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Modern Food Processing

March 2012


EDITORIAL

Out of the cold storage!

C

all it a coincidence! On this page of the previous edition, we had touched upon the sad state of affairs related to the country’s food processing and storage infrastructure. Hence, it is the need of the hour to expect some clear, comprehensive and fast-track measures from the forthcoming Union Budget. The objective is to effect the much-desired improvements so that the Indian food processing sector gets its due share in the global market, sooner than later. In this backdrop, the Union Agriculture Ministry’s recent plan to invest in cold chain infrastructure for fruits in the upcoming financial year is more than welcome! For a country that produces nearly 230 million tonne of fruits and vegetables every year, and given the fast rising demography, with over 1.2 billion populace as on today, India can ill afford to let almost one-fourth of this produce (pegged at ` 50,000 crore) go down the drain primarily due to scarce infrastructure for perishable products. According to recent figures, India has only about 30 million tonne of cold storage capacity, with a staggering shortfall of almost 40 million tonne capacity needed to deal with wastage-related losses. As per reports, the ministry is moving ahead to form a Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) with Fresh and Healthy Enterprises, a fully-owned subsidiary of government-owned Container Corporation of India. In the first phase of the project, the SPV is mandated to provide end-to-end cold chain for fruits such as kinnow, orange, banana and mango. Further, the cold chain facilities are slated to come up at major production centres, for example, areas near Lucknow and Nagpur are likely to have facilities for mangoes and oranges respectively. While the government’s participation will vary from 40-55 per cent, the investment in each cold chain will range from ` 70-100 crore depending on the location.

Editorial Advisory Board

In consideration of an investment of ` 8,150 crore for cold chain development, a government-appointed task force has envisaged to create an additional 9-10 million tonne capacity by 2012. All these will hopefully lead the nation towards a healthy farm-to-fork cold chain in line with the growing domestic and export market outlook. In this mission, active participation of industry bodies as well as other stakeholders will be an icing on the cake!

Dr A S Abhiraman Former Executive Director - Research, Hindustan Lever Ltd

Prof M Y Kamat Former Head, Food Engg & Technology Dept, UICT, Mumbai

Manas R Bastia manas@infomedia18.in

March 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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44

46

32 Cover design:M ahendra Varpe Photography: Joshua Navalkar

Special Focus: Food Processing Machinery Grain processing ................................................................. 32

Insight & Outlook: Beverage Processing

Multinational machinery manufacturers ............................ 34

Beverage industry................................................................ 44

Interface - Tapas Chatterjee, Managing Director, SSP Pvt Ltd ...................................... 36

Aseptic technology.............................................................. 46

Roundtable .......................................................................... 38

In Conversation With

Beverage processing ............................................................ 52 Interface - Moksh Sani, Managing Director, Living Liquidz .................................. 56 Inspection system ............................................................. 58

Pradeep Chona, Managing Director, Havmor Ice Cream Ltd............................... 26

Automation Trends Food microbiology laboratory: Automated systems, the way ahead ..................................................................... 60

Energy Management Facility Visit: Signature International Foods

Case Study - Jain Irrigation Systems: Em‘power’ing agri-economy through waste management......................... 62

Making a difference through much-‘kneaded’ products ... 40

Policies & Regulations

Regular Sections

Organic food certification: Must to make a mark in the market .......................................................... 66

Editorial ........................................................................ 7

Strategy

News, Views & Analysis .............................................. 12

Food retailing: Spelling success through customer loyalty .................................................................. 68

Technology & Innovation............................................ 20

Tips & Tricks

Technology Transfer .................................................... 24

Injury prevention: How to stay a ‘cut’ above in minimising workplace accidents ......................................... 70

Projects ........................................................................ 71 Event List .................................................................... 72 Book Review ................................................................ 76 Products ...................................................................... 77 List of Products .......................................................... 89 List of Advertisers ...................................................... 90

Event Preview Anuga FoodTec 2012: Showcasing innovations for enhancing productivity ....................................................... 74

Highlights of Next Edition Special Focus: Food & Beverage Ingredients Insight & Outlook: Non-alcoholic Beverages

Note: ` stands for Indian rupee, $ stands for US dollar and £ stands for UK pound, unless mentioned otherwise March 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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March 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

MEGA DEAL

FOOD INGREDIENTS

Kellogg to buy Pringles for $ 2.7 billion

Brenntag eyes food and beverages segment for growth

Kellogg Company has agreed to buy Pringles potato chips for $ 2.7 billion in a cash deal that makes the cereal company second only to PepsiCo Inc in the global snack food market. The transaction also marks the final exit of household products maker Procter & Gamble Co from the food business. Adding Pringles will nearly triple the size of Kellogg’s international snack business, pushing snacks to a point where they will account for as much of total revenue as Kellogg’s well-known cereal business – the world’s largest, with brands such as Special K and Rice Krispies. “We are excited to announce this strategic acquisition. Pringles has an extensive global footprint that catapults Kellogg to the number two position in the worldwide savory snacks category, helping us achieve our objective of becoming a truly global cereal and snacks company,” said John Bryant, President and CEO, Kellogg Company.

Brenntag officials during the inauguration of new office

Brenntag, the global leader in chemical distribution, is gearing up to tap the burgeoning food and beverage market in India. As a part of its strategy to grow its business in the country, it recently inaugurated a new head office in Mumbai, which will also have application lab for food ingredients. “At present, we have a strong presence in India, and we are looking forward to nurture this market further by focussing on growing segments like food & beverages, personal care, pharmaceuticals, etc. By expanding our local presence in major cities like Mumbai, we are supporting our strategy of being the leading chemical distributor in both specialty and industrial

chemicals,” commented Steven Holland, CEO, Brenntag Group. With in-house food & beverage and personal care technical application laboratories, the new office offers valueadded services to Brenntag’s customers by meeting specific requirements for the formulation and customisation of various blends of ingredients and chemicals. Speaking about the market for food ingredients, he said, “The demand for processed food and beverage in India is increasing at a fast pace, and hence it offers immense scope of growth for Brenntag, which can offer food processors wide range of ingredients that can be used to develop new products.” For Brenntag, which established its presence in India in 2008, the new office adds to the company’s six existing offices located in all major industrial locations in India and its growing presence in the Asia-Pacific region, which includes more than 40 offices in 15 countries. Rakesh Rao

BEVERAGE PROCESSING

PACKAGED WATER

Alfa Laval to launch aseptic sterilisers

Tata Global Beverages and PepsiCo launch India’s first nutrient water

Swedish food processing equipment giant Alfa Laval is all set to assemble its first indigenously made aseptic filler in India. It will be ready to serve the industry by May 2012. This product will be beneficial for the processing of fruit purees and concentrates. Besides, the company Dharmendra Shukla is also continuously working and developing various models ranging from capacity of 2 tonne per hour (TPH) to 10 TPH of decanters to cater to various capacities of fruit processors. “Efficient clarification systems like decanter centrifuge for applications like separation of black/ brown specs from mango pulp, separation of red specs from litchi puree, depulping of pineapple and citrus juices like orange etc, are the main needs of the beverage processing industry in India today,” said Dharmendra Shukla, Additional General Manager, (BVF), Alfa Laval India. He expects good growth in terms of fruit and vegetable processing, driven by urbanisation and changing food habits of the Indian population. Mahua Roy

12

Modern Food Processing | March 2012

NourishCo, the JV between Tata Global Beverages and PepsiCo India, recently announced plans in keeping with its vision of healthy beverages for a healthier India with the launch of Tata Water Plus, India’s first nutrient water. Priced at ` 16 for a 750-ml PET bottle, Tata Water Plus is nutritionally rich and goes beyond quenching thirst. It looks and tastes like normal water but contains added nutrients that are bio-available. In its launch phase, Tata Water Plus will be available in two variants – zinc and chromium. These elements are known to strengthen immunity and improve overall health respectively. Tamil Nadu will be the first market where the product will be rolled out, covering 20 towns such as Coimbatore, Salem, Madurai, among others. R K Krishna Kumar, Vice Chairman, Tata Global Beverages, said, “NourishCo helps us leverage the trust invested in the Tata name and PepsiCo’s unique sales and distribution expertise.” Manu Anand, Chairman & CEO, PepsiCo India Region, added, “Tata Water Plus is not just a game-changing product but a commitment from two of the world’s most trusted companies to improve peoples’ quality of life. This unique offering by NourishCo is for everybody, developed keeping in mind the nutritional gaps in an average Indian’s diet.”


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

YOGHURT

ETHNIC FOODS

Frozen yoghurt industry sees a new entrant

Signature International to launch RTE Indian flatbreads

The South Korea-based Red Mango, known for all-natural frozen yoghurt, fresh fruit smoothies, yoghurt parfaits, and probiotic iced teas, recently opened operations in India. The company inaugurated its flagship store in Ambience Mall at Vasant Kunj in New Delhi. Red Mango has over 235 stores across the world and is now looking to establish its presence in the Indian subcontinent. “Investment plans for India would range from $ 4-8 million in the next two years. Red Mango plans to open 12-15 stores in 2012, mainly focussing on urban metropolitan cities like New Delhi, Mumbai, Bengaluru and others. In the next five years, the company plans to open 200 stores pan-India,” said Rahul Kumar, CEO & Principal Owner, Red Mango India. According to Kumar, the products have gone through extensive certification process and are approved by the US Food & Drug Administration (US-FDA). All ingredients are imported from its central manufacturing units in the US & Italy and accept a few locally available fruits. Kumar added, “Our focus is to drive the brand to the various tier II and III cities. We believe in providing a healthy alternative meal to our consumers, freshly made at our stores.”

Signature International Foods India recently announced the launch of Legacy of India brand, which includes Indian flatbreads such as naans, rotis, kulchas, parathas, etc. Ajay Talwar, Joint Managing Director, Signature International Foods, said, “There is a huge gap in the Indian market when it comes to the promotion of traditional products. We decided to address this, and thereby launched a strategic mix of products, totally customised towards Indian taste buds and preferences.” The company has imported state-of-the-art European technology to meet sales volume expectations and has set itself a target to become the benchmark in hygienic food manufacture within India. The first phase of the company’s launch has seen production lines that are capable of producing 45,000 chapattis and 25,000 naans each hour. The company is also investing huge amounts in R&D, production and marketing. Also, the company is optimistic about its foray into the B2B segment and is in final stages of talks to supply customised pizza bases to Pizza Hut, Dominos and chapattis to Indian Railway Catering and Tourism Corporation (IRCTC) and Sodexo clients. Mahua Roy

Mahua Roy

MODERN RETAIL

FILTRATION AND SEPARATION

Space hiring seen as a major trend in food retailing

Cole-Parmer expands filtration range through tie-up with ADVANTEC

Due to spurt in modern retail chains, most FMCG food brands are resorting to in-store promotions including sampling, tasting and other promotional ventures to make the customers try out their newly launched products, according to Darshana Shah Darshana Shah, who was recently appointed as the Business Head for Marketing, Visual Merchandising, Loyalty and Space on Hire of Hypercity,. She noted that space on hire is a growing trend. Shah opined, “Hypercity has been a preferred partner for most food launches as we offer customised benefits for each brand, helping them to showcase their products efficiently and make them stand out.” Hypercity offers customer insights and buying behaviour data for their brand to brand managers of food & beverage companies. “Brand managers now-a-days prefer in-store promotions as this medium offers an active audience. Print and TV commercials are meant for a mass audience whereas in-store promotions offer instant gratification for the products,” she added.

Cole-Parmer has acquired authorised distribution rights in India for ADVANTEC’s wide range of filtration solutions for laboratory, research and process applications. ADVANTEC’s products are used in a wide variety of scientific capacities and applications such as microbiological analysis, air/gas filtration, and environmental monitoring. Specifically, it serves food & beverage, pharmaceutical, public health, water analysis, healthcare, life sciences and electronics industries. Because ADVANTEC manufactures its products to exacting standards, it is known for high product integrity. “ADVANTEC’s range of filtration products fits comfortably within Cole-Parmer’s own product range. It offers our customers an additional and valuable range of unique quality products that will enhance the company’s processes and research,” commented Kashmira Nadkarni, Product Manager, Cole-Parmer India. Koichi Shiode, General Manager, ADVANTEC MFS Inc, added, “We are pleased to extend our partnership with Cole-Parmer to India, and are excited about the opportunity to introduce ADVANTEC’s high-quality products to the Indian customers.” Founded in 1917 as the first manufacturer of filter papers in Japan, today ADVANTEC is a global company with a focus on high-quality products for separation science.

Mahua Roy

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Modern Food Processing | March 2012


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

BUSINESS STRATEGY

ANALY TICAL EQUIPMENT

ADF Foods turns around US operation

US-based Brookfield Engineering plans to expand in India

The Mumbaibased ADF Foods Ltd has been successful in turning around the US operation within one year of its acquisition. Bimal Thakkar Attributing successful turnaround to several initiatives taken by the company, Bimal Thakkar, Managing Director, ADF Foods Ltd, said, “We did a detailed analysis of all the products and stock-keeping units (SKUs) and discontinued non-profitable and non-core items. We added new equipment, thereby reducing the labour cost; looked at better purchasing, added new profitable items, etc.” ADF Foods had acquired the US-based Elena’s Food Specialties, manufacturer and marketer of organic and natural products. The company is also planning to increase its product offerings from its US plants in near future. “We have introduced some ethnic Indian food at our US facility. They were introduced in the US market in September last year. We will be adding some more ethnic Indian food lines in this facility,” disclosed Thakkar. Rakesh Rao

David Brookfield (left) and Sanjay Mehta at the new application lab Brookfield Engineering Laboratories, Inc, one of the leading global manufacturers of viscometers and rheometers for laboratory & industrial applications, is looking to target the online process control applications market for its products in India. The company wants to tap industries such as food, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, etc. In its efforts to further expand its business in India, Brookfield Engineering recently opened an application lab in Thane (Maharashtra) in collaboration with Amkette Analytics, its distributor in India. David Brookfield, President and CEO, Brookfield Engineering Labs, Inc, said, “The opening of this advanced lab will help Brookfield customers in India with application support and product

demonstrations. This lab demonstrates Brookfield’s long-term commitment to the Indian customer. Apart from the Indian market, the lab will also serve our customers in West Asia, Africa and the ASEAN nations as a knowledge resource centre for viscosity, rheology and powder flow analysis.” While Amkette Analytics already offers Brookfield products for lab applications in India, the new lab, which is the only advanced application lab in South East Asia, will help it grow its business in online process applications as well. Sanjay Mehta, Co-founder, Amkette Analytics, said, “The lab is a milestone in Amkette’s journey towards the future as it expands its wings. This lab will truly raise the benchmark for technology and solutions in the industry.” For Indian food industry, Brookfield Engineering will also offer powder flow tester (PF T), which it claims to deliver quick and easy analysis of powder flow behaviour in industrial processing equipment. PFT is ideal for manufacturers who process powders daily and want to minimise or eliminate the downtime and expense that occur when hoppers/silos fail to discharge.

MODERN RETAIL

HEALTH DRINKS

Godrej Nature’s Basket crowned ‘Food & Grocery Retailer of the Year’

US-based energy drinks maker enters India

Godrej Nature’s Basket has bagged the prestigious ‘Retailer of the Year’ award in the Food & Grocery Category at the Retail Excellence Awards hosted by the Asia Retail Congress – 2012. The annual event, a global platform supported by over 100 countries to promote world-class retail practices, felicitated Godrej Nature’s Basket with the award. Mohit Khattar, Managing Director, Godrej Nature’s Basket, commented, “It is a proud moment for the entire team at Godrej Nature’s Basket. This win encourages and propels us to continue with our efforts to push the envelope and continue to be the leading world food chain in India.”

Rakesh Rao

Targeting a product portfolio towards the healthconscious population in India, the US-based company MonaVie has recently forayed into the country. The company manufactures health and energy drinks/supplements containing premium ingredients. It has launched health drinks MonaVie Essential and MonaVie Pulse, which have a blend of 19 beneficial fruits, and is loaded with AçaVie – the purest and most potent extract from acai, the Brazilian superfruit. Raj Lingam, President – South Asia, MonaVie, said, “We are one of the few companies that have invested over $ 200 million towards R&D and our products are tried & tested across 32 countries in the world. India is increasingly facing many lifestyle related health problems and we are positioned to provide solutions to health & lifestyle related anomalies in our daily life.” The company also plans to open a manufacturing unit in India. Mahua Roy

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Modern Food Processing | March 2012


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

FOOD INGREDIENTS

FOOD SAFET Y

Ashland offers guar replacement for food processors

3M to aim leading food companies for its new molecular detection system

A commercial unit of Ashland Inc, Ashland Specialty Ingredients, is eyeing to tap the guar user industries with its newly launched cellulose gum products – Aquacel GSA and Aquacel GSH. Two products, which have been developed in response to the current guar shortage, will help the food and beverage industry to supplement or replace guar. “The benefit of Aquacel GSH and GSA cellulose gum is the high level of viscosity synergy with guar gum. This will enable cost savings plus performance enhancement,” claimed Ashland Inc official. These cellulose gums, which can be used either to supplement or replace guar, offer cost-effective alternatives for beverage, bakery and dairy applications at a time when they are needed the most. “Volatility in guar availability and pricing has left food manufacturers scrambling for a replacement. In the US, the demand for guar gum has increased significantly,” explained Laurie Kronenberg, New Product Leader, Nutrition Specialties, Ashland. Aquacel GSA and GSH cellulose gums have been developed to enable synergy with guar to provide higher viscosity in liquid phase, moisture holding, fast hydration development, as well as practical application by simple dry mixing.

3M Food Safety is looking to market time to just 24 hours as compared to the its newly launched 3M Molecular cultural conventional methods and the Detection System for pathogens mainly antigen-antibody methods, which take at leading food processing companies. three to five days. “3M Molecular Detection System is ideally Elaborating on the advantage of the suited for dairy, meat and detection system, Kumar said, environmental samples. For “The time to result is short this equipment, our main – 24 hours, so this will help customers would be global the Indian food and beverages food manufacturers and companies to release their companies who are into products into the market exports,” pointed out Deepak faster. Also, the environmental Kumar, Division Manager, monitoring becomes rapid, Food Safety Business, 3M with this detection system. Deepak Kumar India Ltd. Presence of pathogen such The new system is based on an as Salmonella, Listeria or E.coli O157 in innovative combination of unique the product or environment is a serious technologies involving isothermal DNA issue, hence the F&B manufacturing amplification and bioluminescence companies regularly perform these tests detection. Along with being portable and to ensure that their product and the handy, 3M Molecular Detection System can environment are free from these disease perform the tests with high sensitivity causing pathogens.” Rakesh Rao and specificity. It brings down the result BUDGET EXPECTATION

Fiscal support needed to boost food processing industry The Budget should encourage food processing industry through fiscal benefits that would help in reducing wastages and improving food security, according to N Thiruambalam, Chairman and Managing Director, Heinz India Pvt Ltd. In addition, it should offer consistency in classification and tariff, quick introduction of GST and ensure uniform practices/classification of goods and services/rate regime across the states. In general, Budget should focus more on job creation, skill improvement, productivity and creation of assets than free subsidies, stated Thiruambalam. In addition, he felt that there is a need for better management of supply side and foreign exchange rates so as to address run away inflation Rakesh Rao and bring stability to exchange rate.

MARKET STRATEGY

Mayuresh Industries looks for tie-up for juice dispenser The Kolhapur (Maharashtra) based Mayuresh Industries is eyeing for a tie-up with beverage processing company to market and promote its newly developed juice maker/ dispenser. “This product can be promoted by juice maker or beverage processor. As a manufacturer of this machine, we want to tie-up with beverage manufacturing companies for supplying this machine or 18

promote our machine along with their products,” said Sanjiv Gokhale, Owner, Mayuresh Industries. There are many fruit syrup (sharabat/juice) manufacturers in India who are planning to expand their business in India. “These drinks, which are considered to be healthy, are not available in offices or commercial premises because there is no mechanism or machine

Modern Food Processing | March 2012

available such as tea/coffee vending machine. Our machine offers solution to this challenge and has a huge potential in India. We have the capacity to manufacture this product on a large scale,” opined Gokhale. Mayuresh Industries, established in 1995, ventured into beverage equipment segment six years ago. Rakesh Rao


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

SAFET Y NORMS

AGRIBUSINESS

New ISO standard makes food irradiation safer

Champion Agro offers affordable irrigation technology to farmers

A new ISO standard has been formulated to provide state-ofthe-art requirements for food irradiation, commonly used to improve quality and safety in food processing. The standard will benefit manufacturers, irradiation operators, regulators, customers and, ultimately, consumers. ISO 14470:2011, Food irradiation – Requirements for the development, validation and routine control of the process of irradiation using ionising radiation for the treatment of food was developed by Technical Committee ISO/TC 34, Food Products. Mariana Funes and Noelia Antonuccio, Project Leaders, Technical Committee ISO/TC 34, Food Products, commented, “ISO 14470 will lead to confidence and transparency among the different stakeholders operating in the food sector and will help provide regulators and consumer representatives with improved information on products, enabling better choices.”

