:__________________________________________________Web:_______________________________________________

Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

11/2011

City:_________________________________________Pin:_______________________State:__________________________


POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE

Business Reply Inland Permit No. 555 Bhavani Shankar Post Office, Mumbai 400 028.

Special Projects INFOMEDIA 18 LIMITED Ruby House,1st Floor J K Sawant Marg Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028 INDIA

NO POSTAGE STAMP NECESSARY IF POSTED IN INDIA


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PRODUCTS

Handy coder/marker Process Instrumentation & Controls offers handy coder/ marker. This is a hand operated coder that can be used to mark/ code on corrugated cartons, plywood, wooden crates, paper bags, cement, fertiliser bags, leather, cloth, etc. This is a light weight & hand-held coder reliable for continuous & prolonged use and is extremely sturdy. The handy coder comes in various sizes and has the spring-return arrangement. This has separate rollers (which hold the ink) and the type of ink the rollers has, depends on the coding requirement (nonporous/porous). The stereo sets are grooved types and come in various sizes. Each set of stereo (types) contains a set of letters, alphabets and special characters for marking. This is a reliable and versatile coding/stamping machine and is an innovative system designed with criteria of hand-operated system used for a variety of applications in secondary packaging. It is easy to operate, durable and economical. Process Instrumentation & Controls Vadodara - Gujarat Tel: 0265-235 7228, Fax: 0265-235 5429, Mob: 098251 39846 Email: batchprinting@yahoo.com

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PRODUCTS

Screw blancher Filtron Engineers offers screw blancher with discharge screw. The blancher handles the product very gently, conveys and improves the product yield. Blanching is done by hot water at required temperature and accordingly controls are provided. Hot water circulation is done by a pump and is distributed at several points for uniform temperature. A filter is provided at the suction of the pump. The blancher has removable cover along the full length at the top. The drives of screw shaft and the discharge screw are driven by geared motor with variable frequency drive. Its speed can be adjusted to balance the time. The screw also has false cover of perforated sheet to ensure that floating mangoes are held down. Besides, it has temperature control system and its heat transfer system optimises product quality. It also offers easy access for cleaning. Filtron Engineers Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-2433 8642, Fax: 020-2433 7913 Email: filtron@pn3.vsnl.net.in

Coffee maker Fresh & Honest CafĂŠ offers sleek, portable, sophisticated and easyto-use coffee machine Blue LB 850 Lavazza from Italy. The machine is ideal in rooms & hotel suites and works on the patented capsule technology. These capsules contain ground coffee powder, packed in inert atmosphere and sealed to lock the freshness & aroma. The coffee maker is a classical gift for every coffee connoisseur as one can surely brew the finest Italian espressos, lattes and cappuccinos. Consumers just need to pop in a coffee capsule & press a button, and have the favourite cup of authentic espresso ready. The Lavazza LB 850 is not only perfect for hot coffee but one can beat the heat this summer with variety of cold coffees by chilling the cup of espresso and blending it with scoops of ice cream/ milk/ whipped cream. Fresh & Honest CafĂŠ Ltd Chennai - Tamil Nadu Tel: 044-2462 2595 Fax: 044-2462 2596 Email: info@lavazza.co.in 90

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PRODUCTS

Can seamer Shini-I Machinery Works offers S-M446 automatic irregular can seamer with clincher, which is specially designed for irregular can closing. Filled can is fed forward through a timing screw and a turret to meet with end. Clinching chuck and two clinching rollers push food down and clip end & can body together. Then, clinched can is carried by a turret and chain to enter seaming station. Four seaming rollers undertake seaming operation. A concise seaming head with adjustable chuck set makes seaming quality meet international standards. Each seaming arm is controlled by an individual seaming cam and a copy disc is used to guide rollers turn accordingly. This has simple structure and multiple safety devices, is easy to operate and maintain. SHIN-I Machinery Works Co Ltd Taichung - Taiwan Tel: +886-4-2623 8181 Fax: +884-4-2623 2129 Email: shinican@ms15.hinet.net