Dhirajlal Hirpara (left) with Peter Frykman Champion Agro Ltd recently inked an MoU with DripTech, USA, which would enable it to further build on its own innovative practices and leverage DripTech’s globally acknowledged expertise, for the benefit of farmers. Champion Agro will pioneer the usage of affordable and water-efficient irrigation systems designed for farmers. DripTech is a water technologies company based in Silicon Valley, with offices in Pune and Beijing. It produces affordable, highquality irrigation systems designed for small-plot farmers. Dhirajlal Hirpara, CMD, Champion Agro, said, “This system makes agriculture affordable and profitable for even the small and marginal farmers. The biggest obstacle for such farmers in installing drip irrigation is the affordability factor. But using this

technology, it becomes highly useful and affordable; costing just 30-35 per cent of the high-tech drip system. It will boost yields by 20-50 per cent. The trials have been successful and received a positive response from the farmers.” Peter Frykman, Managing Director, DripTech, said, “This technology is ultimately beneficial to humanity at large, since it addresses the core concerns of improving food security and protecting water resources. The simplicity of the design reduces its cost to less than half of commercial drip irrigation system” One of the leading companies in the agriculture services vertical, Champion Agro introduced the concept of agro-retail malls in Gujarat. It has set up 34 agro-clinics within a span of three years. “We plan to expand further into North India and capitalise on our strengths in fruits and vegetables. We are actively looking at acquisitions and synergistic tie-ups, which can add value to our offerings,” added Hipara. Champion Agro plans to have 52 Champion Agro World centres in Gujarat and 400 centres pan-India including 20 district agro malls cum agro excellence centres by 2014. Mahua Roy

EXHIBITION

COFFEE CHAIN

Singapore to host trade fair for food and wine

Starbucks to source coffee from Tata Coffee

Singapore Exhibition Services (SES) will be organising Food&HotelAsia2012 (FHA2012), a leading trade show for the food service and hospitality industry in Asia, from April 17–20, 2012. The exhibition consists of five specialised shows, namely FoodAsia, HotelAsia, Bakery&Pastry, HospitalityStyleAsia and HospitalityTechnology. Wine&SpiritsAsia2012 will be colocated with FHA2012. FHA2012 is expected to feature more than 2,600 exhibitors from over 60 countries/regions. “With a remarkable contingent of top quality industry players coming from across the globe, it is evident that the five specialised shows together will present a timely and all-inclusive trading platform for sellers and buyers hailing from India,” affirmed Stephen Tan, Chief Executive Officer, SES.

In a sourcing and roasting agreement, Tata Coffee will roast coffee to supply it to Starbucks Coffee Company, and Tata Starbucks Ltd – the recently formed 50:50 joint venture between Starbucks Coffee R K Krishnakumar (left) Company and Tata Coffee. Tata and John Culver Starbucks operated cafés will be developed in cities across the country, beginning with stores in Delhi and Mumbai in 2012. John Culver, President, Starbucks China and Asia-Pacific, said, “We look forward to bringing the Starbucks experience to customers in India by offering high quality arabica coffee, handcrafted beverages, locally relevant food, and legendary service.” R K Krishnakumar, Vice Chairman, Tata Global Beverages, said, “We are excited about the opportunities the alliance presents to innovate in the retail space and bring new beverage experiences to more consumers in India.”

March 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION

Unique spiral membrane of KMS reduces filtration costs Koch Membrane Systems Inc (KMS), one of the leading players in membranes, will introduce the SR3D nanofiltration (NF) element at Anuga FoodTec 2012. The SR3D membrane is the next generation in a wide range of cost-effective solutions to help food and beverage companies increase efficiency and streamline processes. This unique spiral membrane is ideal for a variety of sanitary applications in the field of dairy, food & beverage, industrial biotechnology and pharmaceutical intermediates, including whey demineralisation, lactose, sugar and enzyme concentration, alcohol reduction, purification of organics, and clarification of pharmaceuticals. “SR3D offers several advantages. This membrane was specially designed for stable flux rates over longer periods of time and provides up to 20 per cent higher flux than other commercially available membranes. Combined with higher deashing capabilities, it allows companies to reduce operating costs and increase yield,” said Martin Awe, European Business Manager Industrial and Life Sciences, KMS. In addition to the SR3D membrane, KMS offers a complete line of spiral, tubular and hollow fibre sanitary membranes for concentration, clarification and purification of food and food ingredients, including protein recovery, sweetener and dextrose clarification, juice clarification, citrus debittering, vinegar clarification, and starch & enzyme processing. KMS also provides a full range of membranes to maximise water use and close the process loop in food manufacturing operations – not only removing contaminants, recovering materials, and purifying process streams within the plant, but also treating the outgoing effluent to meet environmental discharge standards.

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Bosch Packaging to showcase series of innovations at Anuga FoodTec Bosch Packaging Technology will implement global launches for two new filling solutions for liquid food at Anuga FoodTec 2012 in Cologne including Bosch’s SurePOUCH stand-up flexible pack style allows the new SurePOUCH for flexibility and shelf differentiation flexible pack style and the new thermoforming clean-fill machine, TFC. The SurePOUCH standup flexible pack styles will allow for multiple packaging and fitment options for a high level of flexibility and shelf differentiation. High hygiene standards are achieved as the product is filled directly into the pouch rather than through the spout. The spout is ultrasonically welded to the exterior of the pouch, so the product does not come into contact with the spout until opened by the consumer. The new lightweight pack styles also offers ease of disposability. The TFC clean-fill thermoforming machine is an addition to the Bosch portfolio of forming and filling technologies. Its existing aseptic thermoforming portfolio allows manufacturers to achieve high hygienic standards, for example, for dairy creamers, desserts and baby food. The TFC thermoforming technology extends this range to provide a solution for the filling of fresh products, foods requiring extended shelf-life such as yoghurts and desserts, and single-serve portions of butter, margarine, condiments and coffee. It is also suitable for cold filling, hot filling and retortable products like ready meals and pet food. Bosch will also launch its new service concept – preventive maintenance, which aims at ensuring that appropriate maintenance activities are conducted at scheduled intervals on site to help customers optimise the performance of machinery and packaging lines.

Waters develops simple method to detect fungicide in orange juice Waters Corporation has developed an analytical technique to rapidly determine residue levels of the fungicide carbendazim in orange juice, with no sample preparation, at regulated levels by taking advantage of the ultra-high sensitivity of Waters® Xevo TQ-S mass spectrometer and ACQUITY UPLC® I-Class system. Recent news about the presence of the fungicide carbendazim in orange juice products has drawn widespread public attention on the safety of the fruit juice. Carbendazim is legally used in Brazil and many other countries for plant disease control, post-harvest food storage or transportation, and seed pre-plant treatment. However, it is not approved for use on citrus fruits in the US, and therefore, is not permitted to be present in any concentration in orange juice. Waters scientists have responded rapidly to this challenge by issuing the simplified method of analysis. “Key to this analytical application is the unrivalled sensitivity of the Xevo TQ-S coupled with the ACQUITY UPLC I-Class, which allows scientists to employ a ‘dilute-and-shoot’ approach to orange juice analysis. The benefits of this approach include increase in analysis throughput and reduction in method development time,” said Dr Paul Young, Senior Director, Food & Environment Business Operations, Waters Division.


TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION

IKA’s automated plant increases efficiency of mayonnaise production The rapidly growing population calls for technology to produce food on large scale with minimum costs at an optimum speed. Therefore, food manufacturers are always seeking innovative technologies. IKA, one of the pioneers in food processing equipment, has now developed an improvised version of ‘Standard Production Plant (SPP)’ for the production of mayonnaise with advanced technology. The SPP

IKA officials after the successful launch of the new system

mayonnaise series comes in 7 sizes ranging from 25 to 2,000 litre. The plant SPP 1000 can produce 1,000 litre of mayonnaise in only 10 minutes, claimed the company. SPP includes all components necessary for the production of mayonnaise, ketchup and sauces. In order to increase the production of mayonnaise that is gaining popularity among masses, IKA has developed the system with fully automated control. Special attention has been paid to a favourable price-performance relation, but at the same time keeping in mind high-quality standards. SPP offers better efficiency because of its indispensable features including: short processing times, consistently high product quality, fully automated and user-friendly operation.

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Modern Food Processing | March 2012

LINPAC’s new packaging may reduce carbon footprint The UK-based LINPAC Packaging has claimed that its two new lightweight packaging films would help boost sustainability in the fresh meat sector. The firm has launched LINtop polypropylene (PP) HB lock seal and LINtop PP HB peelable for use in the fresh meat, poultry and fish packaging industry. LINPAC said, “The films are designed to offer our customers an optimum weight film (to meet their environmental commitments) while retaining the optical and seal integrity required to ensure shelf appeal.” The films work with all types of PP trays, but have been specifically designed for optimum performance with the firm’s own brands. The lock seal is available in a 35μ (microns) gauge, which the firm claims is one of the lowest on the market, or a 42μ gauge. The packaging supplier said it will result in ‘cost savings and a low-carbon footprint in line with retailers’ sustainability strategies’. Erwan Cadoret, Product Manager - Barrier Films, LINPAC Packaging (France), said, “The real benefit of a 35 micron film is the reduced weight of the lidding film for the packer and the retailer. This translates ultimately into savings in energy and carbon rather than monetary savings. These films are lightweight that help reduce the amount of raw material and energy used in their production, therefore reducing their carbon footprint without loss of functionality.” The company claimed that its lock seal film outperforms other brands in terms of films’ anti-fog qualities while the peelable film is in line with the market for anti-fog and oxygen barrier qualities. Cadoret said, “Anti-fog properties are important in terms of displaying produce in the best possible way and not all films do this particularly well.” “Oxygen barrier provides extended shelf-life performance of a pack, which in turn reduces the amount of on-shelf waste in store and also in the home. The films, made in France, have been introduced as part of LINPAC’s fresh thinking innovation strategy,” he added.

Nampak DivFood develops new printing technology for cans Nampak DivFood, a leading manufacturer of food cans and decorative tinware, has developed a new 5-colour Crabtree FastReady printing line for customers. It has also launched End-o-mat production line for can end-making. The new 5-deck printing line with in-line varnish capability is supplied by Crabtree UK, a leading supplier of FastReady metal print technology. The printing line is complemented by Kemtek CTP (Computer to Plate) pre-press technology, which cuts five steps of artwork initiation down to just two. As a result of its new technology, Nampak DivFood estimates that new design lead-times could be reduced by as much as eight weeks in certain cases. John McHugh, Director - Capital Equipment, Crabtree UK, said, “The new printing line has three critical objectives, namely reduction in delivery times, production of better quality and reduction in costs. Nampak DivFood has the equipment, the technology and the enthusiasm to break boundaries in metal packaging, and the company is going to great lengths to achieve this for its customers. Metal is a good packaging material and the new line is a great addition to this product.”


TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

TECHNOLOGY OFFERED As part of our endeavour to spread the technology culture, this section provides a means to promote and facilitate exchange of select technologies. We strive to bring together suppliers of such technologies with suitable users for negotiations and industrial collaboration.

Beverage maker An Indian firm is offering ‘three-in-one’ beverage maker, which is a portable kit that allows the user to simultaneously make three functional beverages as per requirement. Using this, the consumer can set up three different types of fermentation simultaneously at one particular temperature. Areas of application Beverage industry Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Chocolate manufacturing technology An India firm provides chocolate manufacturing and snack extrusion technolog y with machiner y. The firm supplies chocolate machines like chocolate conches, chocolate enrobers with cooling tunnel, one shot chocolate moulding machines, chocolate storage tanks, etc. The machines are manufactured using European technology. Areas of application Chocolate manufacturing Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services and equipment supply

Food-paste moulding machine A Thailand-based firm offers a food-paste moulding machine that produces cylindrical-shaped food paste with both ends sealed. This machine enables faster production of food paste with consistent size and hygiene, which increase business potential in bigger markets both locally and abroad. 24

Modern Food Processing | March 2012

Areas of application It is useful in food processing industries where the food products of cylindrical shape are required Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Food processing machinery An Indian firm offers all machinery for processing fruits, vegetables, poultry, meat and fish. Manufactured in Europe, the machinery is easy to use and makes high-quality food products. It also offers ice-making machines. Areas of application Food processing, agro-based industries Forms of transfer Consultancy, equipment aupply, turnkey

Liquid gluocse An Indian firm offers a novel bio-process technology for liquid glucose production. The company has made a significant progress in technical advancement of the process. Area of application Only for food and confectionary Forms of transfer Consultancy, technology licensing

Sugarcane juice powder (dried) An Indian firm offers technology for making sugarcane juice powder using spray drying technique. It is a natural, healthy, safe and nutritious product from sugarcane. Areas of application Food & beverages sector Forms of transfer Consultancy, technology licensing

Technology for milk, fruit and cereal-based products An Indian firm offers technology for processing milk products, fruit & vegetable products and ready-to-eat & ready-to-cook food products Areas of application Food processing industries Forms of transfer Consultancy, subcontracting, joint venture, technical services, capacity building, technology licensing, equipment supply, turnkey, others

Technology for natural dyes/oleoresins An Indian firm provides assistance in the manufacture of oleoresins/natural colour extracts using latest technology. Area of application Food colours/natural dyes Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services, turnkey

Vacuum sealer and gas injection machine A Thailand-based company is providing technology for preserving and extending shelf-life of food products. Proper packaging is critical for avoiding food spoilage. The vacuum sealing and gas injection technique prevents contaminating microbes to enter the container, thereby increasing the shelf-life of the product. Areas of application Food processing industr y, agro-based industry Forms of transfer Technology licensing


TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

TECHNOLOGY REQUESTED Coconut milk beverage An Indian entrepreneur is interested in acquiring the technology for producing & processing coconut milk beverage. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Consultancy

Corn processing An Indian company is looking for a complete proposal/project report to set up a dry milling corn processing plant in Andhra Pradesh. Targeted finished product is tinned corn, pop corn, corn flakes etc. It is also interested to import similar kind of plant & machinery to set up the same in India. Areas of application Corn processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Extruder pilot plant An Indian company is seeking the extruder pilot plant for manufacturing processed cereal-based weaning food. Areas of application Infant food, supplementary food, weaning food Forms of transfer Others

Food processing equipment An Indian company is seeking technology and equipment for processing of fruits, vegetables and other related products.

Area of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Food preservation

Rice husk ash to silica precipitates

A Thailand-based food and fruit preserved trading firm is looking for efficient technology to extend the shelflife and preserve food and fruit. Areas of application Food processing industr y, confectionery industry, pastry industry Forms of transfer Others

An Indian company is seeking the technology to convert rice husk ash into some useful matter like silica precipitate, as the rice husk is rich in silica content. Areas of application Agro-based mills, which burn rice husk for internal purposes Forms of transfer Others

Fruit drinks-doy pack

Spice grinding and processing plant

A firm from UAE is interested in acquiring the technology for manufacturing fruit juices and drinks using optimum formulation technology. The firm needs technology providers, consultants and price quotes for the project based on turnkey & know-how. Areas of applications Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Juice and food processing A company based in the UAE proposes to establish a food processing plant that would help process fruit juices, jam/jelly, juice concentrates & pulp. Through this plant, the company also wishes to obtain valuable by-products like cattle feed, fertiliser and raw materials for plywood.

An Indian firm is seeking to set up a spice plant and requires turnkey project consultants for the same. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Virgin coconut oil production A Thai entrepreneur is interested in acquiring the technology for production of virgin coconut oil. He has an abundant supply of coconuts and plans to set up a coconut oil production line with technical co-operation from technology providers. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Information courtesy: Dr Krishnan S Raghavan, In-Charge, Technology Transfer Services Group, United Nations - Asian and Pacific Centre for Transfer of Technology (APCTT), APCTT Building , C-2, Qutab Institutional Area, New Delhi 110 016, Tel: 011 - 2696 6509, Fax: 011 - 2685 6274, Email: krishnan@apctt.org, Website: www.apctt.org, For more information on technology offers and requests, please log on to www.technology4sme.net and register with your contact details. This is a free of cost platform provided by APCTT for facilitating interaction between buyers and seekers of technologies across the globe. After submitting technology offer or request to this website, you are requested to wait for at least two weeks for receiving a response from a prospective buyer / seeker through this website, before contacting APCTT for further assistance.

Share and Solicit Technology The mission of Modern Food Processing is to spread the technology culture. Here is an opportunity to be a part of this endeavour by sending your technology on offer or technology requirements. If you belong to any of these two categories, you are invited to furnish the techno-commercial details for publication. The write-up needs to be as per the format of this section with information about the particular technology offered or requested, its areas of application and forms of transfer. Contact us: Modern Food Processing, Infomedia 18 Limited, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028.Tel: 022-3024 5000, 3003 4672 O Fax: 022-3003 4499 O Email: spedit@infomedia18.in

March 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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IN CONVERSATION WITH Pradeep Chona

Companies that come out with good and innovative products will survive in the long run …opines Pradeep Chona, Managing Director, Havmor Ice Cream Ltd. In an exclusive interaction with Avani Jain, he highlights the challenges and opportunities for the ice cream manufacturers in India. How is the demand for ice creams in India? The ice cream industry has seen growth of about 20-25 per cent in 2011, which indicates that the demand for ice creams in India is good. This is due to the fact that people these days are realising the nutritional and energy value of ice creams. People of all ages enjoy ice creams, but the major consumer group includes those in the age group between 15 and 25.

What is the marketshare of this segment in the F&B industry? The marketshare is not more than 4-5 per cent because ice creams are highly perishable and fall under seasonal product category. Moreover, the sector is highly unorganised, so it is difficult to estimate the total share of this segment.

What are the emerging trends in this area? These days, people are demanding rich and exclusive ice creams, which are of world-class quality. It is for the same reason that recently we launched a premium brand of ice cream called HUBER & HOLLY. Another trend is that, people want low-calorie ice creams. Consumers want ice creams, which contain less than two per cent fat. So in this season, we are going to start new range of ice creams, which will be low in fat content and also sugar-free.

Today, consumers are becoming extremely healthand hygiene-conscious. How does your company address this trend?

Photo: Vijaykumar Soneji

In the present times, everyone wants hygienic products, but it is a costly affair. However, we have always focussed on this aspect. We spend considerable time in educating our employees about cleanliness and hold classes so that they learn the importance of a germ-

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Pradeep Chona

free environment and quality products. Thus, we are striving hard to ensure that good products reach our customers.

three months. So if you are making good product, then there are ample opportunities for growth in this segment.

How has the rise in milk prices affected the industry?

What are the reasons behind Havmor’s success in Western India?

Due to the rise in milk prices, many companies have shifted to oil-based ice creams, which are called frozen desserts. These ice creams use coconut oil or other oils instead of milk. Thus, companies like us, which use fresh milk to produce ice creams, suffer, as there is no margin left for us due to rise in milk prices. Further, the frozen desserts are priced lower than the original ice creams, so the customers tend to buy that. Taking this into account, the government needs to reduce taxes and encourage companies, which make pure ice creams.

What are the challenges facing the ice cream manufacturing companies in India? There are many challenges faced by the companies in this segment. First, the tax rates are high as the government charges nearly 15 per cent VAT on the products. Second, the milk supply is erratic and the milk rates are rising continuously. Recently, the milk rates have risen to 25-30 per cent leading to low margins of 3-5 per cent for the ice cream manufacturers. Third, the cases of adulteration of milk have increased in the recent past. For example, people are putting vegetable oil in milk. Thus, the companies have to be careful while purchasing the raw material. As a responsible company, we reject all the unhealthy goods. This has increased our raw material cost. Last, being a seasonal business, it is difficult for the industries to survive in the long run.

What are the opportunities for manufacturers? If you make good ice cream, then people will not bother about the cost and go for quality products. Further, companies that come out with good and innovative products will survive in the long run. For example, since many years, we are famous for introducing new flavours every

We know the pulse of our customers. That is why we are able to cater to their choice fast and make the ice creams accordingly. We are popular for being a 100 per cent ice cream-based company. Other than Gujarat, we are present in Maharashtra and Rajasthan, where we are getting good response as there is large Gujarati populace in these states, who are loyal to this 67-year-old brand. Soon, we will be launching products in Madhya Pradesh. For now, we will cater to the demand in these states through the two plants that we have in Ahmedabad. Later, depending on the demand, we might open plants in other states as well.

What are your growth plans for the company? We believe in serving quality products to our customers. Further, we aim at catering to their existing and upcoming demands through constant innovation. Our company is growing at the rate of 25-30 per cent and we hope to maintain this growth trajectory.

Since yours is a family business, what are its advantages? We are passionate and dedicated to our work. We believe in working harder and smarter than the others. Entrepreneurs like us think 24x7, which is not the case in a professional set-up. Further, it takes only a day or two for us to take a decision, whereas multinationals/co-operatives conduct multiple board meetings to take a decision. Thus, in a professional set-up, decision-making process is always timeconsuming.

What is your outlook for the Indian ice cream industry as a whole? Considering that children prefer ice creams to milk, the product is catching up fast with the young generation and,

What motivates you the most? The passion for making good products has kept me going all these years. The appreciation that I get from people always motivates me.

What was the toughest business decision ever made by you? At a point of time, I had to choose between two things, ie whether to make profit or to make a name. I chose the latter and succeeded in making a good name in the market as I believed that profit will follow automatically.

What was the turning point in your career? When my wife and son joined the business, we became a big team. The result: our business grew and we attained some major milestones.

What is the business etiquette you value the most? ‘Goodness, truthfulness and cleanliness’ are the three principles, which I have always followed in my life. I believe in doing straight business.

What would be your message to aspiring and upcoming entrepreneurs? If you want to achieve success, then you not only have to work hard but also smart as well as do proper planning in advance. Also, you need to have a vision. hence there is huge demand for ice creams in India. All that is required is co-operation from the government in the area of tax reduction, which will encourage companies that are producing hygienic products. Email: avani.jain@infomedia18.in

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An invite that rewards as well... Dear Reader, ‘Modern Food Processing’ solicits original, well-written, application-oriented, unpublished articles that reflect your valuable experience and expertise in the food processing industry. You can send us Technical Articles, Case Studies and Product Write-ups. The length of the article should not exceed 1500 words, while that of a product write-up should not exceed 100 words. The articles should preferably reach us in soft copy (either E-mail or a CD). The text should be in MS Word format and images in 300 DPI resolution & JPG format. The final decision regarding the selection and publication of the articles shall rest solely with ‘Modern Food Processing’. Authors whose articles are published will be sent a complimentary copy of that particular edition. Published by Infomedia 18 Ltd, ‘Modern Food Processing’ one of the leading monthly magazines exclusively meant for producers and user fraternities of the food processing industry. Well supported by a national readership of over 80,000 and our strong network of 26 branch offices across India, this magazine reaches out to key decision makers among the Indian manufacturers of food processing products, machinery and allied sectors. Brought out in association with Hong Kong-based Ringier Trade Publishing Ltd (one of the world’s largest trade publishing houses with more than 200 special interest titles and offices in every major country), it ensures that advertisers are able to promote their products and services across the globe at no extra cost. So get going and rush your articles, write-ups, etc… Thanking you, Yours sincerely,

Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

Manas Bastia Senior Editor

Infomedia 18 Limited ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W) Mumbai 400 028 India

T +91 22 3024 5000 D +91 22 3003 4669 F +91 22 3003 4499 W www.infomedia18.in E manas@infomedia18.in


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SPECIAL FOCUS

FOOD PROCESSING MACHINERY GRAIN PROCESSING Automation in, wastage out ............................................................................................ 32 MULTINATIONAL MACHINERY MANUFACTURERS Eyeing Indian market for better prospects ..................................................................... 34 INTERFACE  Tapas Chatterjee, Managing Director, SSP Pvt Ltd “The demand for energy-efficient equipment has gone up”........................................... 36 ROUNDTABLE Are Indian food processing machinery manufacturers globally competitive?................. 38

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SPECIAL FOCUS Grain processing

Prasenjit Chakraborty

A

n important element of the Public Distribution System (PDS) involves the efficient storage and transfer of food grains f rom farm to market. Practically, this is a difficult process, given that the supply

come out with some much-needed solutions. It has been seen that, in most cases, the raw materials delivered to the mills are not pure grains. Hence, prior to their processing, foreign materials and other contaminants (introduced during the harvest, transportation and storage of the grain) must be removed. The removal of such impurities

colour. Because of this, the Buhler Sortex colour sorter continues to gain increasing relevance. An effective and consistent means of regulating the grains’ moisture levels is an important follow-up to their cleaning. For this, Buhler offers systems for the automatic regulation of moisture levels, comprising moisture

Realising the importance of modernisation, which could significantly reduce grain wastage during processing, the grain processing industry has been focussing on state-of-the-art, automated equipment. As a result, technology and solution providers are taking renewed interest in this industry. mechanism lies in the unorganised sector. Moreover, storage in India is usually done in godowns, which often lack adequate storage and preservation infrastructure, resulting in perishable commodities such as food grains being wasted. But grain wastage also happens during the processing. To address the problem, sophisticated machinery can play a significant role. Understanding the requirements, reputed players have 32

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guarantees the quality of the endproducts, by reducing ash content, specks and factors influencing odour and flavour. Additionally, machine wear is reduced and its lifespan is increased. In this direction, Buhler grain-cleaning machines separate defects from grains with maximal precision on the basis of variable physical properties: size, magnetic response, equilibrium velocity, density, length, shape, firmness and

level measurement, calculation of flow rates, water dispensation and its distribution over the grain surface. Similarly, MILLTEC has a fleet of highly sophisticated machinery with latest concepts in its possession. Recently, it has added a few more CNC machining centres to improve the speed and accuracy in producing high-quality products with high reliability, repeatability and versatility.


Grain processing

“Due to high-quality measures used in manufacturing and procedure, the breakeven of the project is minimum, enabling our customers to expand their mills to higher capacities. The incorporation of bought out parts in our machines f rom reputed brands worldwide has added more strengths to our products that ensure trouble-free operation,” claims R Ravindranath, Director – Marketing, MILLTEC Industries Bangalore Pvt Ltd.

Modernisation process For a long time, the grain processing sector in India used traditional machines. This posed several impediments that involve failure to control pollution, save power, etc. The biggest disadvantage of using traditional machines is their incompetence in reducing wastage. However, the situation has changed significantly and the sector is gradually realising the importance of using automated machines. According to J Sunil Prasad, Head - Sales, Southern Region (Sortex and Rice Business Unit), Buhler India Pvt Ltd, the grain processing sector has now embraced sophisticated machines mainly for handling, storing, processing, milling and sorting of grains. “We are offering machines mainly for pre-cleaning, silo storage, drying, conveying, milling and sorting along with automation solutions. In fact, total turnkey solutions from raw materials to finished products are on offer from Buhler. The main benefits of these machines are that they are pollutionf ree, save power and reduce labour costs. Besides, our machines can be used in higher capacity plants; they provide consistent quality of the end-product, enable multiproduct application on a single line processing, and also offer higher value for finished products. Our supplies are always customised to meet the market standards,” claims Prasad. In order to provide better solutions to the grain processing sector, MILLTEC is now expanding into many other new products like pneumatic

rubber Sheller 6 TPH capacity, tray type paddy separators, multiple length grading machine, and reverse colour sorters. “We have already introduced 8 TPH new rice milling line and various cleaning machines to cater to wheat, pulses, spices and other seeds,” says Ravindranath.

Changing market dynamics There are many issues involved in grain processing machinery sector, right from drying to competition from the unorganised sector. Due to the presence of unorganised sector, branded players have been facing rough weather in the market. “Today, grain drying and storing is a challenging task in India. This has to be flexible and must meet global standards. Apart f rom

The biggest disadvantage of using traditional machines is their incompetence in reducing wastage. However, the food processing sector is gradually realising the importance of using automated machines. this, competition from the unorganised sector is a serious issue. Because of the presence of unorganised sector, reputed players are finding it tough in the market,” rues Prasad. Such players draw customer attention on the price front to sell their products. It seems that technologically such products are not at par with the branded players. The prices of their products are low as they do not have to rely on strong R&D, global presence and more importantly service support. Looking at the changing market dynamics, it seems that unorganised players would face difficulty in the market if they do not embrace modernisation. Today, customers want sophisticated products backed by strong R&D. Another significant

Today, grain drying and storing is a challenging task in India. This has to be flexible and must meet global standards. Apar t from this, competition from the unorganised sector is a serious issue. J Sunil Prasad

Head - Sales, Southern Region (Sortex & Rice Business Unit), Buhler India Pvt Ltd

factor is strong service support because interruption in production is simply unacceptable to grain processors. The issue that needs to be addressed next is wastage. People have become cautious as a result of constant focus on grain wastage. Naturally, the grain processing industry will look for machines, especially automated ones, which are able to address this issue. “Our motto is to reduce wastage, including smallest of small waste in grain processing. We have demonstrated the benefits of paddy byproducts such as rice bran, paddy storage, collection of different grades of broken grains to sell at different prices, value-addition from paddy husk and pulses processing,” claims Prasad. The reputed players come out with products after intensive research on the market needs. “We strategise our movements in the industry by constantly watching the industrial scenario and the market demands. We develop our products keeping two things in mind – efficiency and economical models. We are also on the road to diversification into many more types of machinery in the food industry,” reveals Ravindranath. The advent of foreign players in the grain processing sector clearly indicates that it needs sophisticated machinery. Focus on bringing down grain wastage in India and other issues will definitely drive the demand for state-of-the-art technology in the times to come. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@infomedia18.in

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SPECIAL FOCUS Multinational machinery manufacturers

of skilled manpower, among others. These issues are clearly addressed by the state-ofthe-art machinery supplied by MNCs,” points out Manoj Paul, Country Manager India & South Asia, Heat and Control (South Asia) Pvt Ltd. Besides, technologically, machines from MNCs seem to have better efficiency. Of course, there are also few Indian players who are competing with their foreign counterparts in certain categories.

– is a tremendous advantage for the food processors in India. This is on account of dearth of skilled manpower in the food processing segment. The availability of skilled workforce should be commensurate with the growing demand for processed food. Unfortunately, this is not happening. “Sourcing, training and retaining manpower is one of the biggest challenges faced by all industries, and the situation is no different in the food processing industry. Our technologically advanced but simple-to-operate-andmaintain machines help to overcome the manpower challenge. We import food processing machines from companies based in Taiwan, Denmark, France, etc. These machines are basically used

Eyeing Indian market

for better prospects

Multinational companies (MNCs) offering sophisticated machines are instrumental in moulding the Indian food processing sector as such products ensure quality, safety, faster production, etc. This is evident from the success story of ethnic snack segment that seems to have benefitted the most due to the advent of MNCs in India. Prasenjit Chakraborty

T

he market for food processing machinery in India is evolving. Lately, this segment has witnessed some interesting changes, mainly due to two reasons. First is the growing demand for the processed food, and second, the advent of multinational machinery players in the country. With increasing expectations from customers of processed food in terms of quality, safety, etc, it has become mandatory for the manufacturers in this segment to cater to the emerging market requirements. To meet the demand of end-consumers, technology plays an important role. “The key issues of concern in the Indian food processing industry include product quality and consistency, food safety, and availability 34

Modern Food Processing | March 2012

“One major difference between the food processing machines manufactured by some of the multinational machinery manufacturers and local players is the level of engineering and fabrication. Machines need to be engineered and designed, keeping in mind the life of all the parts and whether they complement each other; this is an important factor. With the availability of imported machines manufactured by MNCs, there are lesser instances of breakdowns, and due to high machine uptime, the processor can produce more in lesser time. Hence, money and resources are not wasted on repairing the same,” points out Ashish Chaudhry, Managing Director, ECOCOSMOS.

Wide array of benefits Besides quality, safety, etc, operational ease – offered by machines from MNCs

in canning, dehydration, frozen foods, ready-to-eat segments etc. Standardised and hygienic output is the foremost benefit that the food processing industry experiences by using the sophisticated range of equipment we provide,” claims Chaudhry. Today, the demand for ethnic snacks has grown significantly. Interestingly, in popularising ethnic snacks machines, MNCs have played a significant role. Take the instance of Heat and Control’s namkeen line, which can handle a majority of namkeen products. “Our namkeen line is based on the heat wave technology and can handle almost all types of Indian namkeen products including lentils, nuts, boondi and various types of bhujia. These lines are available in four capacities starting from 250 kg per hour to 2,000 kg per hour. These lines have completely changed the way namkeen


Multinational machinery manufacturers

products are manufactured in India, and today producers are able to provide consistent quality with longer shelflife,” he claims. Potato chip is another segment in India where Heat and Control established a strong toe-hold. “Today, almost 90 per cent of the total potato chips produced in India are either on Heat and Control lines or on equipment supplied by Flavorite Technologies, a 100 per cent subsidiary of Heat and Control,” he adds.

Focus on customised solutions It is not always possible for MNCs to provide customised solutions because this calls for R&D and should also justify other factors like time, money etc associated with business. No manufacturer will spend time on the issue if the volume for that particular product is less. Giving more insights on this, Chaudhry says, “Actually, we do not agree with the point that multinational machinery players are focussing more on customised products that suits Indian food processors. It will be more suitable to say that Indian processors are looking at the available range of machines and trying to adapt their processing methods and recipes to suit the machines.” However, it happens when there is assured volume and the food processing line is large. In this scenario, manufacturers will take all possible steps for a customised solution. “Large food processing lines are always customised solutions and unique to meet different customer needs. In India, the market for namkeen snacks is much bigger than that of other categories. Hence, we are focussing on providing customised solutions as per the needs of our customers,” points out Paul.

Healthy marketing strategies MNCs that have been doing healthy business in the Indian market are trying to maintain their position in the market. Some are tying up with local manufacturers to provide better solutions to their customers. “Our marketing strategy has been to maintain the leadership position in the large capacity food processing lines through our Heat and Control equipment. Last year, we joined hands with a reputed local company – Flavorite Technologies to provide cost-effective solutions for the snack industry,” says Paul. Its R&D activities have been focussing on providing solutions for the namkeen and other local food products. It is quite perceptible that the use of state-of-the-art machinery supplied by MNC machinery players benefits India immensely as it has done to the rest of the world. “This is like the icing on the cake for India, where abundance of natural resources meets the latest technology for higher processing yields,” concludes Chaudhry. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@infomedia18.in

March 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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SPECIAL FOCUS Interface - Tapas Chatterjee

How is the food processing machinery segment in India shaping up? Food processing machinery segment has started witnessing growth, of late. Entrepreneurs who had ventured into the realm of food processing with small sustainable projects are seeing huge rise in demand for their products and, hence are looking for bigger projects. As such, several opportunities are emerging for the food processing equipment manufacturers.

finishing (equivalent to American 3A standards). We have developed vacuum brand dryer for processing malted milk/chicor y/cereal products. Besides, we have developed freeze drying equipment for coffee and other food products. Evaporation system without use of condenser and cooling tower for milk industr y is another innovation for which patent is pending.

How is the demand for energyefficient equipment in the Indian food processing sector? The demand for energy-efficient equipment has gone up tremendously in a bid to save recurring expenditure and remain competitive in the market. The awareness has dawned that energy efficiency and latest technology are key to future growth. Of late, multinational companies have also started purchasing f rom

“The demand for energy-efficient equipment has gone upâ€? ‌says Tapas Chatterjee, Managing Director, SSP Pvt Ltd. In conversation with Prasenjit Chakraborty, he offers insights on several issues pertaining to food processing machinery segment in India. The earlier trend of selecting different equipment from different manufacturers for the same project is now getting replaced with purchase of total project from the single party, which is responsible for the total project. Therefore, the actual growth potential is bound to get impacted tremendously. Also, the demand for automated and high-quality machines is growing, and to meet this demand scenario, the manufacturers are all gearing up.

What are your latest offerings for the food processing sector? SSP is offering energy-efficient evaporators and dryers with food grade 36

Modern Food Processing | March 2012

According to you, which two issues need to be addressed to make the sector more competitive in the international market? In terms of manufacturing competitiveness, India is ranked second in the world. However, two issues that need to be addressed to make food processing machinery sector in India more competitive are use of the latest generation fabrication machinery to minimise timef rame of production, and quality upgradation & value engineering of equipment by use of latest software like PV Elite, solid modelling etc to cut cost.

the local food processing units and they are insisting on good quality energy-efficient plant to handle their products.

What is your outlook for the Indian food processing machinery segment? Food processing machinery segment will grow at a much higher rate during the coming years as demand for Indian food products are growing internationally. SSP has four manufacturing units; all these units are under expansion. We plan to invest about ` 20 crore for the expansion. Email: prasenjit.chakraborty@infomedia18.in


SPECIAL FOCUS Roundtable

Are Indian food processing machinery manufacturers globally competitive? There is no dearth of talent in India. Despite this, Indian food processing manufacturers fail to make significant impact in the global market. Prasenjit Chakraborty speaks to players associated with the industry to gauge their views on what ails the industry.

Makdum Jahan Country Manager, Veripack Solutions India Pvt Ltd

Sanjeev Gupta Director, Kanchan Metals Pvt Ltd

Javed Husain Director (Marketing & Sales), Muez-Hest India Pvt Ltd

To be globally competitive, one has to have a good leadership standing in the home country first. Currently, majority of the leading Indian food companies that are operating on a pan-India basis or dealing with exports do rely on imported food processing technologies. Moreover, the anomalies faced by the Indian food processing machinery manufacturers are daunting, such as lack of quality design engineers, inadequate R&D, etc. With India becoming the next ‘Kitchen Destination’ for major global food companies, there will be a huge demand for quality food processing machinery and, hence, this presents the best opportunity to the local Indian food processing machinery manufacturers, which could take them to the path of building global capabilities in this niche segment. The industry awakening to this big opportunity should definitely be the most important ‘food for thought process’.

According to me, there is a huge potential awaiting the Indian manufacturers who manufacture quality food processing machinery. The need is to produce world-class technology machines at affordable prices. There is a tremendous requirement within India, given the growth rate of food processing industry in the country. In fact, global machinery manufacturers are setting up shops in India to cater to the needs of this market. Once world-class technology can be achieved, then of course we can be globally competitive. However, there is a need for some corrections in the taxes and Excise Duty policy of the Government of India. Today, the food processing sector does not get MODVAT, which makes the Excise Duty charges a cost burden. This ultimately makes the total cost of the machine expensive, thus reducing the gap between imported and local machines. By taking the right measures, Indian food processing machinery manufacturers can become globally competitive.

Indian food processing machinery is accepted worldwide due to its manufacturing quality, world-class technology adaptation, etc, to meet the requirements of customers. The impact of global recession still persists, therefore in the last one year, there had been a decline in enquiries and also European and American machinery suppliers are trying to offer lucrative prices to local buyers. Therefore, for surviving in the competitive market, Indian manufacturers are re-arranging and adjusting as per market demand. On a positive note, there is good demand from the domestic market, which offers huge opportunities to Indian machinery manufacturers in terms of providing quality machinery to local buyers. The demand for food processing is expected to grow further. Hence, in spite of competition, Indian machinery manufacturers have fairly good chance of survival and better prospects in the coming years.

EDITORIAL TAKE Manufacturing machines that address the latest needs of customers require focussed R&D, which to a great extent is lacking in India. In contrast, MNCs focus intensively on R&D and come out with products the food processing sector looks for. In addition, the Indian food processing machinery sector needs support in terms of policy initiatives from the government. Addressing these issues in time will surely take the segment to new heights.

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Modern Food Processing | March 2012


FACILITY VISIT Signature International Foods

Making a through

difference

much-‘kneaded’ products

Mahua Roy

B

Indigenous technology at its best Living up to the expectations of the consumers in a country where almost every person swears by the quality of his/her mother’s chapattis, is not an easy

“We ensure slow dough fermentation, and shape every naan by hand, thus replicating the tandoori method of cooking. All naans are baked in our unique soft-flame fired tandoori style clay ovens, built in-house. The designing has been done to keep the

Photo: Joshua Navalkar

eing a first mover in the market has its own advantages. You get to explore a new market wherein you face virtually no competition, and the category instantly gets identified with your brand. Interestingly, it also has drawbacks. You are faced with the encumbrance of introducing an entirely new category to the consumers.

It all begins with getting the product right. And Signature International Foods has done just that. All set to launch a range of ambient naans and chapattis for the Indian market, this company boasts of an exemplary manufacturing facility at Nashik.

Automated dough kneading

Here is where Signature International Foods is all set to make a mark of its own. The company will soon be launching an array of Indian flatbreads including chapattis, naans, kulchas, parathas for the Indian market. Although these products are already available, the company will be making the biggest difference by introducing the ambient variant of these breads. Says Ajay Talwar, Joint Managing Director, Signature International Foods, “There is a huge gap in the Indian market when it comes to the promotion of our own traditional products.We decided to address this, and thereby launched a strategic mix of products, totally customised towards Indian taste buds and preferences.” 40

Modern Food Processing | March 2012

Getting ready for rolling

task. Signature International Foods has strived to provide a state-of-the-art manufacturing unit for the flatbreads, combined with the finest packaging facilities. The entire machinery has been designed in-house by William Eid, Joint Managing Director, Signature International Foods, who is an engineer himself. This facility possesses the largest chapatti line in the world, claims the company. This line is also tuned to churn out tortilla wraps. For the naan line, a modernised, continuous clay lined oven is designed. This gives the company an edge over competitors. In the clay oven, actual clay is used. This gives a better flavour profile and authentic quality to the naan. The production process insists on retaining traditional elements. Talwar elaborates,

Rolled out dough makes way to the oven

energy consumption levels minimal.” This second line is also used for the production of parathas, kulchas and pizza bases.

No compromise on food safety Signature International Foods lays utmost emphasis on food safety. No preservatives are used for the ambient flatbread range. The Individually Quick Frozen (IQF) line is the sole, safe method of preservation used. The entire staff is trained on safety standards and procedures. Besides, the packaging unit is a clean room area, where a totally sterile atmosphere is maintained. This unit possesses the biggest Multivac line in the world. Apart from safety, consistency in product quality is also a huge priority for the company. The machines are so calibrated that they would reject the slightest deviations from


Signature International Foods

designated measures of radii, thickness, or circumference of the flatbreads.

What works for the Indian market? In 2008, the company (then called Honeytop Specialty Foods) had conducted an extensive market research across Mumbai, Delhi and Bengaluru to understand the qualitative and quantitative demands of the consumers. Based on the encouraging results, it decided to launch naans and flavoured pizza bases. However, in 2010, chapatti was identified as the missing link in the market, and the company went ahead with investments keeping this product in mind. “The B2B segment has massive growth opportunities for ambient chapattis. Indian Railway Catering and Tourism

Selecting the best, rejecting the rest

Corporation (IRCTC) itself requires 50 lakh chapattis per day. Besides, there are corporate canteens, defence areas, which are quite lucrative,” explains Talwar. The company is in talks with IRCTC and Sodexo for business opportunities. Pizza Hut as well as Domino’s Pizzas are mulling

IN A NUTSHELL R Total investment towards the facility: ` 60 crore R Total area:

80,000 sq ft

R Total output: 45,000 chapattis per hour (first line that also manufactures tortillas); 25,000 naans per hour (second line that also manufactures kulchas, parathas and pizza bases)

over sourcing partnership for pizza bases with Signature International Foods. “The food processing industry in India has flourished because of relentless need-based innovation. This is why products like papads, pickles, which were traditionally made at home are now bought off-the-shelf. Similar logic applies to frozen peas or even gingergarlic pastes,” quips Talwar. It is to be noted that these products are a hit in the non-urban areas too. Thus, maintaining a fine balance of innovation coupled with taste is what will be the right success mix for the Ready-to-Eat (RTE) category.

The food processing industry in India has flourished because of relentless need-based innovation. This is why products like papads, pickles, which were traditionally made at home are now bought off-the-shelf.

Magic touch of modern retail

Promising avenues to explore

In the last couple of years, modern retail has revolutionised the food processing industry. It has given rise to a competitive

The company is looking at 30 per cent of its output for exports. It is in final talks with distributors in Japan, Middle East,

Ajay Talwar

Joint Managing Director

finest technology or competitively priced product does not work. What matters is taste; quality follows closely.”