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PRODUCTS

Pulveriser

Food slicing machine

Jas Enterprises offers impact pulveriser. It is a versatile grinding unit of heavy and rugged construction and built for continuous operation day after day. The unit is especially designed for the medium fine, and fine size reduction. It meets most capacity requirements and enables a wide degree of adjustments with fineness of the finished product ranging from about 60 mesh to bulk passing through 325 mesh, depending on a considerable extent to the particular material being handled. The impact pulveriser combines grinding, classifying and conveying all in one single unit. It consists of an encased rotor carrying swing hammers, whizzer classifier for fineness regulation, and blower fan mounted on a solid shaft. Raw material to be pulverised enters the crushing chamber through the hopper and automatic rotary feeder. The impact of the hammer on the feed material against the liner plates reduces it into fine powder. The ground material is carried towards the whizzer classifier for classification and the oversize particles are rejected by the classifier and returns to the crushing chamber for further grinding. The classified material is then conveyed into the cyclone for collection and bagging. A dust collector is provided in the system for ensuring dust-free operation and no loss of ground powder.

Global Technology offers food slicing machine manufactured by Weber, Germany. It processes sausage, ham, meat and cheese. This slicing machine can be extended to form automatic processing line that includes feeding, scanning, cutting, portioning, weighing, sorting, buffering and automatic transport in packaging machine. It slices up to 2.5 tonne of sausage or cheese per hour, which is the equivalent of 8,000 slices per minute. The ‘Slicer 904 MCS’ with overlapper joins the portions cut next to each other and places them on top of each other. The portions are then fed into the packing machine on a fully automatic basis. The machine is equipped with the ‘Pac-Drives C400’

Jas Enterprises Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2274 3454, Fax: 079-2274 5062 Mob: 094274 17384 Email: info@jasenterprise.com

Global Technology Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-6699 5218, Fax: 022-2822 6570 Email: info@globaltechnology.org.in

and ‘C600’ for all motion control, logic and technology functions in the slicer. Up to 17 frequency inverters, 100 digital inputs & 100 digital outputs, the check weigher and the optical weigher are networked via a CAN network over approximately 50-m length. It is provided with 20 seven-digit weight displays, which indicate the package weight and are located above the packaging machine, where the machine operator can check whether to add or take off slices.

Fluid bed dryer Axial flow fan Vacunair Engineering offers an axial flow fan. To achieve high efficiency this axial flow fan has a defined hub ratio of 71 to 25 for a given capacity, pressure and speed. This is available in 22 sizes from 225 to 2500 mm in each type. Drive available for direct mounting/vee belt drive. The impeller blades are adjustable type and rest at designed angle to suit capacity & in series for higher pressure. The impellers are made or aerofoil profile from cast aluminium alloy. Bifurcated type fan is available for handling corrosive gases. The range covers fans in capacity up to 3,00,000 m3/hr and pressure up to 100 mm of WG.

Aero Therm Systems offers fluid bed dryer. This has a batch capacity of 15 kg to 500 kg. The digital temperature indicator controller gives accurate temperature control. Control action can be on-off or PID as per control accuracy required. Container of fluid bed dryer is made out of MS / SS304 / SS316 / aluminium as per requirement. The perforated sheet & fine wire mesh screen is provided at the bottom for proper air distribution. Flame-proof & spark-proof version is also available. Heating can be electrical/thermic fluid or steam radiator/oil fired hot air generator.

Vacunair Engineering Co Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2291 0771, Fax: 079-2291 0770 Mob: 098240 36375 Email: info@vacunair.com

Aero Therm Systems Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2589 0158, Fax: 079-2583 4987 Mob: 098250 08720 Email: contact@aerothermsystems.com

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PRODUCTS

Digital colour mark sensor Lubi Electronics offers ‘Sunx LX-100’ series digital colour mark sensor. This can detect any marking because the sensor is equipped with red, green and blue Light Emitting Diode (LED) element. Furthermore, to expand the functionality the sensor comes with dual mode, ie, mark mode (ultra high-speed response) & colour mode (highprecision mark colour discrimination) to suit any application. This sensor comes with Mode Navi technology for enhancing features and easy to use. It is provided with 4-digit digital display, 12-bit A/D converter, D-code, key lock, timer, NPN or PNP outputs, IP67 protection, etc. It is used in many applications/industries, especially in packaging, food, pharmaceuticals, textile, plastic & many more. Lubi Electronics Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2220 5471, Fax: 079-2220 0660 Mob: 093274 97006 Email: info@lubielectronics.com

On-line digital printing technology M&M Technologies offers online digital printing technology. It provides the printers with high-resolution Piezo ink-jet technology, thereby offering the packaging industry the most efficient and state-of-art-technology in terms of hardware, software, accessories, consumables. In terms of application, it is the most cost-effective modern technology, used for marking, printing and traceability. It is a user-friendly, robust and compact technology. The simplified operation at each level of production process is versatility in application software to design the logos, text, barcodes, variable and fixed data field, option for multi-colour printing, standalone or network printing. Low maintenance and easy operability makes the system more userfriendly. The printing can be done on coated or uncoated corrugated boxes, aluminium foil, glass, metal for address printing, pharmaceutical primary, secondary package printing as well as on pallets. This system can also be linked into multi-plant and multi-location with Wi-Fi and Internet connection. M&M Technologies Pvt Ltd Navi Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2778 1580 Email: mp@mmtechnologiesindia.com

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PRODUCTS

Fried type extruder

Peanut paste-making grinding mills

Malik Engineers offers fried type extruder (medium shear type) suitable for producing fried type corn collets or curls from de-germinated corn meal or grits. The extruder consists of a horizontal auger screw driven through a geared motor to transport the moisturised corn raw-material. Due to its special design it is suited for producing only kurkure type product or curls. The screw continuously feeds between a stator (fixed) brass plate and rotating brass plate spinning at high speed by a separate high power motor. The shear applied to the material is determined by the speed of rotation of feed screw, the rotor spinning speed and the gap between the two brass plates. Due to friction and mechanical working of corn material, high shear is applied to raw materials which cooks them around 120°C and converts the raw-material to plasticised mass or dough. The length of product can be controlled by varying the knife speed. The width (thickness) of product can be varied by adjusting the gap between the two bronze plates. The rotor is driven through high power AC motor of 30 HP and feed screw is driven through geared motor with 5 HP power. A large capacity hopper is provided above the feed screw to hold the moisturised corn meal/grits. The wet product is transported via elevators/conveyors through downstream equipment, viz, sifter (separator) to separate crushing and small pieces/incomplete expanded material from properly sized collets. The fryer helps in removing the excess moisture and final expansion.

Atlas Exports offers 11 A peanut paste-making grinding mills. These grinding mills are modern day answer for cost-effective grinding of peanuts and sorghum. The machines are simple in operation and easy in maintenance. They are specially designed for wet grinding of peanuts and sorghums. Technical specifications include: driven by 1.5 HP 1440 RPM electric motor; output 20-25 kg per hour; pulley size 12 inch; and net weight around 33 kg.

Malik Engineers Thane - Maharashtra Tel: 0250-239 0839 Fax: 022-2883 0751 Email: info@malikengg.com

Air compressors Eskay Engineering Systems offers 20 HP pet blowing air compressors that are widely used in food industries, pet blowing machines, paramedical industries and plastic industries. Salient features of the range of air compressors include: sturdy construction, higher efficiency, longer functionality, air-cooled & water-cooled, auto drain valves, auto unloader systems, hydraulic tested air receivers, and 400-1100 bottles/hour. Eskay Engineering Systems Coimbatore - Tamil Nadu Tel: 0422-6532890 Fax: 0422-2564565 Mob: 09442113911 Email: info@eskayengg.in 94

Modern Food Processing | November 2011

Atlas Exports Rajkot - Gujarat Tel: 0281-2382322, Fax: 0281-2382322 Mob: 09824202885 Email: newatlas52@hotmail.com