Stacking chapattis into desired pack size

streak and ignited the sense of product enhancements. Talwar is optimistic about the boost that modern retail will provide to this category. “Modern retail gives ample scope for in-store promotions, samplings, and most importantly – showcasing. Once we achieve the level of comfort with our first-time consumers, we will tweak our distribution strategy and be present in most neighbourhood grocery stores as well,” he says. The company has also kept the pricing quite competitive, at about ` 30 for a pack of 8-10 chapattis. The major focus of the company is on taste and quality for which it has made huge investments. Besides, R&D and customisation experiments are carried out on a regular basis to keep up with the market demands. Talwar adds, “In India, emphasis on usage of

Proceeding to packaging

Australia as well as Canada and the US. Apart from presence as ‘Legacy of India’ brand at modern retail outlets, the company is also exploring opportunities for private labels. “The supermarkets abroad are saturated with Indian flatbreads. Private labels, however, offer an opportunity area. For sourcing of private labels, Indian companies are preferred because of expertise and most competitive pricing. At Signature International Foods, our pricing is backed by the finest technology and optimum throughput,” opines Talwar. The company also sees various opportunities in the Indian market. Talwar feels that once the cold chain logistics is in place in India, frozen ready-pizzas would be a huge hit. The company is also planning to launch ready gravies in near future. Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

March 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK

BEVERAGE PROCESSING BEVERAGE INDUSTRY Translating technology prowess into opportunities ........................................................ 44 ASEPTIC TECHNOLOGY A paradigm shift in beverage production ....................................................................... 46 BEVERAGE PROCESSING Is India ready for aseptic technology?............................................................................. 52 INTERFACE  Moksh Sani, Managing Director, Living Liquidz “We want to revolutionise the experience of buying alcohol” ........................................ 56 INSPECTION SYSTEM Five-point checklist for ensuring best product ............................................................... 58

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Beverage industry

Mahua Roy

I

ntroduction of new products in a particular category is stale news. Making waves these days are launches of newer categories altogether! So today we have not just packaged water, but mineral water, tonic water, spring water, nutrient water; not just fruit juices but 100 per cent juice, juice blends, fruit nectar, etc. Similarly, sub-categories have sprung up in other beverages as well, including alcoholic ones. So one can only do a massive permutation-combination to figure out the number of technologies being employed by the beverage processing industry in India. The entr y of multinational corporations in beverage processing, aggressive rise of commodity branding and low cost of technology are changing the economics of the Indian beverage industry. This is also coupled with the aggressive rise of regional players who are strategically making forays into categories where entry barriers are low. India is now set for beverage revolution!

Translating TECHNOLOGY prowess into OPPORTUNITIES The beverage industry in India is witnessing double-digit growth rates. Innovations in formulations are churning out better and exciting products in the market. The beverage processing machinery sector has a vital role to play in the success story of the beverage industry.

Opportunities in India Over the past few years, several new opportunities have been cashed upon by the beverage processing machinery industry. Looking at the large size of the consumer market in the country, many multinational players in this segment have set up base in India. This has created a competitive environment and drastically helped to keep the price of technology low. This in turn has translated into lower costs of made-inIndia beverages, which are far cheaper than the imported variants of the same. Besides, health-consciousness has seen ingredient substitution or modification technologies, which are in some ways easier to execute than making a new addition. And not just that, the beverage industry in India is also realising the importance of Ayurveda and other herbal ingredients, traditional 44

Modern Food Processing | March 2012

Indian drinks like lassi, buttermilk, etc and turning them into successful brands. Customising technology for such products has shown the level of involvement of even foreign players with the Indian consumers. According to the Ministry of Commerce and Industries, the market for food processing machiner y in India (2009-10) was approximately $ 1 billion. And as the food processing industry is growing at more than 20 per cent, the demand for machinery is witnessing an average annual growth rate of 10-15 per cent since the last few years.

Technologies in demand Swedish giant Alfa Laval elaborates on the top technologies demanded by the beverage industry in India. Dharmendra Shukla, Additional General Manager (BVF), Alfa Laval India, says, “Efficient clarification systems like decanter centrifuge for various applications like separation of black/brown specs from mango pulp, separation of red specs from litchi puree, depulping of pineapple and other citrus fruits are witnessing rising demand. We are continuously working towards and have developed various models of decanters ranging from a capacity of 2 tonne-perhour (TPH) to 10 TPH for catering to


Beverage industry

various capacities of fruit processors. We have also started manufacturing aseptic sterilisers for fruit purees and concentrates.” The renowned German food processing machinery major GEA Group has identified the major needs and customised technologies to suit the Indian beverage industry. Sachin Raverkar, AGM-Sales, Liquid Processing, GEA Process Engineering India, puts forward the main demands that he anticipates from the beverage industry. He notes, “The major Indian beverage producers have several plants located at various locations across India. It is, therefore, important that the products manufactured at different plants have uniform attributes when it comes to taste, appearance, quality and consistency.” New technologies are being developed for fruit processing, thereby promoting value-added products like diced mango or strawberry, pulp with dices, etc, which are required by the beverage industry. There is also focus on enhancing the efficiency of the existing processing lines towards pasteurisation, aseptic processing and concentration of pulp by use of energy-efficient heat exchanger designs and better process control. All these aim at ensuring better quality, and retaining aroma & nutritive value of the product. Raverkar is also buoyant about the emphasis laid on sustainability by the beverage processing sector. They are actively looking at technologies that can reduce carbon footprint and water usage. He adds, “The beverage industry utilises large amount of water during the production and cleaning operations and this puts lot of pressure on the natural resources. Also, in view of the stiff competition, the beverage manufacturing companies are always under price pressure. Therefore, there is a need to reduce the processing cost, which is possible by employing highly energy-efficient measures of processing, thereby utilising less energy and water as well as preventing product losses.”

Ensuring product safety

Wish list for the MoFPI

Providing a safe product right till the retail shelf is the primary responsibility of beverage processors. Incorporating technologies that effectively help manage product safety at the processing level itself saves the company a lot of resources. Raverkar says, “Product safety is of high priority as the end-product should be safe for consumption and free from any foreign particles that may find their way into the product through various ingredients used for production, either during processing or packaging.” Besides, Raverkar believes that the cleaning cycle for the plants is also an important aspect and the automated cleaning-in-place (CIP) systems, which

Vision 2015 document released by the Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MoFPI) aims at raising India to the zenith of food processing. The ambitious project specifically targets at increasing the level of food processing from the current 210 per cent to 25 per cent in 2025. Besides, it also plans to increase the level of processing of perishables from 6-20 per cent, value-addition from 20-35 per cent and acquiring a share in global food trade from 1.5-3 per cent by 2015. But the plan needs to incorporate practical issues of funding to beverage processors, towards both upstream and downstream processing. Encouragement to entrepreneurs should be supported by better incentives. Shukla notes that MoFPI has decided to bring its focus from fresh fruit storage to processing by offering grants and subsidies similar to the ones being extended for cold rooms and cold chains at 40 per cent from the present subsidy of ` 50 lakh, which is negligible to start a medium-size fruit processing plant. He adds, “It would be welcomed by the industry if the MoFPI could consider grants/subsidies to the existing processors for upgradation of their existing plants with aseptic bulk processing and evaporation plant to make them suitable for processing multi-fruits and multi-products.” With the Vision 2015 underway, the beverage processing machinery industry can envision being a partner in this growth. But this can be possible only if the government comes up with friendly policies to suit a better business environment. Raverkar says, “The government can further support the food processing segment by allowing the import of machinery at low duties especially for plants, which manufacture fruit- and vegetable-based juices. This should encourage more companies/entrepreneurs to invest in beverage processing facility.”

New technologies are being developed for fruit processing, thereby promoting value-added products like diced mango or strawberry, pulp with dices, etc, which are required by the beverage industry. are part of any beverage processing plant, ensure that the cleaning protocol is strictly followed as per the process requirement. Ensuring that the machinery itself is manufactured under high standards of safety provides double benefits for the beverage processor. While explaining about the manufacturing of equipment at Alfa Laval, Shukla obser ves, “O ur aseptic module manufacturing shop is equipped with ultra-modern facilities to ensure that only the best quality product is shipped from the workshop.” The workshop is pressurised with sterile air to ensure dust-free environment; orbital welding is carried out to ensure smooth weld without any air pockets. Moreover, there is constant inspection by way of camera; the material handling is wellorganised and high level of automation is used.

Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

March 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Aseptic technology

thermal impact than the hot-fill product. This means that the product is more natural and the risk of destroying flavours does not exist. On the other hand, for ESL products, it is essential to always maintain the cold chain – this is often a challenge in countries, where there is a problem of cold chain availability at the point of sale.”

What is the difference?

Courtesy: Krones AG

In hot-fill process, the product is flash pasteurised at temperatures (between 120ºC and 140ºC) and held for a few seconds. After this, the product is cooled down to be filled in a container, which is then laid on its sides to sterilise the cap. It is then erected and undergoes rapid cooling down to about 40ºC in a cooling tunnel. Aseptic filling involves bottling a product at ambient temperature, ie without tunnel pasteurisation or hot-filling and without the addition of preservatives, in such a way that it attains a specified shelf-life. The products are only briefly heated before filling. Aseptic filling is recommended for both still as well as carbonated beverages. Basically, two processes of aseptic filling have emerged, dry and wet sterilisation, both with specific advantages and disadvantages. Kraus explains, “The most common applications in aseptic technology for beverage filling are definitely wet bottle sterilisation with Peracetic Acid (PAA) or dry bottle sterilisation with Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2). The aseptic technology is indeed a strong growing market – the consumer these days expects a natural product without any preservative. The product should be ‘low processed’ to be as inartificial as possible.”

A paradigm shift in beverage production While there are many technologies available in the market to process and pack beverages, aseptic processing is gaining importance as it can preserve the products safely in a natural state. But beverage manufacturers will have to work closely with the technology providers to extract maximum benefit from aseptic processing. Rakesh Rao

N

on-carbonated drinks such as juice, tea, milk, flavoured water,etc need protection from microbial contamination as they contain sugars. Beverage manufacturers use methods such as preservatives, hot-filling, extended shelf-life (ESL), aseptic processing/filling, etc to eliminate microbes, thus ensuring safe consumption of drinks. However, in recent times, aseptic processing is gaining importance in the developed countries. The advantage of the aseptic process compared with hot-fill is obvious, says Stefan Kraus, Product Manager-Filling Technology, Krones AG, adding, “The aseptic product is not as highly processed as the hot-fill product, and the aseptic product experiences less 46

Modern Food Processing | March 2012

Refreshing technology There is an increasing demand for more natural and healthier products among the consumers; so aseptic packaging enables to do away with preservatives, artificial colours etc. “Besides, compared to hot-filling for high acid drinks and retort for the low acid ones, combined with respectively High Temperature Short Time (HTST) and Ultra-high Temperature (UHT) processing, aseptic technology allows to preserve the organoleptic quality of the products still securing a long shelf-life,” elaborates Roland Nicolas, Dairy & Aseptic Business Development Director, Serac. Seconding this thought, V Gokuldas, Managing Director, HRS Process Systems, says, “One of the biggest advantages of aseptic technology is preservation of naturalness of processed


Aseptic technology

product. Compared to other methods such as hot-fill, extended shelf-life wherein preservatives or extenders need to be added, the same is not required in aseptic processing. Also, some of the hot-fill/ESL products need cold chain in the logistics of supply.” The aseptic technology is now a proven and reliable technology, which guarantees to obtain microbiologically stable products. Nicolas says, “The market requires more and more shelf-stable products with a long, sometimes very long shelf-life. It also requires that food products must be kept safe in any conditions during storage, transportation and distribution. Aseptic packaging is suitable for all these requirements.” In the beverage field, aseptic cold filling enables to use standard PET bottles instead of heat-set PET bottles for hot-filling. “This provides a significant packaging material cost reduction and, in addition, offers a wider choice of bottle format, shape, label or sleeve decor as there is no temperature constraints on the packaging,” explains Nicolas. Aseptic processing also follows a general trend in the food industry to upgrade the hygienic standard of the equipment and particularly in the dairies. He adds, “The aseptic technology features a high grade of machinery design and manufacture, complying with food quality standard for ultra-clean and aseptic equipment, the likes of EHEDG, 3A or FDA. This comes together with a set of cleaning, sterilisation and disinfection procedures, which have to be carefully followed. Besides, this necessarily implies an improvement of raw food quality, like fresh milk.”

and steam is much lower than that for the traditional technologies. “However, aseptic packaging requires a higher investment cost; so generally the more production the end-user expects, the easier it is to justify the purchase of an aseptic line,” he adds. Moreover, aseptic technology requires a minimum production capacity in order that the fillers could be cost-effective. Cesar Rodriguez, CEO, MachinePoint Group, says, “This equipment need additional care for specialised personnel in order to keep equipment working and guarantee the product safety (all these safety requirements are necessary to guarantee the shelf-life of products).” Although the initial cost of installation is high for aseptic technology, beverage manufacturers can enjoy several benefits. Gokuldas points out, “Smaller size packets are cheaper in aseptic as compared to hotfill or ESL. Hence, aseptic processing technology is as cost-effective as other methods of processing. However, actual savings can vary from product to product and depending on the capacity of the plant.” A superficial comparison of aseptic packages with other commonly used packaging material often leads laypersons to the conclusion that aseptic packaging is a more expensive option. On the contrary, Rodriguez observes that a deeper understanding of the material and its underlying technology clearly shows unmatched levels of cost-effectiveness. In fact, according to him, aseptic technology offers a host of savings, some of which are tangible while others are intangible (but highly significant in terms of their value).

Customised solutions A cost-effective method? The comparison with other techniques, such as hot-filling, retort, etc, shows that specially for high-capacity lines, aseptic technology is economically more interesting. For example, Nicolas says, aseptic cold-filling enables to use standard PET bottles instead of heat-set PET bottles for hot-filling. Moreover, the overall consumption of processed water 48

Modern Food Processing | March 2012

The growing demand for fruit-based beverages is leading to evaluation of aseptic technology for different products with customisation. Gokuldas says, “Aseptic technology for beverage processing is working in two areas – one is processing and the other packaging. The trend is to design units with low energy consumption and low product hold-up, with optimum processing capacity. In packaging, the trend

WHICH IS THE BEST? Here are some of the characteristics of commonly used beverage processing methods: R Hot-fill: It is normally filled in glass (not a restriction, but one of the most common), the container could be fragile and not easy to transport, and additionally could change the flavour characteristics as well as product properties R ESL: It has less shelf-life than aseptic product; the product quality would be similar R Pasteurised or fresh milk: It requires refrigeration and the shelflife is shorter than aseptic products R Aseptic filling: It requires a minimum production capacity to be cost-effective, and the technology would not be available for small single milk or food producers, because of minimum production requirements Source: Cesar Rodriguez, CEO, MachinePoint Group

is towards low-cost recyclable packaging material, which is effective for an aseptic environment. These are being evaluated for small as well as bulk packaging.” Another area of interest for aseptic technology in the future will be processing of beverages with fruit particles. Kraus opines, “One trend is definitely the high line flexibility with maximum line availability. During the last few years, another trend came up: aseptic filling of particles. The consumer wants to experience the fruit itself in the natural product. So there is a significant growing demand in filling particles without damaging them.” In future, the demand for aseptically processed products, which retain their naturalness in taste and flavour, and contain no additives, are expected to go up manifold with growing number of health-conscious consumers. Hence, keeping in mind the growing consumer demand as well as costeffective technology benefits, the demand for aseptic processing is growing among beverage manufacturers, sums up Gokuldas. Email: rakesh.rao@infomedia18.in


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Beverage processing

IS INDIA READY FOR ASEPTIC TECHNOLOGY F Rakesh Rao

ollowing the global trends, Indian beverage manufacturers are looking for processing alternatives, which can preserve the natural flavour and taste of products. As a result, they are experimenting with technologies such as aseptic processing. “Nowadays, more and more people demand food and beverages in good condition in remote locations. Aseptic processing has been one of the state-of-the-art and more required alternative in food and beverage processing to offer an extended product life. When food or beverage is filled into aseptic package under aseptic process technology, this processed food will be able to keep its properties, flavour and nutritional values longer than any other packaged food,” observes Cesar Rodriguez, CEO, MachinePoint Group. Take the example of dairy industry. India has been the leading producer of milk around the world, and several of the milk producers or farms are in rural areas, where part of the population are living with few resources. “If we consider that the climate in India is almost tropical, the fresh milk is a difficult product to transport, since it needs refrigeration and cold chain distribution system in order to reach the people in good condition as well as conserve the milk properties and vitamins longer,” he points out. Experts suggest that aseptic processing can offer reliable solution in such situation. Rodriguez elaborates, “One alternative can be aseptic processing and filling system, 52

Modern Food Processing | March 2012

where the fresh milk is treated thermally in order to reduce the harmful bacteria and keep a product in an aseptic container, inside which, the milk or food can be kept safe for a long time without refrigeration. This can increase the efficiency of product distribution and storage in remote or rural areas, thus helping to bring safe and good food to the majority of the population.”

Need to scale up operations Though many consider aseptic technology to be a better solution for beverage production, low consumption of processed beverages in India compared to developed countries makes it unviable for beverage manufacturers. “We have been offering some aseptic solution for Indian beverage processors. The minimum required capacity to set up a line is around 5,000–6,000 units/hour to make an optimum cost to conversion ratio. Unfortunately, the average production capacity of some of the Indian food and beverage producers, who have spoken to us about their needs, had been lower than this minimum production speed,” opines Rodriguez. Hence, it is difficult to find suppliers of aseptic fillers for smaller capacities. In addition, the awareness about aseptic technology is low among Indian beverage manufacturers. At the same time, there are no incentives from the government for using latest technologies. But this can be changed, believes Rodriguez. He suggests, “The government should announce financial and manufacturing incentives and lower taxes for processors using aseptic technology, to make it more attractive and affordable to medium-sized producers.”

No doubt aseptic technology is changing the dynamics of beverage processing globally with consumers demanding more natural products. In India, due to absence of large-capacity processing line, lack of awareness, etc, demand for aseptic processing is still low. So will the situation change in near future, let’s find out.

Compared to other processing methods, aseptic technology requires qualified personnel to run the operation. “There is, undoubtedly, an increasing demand from the market for aseptic packaging. But Indian manufacturers have to be aware of the fact that to set up an aseptic operation requires a significant investment and strict maintenance procedures. Finally, it is demanding in terms of staff with adequate technical skills, which makes training an important factor,” opines Roland Nicolas, Dairy & Aseptic Business Development Director, Serac – which recently started marketing in India for food and dairy sectors. And that is why companies like Serac give


Beverage processing

The government should announce financial and manufacturing incentives and lower taxes for processors using aseptic technology, to make it more attractive and affordable to medium-sized producers. Cesar Rodriguez

CEO, MachinePoint Group

lot of emphasis on training their customers’ personnel. To sum up, says Nicolas, aseptic packaging admits no compromise and I am sure that the food industry in India has the necessary resources to cope with these requirements.

Demand picking up Factors such as increasing urban population, rising consumerism, etc is likely to help the beverage industry in India. “For Krones, India is an emerging market, which has to be most exactly observed – India currently has a population of approximately 1.21 billion. All those people have needs – but one thing is a basic need: pure, healthy beverages. Sooner or later, over certain steps of market development, we are in India at the point of aseptic filling,” says Stefan Kraus, Product Manager Filling Technology, Krones AG, a leading technology provider for aseptic processing and filling. With regard to the plan to increase its aseptic processing technology in India, he says, “First, we have to talk to the bottlers – to find out their needs and we have to look to the market requirements. And, step by step the business of aseptic filling will run up.”

There is, undoubtedly, an increasing demand from the market for aseptic packaging. But Indian manufacturers have to be aware of the fact that to set up an aseptic operation requires a significant investment and strict maintenance procedures. Roland Nicolas

Dairy & Aseptic Business Development Director, Serac

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Realising the benefits of the technology, some of the leading beverage manufacturers in India have already installed aseptic line in their facilities. V Gokuldas, Managing Director, HRS Process Systems, states, “We offer a range of pre-heaters, pasteurisers, sterilisers (aseptic), coolers and chillers for products like fruit pulp, fruit juice, pulpy beverage, milk & milk products, etc. These can be for hot fill line or aseptic processing. We have given over 40 lines in India in the past three to four years to all major beverage processors like PepsiCo, Coca-Cola, Parle and their franchisee for capacity ranging from 1,000-27,000 litre per hour (LPH). With growing demand for aseptic in beverage sector, we have provided few units. Recently, we supplied high-capacity ones to Jaipuria Group for its plant in Uganda and to Parle Agro in India.” Though aseptic processing is mostly used in high-capacity plants, technology providers are now offering solutions to small-scale units as well. This augurs well for India, where SMEs dominate the food and beverages segment. Nicolas opines, “Traditionally, the aseptic filling lines are high-capacity lines; but recently there has been, in many countries, an increasing demand for low-capacity equipment. Serac is now in a position to offer this type of equipment, in the region of 6,000 bottles per hour (BPH).” With growth in consumers in the tier II and tier III cities, the demand is shifting for processing beverages at multiple locations. Gokuldas says, “This coupled with availability of packaging machines (new or reconditioned) at competitive prices has enabled small-scale manufacturers to look at aseptic technology seriously. We have received some requests for information on these processing technologies by such manufacturers and are working on some of these proposals.”