Cooking mixer Tricon offers cooking mixers from Stephan, Germany. These mixers perform automated processes via PLC, which include mixing, dispersion, de-aerating (vacuum), indirect steam cooking and jacket cooling. Significantly shorter batch times are possible resulting in tremendous savings in energy and time. The advantages offered by the mixers are minimum space, the tilted vessel design ensures easy filling & emptying of vessel, the rotating scraper optimises mixing, prevention of oxidation, retention of flavours & colours, easy operation & cleaning . These cookers are ideal for cold & hot process – frying of onions/spice pastes, currys, meat, poultry, ketchup, pizza sauces, dressing, mayonnaise, marinades, baby food, hommus, saag/spinach pastes, chilly sauces, soups, rice and vegetables. These are available in 400, 800, 1,200 ltr sizes corresponding capacities 800,1,600 and 2,400 litrs/hr. The company also offers cookers in models KM, UM/SK and VMC with emulsion process. Tricon Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020 -2565 2205/2451 Mob: 098901 92832 Email: triconfood@gmail.com The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/ distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of

Modern Food Processing


LIST OF PRODUCTS

Sl. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102

Product

Pg. No.

AC drive ............................................................... 83 AC motor .................................................................... 23 AC variable frequency drive ........................................ 83 Accoustic enclosure...................................................... 69 Agitator........................................................................ 21 Air compressor............................................................. 94 Air cooler ..................................................................... 19 Air dryer ...................................................53,55,57,59,65 Air purifier ................................................................... 33 Air-cooled chiller ......................................................... 81 Almond cutting machine ............................................. 91 Ammonia liquid chiller ................................................. 8 Animal feed technology................................................. 5 Automatic filling machine ........................................... 93 Automatic rescue device .............................................. 83 Automatic scrubber dryer ............................................ 43 Axial flow fan ..........................................................91,92 Batch disperser ...................................................... 21 Battery charger............................................................. 63 Beverage canning ......................................................... 93 Beverage packaging...................................................... 93 Blender and mixer ....................................................... 78 Blower & fan ............................................................... 91 Boiler ........................................................................... 79 Boiling/stirring............................................................. 78 Brake motor ................................................................. 23 Brewing.......................................................................... 5 Brine chiller ................................................................. 83 Bulk cooler module...................................................... 80 Bulk milk cooler ............................................................ 8 Burner .......................................................................... 79 Butterfly valve ................................................................ 8 Calorimeter ........................................................... 21 Can cap making machine ............................................ 93 Can making machine................................................... 93 Can seamer .................................................................. 91 Capillary copper tubing ................................................. 6 Capping & packaging production line ........................ 93 Caramel bar line .......................................................... 90 Carpet cleaning machine ............................................. 43 Centrifugal air blower.................................................. 91 Cereal bar line ............................................................. 90 Chain die-forming machine ........................................ 83 Chapati machine.......................................................... 91 Chocolate ball mill ...................................................... 90 Chocolate chips line .................................................... 90 Chocolate conche ........................................................ 90 Chocolate drop machine.............................................. 90 Chocolate enrober ....................................................... 90 Chocolate equipment................................................... 90 Chocolate lentils line ................................................... 90 Chocolate melting tank ............................................... 90 Chocolate mould ......................................................... 90 Chocolate moulding machine...................................... 90 Chocolate pipe line ...................................................... 90 Chocolate pump .......................................................... 90 Chocolate refiner conche ............................................. 90 Chocolate suction pad ................................................. 78 Chocolate tempering machine ..................................... 90 Chorafali making machine .......................................... 91 Chow (noodles) making machine................................ 91 Cleaning section equipment .......................................... 5 Chlorine gas cylinder/tonner ....................................... 81 Coding and marking labelling machine ................. COC Coffee maker ............................................................... 90 Colour masterbatch ..................................................... 79 Colour sorting................................................................ 5 Compact moulding machine ....................................... 90 Compressor ............................................................ 19, 91 Controller for furnace .................................................. 83 Conveying blower ........................................................ 91 Conveying system ........................................................ 90 Conveyor belt .............................................................. 82 Cooking mixer ............................................................. 94 Cooling tunnel ............................................................. 90 Counter & power supply ............................................. 31 Cutter/slicer ........................................................... 78, 90 Dairy machinery ...................................................... 8 Daliya making machine ............................................... 91 DC motor .................................................................... 23 Dehumidifier ......................................................... 51, 81 Dehydration equipment......................................... 78, 90 Digital colour mark sensor .......................................... 93 Digital laser sorting machine....................................... 12 Disperser ...................................................................... 21 Door............................................................................. 89 Drawer magnet ............................................................ 84 Drive & automation .................................................... 63 Dry cum wet grinder ................................................... 91 Dry van pump.............................................................. 69 Dust collector system................................................... 91 Dust control door ........................................................ 89 Electromagnetic feeder .......................................... 84 Electronic brake ........................................................... 83 Elevator controller ....................................................... 83 Embedded system ........................................................ 63 Emergency safety kit for cylinder/tonner .................... 81 Encoder........................................................................ 31 End cap machine ......................................................... 93 Evaporating unit .......................................................... 19 Event - IPACK-IMA 2012 ........................................ 35 Exhibition - Engineering Expo.....................50,67,71,73

Sl. No. 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201

Product

Pg. No.

Exhibition - India Packaging Show 2011 ................... 40 Extruded product ........................................................... 5 Extruder for papad machine ........................................ 91 Factory automation .............................................FIC Fat melter .................................................................... 90 Filtration equipment ...................................................BC Filtration system .........................................................BC Fish processing technology .......................................... 78 Fixed type extruder ...................................................... 94 Flame proof motor ...................................................... 23 Flange mounting B5/B35 motor ................................. 23 Flexible transparent PVC strip door ........................... 89 Flour mill ....................................................................... 5 Flow control valve ....................................................... 37 Fluid bed dryer ............................................................ 92 Fluoropolymer tubing ...............................53,55,57,59,65 Foil sealing machine .................................................... 80 Food analysing & testing machine .............................BC Food forming machine ................................................ 78 Food processing line ................................................78,90 Food processing system ............................................ BIC Food slicing machine................................................... 92 Forced convection unit air cooler ................................ 19 Fruits/vegetables processing......................................... 90 Fuel burner .................................................................. 91 Gas chloronical gravity & vaccum feed................... 81 Gear pump................................................................... 89 Geared motor .............................................................. 23 Grain handling system................................................... 5 Gravy machine ............................................................. 91 Grill magnet ................................................................ 84 Grinding & dispersion technology ............................... 5 Gyratory screen ............................................................ 84 Ham processing..................................................... 78 Hammer machine ........................................................ 91 Handy coder/marker.................................................... 89 Heat resistant door ...................................................... 89 Heater controller.......................................................... 63 Heating bath ................................................................ 21 High capacity bag palletiser ........................................ 17 High pressure cleaner .................................................. 43 High pressure homogeniser ......................................... 21 High speed servo-driven bagging machine ................. 10 Homogeniser ............................................................... 84 Hopper magnet............................................................ 84 Hot air & water generator........................................... 79 Hot plate...................................................................... 21 Hygienic design cylinder ..........................53,55,57,59,65 IBR steam boiler ................................................... 79 Impact pulveriser ......................................................... 91 Inclined conveyor system ............................................. 90 Industrial automation .................................................. 47 Industrial control & sensing device ............................. 31 Industrial cooling system ............................................. 83 Industrial door ............................................................. 89 Industrial inkjet printer ............................................... 78 Industrial type unit air cooler ...................................... 19 Inline disperser ............................................................ 21 Innovative automation system ..................................... 37 Integrated food processing technology ........................ 37 Inverter ........................................................................ 63 Juicer .................................................................... 91 Kneading machine ................................................. 21 Laboratory reactor ................................................. 21 Laboratory software ..................................................... 21 Level controller ............................................................ 31 Lined carton machine.................................................. 80 Liquid filling/packing machine ................................... 93 Liquid food processing ...............................................BC Liquid ring vacuum pump ........................................... 91 Magnetic equipment.............................................. 84 Magnetic plate ............................................................. 84 Magnetic stirrer ........................................................... 21 Magnetic trap .............................................................. 84 Masala mill .................................................................. 91 Mathiya making machine ............................................ 91 Measuring & monitoring relay .................................... 31 Meat ball forming machine ......................................... 78 Meat processing ........................................................... 78 Metal detector & separator ........................................... 7 Mill .............................................................................. 21 Mini dal mill ............................................................... 91 Mini pulveriser with circulating system ...................... 91 Mixer grinder............................................................... 91 Mixing & seasoning machine...................................... 84 Mixing machine........................................................... 90 Mixing processing........................................................ 78 Mixture for papad machine ......................................... 91 Motion control ............................................................ 31 Motor........................................................................... 23 Multi-axis motion controller ....................................... 10 Multi-chamber pulveriser ............................................ 91 Multi-fuel-fired IBR steam boiler............................... 79 Multistage centrifugal air blower................................. 91 Natural herbal sweetener ....................................... 32 Neck sleeving machine ................................................ 80 Non-IBR oil-fired steam boiler................................... 79 Noodle making machine ............................................. 91 Oil/coolant cooler ................................................. 83