Finetuning strategies For Indian manufacturers to take advantage of aseptic technology, they have to understand their requirements and analyse the benefits of using the new technology. First, they will have to decide the type of

The demand is shifting for processing beverages at multiple locations. This coupled with availability of packaging machines at competitive prices has enabled smallscale manufacturers to look at aseptic technology seriously. V Gokuldas

Managing Director, HRS Process Systems

packaging to go for. “Carton pack has been so far the traditional aseptic packaging in India. But all the food and beverage manufacturers can easily realise today the limits and the financial constraints of this type of packaging,” says Nicolas. Similarly, it helps if beverage processors select a complete solution provider. For example, dairies in India may choose between High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), which is the most commonly used packaging material today, and PET, currently utilised in the beverage industry. Though PET offers advantages, beverage manufacturers still need to source the right preforms for this application. “Addressing this need gap, Serac, being one of the leading players in UHT milk bottling, is able to offer a turn-key solution from blow-moulding to palletisation, including the aseptic filler, for both types of materials. Serac is thereby in a better position to provide some fair advice and then recommend the right solution,” claims Nicolas. Growing market for products with natural flavour is likely to increase the demand for aseptic processing technology. And to seize this opportunity, some global suppliers have already entered the market, while others like SIG Combibloc are keenly tracking the developments. “SIG Combibloc, a leading systems supplier of aseptic beverage cartons and filling machines, is currently not actively present in the Indian market. But we feel that this market has tremendous potential, and hence we are keeping the market under observation for the right time to enter,” discloses a SIG Combibloc official. Email: rakesh.rao@infomedia18.in


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Interface - Moksh Sani

We want to revolutionise the experience of buying alcohol ...says Moksh Sani, Managing Director, Living Liquidz. This company owns and operates 45 boutique liquor stores in Mumbai. In conversation with Mahua Roy, Sani reveals his inventory & stocking secrets and explains what makes a boutique liquor store such an exciting concept. At a high-end liquor retail store, what exactly is the customer looking for? Purchasing of liquor at the so-called wine shops has always been an unpleasant experience to many. Moreover, the customer would not have access to or information about new, exotic and exciting brands. Considering that liquor outlets are just one of the very few advertising options for alcohol brands, they were not able to utilise it to the fullest. The customer was ill-informed and had to pre-decide which brand he is exactly looking for. Then he would go ahead to the store, pay for it and leave. At Living Liquidz, we wanted to revolutionise the experience of buying alcohol. With changing times, the cities are shedding the taboo related to alcohol. By changing the perception of ‘wine shops’, we wanted to position our brand as a premier and exclusive one-of-a-kind. So that, when a customer wants to buy a particular brand of alcohol, he would choose our particular store and not just another wine shop. At such high-end liquor stores, the customer wants variety. He looks for ease 56

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of categorisation and product display. He also looks for assistance to help him make a choice. And for the retailer, it gives him ample opportunities to tie up with alcohol brands and initiate promotional activities in-store.

How do you ensure customer loyalty? We aim to create a unique positioning for our brand. Our USP is our concept itself. We look towards offering the best and finest quality of liquor, which are exotic and genuine. Living Liquidz offers more than 1,000 different types of liquor brands and more than 300 wine labels covering almost every region of the world. Besides, we also encourage wine tasting sessions. Our uniqueness lies in the experience we provide to the customer, both in-store and offline. This includes the look and feel of our store, online ordering, accessorising (Eurocave, glass ware, wine cellars), door delivery, return back policy, bar tending needs and venue booking as well. At our store-in-store outlet at Star Bazaar, Andheri, we have tried to replicate duty-free shopping experience. And, of course, we have introduced

incredible benefits to members availing of our Live3 Loyalty cards.

Who is the target audience for high-end liquor stores? I would say, everybody. We do not categorise or position ourselves as a brand only for the rich and famous. We have segmented our products based on budget as well as range, so that each customer can have an easy comparison of a similar type of alcohol within a close price range. Not to forget, this experience also favours the woman shopper. Women, who are quite liberal about their choices of alcohol, can now have a world-class experience of shopping liquor in a friendly atmosphere.

What are the future plans of the company in India? Taking into account the response of customers, I am positive about the future of liquor retailing in India. We are aggressively working on plans to set up more retail stores in various cities like Mumbai, Pune, Bengaluru, Gurgaon and Chennai. Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK Inspection system

Five-point checklist for ensuring best product

Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI), which includes British Retail Consortium (BRC), International Food Standard (IFS) and FSSC 22000 schemes. The requirements heaped upon manufacturers do not end with food safety legislation, global certification schemes and process-specific standards. For example, checkweighers play a pivotal role in meeting trading standards like weights and measures, and innovative, centralised product inspection device management helps to placate retailers who have their own, individual sets of standards, such as Tesco, Marks & Spencer, and Walmart, especially in terms of due diligence. 2

Courtesy: Mettler-Toledo Safeline

The need to equip food processing lines with top-quality product inspection equipment is more pressing now than ever before. Tightened regulatory standards and heightened consumer awareness require that food manufacturers take all measures necessary to protect both customer interests and their brand reputation. Neil Giles

I

n 2010, the UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) reported 116 incidents of physical contamination among food products, with 66 per cent concerning ‘extrinsic material not related to the food itself ’. Thirteen product recall notices were also issued. Interestingly, in 2009, the number of incidents was 56, less than half the 2010 figure. These alarming figures are a cause of concern among food manufacturers. There are inevitable and serious consequences in the event of a product recall – the financial cost of sanctions, fines and damaged machines is often high, and can have immediate and long-term implications for company share price. Food safety scares can dent consumer confidence to such an extent that affected brands may find it difficult to recover. 58

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In order to keep a particular brand protected, certain steps must be taken, which are mentioned below. 1

Understand the regulations

The first step in meeting food regulations and standards is to acquire a full understanding of what they entail, and which particular ones apply to the organisation. It is important to select equipment and suppliers that can ensure compliance and have knowledge of global quality standards, regional differences and industry variations. Checkweighers, metal detectors, X-ray equipment and vision inspection systems must satisfy legislation implemented by state regulators in their ability to guarantee process and product security. In many cases, it is also important to choose technology and equipment that adheres to the demands of the industry, such as standards encompassed by the

Know one’s product

Armed with an awareness of relevant regulations and standards, manufacturers must turn their focus to the nature of their products. Is it liquid, powdered or solid? Is it dry or wet, loose or packed? What is the product density and thickness? Is it packaged in glass bottles, jars, cans or cartons? Is the product individually wrapped or in bulk loose flow? Different combinations can affect the optimum inspection solution. For complete safety, it is important to understand at what point, or points, in the manufacturing process the product needs to be inspected and what contaminants to look for at each point. Manufacturers of liquids packaged in domed-base containers looking for potential glass contaminants, for example, are best served by an X-ray system with specially angled beams to eliminate the effects of inspection blind spots, placed at the end of the production line. Looking for metal contaminants in vertically packaged, free-falling powdered or granular food products would lead one to a high-sensitivity metal detection with advanced analytical software, placed directly between a multi-head weigher and the vertical fill, form, seal machine. Product or pack orientation has a similar bearing on the type of inspection needed, as well as positioning on the belt – for example, burger patties may be randomly positioned on a conveyor


Inspection system

belt in the production process. In this instance, X-ray technology is first able to locate a recognisable product, and then run an inspection routine. Product inspection solutions can also be tailored to accurately inspect any product format, of any density, and in any packaging. Part of knowing a product involves understanding the factors that could limit inspection sensitivity. This draws upon knowledge of product technology, potential contaminants and environmental factors. For instance, a food product packed in an environment with limited space may require a metal detector with a sensitive detection coil, plus the ability to be positioned in close proximity to metal structures and other equipment without interference and impaired performance. There are also features in equipment to eliminate interference from nearby metal structures, even when fitted into tight spaces. 3

Increase risk awareness

Good manufacturing practices, such as those outlined in a HACCP programme, should be in place, no matter what or where a company is manufacturing. A comprehensive manufacturer audit involves the systematic identification of manufacturing risks, and the incorporation of means to mitigate the risks when identified or the implementation of corrective actions to manage them. HACCP anal y sis enables manufacturers to get a grasp on which contaminants are most likely to affect their product, be it metals, glass, bone or plastics, in addition to all product integrity risks on the line. These integrity risks, which require accurate product inspection to control, may include the risk of missing product, broken product, damaged packaging or inconsistent fill levels. Once the initial risk assessment is complete, food manufacturers are in a position to better understand which technologies are ideal for their particular risk control requirements.

4

Optimise productivity

While a product inspection system will ensure quality and safety, additional features can be selected to facilitate increased productivity and reduction in downtime. These twin goals can be attained by choosing efficient, easy-touse and flexible equipment, specific to one’s requirements. ‘Condition monitoring’ features in metal detectors are a proven method for improving line efficiency. By identifying potentially adverse trends early on and, crucially, providing advance warning to machine minders or maintenance operatives, these systems help to avert detection system failures and improve overall Original Equipment Effectiveness (OEE). In market-leading inspection solutions, intuitive touch screens provide an easy and efficient system through which to control line parameters, speed up the set-up process and provide further productivity boosts. Easy integration with other surrounding pieces of equipment is also important for inspection machines – this allows installation time to be kept to a minimum, which in turn increases uptime. Similarly, system options exist to provide flexibility for the inspection of multiple different products at a single machine setting (through the use of ‘change-free’ technology). Technologies can also be combined in a single unit, for example, metal detector and checkweigher combinations or X-ray and checkweigher combinations. Integrated data monitoring software program enables real-time monitoring of multiple locations and greatly enhances OEE. Simple-to-understand online visualisation of the complete production line and at-a-glance status of device health and effectiveness ensure that interventions are planned rather than reactive. Inspection systems that can keep up with the speed of the line hold the key to efficiency. However, one should choose technologies that can accurately and reliably inspect products without slowing down throughput.

5

Rely on the experts

The purchase of product inspection equipment best suited to one’s line needs can appear, at first, a daunting task. In addition, with food safety regulations changing continually, there is an added pressure on manufacturers to stay up-todate with the latest developments, and bring in the latest technologies to meet the new required standards. In order to eliminate confusion, and select the most appropriate product inspection equipment, food manufacturers need a partner they can rely upon. They should be able to call on an equipment provider with the worldwide expertise necessary to give close consultation on optimum systems, corrective actions, and the ability to provide the best product inspection equipment available to carry them out. One-stop shops and bespoke solutions are ideal for manufacturers with varying production demands, allowing for the best combination of metal detection, Xray, checkweighers or vision inspection systems, while also offering the ability to easily ramp up or down as production demands change.

On the path to quality The choice of the ideal product inspection programme can be overwhelming as it depends on a number of factors, from product characteristics to regulations and standards. Hence, it is important to analyse all the factors involved before making the decision for ensuring quality products, productivity and compliance. Neil Giles is the Marketing Manager of Mettler-Toledo Safeline, a leading supplier of metal detection and X-ray inspection solutions for food and pharmaceutical industries based in the UK. He currently specialises in metal detection and product inspection technology. He has over 20 years work experience in food and pharmaceutical industries where he has extensive knowledge of equipment for the packaging, processing weighing and inspection sectors. Email: neil.giles@mt.com

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AUTOMATION TRENDS Food microbiology laboratory

Mahua Roy

F

ew weeks back, experimentations by the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) yielded astonishing results. It was found that milk was adulterated and apples were laden with calcium carbide. Newspapers and wire agencies across the world carried this piece of information, hinting at the sad state of India’s food safety scenario. Food microbiological laboratories in India need to be upgraded to a high level of sophistication to cater to the growing problems associated with food safety. However, these laboratories have somehow lagged behind the clinical microbiology sector towards the adoption of automated systems and equipment. But driven by commercial pressures, competition, besides of course, commitment to safety, this segment is poised to see equal growth.

Combining microbiology with automation With new technologies surfacing in the industry, food safety can soon become a confident commitment to the consumer. “Adopting automation in food analysis is important in order to enhance efficiency of the process by avoiding risks involved in each stage, thus providing reliable results without compromising the sensitivity of testing under varied conditions of sample throughput, and without significantly increasing the cost per test,” explains Prantik Mukherjee, Head – Lab Solutions, Merck Millipore. In a similar vein, Deepak Kumar, General Manager, Food Safety Division, 3M, says, “With automation, the microbiologists can spare their additional time towards auditing, documentation, training and other HACCP-related activities. Besides, since the industry is dealing with a dearth of experienced & trained staff, lab automation makes testing easier and requires minimum staff with basic training.”

So where lies the hitch? Why is there a definite lack of sophistication in the food microbiology 60

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Automated systems,

the

WAY AHEAD

Quality makes a brand likeable; its safety makes it bankable. This is the magic formula that food processors aim to achieve. So what is it that QA/ QC, food safety labs must deliver in order to shoulder this huge responsibility for enabling a brand to make its mark? Know more… labs? Pricing of course is the biggest factor. “Analytical methods are critically viewed by food manufacturers since they have a direct impact on the product price. Organisations are ready to invest capital in automated technologies as long as the operational expense is not exorbitant,” observes Mukherjee. Performing an elaborate cost-benefit analysis of each potential solution that can be implemented, considering probable capital & running costs, and quantifying the productivity benefits are the factors to be considered before choosing the right automation solution. Also, one needs to consider the potential impact on staffing levels, return on investment and accreditation or validation issues, if any. Mukherjee also points out that currently there is low level of awareness

among lab executives about the advanced technology that is available in the field of food microbiology. “Continuous education on developments in the food industry is the key and it needs to be addressed by major solution providers in the industry,” he adds. Besides, there are several other intricacies, which need to be redressed. Defining customised solutions for India holds a vital key if automation in the food microbiology lab aspires to be a reality. Says Dr Deepa Bhajekar, Managing Director, Microchem Silliker, “The main challenge in the Indian food analytical labs is that of accuracy in testing results for the different Indian food matrices in the country. The machines need to have validated methods to ensure that the microbiological results are correct in oily, spicy as well as sweet food products, which


Food microbiology laboratory

are the common Indian food matrices. The automated methods need to ensure that there is no interference in results from these base matrices to give any false positive or negative results.”

A practical problem faced by technology providers is that of the guidelines laid down by regulatory authorities. “There exist varying levels of acceptance of local and international regulations that provide guidelines for the use of analytical tools & procedures for automation. For instance, certain protocols laid down by companies for the microbiological quality analysis of food make implementation of automated methods in food analysis prohibitive,” says Mukherjee.

may require a certain level of flexibility in operations, which an automation solution should take care of. Bigger labs, on the other hand, with a high sample throughput and a standardised menu of test methods are usually benefitted by automation. According to Mukherjee, “Product development needs to be customised in line with the throughput of a laboratory. Cost optimisation is possible only if the customisation supports an existing throughput, with a possibility of an upgrade upon an increase in throughput over a period of time. The test menu on a system also needs to be customised so that automated systems are embraced by a larger number of laboratories. Laboratories should be able to select only those test menus on fully automated systems, which they would be utilising on a regular basis.”

Promoting an inclusive growth

Sample preparation

Catering to the demands of both, small and big labs, is the way to go. Small labs with unpredictable and varied workloads

“Sample preparation and pathogen analysis are the biggest opportunity areas for automation in a food microbiology lab,” says

Regulatory procedures: A hurdle?

Dr Bhajekar. In a typical microbiological lab, sample preparation is the most tedious process. Then comes the preparation and dispensing of culture media, which is another time-intensive operation. In fact, many labs employ technicians whose sole KRA includes media preparation! The application of automated technology at this stage thus has great potential for increasing efficiency. For pathogen analysis, as Dr Bhajekar foresees, the opportunity for automation and wider acceptance of pathogen detection methods that do not depend on conventional culture-based technology has led to a number of commercially available instruments, many of which lend themselves to semi- or full automation. “Pathogen testing is the most critical testing in a food microbiology lab, and it takes around 3-5 days by traditional culture method. Thus, the best opportunity for lab automation lies in this area, where the main benefit is the reduced time for detection (10-26 hours) along with minimum manual errors,” concludes Kumar. Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

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ENERGY MANAGEMENT Case Study - Jain Irrigation Systems

Rakesh Rao

I

ndia is one of the leading producers of fruits and vegetables in the world. Processing of fruits and vegetables often lead to generation of waste, which is mostly dumped. Being organic waste, this can be utilised to

a number of business segments such as irrigation systems, polyethylene pipes, plastic sheets, agro-processed products (consisting of dehydrated onion and processed fruit purees), solar heating and lighting systems, etc. JISL’s fruit plant handles up to 800 metric tonne (MT) per day during the peak season from May

The biogas power plant, which was commissioned in July 2010, was constructed in-house with technical assistance from a German engineering company. The biomethanation plant can treat over 200 MT/day of mixed organic wastes and generate electric power from biogas.

through waste management Biomass, which accounts for about 20-30 per cent of the energy requirements in India, is the main source of energy for most of the rural communities for cooking and heating. Food industry can also use agro-waste, a by-product of the manufacturing process, to meet its energy needs. Demonstrating just how it can be done is Jain Irrigation Systems Ltd (JISL). generate energy. Setting an example of how to generate value from this waste is the Jalgaon (Maharashtra)-based JISL. The company has set up biomethanation plant to utilise organic waste and produce biogas, which can be used as fuel in gasbased engines.

Managing agro-waste for sustainability JISL, one of India’s leading companies in the agricultural sector, operates in

The biogas power project reduces carbon footprint by converting methane into energy and improves soil health by generating good quality organic manure. By generating electrical energy and refrigeration along with heat recovery, the project has significantly lowered fossil fuel dependency. Abhishek Satyam

Assistant Manager - Bioenergy Division, JISL

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to July and 300 MT/day during rest of the year. The vegetable processing plant principally produces dehydrated onions to the tune of 300 tonne per day. This generates a significant amount of agrowaste with a yield to waste ratio of 50:50 on an average basis. JISL has adopted a uniquely sustainable method to handle this waste – a combined cycle biomethanation plant. The plant generates 1.668 MW gross power, which is grid interactive captive consumption purpose. Since the plant converts biomass wastes into energy, it has helped JISL to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels. Waste disposal, which is a serious concern (since it requires large dumping lands and can also lead to foul odour and pollution), has also been addressed because of this project. Above all, says Abhishek Satyam, Assistant Manager - Bioenergy Division, JISL, it accomplishes the stated mission of our visionary and respectable Chairman Bhavarlal Hiralal Jain fondly revered as ‘Bade Bhau’ of ‘Leave this world better than you found it’.

Myths and facts about biomethanation The power plant has been recognised by the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, Government of India (GoI), as a first-of-its-kind project in India to treat diverse agro-based products. The power plant has also obtained approval for Renewable Energy Certification (REC). In addition, the biogas power project has generated employment for over 100 local associates in the power generation and fertiliser unit. “The project reduces carbon footprint by converting methane into energy and improves soil health by generating good quality organic manure. By generating electrical energy and refrigeration along with heat recovery, the project has significantly lowered fossil fuel dependency,” observes Satyam. Any process that reduces the dependence on fossil fuels is a significant eco-friendly technology that can be touted as being highly essential. “This is because fossil fuels such as petroleum, coal and natural gas are actually stored carbons present deep in the earth. Their sudden


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Case Study - Jain Irrigation Systems

use as fossil fuels exhausts these carbons directly into the atmosphere greatly increasing CO2 levels in the atmosphere,” he explains. In a typical natural cycle, carbon is trapped by vegetation from the atmosphere and released back to the atmosphere and soil. The biogas power plant taps this natural cycle and generates biogas. “Any carbon that is released is within the limits that would have been released to the atmosphere by the natural cycle. This is because the source material of the biogas power plant is organic matter, which is produced by vegetation by the conversion of CO2 to oxygen and carbohydrates due to the process of photosynthesis,” opines Satyam. Therefore, the biogas power plant establishes a good balance between the exhaustion of CO2 into the atmosphere and absorption of CO2 from the atmosphere, within a short period of time. This is commonly termed as a carbon neutral cycle. Biogas energy is considered carbon neutral, since carbon emitted by its combustion comes from carbon fixed by plants (natural carbon cycle). He elaborates, “The classical argument is that biogas power plants generate methane, which is a greenhouse gas (GHG), with

Basic process flow diagram of unit processes in biogas power plant at JISL

21 times more effect than CO2. However, in the biogas power plant, the combustion of biogas converts methane into CO2 and thereby reduces the greenhouse impact by more than 20 times.” By extracting methane out of waste and using it to produce heat and/or electricity, the plant ensures that the waste does not degrade in an open environment, therefore reducing direct methane atmospheric emissions.

THE WASTETOENERGY JOURNEY JISL’s biogas power plant is a two-phased, controlled temperature (mesophilic range) biomethanation process. “The waste acquired from the fruit processing facility is received, crushed and mixed in mixing tanks thoroughly and homogenised into uniform slurry before feeding into a series of hydrolysis tanks. The indigestible parts such as stones and highly fibrous materials are separated and taken to a bio-mass boiler. Within the hydrolysis tanks, aerobic micro-organisms break down the complex biomaterials into simpler forms such as sugars and acids,” explains Satyam. The process then proceeds to anaerobic digester tanks, where anaerobic microorganisms, principally composed of methanogens (micro-organisms capable of generating methane as an end-product of their metabolism) consume the volatile fatty acids and sugars to generate biogas. The biogas is cleaned in biological scrubbers and stored in gas buffers or balloons before transferring to specially designed biogas engines via blowers. These engines convert biogas into electric power (1.668 MW), which is then synchronised with the grid network, with sufficient protection at the substation so as to ensure internal consumption (prevent seepage beyond JISL). Vapour Absorption Machine (VAM) absorb waste heat and provide 400 tonne of refrigeration (TR) to cool the solar PV manufacturing unit and 27 onion cold storage chambers (onion dehydration plant). The digested slurry from the biogas digesters is an enriched source of nutrients such as nitrogen, dissolved phosphate, among others. This is then taken for composting process in composting yard and converted to soil conditioner.

Thus, it is an environment-friendly and socially responsible project that is a highly sustainable venture, adds Satyam.