Sl. No. 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304

Product

Pg. No.

Oil/gas firing equipment ............................................. 91 Oil milling ..................................................................... 5 Online B2B marketplace ....................................... 61, 95 On-line digital printing technology ........................... 93 Optical colour sorting machine ................................... 12 Overhead stirrer ........................................................... 21 Packaging machine ...........................................45, 49 Palletising robot ........................................................... 17 Panel air-conditioner ................................................... 83 Panipuri making machine............................................ 91 Papad making machine ............................................... 91 Pasta............................................................................... 5 Peanut paste-making grinding mill ............................. 94 Peeler ........................................................................... 90 Photo electric sensor .................................................... 31 Pilot plant .................................................................... 21 Plastic pellet ................................................................... 5 Plate heat exchanger ...................................................... 8 Plug valve ....................................................................... 8 Pneumatic conveying system ....................................... 91 Pneumatic cylinder ...................................53,55,57,59,65 Pneumatic valve ............................................................. 8 Portable loader ............................................................. 91 Pounding machine ....................................................... 91 Power controller .......................................................... 83 Process tank ................................................................... 8 Programmable logic controller .................................... 31 Programmable terminal ............................................... 31 Proximity sensor .......................................................... 31 Pulveriser ..................................................................... 92 Pump ................................................................ 69, 89,91 Pumping filtering unit vacuum pump ......................... 91 PVC strip door ............................................................ 89 Rail tanker .............................................................. 8 Railway product ........................................................... 63 Rare earth tube ............................................................ 84 Refrigerant pump........................................................... 8 Refrigeration .................................................................. 8 Retort ........................................................................... 12 Retort pouch ................................................................ 12 RFID ........................................................................... 31 Rice milling equipment ................................................. 5 Roasting oven .............................................................. 12 Roots blower ................................................................ 69 Rotary evaporator ........................................................ 21 Rotary gear pump ........................................................ 89 Safety door ............................................................ 89 Safety light curtain ...................................................... 31 SCR power controller .................................................. 83 Screening machine ....................................................... 82 Screw blancher ............................................................. 90 Screw compressor .......................................................... 8 Security system ............................................................ 33 Self-adhesive tape ........................................................ 84 Shaker .......................................................................... 21 Shrink film packaging machine ................................... 17 Side channel blower..................................................... 91 Single disc machine ..................................................... 43 Slipring crane duty motor............................................ 23 Soft starter & digital starter ........................................ 83 Solar power .................................................................. 63 Solid-liquid mixer ........................................................ 21 Special refrigeration equipment ................................... 83 Spectrometer ................................................................ 79 Spice mill ..................................................................... 91 Stainless steel fitting .................................53,55,57,59,65 Steam boiler ................................................................. 79 Stirrer ........................................................................... 91 Stretch film packaging machine .................................. 17 Stretch wrapping machine ........................................... 17 Sweeper ........................................................................ 43 Switching relay ............................................................ 31 Tank & silo............................................................. 8 Temperature controller ................................................ 31 Testing facility ............................................................. 37 Thermal process............................................................. 5 Thermic fluid heater .................................................... 79 Thermostat & vaccum dryer/mixer ............................. 21 Timer ........................................................................... 31 TPU masterbatch ........................................................ 79 Trim handling system.................................................. 91 Universal type unit air cooler ................................. 19 UPS.............................................................................. 63 Utility support equipment ........................................... 63 Vacuum cleaner ................................................33, 43 Vacuum booster pump ................................................ 69 Vacuum system ............................................................ 69 Valve ............................................................................ 37 Vane damper................................................................ 91 Variable frequency drive ........................................ 31, 83 Vegetable cutting machine .......................................... 91 Ventilator ..................................................................... 84 Vermicelli machine ...................................................... 91 Vibration motor ........................................................... 84 Vision sensor................................................................ 31 Volumetric cup feeder ................................................. 82 Water chiller ......................................................... 83 Water purifier .............................................................. 33 Water ring vacuum pump ........................................... 91 Water wall membrane panel IBR steam boiler ........... 79 Wood fire four pass thermic fluid heater .................... 79 Wood fire thermic fluid heater ................................... 79