Ushering prosperity The fruit processing plant at JISL is in fact the hallmark, where the hard work of the fruit farmer is converted to world-class products, greatly attributing to the company’s driving philosophy of value-addition, stresses Satyam. The biogas power plant is a continued vision where even the waste products of the fruit industry can be harnessed and converted into valuable electricity. A complete lifecycle is followed from ‘soil-to-soil’, since to complement the process the digested slurry from the biogas power plant is converted to value-added enriched soil conditioner (brand name Bio Samruddhi). Banking on its success in terms of efficiency, energy savings and waste management, Jain Irrigation Systems is now offering its technical expertise and manpower to execute complete turnkey projects and solutions to a diverse range of clientele. This shows that, with right government policies and appropriate technology, India can take advantage of its agro-climatic condition not just to ensure food security, but also to make the country energy secure through proper management of agro-waste. Email: rakesh.rao@infomedia18.in

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POLICIES & REGULATIONS Organic food certification

Prabodh Halde and Chetana Bhandari

O

rganic farming is among the oldest forms of agriculture. It is one of the approaches to meet the objective of sustainable agriculture, which is the need of the hour. Organic agricultural methods are internationally regulated and legally enforced by many nations, based, in large part, on the standards set by the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM). According to IFOAM, organic agriculture is a production system that sustains the health of soils, ecosystems and people. It relies on ecological processes, biodiversity and cycles adapted to local conditions, rather than the use of inputs with adverse effects. Organic agriculture combines tradition, innovation and science to benefit the shared environment and promote fair relationships and a good quality of life for all involved.

bodies, the national organic logo and the regulations governing its use. India has been exporting certified organic foods for some years now and the demand is gradually on the rise with respect to domestic markets too. Keeping in view the growing demand for these products, and to check fraudulence in organic production, the Ministry of Agriculture, Government of India, launched the notification ‘Organic

Indian scenario Internationally and nationally, standards regulate production methods, and in some cases, final output of organic agriculture. Standards may be voluntary or legislated. But certification of products/ processes may be described as what confidence in organic agriculture rests on. An organised system of inspection and certification supported by regulations enables to build a confident consumer community. Thus, the Government of India has implemented the National Programme for Organic Production (NPOP). The programme includes the policies for development and certification of organic products. The standard for NPOP provides information on standards for organic production, systems criteria & procedures for accreditation of certifying 66

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Organic farming provides longterm benefits to people and the environment. Awareness and education in Western countries have brought about an unprecedented demand for organic foods. In India, there is a need for public information and education to encourage more appreciation for organic foods; and the right certification will further support and enhance consumer confidence.

Agricultural Produce Grading and Marking Rules, 2009’ in 2009. Thus, organic agricultural produce may now be graded and certified under Agmark.

Agmark certification Agmark is the accreditation body, and the Agricultural Marketing Adviser issues the certificate of authorisation to certification agencies authorising them to certify organic farms, products and processes for grading and marking organic agricultural produce. Any accredited inspection and certification agency under the NPOP is eligible for the grant of certificate of authorisation under these rules by applying with complete documentation as prescribed in the guidelines. These authorised inspection and certification agencies, in turn, certify the agricultural produce of operators/grower groups as organic. The quality of the produce must be as provided in the NPOP. It must also comply with residue levels of contaminants as provided in the Food Safety and Standards Act. Some of the packing requirements include use of food grade packing material, employing approved additives for manufacturing packaging films, etc. The label of the produce must be provided with the person/company legally responsible for the production with the grade designation mark securely affixed to each package as approved. The ink used for marking must not contaminate the produce.

Grade designation The grade designation for certified organic agricultural produce will be ‘Agmark India Organic’. The grade designation mark consists of Agmark India Organic Insignia, which is a design incorporating the name of the commodity, certificate of authorisation number and the grade designation. The mark may be affixed


Organic food certification

to products or used on packaging or promotional material or in context of advertising activities. This decision of Ministry of Agriculture enables farmers, farmer groups and processing units to use Agmark Organic Certification for their products. This ensures organic produce that are sold in the domestic market to comply with India’s organic agriculture regulation – NPOP as well as grading and marking rules under Grading and Marking Act 1937.

The fee structure for the certification process is devised from the components namely the application fee, travel and inspection cost, assessment & report preparation (man-day cost) and issue of certificates. The charges are fixed in the following categories annually, namely: R Grower groups (small and marginal farmers) R Co-operatives and cottage industries R Large farmers, estates and exporters R Medium- and large-sized processors

Certification procedure and fee

Market potential in India

The procedure of certification is generally provided by the authorised inspection and certification agency. Typically, the process of certification involves review of operator’s application by agency, preinspection procedures, farm inspection by agency, sampling procedures and lab analysis, post-inspection and evaluation. After these verifications, the decision of certification is taken and communicated to the operator.

With the change in dietary need and enhanced income coupled with awareness for health, there is a growing appreciation for organic products. Organically labelled fruits and vegetables are also appearing in some of markets. Since India has much larger area, which have used minimal pesticides & chemicals, and where potential for conversion exist, organic movement has taken root in many of the states, and there is growing demand

especially in cities. It is envisaged that 20 per cent of production shall be organic in five years. Food Safety and Standard Authority India has introduced the new category of food as ‘Organic Food’ as per section 22, and thus in coming days, the organic food will have huge potential in the country. Prabodh Halde is Head (Regulatory Affairs) at Marico Ltd and Honorary Secretary of The Association of Food Scientists and Technologists (AFSTI) Mumbai Chapter. With a BTech in Food Technology, and an MBA, he has over 15 years of experience in the industry. He is a Codex Committee Member of FICCI. Email: prabodh@maricoindia.net Chetana Bhandari is Senior Officer with Regulatory Department at Marico Ltd. She is an expert in food laws. Email: chetanab@maricoindia.net

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STRATEGY Food retailing

Mahua Roy

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odern retail in India has ignited the competitive streak among food and beverage brands. The food and beverage companies are coming up with innovative customer engagement initiatives at modern retail chains to ensure brand loyalty. But competition is not limited to just that. The organised retail industry as well is making rapid strides to ensure consumer loyalty. Thus, it can envision the consumer preferring a more ‘specific’ store than going to ‘just another supermarket’. The Boston Consulting Group estimates the size of organised retail market in India at $ 28 billion and expects it to grow nine times to $ 260 billion in 10 years. Most food and beverage companies have cited increase in their sales figures arising out of modern retail as the distribution vehicle. Besides, most companies have customised products and packaging keeping the modern retail shopper in mind. For food retail, such store formats in large as well as smaller cities are spelling success. To keep up with this growth, modern retail needs to complement the initiatives of the food and beverage companies.

Let the stocking do the talking Managing the inventory effectively and categorising it efficiently will ensure a wonderful shopping experience to the consumer. ‘Sorry Ma’am, it is out of stock’ is a line no shopper likes to hear. “Better efficiency in operations always delivers better returns. From an inventory point of view, the best practice is to have inventory synced to actual consumer demand and demand forecast,” opines Ankur Shiv Bhandari, 68

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Being spoilt for choice in not only selecting a brand of any product, but also being equally spoilt for choices regarding which store to go to, the consumer is being lured aggressively by retailers. So, how to ensure that the footfall at your store rises with each day? Read on… Managing Director-Indian Subcontinent, Kantar Retail. In the bigger picture, there exists a need for food retail to concentrate on developing a strong back-end support, especially for perishable products to reduce wastages, which is estimated to be at 40 per cent of national produce.

Making shopping a cheerful experience It should be ensured that store environment, product assortment along with service standards are dedicated

to provide a wonderful shopping e x p e r i e n c e. Maintaining high standards in customer service, and treating every shopper like it is their first time in the store should be the priority. “A brand essentially provides a consistent proposition and execution across its touch points over a period of time. To strengthen Godrej Nature’s Basket as a brand, we have been striving to bring together an eclectic assortment of differentiated products that are not easily available in the mass market. We have also consistently attempted to offer superior in-store experience to consumers – not just through our friendly store staff but also through association with relevant food experts and renowned chefs. We have worked with them to demystify world food and make it easier to accept and use by our consumers,” says Mohit Khattar, Managing Director, Godrej Nature’s Basket. In traditional grocery stores, customers have to be specific with what they want, but in a modern trade outlet, they can get more options, and even sampling options. This is a growing trend wherein modern retailers see a huge opportunity and are constantly tying up with food & beverage companies to initiate innovative measures towards sampling & promotions. “Godrej Nature’s Basket provides the best of world gourmet food under one roof. So you can find a Japanese Wasabi paste or an authentic Mexican tortilla or a Spanish Iberico ham or the finest French chevre all under one roof. Our objective has never been to provide just an extensive array of fine foods. On the contrary, we indulge customers by offering a deep variety within every category and friendly tips that make the acceptance of these foods a lot easier. We make


Food retailing

sure that the superior in-store service levels bring back consumers repeatedly,” elaborates Khattar.

Strategic positioning of private labels Private labels enable retailers to offer products at better price points, thereby attracting higher footfalls to the store. This in turn not only translates into better margins by having cut out middlemen, but also enhances retailers’ bargaining power with suppliers. Penetration of private labels in emerging markets is expected to be about 6 per cent of retail sales as per India Retail Report 2011, Images Group, which in India is estimated to be about 10–12 per cent. The concept is still at a nascent stage in India, given the infancy of modern retail itself. Private labels offering competitive pricing proposition have helped to generate interest and a slow but steady acceptance from the Indian consumers.

The key for succeeding in private label lies in focussing on small trial pack size or offering a free unit to shoppers or considering product comparison or demonstrations in-store. A product has to make its mark on the customer’s trolley, and not just on the shelf. As per a recent study by AC Nielsen, in 2010, even in the toughest segment for private labels like FMCG foods, store labels claim share of 19-25 per cent in India. Retailers are now mining shopper data to make their private labels enter strategic segments like jams, biscuits, grains, etc. Store chains are segmenting their brands according to consumer needs. They are no longer hesitant in launching premium products and innovative packaging to give mainstream brands a run for their money! Besides, private labels have an edge. Direct access to store shelves and aisles cuts out the need towards high advertising costs that mainstream brands have to bear.

Tweaking loyalty programmes A look at the wallet of a regular shopper and one will find more loyalty cards than plastic money. But loyalty programmes need to be tweaked to suit the actual and practical needs of a shopper. Says a spokesperson from Reliance Retail Company, “Our loyalty programme is our way of saying ‘Thank You’ to our customers for shopping with us. Our entire focus is to make the customer shopping trip more convenient and enjoyable. To make it a hassle-free process, we provide an instant plastic card free of cost. Also, our loyalty programme is spread across multi-formats and multi-categories. So, our customers can earn points on say electronics and avail of discount on their grocery shopping.” Promotions should not stop with a lot of exciting offers in a single visit. The programme needs to be structured in a way that it promotes frequent purchase visits. Email: mahua.roy@infomedia18.in

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TIPS & TRICKS Injury prevention

How to stay a ‘cut’ above in minimising workplace accidents Food processing involves handling of raw food products to make processed/ready-to-cook or ready-to-eat products, which are sold at groceries, restaurants, wholesalers, etc. More often than not, these processes require slicing and cutting of vegetables, fruits, meat and fish. To minimise incidences of cuts/bruises during the processing operations, it is imperative to educate workers about safety management along with handy tips for preventing injuries.

I

njury due to cut is considered to be one of the most serious problems for workers in the food processing industry. Cuts normally occur while using knives, cleavers, or slicing machinery in fruit, vegetable, meat and fish processing units. Hence, it is important for safety managers to create guidelines to ensure workers’ safety. Here are some easy-to-follow and simpleto-use techniques to help workers avoid cuts:

Workplaces that emphasise on safety tend to have fewer injuries and a more positive work environment. Hence, safety training should be a key component in any safety programme. It is essential to train all employees on appropriate lock out procedures and to properly operate machinery such as meat slicers, besides imparting knowledge on safe job procedures including knife use, cleaning and storage. Implementing blade safety tips for food processing can help food manufacturers achieve their safety goals. Always remember to cut away from, not towards, your body to avoid cutting yourself. When slicing, stand to the side of the cut to keep the blade away from your body. Use a stabilising tool, not your fingers, for steadiness. Keep your fingers in view and away from the cutting area to avoid slicing them. Use food pushers, not your hands, to advance food in machines. Never put your finger near a moving part or blade. Not even to ‘just brush something off ’. Make sure all guards and safety devices are in place on meat slicers and other cutting machinery. These devices are designed to protect your hands from the blades and your clothing from getting stuck in the moving parts of the 70

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slicer. Wear appropriate gloves for your job. Use cut-resistant gloves for high production jobs. However, remember they are cutresistant, not cut-proof – injuries can still occur. Make sure the gloves fit properly. Use a cutting board for safe cutting or chopping. Never hold items in your hand while cutting or slicing. Use the correct knife for the job. For example, use carving knives for large jobs; boning knives to remove meat from the bone; paring knives for slicing small jobs. Keep knives and slicers in good working order. Knives and blades should be sharp as dull blades tend to slip, whereas sharp blades improve accuracy and performance. They also decrease strain and fatigue in the worker. Tighten or replace loose handles. If a knife cannot be repaired properly, throw it away. If you work with a variety of raw meat products, wear vinyl gloves over cutresistant gloves. This

keeps your cut-resistant gloves clean and usable for longer time. Be sure the vinyl gloves fit snugly to improve blade control. Change them between types of meat. Studies have shown that sharp knives help prevent musculoskeletal injuries in the meat cutting industry as sharp blades reduce grip force and cutting time. Modernised facility can implement webbased software to help food processing workers develop safety programmes that can make a difference in the workplace. Butchers can use web-based software to ensure safety and maintain workplace productivity. Web-based solutions allow food processing professionals to manage the prevention of office injuries by giving them complete control of their business’ ergonomics programme. The programmes automate critical processes in safety management including how to set up a programme, identify employee discomfort and risks and enable injury reduction. Courtesy: Safety and Health Assessment and Research for Prevention (SHARP) Program of the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries


PROJECTS

New projects and expansion activities are the barometers of industrial growth. These also present business opportunities to service providers like consultants, contractors, plant & equipment suppliers and others down the value chain. This feature will keep you updated with vital information regarding new projects and capacity expansions being planned by companies in the food & beverages industry. Banana processing unit

Desai Fruits and Vegetables Project type New plant Project news Desai Fruits and Vegetables (DFV), the country’s biggest banana exporter, is all set to invest ` 60 crore on infrastructure facilities at Navsari, Gujarat, for processing banana. Besides firming up plans to upgrade and expand its cold storage units, sorting machines and packaging facilities, DFV has been actively considering to rope in more than 2,500 farmers in Navsari for contract farming to take the total production of premium banana to 3 lakh tonne from the current 60,000 tonne. Project location Navsari, Gujarat Project cost ` 60 crore Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Desai Fruits and Vegetables Plot No 49, AT & PO Amadpore, NH 8, Navsari, Gujarat 396445 Tel: 02637-281547/48 Fax: 02637-281546 Email: info@desaifv.com -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Equipment for cold chain infrastructure

Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Danfoss Industries Pvt Ltd 296 Rajiv Gandhi Salai Sholinganallur, Chennai 600119 Tel: 044-6650 1555 Fax: 044-6650 1444 Email: danfoss.chennai@danfoss.com -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Food processing machinery

Heat and Control (South Asia) Pvt Ltd Project type New plant Project news Heat and Control, Inc, one of the world’s leading manufacturers of food processing and packaging equipment, is planning to set up a new facility in Chennai. The plant will be spread over an area of 50,000-60,000 sq ft. Around 10,000 sq ft has been demarcated for office and testing centre. It will produce the range of heat & control and food processing equipment for snack industry. The investment for the project is around $ 8-10 million. Project location Chennai Project cost $ 8-10 million Implementation stage Planning

Danfoss Group Project type New plant Project news To tap the growing demand for cold chain infrastructure, the Denmark-based Danfoss Group is planning to invest Danish Krone (DKK) 500 million over the next four years in a new R&D and manufacturing facility. Project location Yet to finalise Project cost DKK 500 million

Contact details: Heat and Control (South Asia) Pvt Ltd E-2, 3rd Avenue, Anna Nagar (East), Chennai 600102 Tel: 044-4210 3950/51 Fax: 044-4210 3949 Email: lavanyag@heatandcontrol.co.in -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Pulse processing unit

Adani Wilmar Project type New plant Project news

Adani Wilmar is planning to invest ` 100 crore for the pulse processing unit with a capacity to mill 600 tonne per day at either Kolkata or Kanpur. The company will be launching the brand in North India, selling under the brand name Jubilee. Project location Kolkata or Kanpur Project cost ` 100 crore Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Adani Wilmar Ltd ‘Fortune House’, Near Navrangpura Railway Crossing, Ahmedabad 380 009 Tel: 079-2555 5650 Fax: 079-2555 5621 Email: fortune@adaniwilmar.in -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Pulse processing unit

Lakshmi Energy and Foods Ltd Project type New plant Project news Lakshmi Energy and Foods, a leading basmati player, will be investing ` 50 crore to set up a pulse processing mill of 200 tonne per day (TPD) at Khamanon near Ludhiana. It is planning to launch varieties of branded pulses/dals on a pan-India basis. Project location Khamanon near Ludhiana Project cost ` 50 crore Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Lakshmi Energy and Foods Ltd Chandigarh – Ludhiana National Highway Khamanon 140801, Punjab Tel: 01628-661800/268265 Fax: 01628-6618805/268365 Email: corporate@lakshmigroup.in

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EVENT LIST

NATIONAL AAHAR 2012 A comprehensive event for the food processing and hospitality sector in India; March 12-16, 2012; at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi For details contact: India Trade Promotion Organization Pragati Bhawan, Pragati Maidan New Delhi 110 001 Tel: 011-2337 8802 / 1725 Fax: 011-2337 1869 Email: sekaran@itpo-online.com

Nutra India Summit A trade show for nutraceutical products and functional food; March 15-17, 2012; at Hotel Lalit Ashok, Bengaluru For details contact: M M Activ No 240, Kaliandas Udyog Bhavan Near Century Bazaar Babasahebkar Marg Worli, Mumbai Tel: 022-2438 5007 Fax: 022-2437 9882 Email: enquiry@nutraindiasummit.in

Food Forum India Event spanning the vast array of food business segments like processed food, food retail, food services, etc; March 27-28, 2012; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Images Exhibitions S-21, Okhla Industrial Area Phase II, New Delhi Tel: 011-4052 5000 Fax: 011-4052 5001 Email: saketsharma@imagesgroup.in

Food & Bev Tech 2012 International exhibition & conference for the food and beverage processing industry; April 25-27, 2012; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Saurabh Rajurkar, CII (WR) 105, Kakad Chambers 72

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132, Dr A B Road Worli, Mumbai 400 018 Tel: 022-2493 1790 Fax: 022-2493 9463 Email: saurabh.rajurkar@cii.in

India Cold Storage Show Event focussing on the cold chain and relevant technologies for food & beverage processing industry; April 26-28, 2012; at India Expo Centre and Mart, Greater Noida For details contact: Akshita Kapoor Manch Communications E- 26, 1st Floor Lajpat Nagar-II New Delhi Tel: 011-4656 9212 Fax: 011-4652 0734 Email: info@manchcommunications.com

Food & Technology Expo Specialised industry event for the food processing industry and allied stakeholders; July 27-29, 2012; at IARI, PUSA, New Delhi For details contact: Vinod Jain NNS Events & Exhibitions Meri Delhi House, 25/10 East Punjabi Bagh, New Delhi Tel: 011-4686 7500 Fax: 011-4686 7521 Email: nnsonline@nnsonline.com

Fi India 2012 Exhibition with concurrent conference showcasing latest trends in food ingredient technologies; September 06-07, 2012; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: UBM India Pvt Ltd Sagar Tech Plaza A 615-617, 6th Floor Andheri Kurla Road Saki Naka Junction Andheri (E), Mumbai 400 072 Tel: 022-6612 2600 Fax: 022-6612 2626-27 Email: info.india@ubm.com

International Foodtec India 2012 An international exhibition on food processing and packaging technology to be held concurrently with Dairy Universe India, Sweet & SnackTec India, and PackEx India; September 11-13, 2012; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: G Vamshidhar Koelnmesse YA Tradefair Pvt Ltd 1st Floor, 6-3-885/7/B Somajiguda Circle Hyderabad 500 082 Tel: 040-6559 4411, Fax: 040-6668 4433 Email: g.vamshidhar@koelnmesse-india.com

Annapoorna - World of Food India Event showcasing the latest technologies and investment opportunities in the food processing sector in India; September 26-28, 2012; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Sundeep Sundli Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce & Industry (FICCI) Federation House, 1, Tansen Marg New Delhi Tel: 011-2373 8760/2373 8770 Fax: 011-2332 0714/2372 1504 Email: info@Kolenmesse-India.com

International PackTech India and drink technology India International PackTech India, along with drink technology India (dti), will showcase latest trends in packaging, packaging printing, processing, beverage and liquid food industries; November 06-08, 2012; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Messe D端sseldorf India Pvt Ltd Centre Point Building, 7th floor Junction of S V Road & Juhu Tara Road Santacruz (W), Mumbai 400 054 Tel: 022-6678 9933 Email: messeduesseldorf@md-india.com


EVENT LIST

INTERNATIONAL International Food Drink & Technology Exhibition Industry event comprising tradeshow and conference on developments in the food & beverage processing industry; March 09-11, 2012; at Metropolitan Expo Center, Athens, Greece For details contact: Mack Brooks Hellas 210, Mesogion Avenue & Imitou Holargos, Greece Tel: +(30)-(210)-6564411 Fax: +(30)-(210)-6564410 Email: ifdex@mackbrooks.com

Seafood Processing America Tradeshow dedicated to every type of equipment and service involved in preparing, delivering and packaging seafood products; March 11-13, 2012; at Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Boston, USA For details contact: Diversified Business Communications PO Box 7437, Portland, ME 04112-7437 Tel: (207) 842-5500, Fax: (207) 842-5505 Email: customerservice@divcom.com

Ingredients Russia Tradeshow concentrating on the latest developments in food ingredients and other additives; March 13-16, 2012; at All-Russian Exhibition Centre, Moscow, Russia For details contact: Agil Karimov ITE Group Plc 105, Salusbury Road, London The UK Tel:+(44)-(207)-5965000 Fax:+(44)-(207)-5965111 Email: ingredients@ite-expo.ru

China International Food Exhibition Event dedicated to the processed food industry in the emerging economies of Asia; March 27-29, 2012; at Guangzhou Jinhan Exhibition Centre, China

For details contact: Echo Chen Guangzhou Yifan Exhibition Service Co Ltd Room 201, Yinyan Building No 25 Yanling Road Tianhe District, Guangzhou, China Tel:+(86)-(20)-61089279 Fax:+(86)-(20)-61089459 Email : echo.1002@hotmail.com

Anuga Foodtec 2012 An exhibition for food and drink technology; March 27-30, 2012; Cologne, Germany For details contact: Volker De Cloedt Messeplatz 1 50679 Köln Germany Tel: +49 (0)221 8212960 Fax:+49 (0)221 8213285 Email: v.decloedt@koelnmesse.de

Poultry & Livestock Middle East Exhibition Trade show catering to the meat processing industry; April 02-04, 2012; at Dubai International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Dubai, The UAE For details contact: IIR Middle East Abeer Khalid PO Box 21743, Dubai The UAE Tel:+(971)-(4)-3365161 Fax:+(971)-(4)-3364021 Email: headoffice@informa.com

Global Natural Food & Machinery Industry Exhibition Ideal platform for the professionals related to food and machinery industry; April 19-22, 2012; at Changwon Exhibition Convention Centre, Changwon, South Korea For details contact: Heo Jae Man Messe Korea Inc No 43, Apec-ro, Haeundea-gu Busan, South Korea

Tel:+(82)-(51)-7407707 Fax: +(82)-(51)-7407708 Email: jeman245@naver.com

World Dairy Expo & Summit Premier event focussing on latest dairy technologies across the world; June 16-18, 2012; at Zhengzhou, China For details contact: Yu Wenhui China Great Wall International Exhibition 30 Haidian Nanlu Beijing, China Tel:+(86)-(10)-6874 8934 Fax:+(86)-(10)-6874 8993 Email: yuwenhui@chgie.com

ProFood France Business convention and tradeshow related to the food processing equipment industry; June 19-20, 2012; at Nantes Parc des Expositions de La Beaujoire, Nantes, France For details contact: Hayet Zinedine Advanced Business Events 35/37 Rue Des Abondances Boulogne, France Tel: +(33)-(1)-41864168 Fax: +(33)-(1)-46045761 Email: hzinedine@advbe.com

Malaysia International Food & Beverage Trade Fair Tradeshow for food and beverage industry professionals to explore business opportunities; July 12-14, 2012; at Putra World Trade Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia For details contact: Expomal International Sdn Bhd 7-2 Subang Business Centre Jalan USJ 9/5Q, 47620 Subang Jaya Selangor Darul Ehsan Malaysia Tel: +603 – 8024 6500 Fax: +603 – 8024 8740 Email: mifb@expomal.com

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective organiser. In any case, it does not represent the views of Modern Food Processing

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EVENT PREVIEW Anuga FoodTec 2012

Showcasing innovations for enhancing productivity The much-awaited event Anuga FoodTec 2012 will provide an important platform to gain access to information and people associated with the food and beverage industry throughout the world. Conference on important topics pertaining to food and beverages will provide further momentum to the exhibition.