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover, COC - Cover on Cover

November 2011 | Modern Food Processing

95


LIST OF ADVERTISERS

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Alok Masterbatches Ltd T: +91-11-41612244 E: sales@alokindustries.com W: www.alokmasterbatches.com

79

Hi-Rel Electronics Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-23827180 E: contact@hirel,net W: www.hirel.net

Ani Engineers T: +91-2752-241479 E: anivarya@sancharnet.in W: www.anivaryapumps.com

89

HRS Process Systems Ltd T: +91-20-66047894 E: info@hrsasia.co.in W: www.hrsasia.co.in

Aqua Services T: +91-265-2331748 E: aquaas@sify.com W: www.aquaservicesindia.com

81

IDMC Limited T: +91-2692-225399 E: idmc@idmc.coop W: www.idmc.coop

Arctic India Sales T: +91-11-23906777 E: bryairmarketing@pahwa.com W: www.bryair.com

81

IKA India Private Limited T: +91-80-26253900 E: process@ika.in W: www.ika.in

Balkrishna Boilers Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-25894701 E: info@balkrishn.com W: www.balkrishn.com

79

IndiaMART InterMESH Ltd T: +1800-200-4444 / 91-120-3911000 E: pr@indiamart.com W: www.indiamart.com

Beumer Group Gmbh & Co. Kg T: +49-2521-240 E: vt@beumer.com W: www.beumer.com

17

Ipack-Ima Spa T: +91-22-24368186 E: w.pereira@indiaitaly.com

35

Bry Air (Asia) Pvt Ltd T: +91-11-23906777 E: bryairmarketing@pahwa.com W: www.bryair.com

51

Jas Enterprises T: +91-79-22743454 E: info@jasenterprise.com W: www.jasenterprise.com

Buhler (India) Pvt Ltd T: +91-80-22890000 E: mallikarjuna.s@buhlergroup.com W: www.buhlergroup.com

5

63

BIC

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details Misumi India Pvt Ltd T: +91-20-66470000 E: sales@misumi.co.in W: http://in.misumi-ec.com

Pg No FIC

Nichrome India Ltd T: +91-20-66011001 E: marketing@nichrome.com W: www.nichrome.com

45

Noida Fabcon Machines Pvt Ltd T: +91-120-4225550 E: nishantb@fabcon-india.com W: www.fabcon-india.com

82

21

Omron Automation Pvt. Ltd. T: +91-80-40726400 E: in_enquiry@ap.omron.com W: www.omron-ap.com

31

61; 95

Plast World T: +91-9376128372 E: plastworld1@rediffmail.com W: www.stripdoor.co.in

89

40

91

Print Packaging.Com Pvt Ltd T: +91-22-27812093 E: info@indiapackagingshow.com W: www.IndiaPackagingshow.com

Jay Instruments & Systems Pvt Ltd T: +91-22-23526205 E: sales@jayinst.com W: www.jayinst.com

47

S+S Separation And Sorting Technology Gmbh T: +91-20-26741012 E: makarand.mandke@se-so-tec.com W: www.se-so-tec.com

8

84

Clearpack India Pvt Ltd T: +91-22-42532222 E: info@clearpack.com W: www.clearpack.com

49

Jaykrishna Magnetics Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-22970452 E: info@jkmagnetics.com W: www.jkmagnetics.com

Shin-I Machinery Works Co., Ltd T: +886-4-2623-8181 E: shinican@ms15.hinet.net W: www.shinican.com

12

Diversey India Pvt Ltd T: +91-22-66444222 W: www.diversey.com

43

Jeevika Food Machinery Co. T: +91-44-23660742 E: srinivasan@jfm.co.in W: www.jfm.co.in

SMC Pneumatics (India) Pvt Ltd T: +91-120-2568730 E: info@smcindia.in W: www.smcin.com

Jeltron Systems (India) Pvt.Ltd. T: +91-40-23401159 E: info@jeltron.com W: www.jeltron.com

7

93

53;55;57;59;65

SPX W: www.spx.com/india

37

83

Sreelakshmi Traders T: +91-44-24343343 E: sreelakshmitraders@gmail.com W: www.sreelakshmitraders.com

84

Engineering Expo T: +91-09819552270 E: engexpo@infomedia18.in W: www.engg-expo.com

50;67;71;73

Eureka Forbes Limited T: +91-80-30251500 E: fandb@eurekaforbes.com W: www.eurekaforbes.com

33

Jet Pack Machines T: +91-22-33071100 E: info@jetpackmachines.com W: www.jetpackmachines.com

80

The Indian Electric Co T: +91-20-24474303 E: icemktg@indianelectric.com W: www.indianelectric.com

23

Everest Transmission T: +91-11-45457777 E: info@everestblowers.com W: www.everestblowers.com

69

Kinn Shang Hoo Iron Works T: +886-7-551-5397 E: ksh6671@ms27.hinet.net W: www.ksh.com.tw

78

V S International T: +91-129-2254165 E: info@vspackit.com W: www.vspackit.com

10

FX Multitech Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-27910993 E: fxmultitech@gmail.com W: www.fxmultitech.com

19

Kwality Tubes And Capillaries T: +91-141-2330476 E: papriwal@sancharnet.in W: www.vaishalimetal.com

6

Vacunair Engineering Co Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-22910771 E: info@vacunair.com W: www.vacunair.com

91

Giantwell Machinery Co., Ltd. T: +886-4-852-0178 E: paulsale@giantwell.com.tw W: www.giantwell.com.tw

90

Markem-Image India Private Limited T: +91-120-4099500 E: salesindia@markem-imaje.com W: www.markem-imaje.com

Varsha Engineering Co., T: +91-40-27267888 E: vecsystems@gmail.com W: www.vecchocolatesystem.com

90

Werner Finley Pvt Ltd T: +91-80-23289889 E: info@wernerfinley.com W: www.wernerfinley.com

83

Guan Yu Machinery Factory Co., Ltd T: +886-4-896-5198 E: info@guan-yu.net W: www.guan-yu.net

BC

Mech-Air Industries T: +91-265-2280017 E: info@freshnpure.net W: www.freshnpure.net

COC

32

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover, COC - Cover on Cover

96

Modern Food Processing | November 2011

Our consistent advertisers


Registration No: MH / MR / WEST / 232 / 2009-2011; RNI No: MAHENG / 2008 / 25262 Licence to Post at Mumbai Patrika Channel Sorting Office, Mumbai GPO., Mumbai 400 001 Date of Mailing 3rd & 4th of Every Month Issue. Date Of Publication: 28th of Every Month

98

Modern Food Processing - November 2011  

'MODERN FOOD PROCESSING’ is the leading monthly business magazine in India exclusively for the food processing industry. It covers the lates...

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