A

nuga FoodTec 2012 scheduled to be held from March 27-30, 2012, in Cologne, Germany, will present relevant themes on food production in the international food business on the basis of the three pillars – food processing, food packaging and food safety. Jointly organised by Koelnmesse GmbH and the German Agricultural Society (DLG), the event will witness around 1,300 exhibitors from 35 countries who will present their technical innovations and cuttingedge solutions. Compared to the previous event, the sixth edition of the trade fair is set to expand its participation figures by more than 16 per cent this year. Over 50 per cent of the exhibiting companies will come from abroad. The majority of these participants will be from Italy, the Netherlands, Denmark, France, the UK and Sweden, followed by Spain, Austria, Turkey and the US.

processes and applications. Some of the leading companies that have already registered to exhibit include Albert Handtmann, Alco-Food-Machines, Alpma, Bizerba, Ecolab, Fuji Packaging, Grundfos, Grundwald, Heinen Freezing, Krones, Mespack, Multivac, Reepack, Robert Bosch, Serac, Sidel, Siemens AG, Henckert Engineering, Inauen, Indag, IMA Industries, Unipersonale, Ishida, Kiremko, SPX Flow Technology, Trepko, etc. About the event, Chris Huntley, Senior Vice President Communications, Tetra Pak International, says, “Anuga FoodTec provides an excellent platform to showcase our products and services to customers from around the world, thus reinforcing the strength of our existing portfolio. It will also enable to highlight recent innovations and give a flavour to what we have in the pipeline. We are pleased to be returning in 2012.”

Prominent exhibitors

The 2012 edition will see many new companies from Germany and abroad. More than 400 new exhibitors have registered for Anuga FoodTec so far. This growth in exhibitor turnout is also reflected in the size of the exhibition area. In addition to the large number of

The companies that have already registered for Anuga FoodTec 2012 include not only reputed international companies that offer complete solutions, but also the smaller technology suppliers who specialise in certain

Growing from strength to strength

EVENT HIGHLIGHTS R About 1,300 suppliers from 35 countries will showcase innovations R More than 400 new exhibitors R Gross exhibition space of 1,27,000 sq m – a gross increase of 10,000 sq m compared to previous edition R A live presentation of the Robotic Pack Line demonstrating the hygienic handling of real fresh meat

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Anuga FoodTec 2012

new exhibitors, many regular exhibitors have signed up for significantly larger stand areas. As a result, Anuga FoodTec will not only occupy Halls 4.1, 5.1, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10.1, as in 2009, but will also integrate Hall 5.2 for the first time, thus creating a gross exhibition space of 1,27,000 sq m – a gross increase of 10,000 sq m. Unlike sector-specific trade fairs for food and beverage technologies, Anuga FoodTec provides a processoriented perspective that encompasses the full spectrum of raw materials and an overview of the technologies used for all types of processing at all levels of food and beverage production. The sectors that are going to be represented are process technology, packaging technology, automation, food safety and quality management, environmental technology, bio-engineering, information technology/EDP, technological process materials & ingredients, and services. Since many companies cover several sectors with their product ranges, they appeal to a broad target group in the food industry.

Know-how exchange A series of conferences are scheduled to be held at Anuga FoodTec 2012. The congress organised by the European Federation of Food Science and Technology (EFFoST) will show the latest developments in the production of chilled food, with a particular focus on fresh-cut products. The symposium by the European Hygienic Engineering & Design Group (EHEDG) will share comprehensive know-how on the role of hygiene technology in the production of undamaged and healthy food. A particular focus will be on hygienic design and guidelines for hygienic processing. Once again Anuga FoodTec will be hosting International Fruit World (IFW). Under the title ‘An opportunity for fruit juice?’ the seminar will focus on several cutting-edge topics, including markets and trends, quality assurance, process technology and the raw materials procurement market. Experts from the

arenas of business, industry, science and research will offer insights on various vital issues pertaining to the segment. For the second time now, the Nova Institute will organise a conference on ‘Sustainable Packaging - SusPack’ at Anuga FoodTec. During the two-day conference, there will be presentations and discussions that will analyse the current challenges and solutions in the field of sustainable packaging. At a joint event with Anuga FoodTec, Nova-Institute GmbH will for the first time issue the ‘SusPack-Award’ for the most innovative and most sustainable packaging solution introduced in the market during 20112012. Following a pre-selection round, a panel of judges will choose the overall winner on the first day of the conference. The prize will be awarded on March 29, 2012, during a special evening event. In addition, this year’s trade fair will host a world premiere live presentation of the Robotic Pack Line, which will demonstrate new possibilities for the sector. This time, the show will demonstrate the hygienic handling of real fresh meat. In a complete production line, robots will automatically take E2 boxes from pallets and check the fresh meat contained in the boxes. A robot equipped with a hygienic gripper will take the pieces of meat out of the boxes and place them in a piece of primary packaging (a tray), which it then seals. After the seams of the seal have been checked and the product labelled, a Scara robot will lay the finished pieces of primary packaging in the cleaned E2 boxes, which are then automatically placed onto the palette. Another section of the Robotic Pack Line will demonstrate a high-performance secondary packaging process. Here, the trays are automatically removed, checked, labelled and put into boxes. The trays are then labelled as well and placed onto pallets. All these clearly predict that Anuga FoodTec 2012 will offer opportunities galore to all participants by showcasing many new technologies and trends to the entire spectrum of food and beverage industry. spedit@infomedia18.in

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BOOK REVIEW

Sanitation: Cleaning and disinfection in the food industry Author: Mario Stanga Price: ` 5,680

Food safety is recognised as a major issue, worldwide today. One of the most essential factors towards the promotion of food safety is the cleaning and disinfection of the equipment used in the food industry. The hazards may be physical, microbiological, biological or chemical agents of disease. The consequences of contamination can be extremely harmful for the consumer, and the economic & legal implications for the manufacturer are often disastrous. This book provides an up-to-date guide to cleaning and disinfection for the food processing industry. It discusses a host of practical examples from various food industries including biofilm formation, general sanitising, and clean-in-place systems. Equally, the principles related to contamination, cleaning compounds, sanitisers and cleaning equipment are discussed. Certain chemical concepts such as applied detergency, etc are elaborated in order to understand and solve problems related to the cleaning and disinfection of laboratories, plants and other industrial environments where food & beverages are prepared. This book will be helpful for food technologists and chemists, students in food chemistry, chemical engineers, engineering scientists & personnel in the food industry.

Sweeteners Edited by: Rachel Wilson Price: ` 9,700 In these days of health-conscious consumers, artificial sweeteners are getting incorporated into most of the new products in food and beverages industry. The combination of bulk and intense sweeteners allows specific tailoring of sweetener specifications to fit the technical restrictions of particular products and the sweetness profiles desired. This book is an essential reference tool for the food industry, providing detailed information on the properties and applications of the sweeteners currently permitted for use in foodstuffs. The third edition of the book contains new sections on neotame, isomaltulose and trehalose, and fully revised & updated sections on bulk and intense sweeteners by experts who manufacture or use these sweeteners in food development and production. Besides, there is an entire section dedicated to the elaboration of various legislations globally related to the use of sweeteners in foodstuffs. This book will be beneficial for food scientists and academicians & students of food science and technology.

Reviewer: Rini Ravindran, Lecturer, Department of Biochemistry and Food Science & Quality Control, Ramnarain Ruia College, Mumbai.

Available at: Wisdom Book Distributors, Hornby Building, 1st floor, 174, D N Road, Mumbai 400 001 Tel: 022-2207 4484/6631 8958, Telefax: 022-2203 4058, Email: thadam@vsnl.com

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PRODUCTS This section provides information about the national and international products available in the market

Homogenisers These high-pressure homogenisers are available in capacities ranging from 20 to 20,000 lph. The lubrication and air cooling system ensures optimum temperature for continuous duties. The homogenisers are equipped with hydraulically operated two-stage homogenising head, specially designed homogenising valves, plunger made of special steel with wear-resistant coating, special surface treatment, specially designed ball/poppet valves of stellite/ceramic for viscous products, etc. The onepiece forged cylinder block is ultrasonically tested for long life. Goma Engineering Pvt Ltd Thane - Maharashtra Tel: 022-21731801, Mob: 09322654236 Email: goma@vsnl.com Website: www.gomaengg.com

Food packaging equipment The food packaging equipment includes jar filling machines for pickles and insulated bottle filling tanks. These machines are useful for bottle and high weight pet bottles filling for mango, lemon, mix pickles suitable for bottle filling machines and jar filling machines. Jar filling equipment with 125 kg filling hopper has provision of suitable nozzles. Regulated speed motor is provided with auger filler. Special feature is that there are no damages to the blended pickle and fruits. Weight filling is done by these machines and final weight is achieved by oil topping.

temperature for quality meat products. Weighing and dosage is done manually at the touch of a button, or by the processing system. Markmax Machines Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-2356 5308/4095 2278 Email: markmaxmachines@gmail.com

PVC strip door The flexible PVC strip door is used for climate control, and safety of environment. This door is equipped with PVC transparent flexible strips of 3-5 mm thickness mounted on hangers to reduce energy loss due to air conditioning. The door is effective as an air conditioning barrier, as well as sound and thermal barrier. The hands-free self-open type door allows non-stop movement, and isolates noisy machinery as well as smelly areas. It is ideal for cold storage, food processing, dairy, and pharmaceutical industries. Plast World Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 9376128372, 9426544968 Email: plastworld1@rediffmail.com Website: www.stripdoor.co.in

Varada Engineers Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-2698 9087, 09823076601 Email: omvarada@gmail.com

Chip ice-making machine The chip ice-making machine comes with split condenser or condensing unit. It is available as standard and tropical version or in special designs. The machine has ideal ice temperature of -0.5째C providing easy handling, good ice quality and also provides fast and even cooling. Ice does not freeze together, not too hard and has no sharp edges, thus preserving the cutter blades. As the ice does not form lumps, it provides a homogenous

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PRODUCTS

Bottle filling machines These compact automatic volumetric high-speed bottle liquid filling machines consist of turntable, SS slat conveyor belt, filling & post-gassing SS-316 nozzles, precision built SS-316 syringes, non-toxic synthetic rubber tubing, easy-to-reach compact panel and no container-no filling

system, etc. The matt-finished units are totally enclosed in stainless steel. The unscrambler is designed in the machine to eliminate dead ends and difficult-to-clean spots. All exposed parts are made of SS-304, matt finished to avoid any reflection. Laxmi Pharma Equipment Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-25831600, Mob: 09426406754 Email: laxmipharma1@dataone.in Website: www.laxmipharmaequipments.com

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PRODUCTS

Food extruder This food extruder is used for converting a large variety of food cereals for extruding various shapes, like pellets, RTE snacks, breakfast cereals, precooked flours & starches, expanded products, such as soy nuggets, aqua feed, and various pasta products, viz, macaroni, vermicelli, spaghetti. Direct expanded snack products are produced using high shear adiabatic extruders. Malik Engineers Dist Thane - Maharashtra Tel: 0250-2390839, Mob: 09870600337 Email: info@malikengg.com Website: www.malikengg.com

Food processing machine The Brambati food processing machine is used for production of various food products, like bread, biscuits, confectioneries, cakes, baby-food, coffee, breakfast products, etc. Online system for proportioning the raw materials to be weighed is carried out with a turbomax, which is one of the unusual characteristics of the plants. All various steps undergo a weight check carried out by a management computer with a printout

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of the quantities measured. A wide range of systems and precision built machines are offered that are suitable for smaller production as well as larger volume production, depending on the needs of the customers. Penguin Engineers Coimbatore - Tamil Nadu Tel: 0422-2315640, Mob: 09842231564 Email: penguin@vsnl.com, Website: www.penguin.in

Colour sorter This multi-purpose colour sorter comes with highresolution CCD camera capable of detecting minute defects, like dots and subtle colour variations. It has a 2048 pixel high-sensitivity line scan double view CCD camera. It sorts rice (raw, parboiled, boiled & steam), toor, urad, moong, channa dal, fried gram, tamarind seeds, sesame, poppy seeds, wheat and other food grains with minimum setting, using only control panel. The colour sorter has high-speed processing, which scans 20,000 lines/sec for accurate sorting. QED Agro Systems Pvt Ltd Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-2780 3074, Mob: 09341218299 Email: qed@vsnl.com


Product Inquiry Card

5

EASY STEPS TO GET PRODUCT INFO

Product Sourcing Just Got Simpler

1 See the index page in this issue. Every product carries a number. 2 Choose products of your choice from the list. 3 Write their serial numbers (as per the index page) of your chosen product/s one-by-one in the boxes. 4 Fill in your complete contact details. 5 Send it to us at the address printed overleaf.

-1 TIPIN THE BDOUXCETS

UR O L FIL TH PR OF YO D WI ER/S EN S ND MB NU OICE A CH

-2 TIP SE ENSUILRLEIN Name:___________________________________________________Designation:_________________________________________ Company:_______________________________________________________________________________________________

F A PLE T YOU ETAILS THA THE D RED ALL REQUI

Address:_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Tel:________________________________________Mob:_______________________________Fax:_________________________ Email:__________________________________________________Web:_______________________________________________

Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

03/2012

City:_________________________________________Pin:_______________________State:__________________________


POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE

Business Reply Inland Permit No. 555 Bhavani Shankar Post Office, Mumbai 400 028.

Special Projects INFOMEDIA 18 LIMITED Ruby House,1st Floor J K Sawant Marg Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028 INDIA

NO POSTAGE STAMP NECESSARY IF POSTED IN INDIA


PRODUCTS

Hot beverage vending machine This fully-automatic vending machine is used for dispensing hot beverages from instant soluble premix powders. The state-of-the-art brewing system features precise ingredient control system to ensure quality and satisfaction. This machine is ideal for both big and small organisations. Alphanumeric display on the front panel displays the machine status, counters and also presents a userfriendly menu for programming the premix gram mage and water flow adjustment at the touch of a button. This has an in-built two litre storage tank and also has the option for using the 20 litre purified water bottle. Jas Enterprises Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-22743454, Mob: 09427417384 Email: info@jasenterprise.com

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PRODUCTS

Liquid chromatography system The Agilent 1260 Infinity Bio-inert Quaternary liquid chromatography system is a dedicated solution for large bio-molecule analysis. The design of new metal-free components in the sample flow-path and the absence of iron and steel in solvent delivery ensure the integrity of bio-molecule, minimise unwanted surface interactions and increase column life-time. Agilent Technologies India Pvt Ltd New Delhi Tel: 011-46237100 Email: agilent@agilent.com, Website: www.agilent.com

Vegetable washer This is suitable for various fruits, like mango, apple; and vegetables, like carrot, cucumber, etc. The system has a specially designed takeoff conveyor to transfer the product from the washing tank to the discharge end. Jwala Engineering Company Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-65703038, Mob: 09820197764 Email: jwala_engg@vsnl.com, Website: www.jwala-engineering.com

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PRODUCTS

Ripening chamber The gas emission ripening system and ethylene generator system is available along with necessary controls for monitoring ripening parameters. The bananas ripened through these systems ensures even ripening, controlled output as per the demand, uniform golden yellow colour, longer shelf life and improved marketability of bananas. Blue Star Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-66654000 Email: suneel@bluestarindia.com, Website: www.bluestarindia.com

Flour mixer machine This machine is made from unique quality of raw material. Its stunning features include capacity of 10 kg/ hr, height blade made from bright bar with zinc finish, total height of machine at 35”, and available in wooden case size of 36” x 24” x 24” without electric motor. Unisoft Pheripherials Rajkot - Gujarat Tel: 0281-2450300, Mob: 09825389070 Email: unisoftp@gmail.com, Website: www.taperlockpulleysindia.com

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PRODUCTS

Foodwaste disposal system Kitchen garbage/food waste disposal system is used for at-source disposal of all kinds of biodegradable food waste generated in hotel kitchens and food processing industries. Various models to suit each point of food preparation area/vegetable preparation area/non-veg preparation/butchery area/tableware wash/landing table/dining area/wet and dry garbage room applications are available. The system crushes all food wastes into a slurry form that pass through the drainage. It protects hotels/ foodprocessing industries from contamination of bacteria, insects, files & rodents, foul odour, etc. Sree Devi Enviro Pvt Ltd Chennai - Tamil Nadu Tel: 044 -24512850 Email: bioclean_sde@yahoo.com

Crate washing station The crate washing station is used in dairy, ice cream, food, beverage, pharma, bio-tech and allied process industries. The crate to be washed is conveyed by a chain conveyor into the wash chamber. It passes through high-pressure waterjet nozzles having accurate spray angles for washing. This ensures optimum cleaning in the shortest possible time. If desired, the crate can be washed by detergent solution or hot water. Industrial EquipWash Inc Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-26797941, Mob: 09869231815 Email: iewi@mtnl.net.in, Website: www.iewi.net

Cold storage system The cold storage system used in hotels, hospitals, industries, canteens, etc, is available as cold stores, modular walk-in cold room, reach-in mini cold room and cold room with display shelves. The modular panel used for making cold storage consists of two galvanised steel sheets covered with food safe plasticised film and is available in ranges of 400-600-800-1200 mm wide and 40-150 mm thick. The modular structure is self-bearing and it can be disassembled. Industrial Refrigeration Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2204 1185 Email: info@irl.co.in, Website: www.irl.co.in 86

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PRODUCTS

Speed controller The LIFO (last-in-first-out) speed controller operates without resistance during the storage process and only transfers its brake force to the pallets to be unloaded. Its main advantages include enhanced safety, greatly improved stock turn and longer service life than with standard controllers. Standard controllers can be easily replaced by LIFO speed controllers in existing storage systems. Also offered are flow storage modules for lanes of up to 41 pallet positions with integrated safety separators and speed controllers. Solutions for both FIFO (first-in-first-out) and LIFO applications and for special pallets and crates are also available. Interroll Drive and Rollers India Pvt Ltd Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-2386 4996, Mob: 09886223025 Email: ind-sales.ds@interroll.com Website: www.interroll.com

Volumetric cup feeder This volumetric cup feeder is used for packaging homogenous granular products, like avla, supari, whole spices, foodgrains, etc. The feeder is provided with auto strip cutting system and does not require compress air for machine operations. All contact parts are in SS-304/316 and are available with complete powder-coated base frame structure. The cup feeder is equipped with castor wheel for ease of cleaning beneath the machine and for relocating. Auto-detect type photo-cell ensures no change of gear for change in pouch length.

mounted, as the dies do not require any foundation, and can be moved anywhere in the bottling hall. Alien Fabricon (India) Ahmedabad - Gujarat Email: sanimesh@alienfabricon.co.in Website: www.bottlingplantconveyor.com

Portable vacuum heat sealer The portable vacuum heat sealer is a small machine with superior vacuuming ability. It seals all types of virgin plastic bags as well as multi-filament laminated bags. The sealer gives two lines of parallel sealing to keep food articles tamper-proof and 100 per cent air-tight, thereby increasing the shelf-life. It is used to seal different types of food articles, like dried fruits, tea, coffee, spices, meats, vegetables, sweets, snacks, etc. The vacuum heat sealer comes with heat seal timer, digital setting, auto control and audio buzzer. Nikko Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2386 4641, 2386 3117 Email: nikko@vsnl.com

Simple Packolutions Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-09969000, Mob: 09820643731 Email: packolutions@gmail.com

Closure feeding system This fully automatic, hygienic and sanitation-friendly closure feeding system is used for crowns, PP caps, aluminium caps, etc. The system is suitable for highspeed bottle filler machines up to 600 BPM for industries, like beverages, breweries, distilleries, pharmaceuticals, dairy, etc, which ensures the flow of closure in gentle and controlled manner into the crowner/capper hopper, which nullify the damage and bending of closures remarkably. The system is self-

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PRODUCTS

FORM IV Statement about ownership and other particulars about Modern Food Processing, as required to be published in the first issue every year after the last day of February. 1. Place of Publication: Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, JK Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai-400028 2. Periodicity of Publication: Monthly 3. Printer’s Name: Mr Mohan Gajria Nationality: Indian Address: Infomedia 18 Ltd, Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, JK Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai-400028 4. Publisher’s Name: Mr Lakshmi Narasimhan Nationality: Indian Address: Infomedia 18 Ltd, Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, JK Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai-400028 5. Editor’s Name: Mr Manas Bastia Nationality: Indian Address: Infomedia 18 Ltd, Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, JK Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai-400028 6. Names and addresses of Individuals who own Modern Food Processing & partners or shareholders holding more than 1% of total capital: Infomedia 18 Limited (formerly known as Infomedia India Limited), Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, JK Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai-400028 is the owner of Modern Food Processing. Details of the shareholders of Infomedia 18 Limited who are holding more than 1% of the paid up equity share capital of the company as on 20-02-2012: 1. Network18 Media & Investments Limited, 503,504 & 507, 5th Floor, Mercantile House, 15 Kasturba Gandhi Marg, New Delhi - 110001 2. Acacia Conservation Fund LP, Citibank N A, Custody Services 3rd Flr, Trent House, G Block, Plot No. 60, BKC, Bandra (East), Mumbai - 400051 3. Pramod Premchand Shah, Kalpana Pramod Shah, Agra Building, 1st Floor, 121/4 M.G.Road, Mumbai - 400023 4. Acacia Institutional Partners, LP, Citibank N A, Custody Services 3rd Flr, Trent House, G Block, Plot No. 60, BKC, Bandra (East), Mumbai - 400051 5. SPS Capital & Money Management Services Pvt Ltd, 66,Tamarind Lane, 4/5,Haji Kasam Bldg, 1st Floor, Fort, Mumbai - 400023 6. Sanjiv Dhireshbhai Shah, 201-203, Sapphire Complex, Nr. Cargo Motors, C.G. Road, Ahmedabad - 380006 7. The Oriental Insurance Company Limited, Oriental House, P B 7037, A-25/27, Asaf Ali Road, New Delhi - 110002 8. Accurate Finstock Pvt Ltd, 9th Floor, Shikhar, Adani House, Nr. Mithakhali Six Road, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad - 380009 I, Lakshmi Narasimhan, hereby declare that all particulars given above are true to the best of my knowledge and belief. Dated: 20th February 2012 Lakshmi Narasimhan Signature of the publisher

Vegetable process equipment The Solia series machine is used for washing and peeling carrots, onions, potatoes, and rooted vegetables. Capacity of the machine is 50-400 kg/hr. The equipment includes multi-purpose vegetable processors. The equipment is used for cutting, slicing, dicing, cubing, juliennes, strip cutting, shredding, etc. Stephan UM universal mixer is used for chopping, cutting, blending, stirring, kneading, pureeing and emulsifying. It has a capacity of 50-60 per cent of bowl volume and can process 6-10 batches/hr. The Stephan MC microcut emulsifier has a capacity of 500-5,000 kg/hr. Tricon Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-26991782, Mob: 09370764704 Email: sales@shandliyaenergy.com Website: www.shandilyaenergy.com

Juice manufacturing equipment The ready-to-drink juice manufacturing equipment is available in the capacity of 100 lph to 1,000 lph. It is offered depending on customers’ requirements and budget, as either automatic or semi-automatic line. The fruit drinks include: mango, orange, pineapple, amla, pomegranate, tamarind, jamun, and many more. The complete line includes fruit washer, inspection conveyor, pulper, screw-type juice extractor, pulveriser, basket press, filtration unit, blending tank, homogeniser, pasteuriser, steam jacketed kettle, pumps, filling unit for PET bottles with bottle sterilising unit, etc. Tambes Farm Products Pune - Maharashtra Mob: 09423012005

Stainless steel tank A variety of tanks in different shapes and capacities for storing fruits, fruit pulps, vegetables, juices, etc, is offered. Also built are custom-designed tanks. The range includes holding tanks (round/conical), balance tanks, blending tanks, mixing tanks, storage tanks, collection tanks, etc. Shiva Engineers Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-2712 9610, Mob: 09822499586 Email: shivaengineers1@gmail.com Website: www.food-processing.net The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of

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LIST OF PRODUCTS ToProduct know more about the Pg. products featured magazine, fax us onPg. 022-3003 4499 and post to us the Pg. No. No. Sl. No. in this Product No. Sl. No. or tear Product ‘Product Inquiry Card’ by following the 5 easy steps given there. Alternatively, you may also write to us at michael@infomedia18.in or call us on 022-3003 4684, and we will send your inquiries to the advertisers/companies directly to help you source better.

Sl. No.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98

AC drive ...................................................... 61 AC motor .......................................................... 23 AC variable frequency drive .............................. 61 Acoustic enclosure ............................................. 49 Agitator .............................................................. 37 Air cooler ........................................................... 13 Allen cap ............................................................ 55 Allen CSK ......................................................... 55 Ammonia liquid chiller ........................................ 6 Analytical instrumentation................................. 39 Animal feed technology ....................................BC AS-interface system ............................................. 5 Auto L-sealer ..................................................... 87 Automatic rescue devices ................................... 61 Automation and storage system .......................... 5 Automation device ............................................. 15 Axial flow fan .................................................... 85 Barcode and inkjet printer ............................ 87 Batch disperser ................................................... 37 Belt conveyor ..................................................... 15 Blender and mixer.............................................. 69 Blower and fan................................................... 85 Boiler.................................................................. 77 Boiling and stirring system ................................ 69 Bottle filling machines ....................................... 78 Brake motor ....................................................... 23 Brewing .............................................................BC Brix meter .......................................................... 10 Bulk milk cooler .................................................. 6 Burner ................................................................ 77 Butterfly valve ...................................................... 6 Cables for bus system...................................... 5 Cables handling and processing system............... 5 Cables scan........................................................... 5 Calorimeter ........................................................ 37 Cap sealer and induction sealer ......................... 87 Capacitive and magnetic sensor........................... 5 Centrifugal air blower ........................................ 85 Chip ice-making machine ................................. 77 Chlorine gas cylinder and tonner ...................... 78 Chocolate and cocoa .........................................BC Cleaning section equipment .............................BC Closure feeding system ...................................... 87 Cold form section ................................................ 4 Cold storage system ........................................... 86 Colour masterbatches......................................... 80 Colour sorter ...................................................... 80 Colour sorting machine ....................................BC Column and chemistry ...................................... 39 Compressor .................................................. 13, 85 Connector accessory............................................. 5 Continuous bag sealer........................................ 87 Controller for furnace ........................................ 61 Conveyor belt ............................................... 30, 79 Conveying blower .............................................. 85 Conveying system .............................................. 86 Conveyor ........................................................... 77 Counter and power supply................................... 3 Crate washing station ........................................ 86 Crimp contact and tool ....................................... 5 Customised machine .......................................... 87 Custom-made cable ............................................. 5 Cutter and slicer .......................................... 69, 86 Dairy and food equipment ............................ 78 Dairy machinery................................................... 6 Dairy plant ......................................................... 29 Data cable ............................................................ 5 Data logger ........................................................ 10 DC motor .......................................................... 23 De-bacterisation plant ....................................... 35 Dehumidifier...................................................... 17 Dehydration equipment ............................... 69, 86 Disperser ............................................................ 37 Door ................................................................... 83 Dry vane pump .................................................. 49 Dust collector system ......................................... 85 Dust control door .............................................. 83 Electronic brake ........................................... 61 Elevator controller ............................................. 61 Emergency safety kit.......................................... 78 Empower chromatography data software .......... 39 Encoder ................................................................ 3 Evaporating unit ................................................ 13 Exhibition – Engineering Expo ........................ 42 Extruded product ..............................................BC Fasteners ...................................................... 55 Fire tube-type package....................................... 77 Fish processing................................................... 69 Flameproof motor .............................................. 23 Flange mounting motor ..................................... 23 Flexible conveyor system.................................... 15 Flexible transparent PVC strip door ................. 83 Floor automation ............................................... 47 Flour milling .....................................................BC Flour mixer machine .......................................... 85 Foil sealing machine .......................................... 87 Food extruder..................................................... 80 Food forming machine ...................................... 69

99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196

Food packaging equipment................................ 77 Food processing ...............................................FIC Food processing line .................................... 69, 86 Food processing machinery ......................... 57, 80 Food processing system .................................. BIC Food waste disposal system ............................... 86 Foot sealer .......................................................... 87 Forced convection unit air cooler ...................... 13 Free flow conveyors ........................................... 15 Fruit and vegetable processing........................... 86 Fuel burner......................................................... 85 Fully threaded bar .............................................. 55 Gantry automation ....................................... 47 Gas chloronical gravity and vacuum feed .......... 78 Gas conditioning and fire protection ................ 53 Gas flushing machine ........................................ 87 Grain handling..................................................BC Grinding and dispersion ...................................BC Ham processing ............................................ 69 Hand sealer ........................................................ 87 Heating bath ...................................................... 37 Heat-resistant door ............................................ 83 Heavy-industrial steel structures .......................... 4 Hex bolts............................................................ 55 High-pressure homogeniser ............................... 37 High-speed servo-driven bagging machine ....... 85 Homogenisers .................................................... 77 Horizontal ribbon blender ................................. 84 Hot air and water generator .............................. 77 Hot air gun ........................................................ 87 Hot beverage vending machine ......................... 83 Hot plate ............................................................ 37 HPLC ................................................................ 39 Hydraulic and pneumatic lifter .......................... 77 IBR steam boiler .......................................... 77 Identification system ............................................ 5 Incubator ............................................................ 10 Inductive system .................................................. 5 Industrial chilling equipment............................. 67 Industrial connector ............................................. 5 Industrial control and sensing device .................. 3 Industrial door ................................................... 83 Industrial-type unit air-cooler............................ 13 Informatics ......................................................... 39 Infra ray dryers ................................................... 77 Inline disperser................................................... 37 Instrumentation made cable ................................ 5 Inverter and variable frequency drive................... 3 Juice manufacturing equipment..................... 88 Kneading machine ........................................ 37 Lab supplies ................................................. 10 Laboratory reactor.............................................. 37 Laboratory software ........................................... 37 Level controller .................................................... 3 Liquid chromatography system ......................... 84 Liquid ring vacuum pump ................................. 85 Liquid sealer ...................................................... 87 Magnetic stirrer ............................................ 37 Measuring and monitoring relay ........................ 3 Meat ball forming machine ............................... 69 Meat processing ................................................. 69 Milk storage tank............................................... 78 Mill .................................................................... 37 Mixer.................................................................. 10 Mixing machine ................................................. 86 Mixing technology ............................................. 69 Motion control..................................................... 3 Motor ................................................................. 23 Multi-axis motion controllers ............................ 85 Multi-fuel fired IBR steam boiler ..................... 77 Multi-level steel car park ..................................... 4 Multi-stage centrifugal air blower ..................... 85 Natural herbal sweetener................................. 8 Neck sleeving machine ...................................... 87 Nuts ................................................................... 55 Oil and gas firing equipment......................... 85 Oil milling ........................................................BC Oven................................................................... 10 Overhead stirrer ................................................. 37 Pallet wrapper .............................................. 87 Pasta ..................................................................BC Pasta/fryums machine ........................................ 83 PBEGL geared motor ....................................... 23 Peeling ............................................................... 86 pH meter............................................................ 10 Photoelectric sensor ......................................... 3, 5 Pick and place system ........................................ 15 Pilot plant .......................................................... 37 Plant and machinery ........................................FIC Plastic pellet ......................................................BC Plate heat exchanger ............................................ 6 Plug valve ............................................................. 6 Pneumatic conveying system ............................. 85 Pneumatic valve ................................................... 6 Portable loader ................................................... 85 Portable vacuum heat sealer............................... 87 Powder filling line ............................................. 77 Power controller................................................. 61

197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293

Pre-engineered metal building............................. 4 Process tank ......................................................... 6 Product demo..................................................... 87 Programmable logic controller............................. 3 Programmable terminal ....................................... 3 Protective-conduit system .................................... 5 Proximity sensor .................................................. 3 Pump ...................................................... 10, 49, 85 Pumping filtering unit vacuum pump ............... 85 PVC strip door ............................................ 77, 83 Rail tanker ..................................................... 6 Refractometer..................................................... 10 Refrigerant pump ................................................. 6 Refrigeration ........................................................ 6 RFID.................................................................... 3 Rice milling equipment ....................................BC Ripening chamber .............................................. 85 Road milk tanker ............................................... 78 Robotic automation ........................................... 47 Robotic palletisation .......................................... 15 Roller conveyor .................................................. 15 Roofing and cladding sheet ................................. 4 Roots blower ...................................................... 49 Rotary encoder ..................................................... 5 Rotary evaporator ............................................... 37 Safety door ................................................... 83 Safety glove ........................................................ 10 Safety light curtain............................................... 3 Sauanng making................................................. 69 SCR power controller ........................................ 61 Screw compressor................................................. 6 Self-adhesive tape .............................................. 86 Self-tapping and machine screw ........................ 55 Sensor................................................................... 5 Shaker ................................................................ 37 Shrink machine .................................................. 87 Side-channel blower........................................... 85 Silent operation .................................................. 85 Slat conveyor ...................................................... 15 Sleeve wrapping machine................................... 87 Slip ring crane-duty motor ................................ 23 Sludge drainage press......................................... 35 Soft starter and digital starter ............................ 61 Solid-liquid mixer .............................................. 37 Special-purpose process machinery.................... 15 Speed controller ................................................. 87 Spirac cable .......................................................... 5 Spray analysis ..................................................... 53 Spray control ...................................................... 53 Spray fabrication ................................................ 53 Spray nozzle and accessory ................................ 53 Stainless steel fasteners ...................................... 55 Stainless steel tank ............................................. 88 Steam boiler ....................................................... 77 Strapping machine ............................................. 87 Stretch wrapper .................................................. 87 Structural floor decking sheets ............................ 4 Sugar herb ............................................................ 8 Switching relay..................................................... 3 Tank and silo ................................................. 6 Tapping and strapping machine ........................ 87 Temperature controller ........................................ 3 Temperature products ........................................ 10 Thermal process ................................................BC Thermic fluid heater .......................................... 77 Thermoform-fill-seal machine........................... 21 Thermostat and vacuum dryer/mixer ................ 37 Timer ................................................................... 3 TPU masterbatches............................................ 80 Tray sealer .................................................... 50, 84 Tray-sealer panorama ........................................ 21 Trim handling system ........................................ 85 Turnkey system for dust suppression................. 53 Ultrasonic sensor ............................................ 5 Universal type unit air cooler............................. 13 UPLC ................................................................ 39 Vacuum belt dryer ........................................ 35 Vacuum booster pump ....................................... 49 Vacuum drying cabinet ...................................... 35 Vacuum machine ............................................... 87 Vacuum system .................................................. 49 Vane damper ...................................................... 85 Variable frequency drive .................................... 61 Vegetable process equipment ............................. 88 Vegetable washer ............................................... 84 Ventilator ........................................................... 86 Vertical blender .................................................. 84 Vertical non-IBR oil-fired steam boiler ............ 77 Vision sensor ........................................................ 3 Volumetric cup feeder........................................ 87 Washing sink ............................................... 77 Water and steam miming battery CIP system ...... 77 Water ring vacuum pump.................................. 85 Water wall membrane panel IBR steam boiler ..... 77 Wood fire four-pass thermic fluid heater .......... 77 Wood fire thermic fluid heater.......................... 77 Zeodration plants ......................................... 35

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover March 2012 | Modern Food Processing

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LIST OF ADVERTISERS

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details Aakanksha Technologies

Pg No 57

T: +91-09810193422 E: aakankshatechnologies@rediffmail.com W: www.pigo.biz

Alok Masterbatches Ltd

80

T: +91-11-41612244 E: sales@alokindustries.com W: www.alokmasterbatches.com

Aqua Services

78

77

17

35

Sreelakshmi Traders T: +91-44-24343343 E: sreelakshmitraders@gmail.com W: www.sreelakshmitraders.com

W: www.idmc.coop

37

78

E: process@ika.in W: www.ika.in

61

69

E: ksh6671@ms27.hinet.net

V S International 8

T: +91-265-2280017

Vacunair Engineering Co Pvt Ltd

T: +91-281-2461826 E: monarchrajkot@gmail.com

Veripack Solutions India Pvt Ltd

W: www.monarchappliances.com

T: +91-22-66971133 E: makdum.j@veripackindia.com W: www.veripackindia.com

87

30

T: +91-120-4225550

Vimson India Engineers

T: +91-80-40726400 E: in_enquiry@ap.omron.com W: www.omron-ap.com

Our consistent advertisers

23

79

4

85

85

21

84

T: +91-09422302615 E: vimson_india@yahoo.co.in

W: www.fabcon-india.com

Omron Automation Pvt. Ltd.

29

T: +91-129-2254165 E: info@vspackit.com W: www.vspackit.com T: +91-79-22910771 E: info@vacunair.com W: www.vacunair.com

Noida Fabcon Machines Pvt Ltd

86

T: +91-129-4113187 E: info@ultraplast.in W: www.ultraplastindia.com

W: www.macromachinery.com

E: nishantb@fabcon-india.com

Modern Food Processing | March 2012

Ultraplast Chainbelts Pvt. Ltd

E: macromachinery@yahoo.com

T: +91-09890001080

Monarch Appliances

13

The Indian Electric Co

T: +91-44-42321801 E: admin@unitedstructurals.com W: www.unitedstructurals.com

W: www.freshnpure.net

.FIC

SSP Pvt Limited

United Steel & Structurals Pvt. Ltd 83

E: info@freshnpure.net

49

53

T: +91-20-24475845 E: iecmktg@indianelectric.com W: www.indianelectric.com

E: info@jeltron.com

Mech-Air Industries 42

50, 84

T: +91-129-4183700 E: info@sspindia.com W: www.sspindia.com

W: www.ksh.com.tw

T: +91-79-27910993 E: fxmultitech@gmail.com W: www.fxmultitech.com

90

6

55

T: +91-80-39853200 / 01 E: ssipl@sprayindia.com W: www.spray.com

E: idmc@idmc.coop

Macro Machinery India

83

T: +91-09311198333 E: racglobal@gmail.com

T: +91-2692-225399

T: +886-7-551-5397

T: +91-09312069945 E: info@foodbiotech.co.in W: www.foodbiotech.co.in

FX Multitech Pvt Ltd

W: www.icemakeindia.com

Kinn Shang Hoo Iron Works

5

T: +91-79-27561915 E: domestic@raajfasteners.com W: www.raajfasteners.com

Spraying Systems (India) Pvt Ltd

W: www.jeltron.com

10

Raajratna Ventures Ltd

Rac Equipment India (P) Ltd 67

T: +91-40-23401159

T: +91-11-45457777 E: info@everestblowers.com W: www.everestblowers.com

Food & Biotech Engineers (I) Pvt Ltd

.BIC

W: www.hrsasia.co.in

Jeltron Systems (India) Pvt.Ltd. .BC

Plast World

Pg No

T: +91-9376128372 E: plastworld1@rediffmail.com W: www.stripdoor.co.in

T: +91-80-26253900

T: +91-09819552270 E: engexpo@infomedia18.in W: www.engg-expo.com

Everest Blowers

HRS Process Systems Ltd

IKA India Private Limited

T: +91-20-65101272 E: rawat_dairytech@rediffmail.com W: www.dairytechequipment.com

Engineering Expo

47

W: www.gudel.com

IDMC Limited

T: +91-22-6716-2222 E: response@coleparmer.in W: www.ColeParmer.in/3125

Dairy Tech India

Gudel India Pvt Ltd

E: icemake1@gmail.com

T: +91-80-22890000 E: mallikarjuna.s@buhlergroup.com W: www.buhlergroup.com

Cole Parmer India

W: www.pepperl-fuchs.com

T: +91-2764-291022

T: +41-44-857-2300 E: manuela.gremlich@bucherunipektin.com W: www.bucherunipektin.com

Buhler (India) Pvt Ltd

E: info@in.pepperl-fuchs.com

W: www.giantwell.com.tw

IC Ice Make Refrigeration Pvt Ltd

T: +91-11-23906777 E: bryairmarketing@pahwa.com W: www.bryair.com

Bucher Unipektin Ag

E: paul@giantwell.com.tw

E: info@hrsasia.co.in

15

Pepperl+Fuchs(India) Pvt Ltd. T: +91-80-28378030

T: +91-20-66047894

T: +91-79-25894701 E: info@balkrishn.com W: www.balkrishn.com

Bry Air (Asia) Pvt Ltd

86

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

T: +886-4-852-0178

E: info@in.gudel.com

T: +91-80-2608 3300 E: marketing@avasarala.com W: www.avasarala.com

Balkrishna Boilers Pvt Ltd

Giantwell Machinery Co., Ltd.

Pg No

T: +91-20-25459531

T: +91-265-2331748 E: aquaas@sify.com W: www.aquaservicesindia.com

Avasara Technologies Ltd

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

3

Waters (India) Private Limited

39

T: +91-80-28371900 E: waters_india@waters.com W: www.waters.com BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover


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Modern Food Processing - March 2012  

'MODERN FOOD PROCESSING’ is the leading monthly business magazine in India exclusively for the food processing industry. It covers the lates...

Modern Food Processing - March 2012  

'MODERN FOOD PROCESSING’ is the leading monthly business magazine in India exclusively for the food processing industry. It covers the lates...

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